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Question:

Thank you for your informative conversation earlier today. I am beginning to work on client surveys and when you spoke about them, it caught my interest. I would like to implement the system of sending out the 3 surveys per relationship,additionally, I would like to send out a survey to those who come in for a consultation, although do not retain us that day. What type of questions do you think we should ask without sounding too pushy for information or for business?Your information is appreciated.

Answer by Ed Poll:

There are many books written about surveys and survey questions. And there are marketing associations and bar associations that may have the answers for you. You might look at http://www.abanet.org and look at the ABA publications; LPM publications for marketing are listed at http://www.abanet.org/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?catalogId=10001&storeId=10251&categoryId=-3717&langId=-1&pageType=cat

In fact, the ABA itself has a survey that might be a starting point for you: http://www.abanet.org/abapubs/feedbackform.html to see how they approach the issue of inquiry.

Make the survey simple. If you deal with clients from a particular country more than others, use their language, even if you have to get a translator to help you. The point is to make the survey simple, short and easy to answer and get to you (perhaps include a self-addressed, stamped envelop).

Questions to consider, without me "cleaning them up" for form might include: Were you satisfied with the way you were received in the office by our receptionist? Did you have to wait for your appointment for more than 15 minutes? Did you understand the attorney with whom you met? Did you understand the fee agreement? Do you have any questions that remain unanswered? etc.

But keep it short and simple ... This would be for the initial interview, to be sent within 30 days. Other surveys can be oral during the representation, or even written. And the final survey, if you choose to do one, can be a little longer ...


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