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< Back to current issue of Immigration Daily < Back to current issue of Immigrant's Weekly

[Federal Register: June 10, 2003 (Volume 68, Number 111)]
[Notices]               
[Page 34617-34626]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr10jn03-72]                         

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Administration for Children and Families

 
Office of Refugee Resettlement; Program Announcement No. CFDA 
93.576; Discretionary Funds for Refugee Family Enrichment Projects

AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), ACF, HHS.

ACTION: Request for applications to conduct projects to strengthen 
refugee families through services promoting healthy marriages and the 
adjustment of refugee elderly and refugee youth to changing family 
dynamics.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: ORR invites the submission of applications for assistance that 
supports activities in three categories aimed at strengthening refugee 
family life by promoting healthy marriages for refugee couples and 
support services for adjustment of refugee elderly and refugee 
youth.\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ Eligibility for refugee social services includes: (1) 
refugees; (2) asylees; (3) Cuban and Haitian entrants; (4) certain 
Amerasians from Vietnam, including U.S. citizens; (5) victims of a 
severe form of trafficking (see 45 CFR 400.43 and ORR State Letter 
01-13 http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/orr/policy/sl01-13.htm
 as modified by ORR State Letter 02-01 http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/orr/policy/sl02-01.htm on trafficking 
victims). For convenience, the term ``refugee'' is used in this 
notice to encompass all such eligible persons.

DATES: The closing date for submission of applications is July 10, 
2003. ACF will acknowledge receipt of applications. Mailed applications 
postmarked after the closing date will be classified as late.
    Deadline: Mailed applications shall be considered as meeting an 
announced deadline if they are either received on or before the 
deadline date or sent on or before the deadline date and received by 
ACF in time for the independent review to: U.S. Department of Health 
and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of 
Grants Management, Division of Discretionary Grants, Attention: Daphne 
Weeden, Grants Management Officer, 370 L'Enfant Promenade SW., 4th 
Floor West, Washington, DC 20447. See Part IV of this announcement for 
more information on submitting applications.
    Announcement Availability: The program announcement and the 
application materials are available from Irving Jones, Office of 
Refugee Resettlement (ORR), 370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW., 8th Fl., 
Washington, DC 20447 and from the ORR Web site at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/orr
.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For all categories, contact Irving 
Jones, Division of Community Resettlement (DCR), ORR, Administration 
for Children and Families (ACF), (202) 401-6533; Fax (202) 401-0981; E-
mail: ijones@acf.hhs.gov or Daphne Weeden, Office of Grants Management 
(OGM), (ACF), (202) 401-4577; E-mail: dweeden@acf.hhs.gov.
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This program announcement consists of four 
parts:

Part I: The Program--legislative authority, funding availability, 
CFDA Number, eligible applicants, project and budget periods, 
background, program purpose and objectives, allowable activities, 
non-allowable activities, and review criteria.
Part II: The Review Process--intergovernmental review, initial ACF 
screening, and competitive review.
Part III: The Application--application forms, application submission 
and deadlines, certifications, assurances, and disclosure required 
for non-construction programs, general instructions for preparing a 
full project description, and length of application.
Part IV: Post-award--applicable regulations, treatment of program 
income, and reporting requirements.

    Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-13): The public 
reporting burden for this collection of information, for preparing the 
application, is estimated to average 15 hours per response, including 
the time for reviewing instructions, gathering and maintaining the data 
needed, and reviewing the collection of information. Information 
collection is included in the following program announcement: OMB 
Approval No. 0970-0139, ACF Uniform Project Description (UPD) attached 
as Appendix A, which expires 12/30/03. An agency may not conduct or 
sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of 
information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number.

Part I: The Program

Legislative Authority

    This program is authorized by section 412(c)(1)(A) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) (8 U.S.C. 1522 (c)(1)(A), as 
amended, the Director of ORR recognizes that refugees have specific 
needs for services that are authorized under section 412(c)(1)(A) iii, 
as follows:

    to make grants to, and enter into contracts with, public or 
private non-profit agencies for projects specifically designed--(i) 
to assist refugees in obtaining the skills which are necessary for 
economic self-sufficiency, including projects for job training, 
employment services, day care, professional

[[Page 34618]]

refresher training, and other recertification services; (ii) to 
provide training in English where necessary (regardless of whether 
the refugees are employed or receiving cash or other assistance); 
and (iii) to provide where specific needs have been shown and 
recognized by the Director, health (including mental health) 
services, social services, educational and other services.

Funding Availability

    This program announcement governs the availability of, and award 
procedures for, the Refugee Family Enrichment Program, which will be 
funded using FY 2003 discretionary social service funds.
    Category 1--Refugee Marriage Enrichment Projects through one 
cooperative agreement for approximately $1 million to one public or 
private non-profit agency with extensive knowledge of and comprehensive 
experience in working with refugees through reception and placement 
services and ongoing resettlement activities.
    Category 2--Refugee Marriage Enrichment Projects through two to 
four cooperative agreements of approximately $400,000-$750,000 each to 
two to four public or private non-profit agencies with extensive 
knowledge of, and comprehensive experience in, working with, refugee 
community-based organizations.
    Category 3--Refugee Family Enrichment Projects for Elderly and 
Youth through an estimated twenty grants ranging from $75,000 to 
$100,000 each to faith-based or community organizations and public 
agencies.
    CFDA Number--93.576.

Eligible Applicants

    Eligible applicants for these funds include public or private non-
profit agencies, including faith-based and community organizations and 
public agencies. Applicants in all three categories must demonstrate, 
in detail, their relationship to the refugee communities they seek to 
serve and how those communities will participate in the proposed 
services. Also, applicants to category 1 and category 2 of this 
announcement should demonstrate their knowledge of and relationship to 
family enrichment activities.
    Any non-profit organization submitting an application must submit 
proof of its non-profit status at the time of submission. The non-
profit agency can accomplish this by providing a copy of the 
applicant's listing in the Internal Revenue Service's (IRS) most recent 
list of tax-exempt organizations described in Section 501(c)(3) of the 
IRS code, or by providing a copy of the currently valid IRS tax 
exemption certificate, or by providing a copy of the articles of 
incorporation bearing the seal of the State in which the corporation or 
association is domiciled, or by providing a certified copy of the 
organization's certificate of incorporation or similar document that 
clearly establishes non-profit status, or any of the items above for a 
State or national parent organization and a statement signed by the 
parent organization that the applicant organization is a local non-
profit affiliate. Private, nonprofit organizations are encouraged to 
submit with their applications the optional survey located under 
``Grant Manuals & Forms'' at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofs/forms.htm
.

