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[Congressional Record: September 24, 2002 (House)]
[Page H6525-H6527]
From the Congressional Record Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:cr24se02-52]                         



 
RECOGNIZING HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF 100 YEARS OF KOREAN IMMIGRATION 
                            TO UNITED STATES

  Mr. TOM DAVIS of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules 
and agree to the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 297) recognizing 
the historical significance of 100 years of Korean immigration to the 
United States.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                            H. Con. Res. 297

       Whereas missionaries from the United States played a 
     central role in nurturing the political and religious 
     evolution of modern Korea;
       Whereas in December 1902, 56 men, 21 women and 25 children 
     left Korea and traveled across the Pacific Ocean on the S.S. 
     Gaelic and landed in Honolulu, Hawaii on January 13, 1903;
       Whereas the early Korean-American community was united 
     around the common goal of obtaining independence from their 
     colonized mother country;
       Whereas members of the Korean-American community have 
     served with distinction in the Armed Forces of the United 
     States during World War I, World War II, and the Korean 
     Conflict;
       Whereas on June 25, 1950, Communist North Korea invaded 
     South Korea with approximately 135,000 troops, thereby 
     initiating the involvement of approximately 5,720,000 
     personnel, both military and civilian from South Korea and 
     the United States, who worked to stem the spread of communism 
     in Korea;
       Whereas casualties in the United States Armed Forces 
     included 54,260 dead, of whom 33,665 were battle deaths, 
     92,134 wounded, and 8,176 listed as missing in action or 
     prisoners of war;
       Whereas in the early 1950s, thousands of Koreans, fleeing 
     from war, poverty, and desolation, came to the United States 
     seeking opportunities;
       Whereas Korean-Americans, like waves of immigrants that 
     came to the United States before them, have taken root and 
     thrived in the United States through strong family ties, 
     community support, and hard work;
       Whereas Korean immigration has invigorated businesses, 
     churches, and academic communities in the United States;
       Whereas according to the 2000 United States Census, Korean-
     Americans own and operate 135,571 businesses across the 
     United States that have gross sales of $46,000,000,000 
     annually, and employ 333,649 individuals;
       Whereas the contributions of Korean-Americans to the United 
     States include the development of the first beating heart 
     operation for coronary artery disease, the development of 
     several varieties of the nectarine, and achievements in 
     engineering, architecture, medicine, acting, singing, 
     sculpture, and writing;
       Whereas Korean-Americans play a crucial role in maintaining 
     the strength and vitality of the United States-Korean 
     relationship;
       Whereas the partnership of the United States and South 
     Korea helps maintain peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific 
     region and provides economic benefits to the people of both 
     nations and to the rest of the world; and

[[Page H6526]]

       Whereas beginning in 2003, more than 100 communities 
     throughout the United States will celebrate the 100th 
     anniversary of Korean immigration to the United States: Now, 
     therefore, be it
       Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
     concurring), That the Congress--
       (1) recognizes the achievements and contributions of 
     Korean-Americans to the United States over the past 100 
     years; and
       (2) requests that the President issue a proclamation 
     calling on the people of the United States and interested 
     organizations to observe the anniversary with appropriate 
     programs, ceremonies, and activities.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Tom Davis) and the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Davis) 
each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Tom Davis).


                             General Leave

  Mr. TOM DAVIS of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that 
all Members may have 5 legislative days within which to revise and 
extend their remarks on H. Con. Res. 297.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Virginia?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. TOM DAVIS of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, House Concurrent Resolution 297 recognizes the 
contributions of Korean Americans during the past 100 years, and it 
asks the President to issue a proclamation calling on the people of the 
United States and interested organizations to observe this anniversary. 
I commend the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Hoekstra) for introducing 
this important resolution.
  January 2003 will mark the 100th anniversary of the arrival of 56 
men, 21 women and 25 children from the Korean Peninsula to Honolulu, 
Hawaii. These brave people left Korea and traveled across the Pacific 
Ocean on the SS Gaelic on January 13, 1903. This trip initiated a 
century of Korean immigration to the United States, and America has 
benefited tremendously from the hard work and loyalty of Korean 
immigrants and their sons and daughters.
  Korean Americans have served in the United States Armed Forces with 
distinction during World War I, World War II, and the Korean conflict 
in the early 1950s. In particular, the U.S. and South Korea worked 
together to keep communism from covering the Korean peninsula during 
those difficult times.
  Korean Americans have made many contributions to the United States 
and have had a lasting impact on their communities. Hard work, strong 
families and cultural influence are just a few of the qualities that 
Korean Americans are known for and continue to thrive today. Korean 
Americans have played a crucial role in advancing the United States-
Korea partnership, which helps provide peace and stability in the Asia 
Pacific region.
  Among the many contributions of Korean Americans are the first 
beating heart operation for coronary artery disease, the development of 
several varieties of the nectarine, and achievements in engineering, 
architecture, medicine, acting, singing, sculpture and writing.
  According to the 2000 census, over 135,000 American businesses are 
owned and operated by Korean Americans across the country, with gross 
sales and receipts of $46 billion. These businesses employ over 330,000 
individuals.
  Mr. Speaker, the Korean community is alive and well in my 
Congressional District out in Northern Virginia, at Bailey's 
Crossroads, Annandale, Fairfax and Woodbridge.

