ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers

Home Page

Advanced search


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

Chinese Immig. Daily

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE

Immigration Daily

 

Chinese Immig. Daily



The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of free
information!

Copyright
©1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

Immigration Daily: the news source for
legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers
Enter your email address here:



< Back to current issue of Immigration Daily < Back to current issue of Immigrant's Weekly


[Congressional Record: July 22, 2002 (House)]
[Page H4989-H4992]
From the Congressional Record Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:cr22jy02-57]                         



 
                      CHILD STATUS PROTECTION ACT

  Mr. SENSENBRENNER. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and 
concur in the Senate amendment to the bill (H.R. 1209) to amend the 
Immigration and Nationality Act to determine whether an alien is a 
child, for purposes of classification as an immediate relative, based 
on the age of the alien on the date the classification petition with 
respect to the alien is filed, and for other purposes.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Senate amendment:
       Strike out all after the enacting clause and insert:

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Child Status Protection 
     Act''.

     SEC. 2. USE OF AGE ON PETITION FILING DATE, PARENT'S 
                   NATURALIZATION DATE, OR MARRIAGE TERMINATION 
                   DATE, IN DETERMINING STATUS AS IMMEDIATE 
                   RELATIVE.

       Section 201 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 
     U.S.C. 1151) is amended by adding at the end the following:
       ``(f) Rules for Determining Whether Certain Aliens Are 
     Immediate Relatives.--
       ``(1) Age on petition filing date.--Except as provided in 
     paragraphs (2) and (3), for purposes of subsection 
     (b)(2)(A)(i), a determination of whether an alien satisfies 
     the age requirement in the matter preceding subparagraph (A) 
     of section 101(b)(1) shall be made using the age of the alien 
     on the date on which the petition is filed with the Attorney 
     General under section 204 to classify the alien as an 
     immediate relative under subsection (b)(2)(A)(i).
       ``(2) Age on parent's naturalization date.--In the case of 
     a petition under section 204 initially filed for an alien 
     child's classification as a family-sponsored immigrant under 
     section 203(a)(2)(A), based on the child's parent being 
     lawfully admitted for permanent residence, if the petition is 
     later converted, due to the naturalization of the parent, to 
     a petition to classify the alien as an immediate relative 
     under subsection (b)(2)(A)(i), the determination described in 
     paragraph (1) shall be made using the

[[Page H4990]]

     age of the alien on the date of the parent's naturalization.
       ``(3) Age on marriage termination date.--In the case of a 
     petition under section 204 initially filed for an alien's 
     classification as a family-sponsored immigrant under section 
     203(a)(3), based on the alien's being a married son or 
     daughter of a citizen, if the petition is later converted, 
     due to the legal termination of the alien's marriage, to a 
     petition to classify the alien as an immediate relative under 
     subsection (b)(2)(A)(i) or as an unmarried son or daughter of 
     a citizen under section 203(a)(1), the determination 
     described in paragraph (1) shall be made using the age of the 
     alien on the date of the termination of the marriage.''.

     SEC. 3. TREATMENT OF CERTAIN UNMARRIED SONS AND DAUGHTERS 
                   SEEKING STATUS AS FAMILY-SPONSORED, EMPLOYMENT-
                   BASED, AND DIVERSITY IMMIGRANTS.

       Section 203 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 
     U.S.C. 1153) is amended by adding at the end the following:
       ``(h) Rules for Determining Whether Certain Aliens Are 
     Children.--
       ``(1) In general.--For purposes of subsections (a)(2)(A) 
     and (d), a determination of whether an alien satisfies the 
     age requirement in the matter preceding subparagraph (A) of 
     section 101(b)(1) shall be made using--
       ``(A) the age of the alien on the date on which an 
     immigrant visa number becomes available for such alien (or, 
     in the case of subsection (d), the date on which an immigrant 
     visa number became available for the alien's parent), but 
     only if the alien has sought to acquire the status of an 
     alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence within one 
     year of such availability; reduced by
       ``(B) the number of days in the period during which the 
     applicable petition described in paragraph (2) was pending.
       ``(2) Petitions described.--The petition described in this 
     paragraph is--
       ``(A) with respect to a relationship described in 
     subsection (a)(2)(A), a petition filed under section 204 for 
     classification of an alien child under subsection (a)(2)(A); 
     or
       ``(B) with respect to an alien child who is a derivative 
     beneficiary under subsection (d), a petition filed under 
     section 204 for classification of the alien's parent under 
     subsection (a), (b), or (c).
       ``(3) Retention of priority date.--If the age of an alien 
     is determined under paragraph (1) to be 21 years of age or 
     older for the purposes of subsections (a)(2)(A) and (d), the 
     alien's petition shall automatically be converted to the 
     appropriate category and the alien shall retain the original 
     priority date issued upon receipt of the original 
     petition.''.