Project and Budget Periods

    This announcement is inviting applications for project periods up 
to three years. Awards, on a competitive basis, will be for a one-year 
budget period. Applications for continuation grants funded under these 
awards beyond the one-year budget period but within the three year 
project period will be entertained in subsequent years on a 
noncompetitive basis, subject to availability of funds, satisfactory 
progress of the grantee and a determination that continued funding 
would be in the best interest of the Government. No matching or cost 
sharing is required.

Background

    The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is currently 
supporting several initiatives that promote and encourage healthy 
marriages and strengthen families. This program announcement reflects 
ORR's participation in these initiatives as they relate to refugee 
populations. The cultures of most refugee populations are built upon 
successful and stable family life. This strength is worthy of 
preservation and ORR seeks, through this announcement, to support 
activities toward that end. ORR believes that refugee couples face 
unique difficulties because of their flight from persecution and long 
periods of insecurity and that marriage education is a social service 
that can help refugees cope with these difficulties. ORR also believes 
that there are benefits to marriage that extend to children, adults and 
to all society. Thus ORR is committed to promoting policies and 
programs that help strengthen marriage as an institution and help 
refugee parents raise their children in positive and healthy 
environments.
    Many refugee families have endured persecution or torture, trauma, 
abrupt flight from war, and separation from, or death of, friends and 
family members. Furthermore, the relationships in refugee families may 
become strained before arrival because of suffering and deprivation 
endemic to the refugee condition. Refugees in the U.S. face many 
challenges. The pressures of their new American environment may weaken 
the strong, positive family relationships that refugees have brought 
with them to the United States.
    Family relationships may undergo strain and transformation when 
refugees resettle in the U.S. Strong authoritarian and sometimes 
patriarchal family structures may provoke conflicts when members take 
on new roles as they adapt to American culture. For example, school/
parent relationships may differ from those in their home countries and 
may produce miscommunication and tension; refugee parents may have 
concerns or object to the range of freedom American youth are afforded; 
and the physical disciplinary practices between a husband and wife or 
between parents and children may differ from what is the norm or legal 
in the U.S. The low wages of entry-level jobs may force both adults to 
work outside the home, thereby disrupting traditional roles. Typically, 
low incomes force refugee households to locate in neighborhoods with 
high crime rates. Poor public transportation adds to time spent away 
from family members and complicates efforts to access services and 
participate in community activities. The resulting strain from these 
difficulties may damage refugee marriages, families and communities.
    Marriage education can help refugee couples strengthen and adjust 
relationship skills and help them cope with the difficulties of their 
new American environment with the result of improving the quality of 
family life. Along with the skills that enable couples to communicate 
more effectively, manage conflict and work together as a team, marriage 
education can also teach the benefits that can be obtained from 
identifying future challenges in their relationships so that these 
challenges can be successfully negotiated when they arise.
    Research reveals that the benefits of healthy marriages are 
particularly beneficial for children. On average, children raised by 
parents in healthy marriages are less likely to fail at school, suffer 
an emotional or behavioral problem requiring psychiatric treatment, be 
victims of child abuse and neglect, get into trouble with the law, use 
illicit drugs, smoke cigarettes, abuse alcohol, engage in early and 
promiscuous sexual activity, grow up in poverty or attempt suicide. On 
average, children raised by

[[Page 34619]]

parents in healthy marriages are more likely to have a higher sense of 
self-esteem, form healthy marriages when they marry, attend college and 
are physically healthier.
    In summary, ORR seeks to use this announcement to provide 
opportunities for refugees to strengthen marital and parenting skills 
within healthy and supportive relationships. ORR also seeks to expand 
understanding of the refugees' marriage and family difficulties in the 
resettlement experience and the factors that contribute to successfully 
meeting the challenges to the marriage relationship. Despite difficult 
hurdles such as trauma, cultural adjustment and low wage jobs, refugee 
families are resilient. Once in the U.S., most envision a bright future 
for themselves and their children. If the issues faced by refugee 
families are addressed early through marriage education, the problems 
they encounter may be reduced or prevented and refugee families can 
achieve the bright future they seek.

Other Vulnerable Refugee Family Members: Elderly and Youth

    ORR is also interested in programs that support services for the 
elderly and youth, who may be the more vulnerable family members. 
Refugee elderly and youth have also experienced or witnessed 
persecution. They also face hardships while resettling and pose unique 
challenges to their families, communities and the agencies that seek to 
serve them.
    Older refugees face various issues that make them particularly 
vulnerable: chronic health and emotional problems stemming from the 
conditions of refugee flight; family loss or separation; an inability 
to advocate for themselves because of cultural, linguistic, or 
educational barriers; limited access to appropriate health and social 
service agencies; limited income due to lack of work history; and 
barriers to meeting the requirements for naturalization. Many older 
refugees in the United States, particularly women, live in difficult 
circumstances in which they may live alone without a caregiver, have 
low incomes, or may be abused, neglected or exploited. Additionally, 
some elderly refugees have lost Supplementary Security Income and 
Medicaid due to expiration of eligibility.
    Refugee youth also confront a number of challenges as they 
integrate into American society. Because youth usually adapt more 
quickly to their new surroundings than adult refugees, relationships 
with parents often undergo stress and change. Youth often learn English 
more quickly and become translators for their parents. This shifts 
power to the young, disrupting traditional relationships within the 
family. Refugee youth often face problems in the United States that did 
not exist in their home countries, depriving them of the wisdom and 
experience of their parents who never dealt with these problems. Youth 
also face dilemmas surrounding relationships with the opposite sex, as 
male/female relationships in the U.S. may differ significantly from 
those of their home country. In addition, the stress of working while 
attending school, along with conflicts with students, teachers and 
school administrators over conduct, dress or diet may impede success at 
school. Refugee youth may also reject their home culture and desire 
acceptance from peers in the U.S. This desire for acceptance can lead 
to discipline problems in school and at home and to problems with local 
law enforcement agencies.
    Through category 3 of this announcement ORR seeks to fund programs 
that address the particular challenges faced by refugee elderly and 
youth so that they can meet the challenges in their resettlement 
experiences.