                              {time}  1745

  These immigrants have chosen America for the freedom and opportunity 
this country offers, and they are making lasting contributions to our 
community and communities across the country.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask for adoption of the resolution.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to join with the 
gentleman from Virginia in consideration of this resolution honoring 
the significance of Korean immigration.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as she may consume to the 
distinguished gentlewoman from California (Ms. Watson).
  (Ms. WATSON of California asked and was given permission to revise 
and extend her remarks.)
  Ms. WATSON of California. Mr. Speaker, I am proud to join my 
colleagues today in honoring the contributions of Korean Americans to 
our national heritage.
  On January 13, 1903, the S.S. Gaelic arrived in Honolulu, marking the 
beginning of the documented history of the Korean-American experience. 
Mr. Speaker, 102 Korean immigrants walked off that ship almost 100 
years ago. Many of them probably expected that they would spend a few 
years in Hawaii and then return home. In the 100 years since then, the 
Korean-American population has grown to over 1 million and has become a 
vital and dynamic part of our American family.
  No account of Korean-American heritage would be complete without 
listing the accomplishments of several American heroes of Korean 
descent, like Colonel Young Oak Kim, the first Asian American to 
command a combat battalion. To date, Colonel Kim is also the most 
decorated Asian-American soldier, earning two Purple Hearts, a Silver 
Star, and the Distinguished Service Cross. Or Dora Yum Kim, a pioneer 
in developing social services for California's poor and disadvantaged 
citizens. And Dr. Sammy Lee, Olympic diver and swimming coach, 
physician and veteran. Dr. Lee was not only the first Asian-American to 
win an Olympic gold medal, but also the first American to win two 
Olympic gold diving medals, the oldest person to win a gold in diving, 
and the first male to win back-to-back gold medals in diving as well.
  I am proud to represent a congressional district with a vibrant 
Korean-American community. My congressional district is also home to a 
number of institutions that stand as a testament both to the 
determination and success of Korean-Americans, but also to the richness 
of Korean-American heritage.
  The Korean-American Museum presents exhibitions that serve to bring 
the role of Korean-Americans in our history to the public at large. The 
Korean Heritage Library at the University of Southern California holds 
a wealth of history of Korean-American life. And one cannot forget the 
many churches, community groups, and businesses that make up the fabric 
of everyday life in the Korean-American community.
  The Korean-American story is above all an American story, a story of 
our country, our communities, and our neighborhoods. I urge my 
colleagues to support this resolution to celebrate 100 years of Korean-
American contributions to our Nation.
  Mr. TOM DAVIS of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he may 
consume to the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Hoekstra).
  Mr. HOEKSTRA. Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his helping in 
moving this bill to the floor and getting it up for a vote today.
  Mr. Speaker, H. Con. Resolution 297 recognizes the contributions of 
Korean-Americans and the contributions that they have made over the 
last 100 years. Since that first day when Korean-Americans immigrated 
and landed in Honolulu, they have become an integral part of the 
diverse fabric that makes up American society. They have contributed 
economically; but beyond economic contributions, they have eagerly 
embraced our commonly held American ideals.
  The first Korean-Americans were united in the cause of achieving 
freedom for their annexed homeland and for her people. And in this 
present day, Korean-Americans remain united in their hopes for the 
reunification of their ancestral homeland and the reunification of 
families torn apart by war and for an end to the dictatorial oppression 
of their fellow Koreans in North Korea.
  By organizing through churches, associations, and other groups, 
Korean-Americans have built strong mutual-support networks and strong 
communities. Perhaps most importantly, at the center of Korean-American 
life are strong family ties and hard work. This has allowed Korean-
Americans to prosper and make innumerable contributions to American 
life and society.
  In January of 2003, there will be more than 100 communities across 
America celebrating the 100th anniversary of Korean-American 
immigration. It is