     SEC. 4. USE OF AGE ON PARENT'S APPLICATION FILING DATE IN 
                   DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ASYLUM.

       Section 208(b)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 
     U.S.C. 1158(b)(3)) is amended to read as follows:
       ``(3) Treatment of spouse and children.--
       ``(A) In general.--A spouse or child (as defined in section 
     101(b)(1) (A), (B), (C), (D), or (E)) of an alien who is 
     granted asylum under this subsection may, if not otherwise 
     eligible for asylum under this section, be granted the same 
     status as the alien if accompanying, or following to join, 
     such alien.
       ``(B) Continued classification of certain aliens as 
     children.--An unmarried alien who seeks to accompany, or 
     follow to join, a parent granted asylum under this 
     subsection, and who was under 21 years of age on the date on 
     which such parent applied for asylum under this section, 
     shall continue to be classified as a child for purposes of 
     this paragraph and section 209(b)(3), if the alien attained 
     21 years of age after such application was filed but while it 
     was pending.''.

     SEC. 5. USE OF AGE ON PARENT'S APPLICATION FILING DATE IN 
                   DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ADMISSION AS 
                   REFUGEE.

       Section 207(c)(2) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 
     U.S.C. 1157(c)(2)) is amended--
       (1) by striking ``(2)'' and inserting ``(2)(A)''; and
       (2) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(B) An unmarried alien who seeks to accompany, or follow 
     to join, a parent granted admission as a refugee under this 
     subsection, and who was under 21 years of age on the date on 
     which such parent applied for refugee status under this 
     section, shall continue to be classified as a child for 
     purposes of this paragraph, if the alien attained 21 years of 
     age after such application was filed but while it was 
     pending.''.

     SEC. 6. TREATMENT OF CLASSIFICATION PETITIONS FOR UNMARRIED 
                   SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF NATURALIZED CITIZENS.

       Section 204 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 
     U.S.C. 1154) is amended by adding at the end the following:
       ``(k) Procedures for Unmarried Sons and Daughters of 
     Citizens.--
       ``(1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), in 
     the case of a petition under this section initially filed for 
     an alien unmarried son or daughter's classification as a 
     family-sponsored immigrant under section 203(a)(2)(B), based 
     on a parent of the son or daughter being an alien lawfully 
     admitted for permanent residence, if such parent subsequently 
     becomes a naturalized citizen of the United States, such 
     petition shall be converted to a petition to classify the 
     unmarried son or daughter as a family-sponsored immigrant 
     under section 203(a)(1).
       ``(2) Exception.--Paragraph (1) does not apply if the son 
     or daughter files with the Attorney General a written 
     statement that he or she elects not to have such conversion 
     occur (or if it has occurred, to have such conversion 
     revoked). Where such an election has been made, any 
     determination with respect to the son or daughter's 
     eligibility for admission as a family-sponsored immigrant 
     shall be made as if such naturalization had not taken place.
       ``(3) Priority date.--Regardless of whether a petition is 
     converted under this subsection or not, if an unmarried son 
     or daughter described in this subsection was assigned a 
     priority date with respect to such petition before such 
     naturalization, he or she may maintain that priority date.
       ``(4) Clarification.--This subsection shall apply to a 
     petition if it is properly filed, regardless of whether it 
     was approved or not before such naturalization.''.

     SEC. 7. IMMIGRATION BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN ALIEN CHILDREN NOT 
                   AFFECTED.

       Section 204(a)(1)(D) of the Immigration and Nationality Act 
     (8 U.S.C. 1154(a)(1)(D)) is amended by adding at the end the 
     following new clause:
       ``(iii) Nothing in the amendments made by the Child Status 
     Protection Act shall be construed to limit or deny any right 
     or benefit provided under this subparagraph.''.

     SEC. 8. EFFECTIVE DATE.