Category 1--Marriage Enrichment Projects

Category 1 Purposes and Objectives
    ORR intends to award funds, under one cooperative agreement, to a 
public or private non-profit agency with extensive knowledge of and 
comprehensive experience in working with refugees through (1) reception 
and placement services and (2) ongoing resettlement activities. Through 
this cooperative agreement, the grantee will meet the needs of a wide 
variety of ethnicities among recently arrived refugee populations. To 
reach these populations and to ensure that the services provided are 
culturally and linguistically appropriate, the applicant should have 
local offices or affiliated organizations with an ongoing relationship 
to, and the trust and respect of each group of refugees. The family 
enrichment activities proposed in this announcement may be outside the 
experience of many refugees and may be difficult to implement without a 
well-established relationship between the refugees and the applicant.
    Applicants should describe their efforts to create collaborations, 
with both national and local marriage education providers who have 
knowledge or expertise in family strengthening activities. Information 
about organizations providing marriage enrichment activities can be 
found on the ORR web site at: http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/orr/programs
, or applicants may contact Irving Jones, Division of Community 
Resettlement, ORR, Administration for Children and Families (ACF), 
(202) 401-6533; E-mail: ijones@acf.hhs.gov.    ORR expects that approximately 90 percent of the funding will be 
expended at the local level, and that the applicant should budget for 
no more than one full-time staff person at the national level. Through 
this cooperative agreement, ORR intends to review and approve: (1) A 
plan for sub-grants, including plans for geographical distribution and 
technical assistance; (2) a plan for implementation, which should 
include the building of coalitions and client outreach; (3) all written 
materials developed and proposed for dissemination; (4) timelines and 
major program outcomes; and (5) a reporting format that outlines the 
difficulties refugee couples face, a description of the proposed 
intervention and the impact of the intervention on the refugee family.
    Category 1--Allowable Activities--Projects may be designed to 
translate and adapt contemporary American approaches to traditional 
refugee practices and cultural settings, in coalition with marriage 
enrichment organizations, at both the national and local levels. ORR 
supports creative and unique approaches that address the needs of 
refugee families as well as the development of strategies for 
partnerships with marriage enrichment organizations. Applicants may 
propose activities that include, but are not limited to, the following:
    [sbull] Award 10-20 sub-grants to local organizations to conduct 
marriage enrichment activities with refugees.
    [sbull] Develop culturally and linguistically appropriate marriage 
enrichment and family strengthening materials to be used in training 
local refugee communities.
    [sbull] Assist sub-grantees, in coalition with marriage enrichment 
organizations, to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate 
communication and conflict resolution skills training to refugee 
couples to help them improve their relationships and enrich their 
marriages.
    [sbull] Assist sub-grantees to train refugee couples to act as 
mentors in their ethnic community. Newly married refugee couples should 
be considered a priority group for mentoring.
    [sbull] Conduct local workshops on marriage and relationship skills 
for refugees that may include coping with the customs of a new 
community,

[[Page 34620]]

conflict resolution, financial management and job and career 
advancement.
    [sbull] Conduct customized pre-marital education and marriage 
enrichment programs for refugee youth and young adults.
    [sbull] Develop refugee resource centers to help enhance the 
relationships in refugee families.
    [sbull] Teach effective child-rearing techniques, including 
positive and culturally-acceptable child disciplinary practices and 
parenting skills for refugees.
    [sbull] Provide information about U.S. cultural and legal issues as 
they affect gender, parenting roles and intergenerational family 
relationships.
    Category 1 Review Criteria--Category 1 applications will be 
reviewed and rated based on the following criteria:
    1. Organizational Profiles (30 points)--Application demonstrates an 
extensive knowledge of and comprehensive experience in working with 
refugees through reception and placement services and ongoing 
resettlement activities. Application includes letters of support that 
demonstrate the organization's strong relationship with the local 
refugee resettlement community; experience in providing refugee 
resettlement services; and relationship with marriage enrichment 
programs. Individual staff position descriptions, volunteer positions, 
consultants and coalition organizations are appropriate to the goals of 
the project. The administrative and management features of the project, 
including a monitoring and technical assistance plan for program and 
fiscal activities, are adequately described. The applicant provides a 
copy of its most recent audit report.
    2. Objectives and Need for Assistance (20 points)--Applicant (a) 
fully and clearly describes the need for activities to support and 
strengthen refugee marriages, (b) demonstrates a comprehensive 
understanding of the refugees' experiences in resettlement services in 
local U.S. communities and demonstrates access to agencies that provide 
reception and placement services (c) clearly understands the marriage 
enrichment concept and can effectively integrate it with refugee 
resettlement activities, and (d) proposes establishing a coalition with 
marriage enrichment organizations at the local level for purposes of 
providing marriage education services to the refugee community.
    3. Approach (20 points)--The proposed approach for the cooperative 
agreement and awarding of sub-grants is fully and clearly described. 
The strategy and plan demonstrate the ability to achieve the proposed 
results. The proposed communities and the resident refugee groups along 
with strategies for recruiting them into the program are described in 
detail. Timeframes are reasonable and feasible. The proposed activities 
are likely to lead to the desired results, i.e., healthy marriages 
among refugee communities.
    4. Results or Benefits Expected (20 points)--Applicant describes 
outcomes that are consistent with the goals of marriage enrichment 
programs for refugee families. The outcomes are likely to be reached 
through the activities proposed. Proposed outcomes are measurable and 
achievable within the grant project period.
    5. Budget and Budget Justification (10 points)--The budget and 
narrative justification are reasonable, clearly presented, and cost-
effective in relation to the proposed activities and anticipated 
results. Approximately 90 percent of the funding is expended at the 
local level. The budget contains no more than one full-time staff 
position at the national level.

