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Dear Editor:
I am all for updating the prevailing wage system. If the wages are artificially low via the current system, the DOL and other agencies should certainly fix that. But with any system, it will rely on humans to make sure that the laws are complied with. To make sure a set wage is actually paid and set hours are complied with there must be an enforcement mechanism. So no matter what wages are set someone must monitor both the wages and the hours of the employees. Though I still don't understand the effect of the advertising proposal where an employer wants to hire more than one worker. Would that employer be precluded from hiring any foreign workers if they hire just one US worker or is it a one for one proposition? By the way, I like the three year green card proposal so much I'd like to reduce it to one year. I can get a labor certification done in less than 3 years so I'd like a form of visa that would allow me to get it done faster than that. I want to thank David Murray for his kind remarks. Too kind if you ask my co-workers. They think I am a mean old man. On an unrelated note. The multitude of proposals by various forces in our government to allow local law enforcement to enforce immigration laws is rather frightening to me. Immigration laws are incredibly complex and I don't care what kind of training program is in place it will not be enough to teach local cops the ins and outs of immigration law. I imagine there will be quite a lot of erroneous arrests and detentions, as if there aren't enough already. Not to mention the fact that this will clearly lead to more racial profiling in a country already rife with it. I am pretty happy that the law enforcement agency in my city, Chicago, has recognized that it's more important to have a good rapport with the community than to turn some EWI's or overstays into the BCIS. Unfortunately, the suburban law enforcement agencies don't seem to be following suit.

Justin G. Randolph
Carpenter & Capt, Chtd.



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