       The amendments made by this Act shall take effect on the 
     date of the enactment of this Act and shall apply to any 
     alien who is a derivative beneficiary or any other 
     beneficiary of--
       (1) a petition for classification under section 204 of the 
     Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1154) approved 
     before such date but only if a final determination has not 
     been made on the beneficiary's application for an immigrant 
     visa or adjustment of status to lawful permanent residence 
     pursuant to such approved petition;
       (2) a petition for classification under section 204 of the 
     Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1154) pending on or 
     after such date; or
       (3) an application pending before the Department of Justice 
     or the Department of State on or after such date.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Wisconsin (Mr. Sensenbrenner) and the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Brown) 
each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. 
Sensenbrenner).


                             General Leave

  Mr. SENSENBRENNER. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all 
Members may have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend 
their remarks on H.R. 1209.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Wisconsin?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. SENSENBRENNER. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Speaker, H.R. 1209, the Child Status Protection Act, is the good 
work of the Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security and Claims 
chairman, the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Gekas), and the ranking 
member, the gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Jackson-Lee.) It passed the 
House by a vote of 416 to 0 in June of 2001. Today we take up the bill 
as amended by the Senate.
  Aliens residing in the United States who are eligible for permanent 
resident status may adjust their status with the INS. However, INS 
processing delays have caused up to a 3-year delay for adjustment. For 
alien children of U.S. citizens, this delay in processing can have 
serious consequences, for once they turn 21 years of age they lose 
their immediate relative status. An unlimited number of immediate 
relatives of U.S. citizens can receive green cards every year. However, 
there are a limited number of green cards available for the adult 
children of citizens.
  If a U.S. citizen parent petitions for a green card for a child 
before the child turns 21 but the INS does not get around to processing 
the adjustment of status application until after the child turns 21, 
the family is out of luck. The child goes to the end of the long 
waiting list. The child is being punished because of INS ineptitude, 
which we have heard much about, and it is not right. H.R. 1209 corrects 
this outcome by providing that a child shall remain eligible for 
immediate relative status as long as an immigrant visa petition was 
filed for him or her before turning age 21.
  The Senate passed H.R. 1209 with a few appropriate additions, and the 
motion today is to concur in those additions. The Senate bill addresses 
three other situations where alien children lose immigration benefits 
by ``aging out'' as a result of INS processing delays.
  Case number one: Children of permanent residents. Under current law, 
when a child of a permanent resident turns 21, he or she goes from the 
second preference A waiting list to the second waiting list B waiting 
list, which is much longer.
  Case number two: Children of family and employer-sponsored immigrants

[[Page H4991]]