Category 2--Refugee Marriage Enrichment

Category 2 Purpose and Objectives
    ORR is interested in funding, under cooperative agreements, two to 
four public or private non-profit agencies with extensive knowledge of, 
and comprehensive experience in, working with refugee community-based 
organizations. Through this category, ORR plans to meet the needs of 
more targeted populations of refugees who may have been in the country 
for a longer period of time. To reach this population and to ensure 
that the services provided are culturally and linguistically 
appropriate, the applicant should have an ongoing relationship with and 
the trust and respect of refugees within the community. Unlike Category 
1, Category 2 applicants need not be conducting ongoing reception and 
placement activities. The successful applicants for Category 2 will 
provide funds and training to five to ten agencies including faith-
based and community organizations, which may include (1) local 
affiliates of the applicant or affiliates of other non-applicant 
refugee national organizations with whom the applicant has formed a 
collaboration; (2) independent refugee organizations, or (3) entities 
that have demonstrated an ability to work closely with refugees. The 
successful applicants will provide financial and program support to 
enable families within the refugee community to receive marriage 
enrichment training. The marriage enrichment activities proposed in 
this announcement may be outside the experience of many refugees and 
may be difficult to implement without a well-established relationship 
between the refugees and the grantee. Applicants should also 
demonstrate a relationship to marriage enrichment resources.
    ORR is interested in projects which can address refugee needs for 
cultural and linguistic access to family enrichment services and this 
is often best achieved through partnerships with grass-roots 
organizations, including refugee community-based organizations or 
faith-based organizations. The successful applicants will, through 
grassroots organizations, provide culturally sensitive marriage 
enrichment to refugee couples.
    Applicants should describe their efforts to create collaborations 
with marriage education providers and knowledge or expertise in 
marriage strengthening activities. Information about organizations 
providing marriage enrichment activities can be found on the ORR web 
site at: www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/orr/programs, or by contacting 
Irving Jones, Division of Community Resettlement, ORR, Administration 
for Children and Families (ACF), (202) 401-6533; E-mail: 
ijones@acf.hhs.gov.    ORR expects that approximately 90 percent of the funding will be 
expended at the local level, and that the applicant should budget for 
no more than one full-time staff person at the national level. Through 
this cooperative agreement, ORR intends to review and approve: (1) A 
plan for sub-grants, including plans for geographical distribution and 
technical assistance; (2) a plan for implementation, which should 
include the building of coalitions and client outreach; (3) all written 
materials developed and proposed for dissemination; (4) timelines and 
major program outcomes; and (5) a reporting format that outlines the 
difficulties refugee couples face, a description of the proposed 
intervention and the impact of the intervention on the refugee family.
    Category 2 Allowable Activities--ORR is interested in the 
preservation of refugee families and in ensuring their long-term 
stability and self-sufficiency. ORR supports creative and unique 
approaches that address the needs of refugee families as well as the 
development of strategies for partnerships with marriage enrichment 
organizations. These projects may be designed to translate and adapt 
contemporary American approaches to traditional practices and cultural

[[Page 34621]]

settings. Applicants may propose activities that include, but are not 
limited to, the following:
    [sbull] Award 5--10 sub-grants to local organizations to conduct 
marriage enrichment activities for refugees.
    [sbull] Develop culturally and linguistically appropriate marriage 
enrichment and family strengthening materials to be used in training 
local refugee communities.
    [sbull] Assist sub-grantees, in coalition with marriage enrichment 
organizations, to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate 
communication and conflict resolution skills training to refugee 
couples in specific refugee ethnic communities to help them improve 
their relationships and enrich their marriages.
    [sbull] Assist sub-grantees to train refugee couples to act as 
mentors in their ethnic community. Newly married refugee couples should 
be considered a priority.
    [sbull] Conduct local workshops on marriage and relationship skills 
that may include coping with the customs of a new community, conflict 
resolution, financial management, and job and career advancement for 
refugees.
    [sbull] Conduct customized premarital education and marriage 
enrichment programs for refugee youth and young adults.
    [sbull] Develop refugee resource centers to help enhance the 
relationships in refugee families.
    [sbull] Teach effective child-rearing techniques, including 
positive and culturally-acceptable child disciplinary practices and 
parenting skills for refugees.
    [sbull] Provide information about U.S. cultural and legal issues as 
they affect gender, parenting roles, and intergenerational family 
relationships for refugees.
    The successful application will demonstrate extensive knowledge of, 
and comprehensive experience working with, refugee communities in 
providing services or access to services to refugees. The successful 
application also will demonstrate knowledge of marriage enrichment 
organizations, both national and in the local communities of sub-
grantees.
    Category 2 Review Criteria--Category 2 applications will be 
reviewed and rated based on the following criteria:
    1. Organizational Profiles (30 points)--Application demonstrates an 
extensive knowledge of and comprehensive experience working with local 
entities, including faith-based and community organizations. 
Application includes letters of support that demonstrate the 
organization's strong relationship with the local refugee community 
groups and relationship with marriage enrichment programs. Individual 
staff position descriptions, volunteer positions, consultants and 
coalition organizations are appropriate to the goals of the project. 
The administrative and management features of the project, including a 
monitoring and technical assistance plan for program and fiscal 
activities, are adequately described. The applicant provides a copy of 
its most recent audit report.
    2. Objectives and Need for Assistance (20 points)--Applicant (a) 
fully and clearly describes the need for activities to support and 
strengthen refugee marriages, (b) demonstrates a comprehensive 
understanding of the refugee experience in local U.S. communities and 
demonstrates access to agencies that have relationships with refugees, 
including faith-based and community organizations, (c) clearly 
understands the marriage enrichment concept and can effectively 
integrate it with the activities of local refugee community-based 
organizations, and (d) proposes establishing a coalition with marriage 
enrichment organizations at the local level for purposes of providing 
marriage education services to the refugee community.
    3. Approach (20 points)--The proposed approach for the cooperative 
agreement and awarding of sub-grants is fully and clearly described. 
The strategy and plan demonstrate the ability to achieve the proposed 
results. The proposed communities and the resident refugee groups along 
with strategies for recruiting them into the program are described in 
detail. Timeframes are reasonable and feasible. The proposed activities 
are likely to lead to the desired results, i.e., healthy families among 
refugee communities.
    4. Results or Benefits Expected (20 points)--Applicant describes 
outcomes that are consistent with the goals of marriage enrichment 
programs for refugee families. The outcomes are likely to be reached 
through the proposed activities. Proposed outcomes are measurable and 
achievable within the grant project.
    5. Budget and Budget Justification (10 points)--The budget and 
narrative justification are reasonable, clearly presented, and cost-
effective in relation to the proposed activities and anticipated 
results. Approximately 90 percent of the funding is expended at the 
local level. The budget contains no more than one FTE at the national 
level.