[[Page H6527]]

both deserving and important that Congress recognize the significance 
of this fact, and encourage schools, civic groups, and all levels of 
government to take part in planning activities and events surrounding 
this major milestone.
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Speaker, the pioneers of the Korean community in the United 
States were a small group of political and social reformers, expelled 
from Korea following an unsuccessful attempt to overthrow the 
government, who arrived as exiles in San Francisco. Among them was Suh 
Jae-pil, who later adopted the American name Philip Jaisohn. Mr. 
Jaisohn became the first Korean to become an American citizen and the 
first Korean-American to receive an American medical degree.
  In 1886, 4 years after getting his medical degree, Mr. Jaisohn 
established the first Korean newspaper. He became involved in the fight 
to keep Korea independent of China and, after 1910, to liberate it from 
Japan. Dr. Jaisohn devoted the majority of his life to the cause of 
Korean independence. His work in medical research and pathology and for 
Korean causes gained respect in both his homeland and in the United 
States.
  Mr. Jaisohn, like thousands of other Koreans who immigrated to the 
United States, played a central role in nurturing the political and 
religious evolution of modern Korea.
  Members of the Korean-American community have served with distinction 
in the Armed Forces, have helped the development of the first beating 
heart operation for coronary artery disease, and own and operate more 
than 135 businesses in the United States with gross sales of $46 
billion annually.
  Korean-Americans play a vital role in maintaining the strength and 
vitality of United States-Korean relationships. The partnership between 
the United States and South Korea has helped to maintain peace and 
stability in the Asia-Pacific region.
  This year, 100 communities throughout the United States will 
celebrate the 100th anniversary of Korean immigration to the United 
States, including a large Korean community on the north side of the 
city of Chicago and in other areas spread throughout the city.
  Mr. Speaker, my former legislative director is Korean. Her name is 
Courtni Pugh. She and her twin sister were featured on the cover of a 
Korean magazine about 3 years ago as premier young Korean or Asian 
activists in the United States. So I take this opportunity to convey 
greetings to them and all of my Korean friends throughout the 
metropolitan area of Chicago. Again, I commend the gentleman for 
introducing this resolution, and I am pleased to share its movement 
with my colleague, the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Tom Davis).
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. TOM DAVIS of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, this resolution appropriately recognizes Korean-
Americans and their contributions to this country. It seeks to 
celebrate 100 years of immigration by supporting events and ceremonies 
by marking this important date in 2003, and I am proud to support this 
resolution.
  Mr. WU. Mr. Speaker, I rise to honor support House Resolution 297 
recognizing the historical significance of 100 years of Korean 
immigration to the United States. In 1902, 102 Koreans arrived in 
Hawaii after a month-long journey across the Pacific Ocean. Since that 
time, the Korean-American presence has grown to more than 100 
communities with a population of about 1.1 million people, and has made 
immense contributions to our nation.
  Abroad, members of the Korean-American community served with valor 
and distinction in the Armed Forces of the United States, notably 
during World War I, World War II, and the Korean Conflict, where they 
helped defend South Korea from Communist North Korea's invasion. Their 
sacrifices helped to preserve the freedom and democracy that we have 
today.
  At home, Korean-Americans, like other waves of immigrants to America, 
have spurred the growth of new businesses, churches, and academic 
communities. They have also made tremendous contributions in areas such 
as athletics, literature, the arts, medicine, architecture, and 
engineering.
  As Chair of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, and as 
an immigrant, I am proud to recognize these achievements.
  Mr. TOM DAVIS of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of 
my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Bass). The question is on the motion 
offered by the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Tom Davis) that the House 
suspend the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution, H. Con. Res. 
297.
  The question was taken.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. In the opinion of the Chair, two-thirds of 
those present have voted in the affirmative.
  Mr. TOM DAVIS of Virginia. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and 
nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX and the 
Chair's prior announcement, further proceedings on this motion will be 
postponed.

                          ____________________






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