Category 3--Refugee Family Enrichment Projects for Elderly and Youth

    Category 3 Purpose and Objectives: ORR is interested in funding 20 
or more public or private agencies, including faith-based or community 
organizations to aid the elderly in accessing appropriate services and 
to work with youth to promote healthy development. Programs should 
focus on unmet needs and not duplicate or supplant programs available 
under any other Federal source of funding.
    The successful applicant must demonstrate extensive knowledge of 
and comprehensive experience in working with refugee communities in 
providing specialized services to the youth and elderly and promoting 
access to mainstream services for refugees.
    The specific services proposed may be as diverse as the refugee 
populations and the resettlement communities themselves. Proposed 
activities and services should be planned in conjunction with 
mainstream service providers and should provide linkages to these 
services. ORR is particularly interested in projects that are planned 
and implemented through coalitions with community-based organizations 
and local service providers. Such projects would address refugee needs 
for cultural and linguistic access to services, and would work with 
their refugee community members to help the elderly to access 
appropriate services, or with youth, to promote healthy development and 
adjustment.
    Category 3 Allowable Activities--ORR is interested in applications 
in which an applicant addresses, based on an analysis of service needs 
and available resources, the difficulties which refugee elderly and 
youth face. The goals and expected outcomes of activities should be 
clearly stated and should respond to the particular needs of the 
elderly and youth in refugee families. The application should clearly 
outline how the agency will accomplish the goals and how the proposed 
activity fits into the existing network of services.
    An application may include activities for youth, the elderly, or a 
combination thereof. ORR seeks to support local communities in finding 
innovative approaches that fit the unique needs of families in 
different communities. Projects may be designed to adapt contemporary 
American approaches to traditional practices and cultural settings. 
Applicants may propose activities that include, but are not limited to, 
the following:
Elderly
    [sbull] Develop or implement programs or provide linkages to 
existing local programs that enable older refugees to live 
independently as long as possible.
    [sbull] Provide services that meet the needs of older refugees, 
such as

[[Page 34622]]

outreach, information, referrals, follow-up, nutrition programs (both 
congregate and home delivered), and transportation to senior centers or 
medical appointments.
    [sbull] Conduct outreach to locate and inform elderly refugees of 
the existence of services in their community.
    [sbull] Provide transportation services.
    [sbull] Conduct case management.
    [sbull] Provide services and/or information and referral to 
appropriate services that offer in-home care, adult day care, 
institutionalized care, and State Nursing Home Ombudsmen.
    [sbull] Offer programs or provide linkages to existing programs 
that prevent or discourage the abuse of elderly refugees.
    [sbull] Offer English tutoring or home-based English language 
training for homebound refugees.
    [sbull] Provide employment support services, especially with 
agencies involved with the Older American Act, Title V Senior 
Employment Programs.
    [sbull] Provide linkages to caregiver programs.
    [sbull] Help elderly become naturalized.
Youth
    [sbull] Conduct workshops for parents and youth on dating and 
gender cultural norms in the U.S.
    [sbull] Help students negotiate the school system, familiarizing 
them with the school rules and fostering better communication between 
youth, administrators, counselors, mentors and tutors.
    [sbull] Support or foster parental outreach programs that involve 
refugee parents in their children's education to help them understand 
school life.
    [sbull] Provide youth employment support services.
    [sbull] Provide after-school tutorials focused on helping students 
understand and complete assignments.
    [sbull] Conduct programs that encourage high school completion and 
full participation in school activities.
    [sbull] Conduct after-school activities that foster engagement in 
constructive activities.
    [sbull] Conduct cognitive enrichment programs to bridge the gap 
between refugee students' intellectual abilities and the elements of 
school and curriculum that are culture-based.
    Category 3 Review Criteria--Category 3 applications will be 
reviewed and rated based on the following criteria:
    1. Organizational Profiles (25 points)--Application demonstrates a 
history, in-depth experience with, and access to, local refugee 
communities. Individual staff position descriptions, volunteer 
positions, consultants and coalition organizations are appropriate to 
the goals of the project. Application includes letters of support that 
demonstrate the organization's ability to accomplish, with appropriate 
partnerships with community organizations, the purpose and objectives 
of the application. The administrative and management features of the 
project, including a monitoring and technical assistance plan for 
program and fiscal activities, are adequately described. The applicant 
provides a copy of its most recent audit report.
    2. Objectives and Need for Assistance (20 points)--The application 
clearly describes the youth or elderly refugees' physical, economic, 
social, financial, institutional and/or other issues requiring a 
solution. The need for assistance must be demonstrated and the 
objectives of the project must be clearly stated. The application 
clearly describes how funding through this program will meet those 
needs.
    3. Results or Benefits Expected (20 points)--The applicant fully 
and clearly describes the results and benefits to be achieved. The 
applicant identifies how improvement will be measured on key indicators 
for the well-being of refugee elderly and youth and provides milestones 
indicating progress. Proposed outcomes are tangible and achievable 
within the grant project period and the proposed monitoring and 
information collection are adequately planned.
    4. Approach (20 points)--The strategy and plan are likely to 
achieve the proposed results and the proposed activities and timeframes 
are reasonable and feasible. The proposed activities focus on unmet 
needs and do not duplicate or supplant programs available under any 
other Federal source of funding. The plan describes in detail how the 
proposed activities will be accomplished as well as the potential for 
the project to have a positive impact on the quality of life for 
refugee elderly and youth and communities by (1) improving refugees' 
abilities to access services, providing mutual assistance and creating 
services where they are not available and (2) instituting change among 
service providers to make these services more accessible.
    5. Budget and Budget Justification (15 points)--The budget and 
narrative justification are reasonable in relation to the proposed 
activities and anticipated results. The budget narrative provides 
justification in relation to the proposed activities and anticipated 
outcomes.

Part II: The Review Process

    Intergovernmental Review--This program is covered under Executive 
Order 12372, ``Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs,'' and 45 
CFR Part 100, ``Intergovernmental Review of Department of Health and 
Human Services Programs and Activities.'' Under the Order, States may 
design their own processes for reviewing and commenting on proposed 
Federal assistance under covered programs.

    * All States and Territories except Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, 
Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, 
Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio, 
Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, 
Virginia, Washington, Wyoming, and Palau have elected not to 
participate in the Executive Order process. Applicants from these 
twenty-seven jurisdictions need take no action regarding E.O. 12372. 
Applicants for projects to be administered by federally-recognized 
Indian Tribes are also exempt from the requirements of E.O. 12372. 
Applicants should contact their Single-Points-of-Contact (SPOC) as 
soon as possible to alert them of the prospective applications and 
receive any necessary instructions. Applicants from participating 
jurisdictions must submit any required material to the SPOCs as soon 
as possible so that the program office can obtain and review SPOC 
comments as part of the award process. The applicant must submit all 
required materials, if any, to the SPOC and indicate the date of 
this submittal (the date of contact) on the Standard Form 424, item 
16a.
    Under 45 CFR 100.8(a)(2), a SPOC has 30 days from the application 
deadline to comment on proposed new or competing continuation awards. 
SPOCs are encouraged to eliminate the submission of routine 
endorsements as official recommendations. Additionally, SPOCs are 
requested to clearly differentiate between mere advisory comments and 
those official State process recommendations that may trigger the 
``accommodate or explain'' rule.
    When comments are submitted directly to ACF, they should be 
addressed to: Grants Management Officer, U.S. Department of Health and 
Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of 
Refugee Resettlement, 370 L'Enfant Promenade SW., 4th floor, Washington 
DC, 20447.
    A list of the Single Points of Contact for each participating State 
and Territory can be found on the web at: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants/spoc.html
.
    Initial ACF Screening--Each application submitted under this 
program announcement will undergo a pre-review to determine that (1) 
the application was received by the closing date and submitted in 
accordance with the instructions in this announcement;

[[Page 34623]]

and (2) the applicant is eligible for funding.
    Competitive Review and Evaluation Criteria--Applications which pass 
the initial ACF screening will be evaluated and rated by an independent 
review panel on the basis of evaluation criteria specified in Part I. 
The evaluation criteria were designed to assess the quality of a 
proposed project and to determine the likelihood of its success. The 
evaluation criteria are closely related and are considered as a whole 
in judging the overall quality of an application. Points are awarded 
only to applications that are responsive to the evaluation criteria 
within the context of this program announcement.

Part III: The Application

    In order to be considered for a grant under this program 
announcement, an application must be submitted on the forms supplied 
and in the manner prescribed by ACF. Selected elements of the ACF 
Uniform Project Description (UPD) relevant to this program announcement 
are attached as appendix A.
    Application Forms--Applicants requesting financial assistance under 
this announcement must file the Standard Form (SF) 424, Application for 
Federal Assistance; SF 424A, Budget Information--Non-Construction 
Programs; SF 424B, Assurances--Non-Construction Programs. The forms may 
be reproduced for use in submitting applications. Application materials 
including forms and instructions are also available from the Contact 
named in the preamble of this announcement.
    Application Submission and Deadlines--An application with an 
original signature and two clearly identified copies are required. 
Applicants must clearly indicate on the SF 424 the grant announcement 
number under which the application is submitted.
    Applicants must ensure that a legibly dated U.S. Postal Service 
postmark or a legibly dated, machine produced postmark of a commercial 
mail service is affixed to the envelope/package containing the 
application(s). To be acceptable as proof of timely mailing, a postmark 
from a commercial mail service must include the logo/emblem of the 
commercial mail service company and must reflect the date the package 
was received by the commercial mail service company from the applicant. 
Private Metered postmarks shall not be acceptable as proof of timely 
mailing. (Applicants are cautioned that express/overnight mail services 
do not always deliver as agreed.)
    Applications hand carried by applicants, applicant couriers, or by 
other representatives of the applicant shall be considered as meeting 
an announced deadline if they are received on or before the deadline 
date, between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., EST, at the U.S. 
Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children 
and Families, Office of Grants Management, Division of Discretionary 
Grants, 370 L'Enfant Promenade SW., 4th Floor, Washington, DC 20447 
between Monday and Friday (excluding Federal holidays). The address 
must appear on the envelope/package containing the application with the 
note ``Attention: Daphne Weeden.'' (Applicants are cautioned that 
express/overnight mail services do not always deliver as agreed.)
    ACF cannot accommodate transmission of applications by fax or 
through other electronic media. Therefore, applications transmitted to 
ACF electronically will not be accepted regardless of date or time of 
submission and time of receipt.
    Late applications: Applications that do not meet the criteria above 
are considered late applications. ACF will notify each late applicant 
that its application will not be considered in the current competition.
    Extension of deadlines: ACF may extend application deadlines when 
circumstances such as acts of God (e.g. floods, hurricanes, etc.) 
occur, or when there are widespread disruptions of mail service. 
Determinations to extend or waive deadline requirements rest with the 
Chief Grants Management Officer.
    For Further Information on Application Deadlines Contact: Grants 
Management Officer, Administration for Children and Families, Office of 
Grants Management, Division of Discretionary Grants, 370 L'Enfant 
Promenade SW., 4th Floor, West Wing, Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: 
(202) 401-4577.
    Certifications, Assurances, and Disclosure Required for Non-
Construction Programs--Applicants requesting financial assistance for 
non-construction projects must file the Standard Form 424B, 
``Assurances: Non-Construction Programs.'' Applicants must sign and 
return the Standard Form 424B with their applications. Applicants must 
provide a certification regarding lobbying when applying for an award 
in excess of $100,000. Applicants must sign and return the 
certification with their applications.
    Applicants must disclose lobbying activities on the Standard Form 
LLL when applying for an award in excess of $100,000. Applicants who 
have used non-Federal funds for lobbying activities in connection with 
receiving assistance under this announcement shall complete a 
disclosure form to report lobbying. Applicants must sign and return the 
disclosure form, if applicable, with their applications.
    Applicants must make the appropriate certification of their 
compliance with the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988. By signing and 
submitting the application, the applicant is providing the 
certification and need not mail back the certification with the 
applications. Applicants must make the appropriate certification that 
they are not presently debarred, suspended or otherwise ineligible for 
an award. By signing and submitting the application, the applicant is 
providing the certification need not mail back the certification with 
the applications.
    Applicants must make the appropriate certification of their 
compliance with the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988. By signing and 
submitting the application, the applicant is providing the 
certification and need not mail back the certification with the 
applications. Applicants must make the appropriate certification that 
they are not presently debarred, suspended or otherwise ineligible for 
an award. By signing and submitting the application, the applicant is 
providing the certification need not mail back the certification with 
the applications.
    General Instructions for Preparing a Full Project Description--The 
project description provides a major means by which an application is 
evaluated and ranked to compete with other applications for available 
assistance. The project description should be concise and complete and 
should address the activity for which Federal funds are being 
requested. Supporting documents should be included where they can 
present information clearly and succinctly. Applicants are encouraged 
to provide information on their organizational structure, staff, 
related experience, and other information they consider relevant. 
Awarding offices use this and other information to determine whether 
the applicant has the capability and resources necessary to carry out 
the proposed project. It is important, therefore, that this information 
be included in the application. However, in the narrative the applicant 
must distinguish between resources directly related to the proposed 
project from those that will not be used in support of the specific 
project for which funds are requested. Please refer to the UPD sections 
in the appendix.
    Length of Applications--Each application narrative should not 
exceed 20 pages in a double spaced 12-pitch

[[Page 34624]]

font. Attachments and appendices should not exceed 25 pages and should 
be used only to provide supporting documentation such as administration 
charts, position descriptions, resumes, and letters of intent or 
partnership agreements. A table of contents and an executive summary 
should be included but will not count in the page limitations. Each 
page should be numbered sequentially, including the attachments and 
appendices. This limitation of 20 pages should be considered as a 
maximum, and not necessarily a goal. Application forms are not to be 
counted in the page limit.
    Please do not include books or videotapes as they are not easily 
reproduced and are, therefore, inaccessible to the reviewers.

Part IV: Post-Award

    Applicable Regulations--Applicable DHHS regulations can be found in 
45 CFR part 74 or 92.
    Treatment of Program Income--Program income from activities funded 
under this program may be retained by the recipient and added to the 
funds committed to the project, and used to further program objectives.

Reporting Requirements

    All required reports must be submitted in a timely manner. Program 
progress reports must be submitted quarterly. A grantee is allowed 30 
days to submit the report following the end of the period. Recommended 
formats for the reports will be provided. The final report is due 90 
days after the end of the project. Grantees are required to file the 
Financial Status Report (SF-269) semi-annually.
    Funds awarded must be accounted for, and reported under the 
distinct grant number ascribed. Although ORR does not expect the 
proposed projects to include evaluation activities, it does expect 
grantees to maintain adequate records to track and report on project 
outcomes and expenditures. The official receipt point for all reports 
and correspondence is the Grants Management Officer, Administration for 
Children and Families/Office of Grants Management, Division of 
Discretionary Grants, 370 L'Enfant Promenade SW., 4th Floor West, 
Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-4577. An original and one 
copy of each report must be submitted within 30 days of the end of each 
reporting period directly to the Office of Grants Management.
    A Final Financial and Program Report will be due 90 days after the 
project expiration date or termination of Federal budget support.

Appendix A--Uniform Project Description OMB No. 0970-0139

    The project description is approved under OMB control number 
0970-0139 which expires 12/31/03.

Part I: The Project Description Overview

Purpose

    The project description provides a major means by which an 
application is evaluated and ranked to compete with other 
applications for available assistance. The project description 
should be concise and complete and should address the activity for 
which Federal funds are being requested. Supporting documents should 
be included where they can present information clearly and 
succinctly. In preparing your project description, all information 
requested through each specific evaluation criteria should be 
provided. Awarding offices use this and other information in making 
their funding recommendations. It is important, therefore, that this 
information be included in the application.

General Instructions

    ACF is particularly interested in specific factual information 
and statements of measurable goals in quantitative terms. Project 
descriptions are evaluated on the basis of substance, not length. 
Extensive exhibits are not required. Cross-referencing should be 
used rather than repetition. Supporting information concerning 
activities that will not be directly funded by the grant or 
information that does not directly pertain to an integral part of 
the grant funded activity should be placed in an appendix.
    Pages should be numbered and a table of contents should be 
included for easy reference.

Part II: General Instructions for Preparing a Full Project Description

Introduction

    Applicants required to submit a full project description shall 
prepare the project description statement in accordance with the 
following instructions and the specified evaluation criteria. The 
instructions give a broad overview of what your project description 
should include while the evaluation criteria expands and clarifies 
more program-specific information that is needed.

Project Summary/Abstract

    Provide a summary of the project description (a page or less) 
with reference to the funding request.

Objectives and Need for Assistance

    Clearly identify the physical, economic, social, financial, 
institutional, and/or other problem(s) requiring a solution. The 
need for assistance must be demonstrated and the principal and 
subordinate objectives of the project must be clearly stated; 
supporting documentation, such as letters of support and 
testimonials from concerned interests other than the applicant, may 
be included. Any relevant data based on planning studies should be 
included or referred to in the endnotes/footnotes. Incorporate 
demographic data and participant/beneficiary information, as needed. 
In developing the project description, the applicant may volunteer 
or be requested to provide information on the total range of 
projects currently being conducted and supported (or to be 
initiated), some of which may be outside the scope of the program 
announcement.

Results or Benefits Expected

    Identify the results and benefits to be derived. For example, 
when applying for a grant to establish a marriage enrichment 
program, describe who will access program services, and how those 
services will benefit refugees.

Approach

    Outline a plan of action that describes the scope and detail of 
how the proposed work will be accomplished. Account for all 
functions or activities identified in the application. Cite factors 
that might accelerate or decelerate the work and state your reason 
for taking the proposed approach rather than others. Describe any 
unusual features of the project such as design or technological 
innovations, reductions in cost or time, or extraordinary social and 
community involvement.
    Provide quantitative monthly or quarterly projections of the 
accomplishments to be achieved for each function or activity in such 
terms as the number of people to be served and the number of 
activities to be accomplished. For example, when applying for a 
grant to establish a marriage enrichment program, describe the 
number of refugee couples expected to access marriage enrichment 
services for the quarter. When accomplishments cannot be quantified 
by activity or function, list them in chronological order to show 
the schedule of accomplishments and their target dates.
    If any data is to be collected, maintained, and/or disseminated, 
clearance may be required from the U.S. Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB). This clearance pertains to any ``collection of 
information that is conducted or sponsored by ACF.''
    List organizations, cooperating entities, consultants, or other 
key individuals who will work on the project along with a short 
description of the nature of their effort or contribution.

Staff and Position Data

    Provide a biographical sketch for each key person appointed and 
a job description for each vacant key position. A biographical 
sketch will also be required for new key staff as appointed.

Organizational Profiles

    Provide information on the applicant organization(s) and 
cooperating partners such as organizational charts, financial 
statements, audit reports or statements from CPAs/Licensed Public 
Accountants, Employer Identification Numbers, names of bond 
carriers, contact persons and telephone numbers, child care licenses 
and other documentation of professional accreditation, information 
on compliance with Federal/State/local government standards, 
documentation of experience in the program area, and other pertinent 
information. Any

[[Page 34625]]

non-profit organization submitting an application must submit proof 
of its non-profit status in its application at the time of 
submission.
    The non-profit agency can accomplish this by providing a copy of 
the applicant's listing in the Internal Revenue Service's (IRS) most 
recent list of tax-exempt organizations described in Section 
501(c)(3) of the IRS code, or by providing a copy of the currently 
valid IRS tax exemption certificate, or by providing a copy of the 
articles of incorporation bearing the seal of the State in which the 
corporation or association is domiciled.

Third-Party Agreements

    Include written agreements between grantees and subgrantees or 
subcontractors or other cooperating entities. These agreements must 
detail scope of work to be performed, work schedules, remuneration, 
and other terms and conditions that structure or define the 
relationship.

Letters of Support

    Provide statements from community, public and commercial leaders 
that support the project proposed for funding. All submissions 
should be included in the application OR by application deadline.

Budget and Budget Justification

    Provide line item detail and detailed calculations for each 
budget object class identified on the Budget Information form. 
Detailed calculations must include estimation methods, quantities, 
unit costs, and other similar quantitative detail sufficient for the 
calculation to be duplicated. The detailed budget must also include 
a breakout by the funding sources identified in Block 15 of the SF-
424.
    Provide a narrative budget justification that describes how the 
categorical costs are derived. Discuss the necessity, 
reasonableness, and allocability of the proposed costs.

General

    The following guidelines are for preparing the budget and budget 
justification. Both Federal and non-Federal resources shall be 
detailed and justified in the budget and narrative justification. 
For purposes of preparing the budget and budget justification, 
``Federal resources'' refers only to the ACF grant for which you are 
applying. Non-Federal resources are all other Federal and non-
Federal resources. It is suggested that budget amounts and 
computations be presented in a columnar format: first column, object 
class categories; second column, Federal budget; next column(s), 
non-Federal budget(s), and last column, total budget. The budget 
justification should be a narrative.

Personnel

    Description: Costs of employee salaries and wages.
    Justification: Identify the project director or principal 
investigator, if known. For each staff person, provide the title, 
time commitment to the project (in months), time commitment to the 
project (as a percentage or full-time equivalent), annual salary, 
grant salary, wage rates, etc. Do not include the costs of 
consultants or personnel costs of delegate agencies or of specific 
project(s) or businesses to be financed by the applicant.

Fringe Benefits

    Description: Costs of employee fringe benefits unless treated as 
part of an approved indirect cost rate.
    Justification: Provide a breakdown of the amounts and 
percentages that comprise fringe benefit costs such as health 
insurance, FICA, retirement insurance, taxes, etc.

Travel

    Description: Costs of project-related travel by employees of the 
applicant organization (does not include costs of consultant 
travel).
    Justification: For each trip, show the total number of 
traveler(s), travel destination, duration of trip, per diem, mileage 
allowances, if privately owned vehicles will be used, and other 
transportation costs and subsistence allowances. Travel costs for 
key staff to attend ACF-sponsored workshops should be detailed in 
the budget.

Equipment

    Description: ``Equipment'' means an article of nonexpendable, 
tangible personal property having a useful life of more than one 
year and an acquisition cost which equals or exceeds the lesser of 
(a) the capitalization level established by the organization for the 
financial statement purposes, or (b) $5,000. (Note: Acquisition cost 
means the net invoice unit price of an item of equipment, including 
the cost of any modifications, attachments, accessories, or 
auxiliary apparatus necessary to make it usable for the purpose for 
which it is acquired. Ancillary charges, such as taxes, duty, 
protective in-transit insurance, freight, and installation shall be 
included in or excluded from acquisition cost in accordance with the 
organization's regular written accounting practices.)
    Justification: For each type of equipment requested, provide a 
description of the equipment, the cost per unit, the number of 
units, the total cost, and a plan for use on the project, as well as 
use or disposal of the equipment after the project ends. An 
applicant organization that uses its own definition for equipment 
should provide a copy of its policy or section of its policy which 
includes the equipment definition.

Supplies

    Description: Costs of all tangible personal property other than 
that included under the Equipment category.
    Justification: Specify general categories of supplies and their 
costs. Show computations and provide other information that supports 
the amount requested.

Contractual

    Description: Costs of all contracts for services and goods 
except for those which belong under other categories such as 
equipment, supplies, construction, etc. Third-party evaluation 
contracts (if applicable) and contracts with secondary recipient 
organizations, including delegate agencies and specific project(s) 
or businesses to be financed by the applicant, should be included 
under this category.
    Justification: All procurement transactions shall be conducted 
in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open and 
free competition. Recipients and sub-recipients, other than States 
that are required to use part 92 procedures, must justify any 
anticipated procurement action that is expected to be awarded 
without competition and exceed the simplified acquisition threshold 
fixed at 41 U.S.C. 403(11) currently set at $100,000. Recipients 
might be required to make available to ACF pre-award review and 
procurement documents, such as request for proposals or invitations 
for bids, independent cost estimates, etc.

    Note: Whenever the applicant intends to delegate part of the 
project to another agency, the applicant must provide a detailed 
budget and budget narrative for each delegate agency, by agency 
title, along with the required supporting information referred to in 
these instructions.

Other

    Enter the total of all other costs. Such costs, where applicable 
and appropriate, may include but are not limited to insurance, food, 
medical and dental costs (non-contractual), professional services 
costs, space and equipment rentals, printing and publication, 
computer use, training costs, such as tuition and stipends, staff 
development costs, and administrative costs.
    Justification: Provide computations, a narrative description and 
a justification for each cost under this category.

Indirect Charges

    Description: Total amount of indirect costs. This category 
should be used only when the applicant currently has an indirect 
cost rate approved by the Department of Health and Human Services 
(HHS) or another cognizant Federal agency.
    Justification: An applicant that will charge indirect costs to 
the grant must enclose a copy of the current rate agreement. If the 
applicant organization is in the process of initially developing or 
renegotiating a rate, it should immediately upon notification that 
an award will be made, develop a tentative indirect cost rate 
proposal based on its most recently completed fiscal year in 
accordance with the principles set forth in the cognizant agency's 
guidelines for establishing indirect cost rates, and submit it to 
the cognizant agency. Applicants awaiting approval of their indirect 
cost proposals may also request indirect costs. It should be noted 
that when an indirect cost rate is requested, those costs included 
in the indirect cost pool should not also be charged as direct costs 
to the grant. Also, if the applicant is requesting a rate which is 
less than what is allowed under the program, the authorized 
representative of the applicant organization must submit a signed 
acknowledgment that the applicant is accepting a lower rate than 
allowed.

Program Income

    Description: The estimated amount of income, if any, expected to 
be generated from this project.
    Justification: Describe the nature, source and anticipated use 
of program income in the budget or refer to the pages in the 
application that contain this information.

[[Page 34626]]

Non-Federal Resources

    Description: Amounts of non-Federal resources that will be used 
to support the project as identified in Block 15 of the SF-424.
    Justification: The firm commitment of these resources must be 
documented and submitted with the application in order to be given 
credit in the review process. A detailed budget must be prepared for 
each funding source.

Total Direct Charges, Total Indirect Charges, Total Project Costs.

    [Self-explanatory]

    Dated: June 5, 2003.
Nguyen Van Hanh,
Director, Office of Refugee Resettlement.

[FR Doc. 03-14593 Filed 6-9-03; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4184-01-P




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