and diversity lottery winners. Under current law, when an alien 
receives permanent residence as a preference visa recipient or a winner 
of the diversity lottery, a minor child receives permanent residence at 
the same time. After the child turns 21, the parent would have to apply 
for the child to be put on the second preference B waiting list.
  Case number three: Children of asylees and refugees. Under current 
law, when an alien receives asylum or is granted refugee status, a 
minor child receives permanent residence at the same time as the 
parent. After the child turns 21, the parent would have to apply for 
him or her to be put on the second preference B waiting list.
  The Senate amendment also fixes a troubling anomaly in our 
immigration laws. Under current law, when a permanent resident 
naturalizes who has sponsored adult sons and daughters for preferential 
visas, they move from the second preference B category to the first 
preference category. Normally, the wait for a first preference visa is 
much shorter than the wait for second preference B visa. However, 
currently this is not the case for sons and daughters of immigrants 
from the Philippines. For complicated factors, the line actually gets 
longer for sons and daughters when the parent naturalizes. Immigrants 
are in effect being penalized for becoming citizens, and we don't want 
that.
  The Senate amendment provides a simple fix by allowing an adult son 
or daughter to decline to be transferred from the second preference B 
category to the first preference category when a parent naturalizes.
  This bill is a fine example of how we and the other body can work 
together in a collaborative fashion. Bringing families together is a 
prime goal of our immigration system. H.R. 1209 facilitates and hastens 
the reuniting of legal immigrants' families. It is family-friendly 
legislation that is in keeping with our proud traditions. I urge my 
colleagues to support this bill.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the gentlewoman from 
Texas (Ms. Jackson-Lee) will control the time.
  There was no objection.
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I thank you for your kindness, 
and I might also acknowledge the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Brown) for 
his kindness. Traveling sometimes causes one to be delayed.
  Mr. Speaker, let me rise to support what I think is a very special 
and important piece of legislation that has come about from the 
Committee on the Judiciary in a bipartisan manner, the Child Status 
Protection Act of 2001, H.R. 1209.
  I would ask my colleagues to enthusiastically support this 
legislation, which was originally cosponsored by the subcommittee 
chairman, the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Gekas), and myself, and 
it is a culmination of a bipartisan agreement of both the House and the 
Senate that addresses the status of unmarried children of U.S. citizens 
who turn 21 while in the process of having an immigrant visa petition 
adjudicated. The age and marital status of the offspring of U.S. 
citizens determine whether they are eligible for immigrant status as an 
immediate relative or under the family-first preference category.
  As has been noted throughout our debates on the floor of the House, 
we are interested in and encouraged by the interest of immigrants in 
this country to access legalization, to become American citizens, to be 
part of the great values and the great beliefs of this Nation.
  H.R. 1209 would protect the status of children of United States 
citizens who ``age out'' while awaiting the processing and adjudication 
of immediate relative petitions.
  The child of a U.S. citizen is eligible for admission as an immediate 
relative. Immediate relatives of U.S. citizens are not subject to any 
numerical restrictions. That is, visas are immediately available to 
them under the statute, subject only to the processing time required to 
adjudicate the immediate relative visa petition.
  Obviously, the parent and child relationship is very important. The 
benefits that come from the parent-child relationship or relative 
relationship is very important, the ability to be able to go to school, 
to a place of higher education, to receive other governmental benefits. 
Thus, the only wait that such children are required to endure is the 
time it takes to process their paperwork. We want to see that 
completed.
  Under current law, once children reach the age of 21 and above, they 
are no longer considered immediate relatives under the INA. That means 
that they ``age out.'' Thus, instead of being entitled to admission 
without numerical limitation, the U.S. citizen's sons or daughters are 
placed in the back of the line for one of the INS's backlogged family 
preference categories of immigrants. That means they have already been 
standing in line for maybe 2, 3, 4 years. They may have been 17 or 16 
or 19, and they have then aged out. By putting them behind a long list 
of individuals then complicates further the situation of the benefits 
that they might receive and also the relationship being established as 
an American citizen.
  This can be particularly difficult when there are just over 23,000 
family-first preference visas available each year to the adult 
unmarried sons and daughters of citizens, many of whom are coming over 
to the country for the first time. Some of these that will be impacted 
by this law are already here waiting to access citizenship. The waiting 
list at times has been in excess of over 90,000 people. It is not 
uncommon for people to wait on this waiting list for 4 years.
  The Senate expanded this bill to cover other situations where alien 
children lose immigration benefits by aging out as a result of INS 
processing delays. The Senate amendment expands age-out protection to 
cover the following:
  Children of permanent residents. Under current law, there is a group 
that is waiting in permanent residence, and we have expanded that. 
Children of family and employer-sponsored immigrants and diversity 
lottery winners, which allows those who are under visas such as H1(b), 
which is very helpful. Children of asylees and refugees. Under current 
law, when an alien receives asylum or is granted refugee status, a 
minor child receives permanent residence at the same time as the 
parent. After the child turns 21, the parent would have to apply for 
him or her to be put on the second preference B waiting list.
  I have a dilemma in my own district with where a family of nine is 
now in detention because the only citizen they have in their family is 
a 9-year-old child, which shows that, in many instances, sometimes 
there are difficulties in families, good families, trying to access 
legalization. This family has been in the country for 9 years. This 
legislation does not apply to that, but it shows that where we can 
correct situations to bring families together, this is extremely 
important.
  So the Senate has brought about an opportunity to correct or expand 
upon what was not done in the House. I believe this is an important 
bill that helps those who are aging out and brings families together. I 
hope my colleagues will support this legislation enthusiastically.
  Mr. Speaker, ``The Child Status Protection Act'' we are considering 
today, originally sponsored by Subcommittee Chairman George Gekas and 
myself, is the culmination of a bi-partisan agreement of both the House 
and the Senate, that addresses the status of unmarried children of U.S. 
citizens who turn 21 while in the process of having an immigrant visa 
petition adjudicated. The age and marital status of the offspring of 
U.S. citizens determine whether they are eligible for immigrant status 
as ``immediate relatives'' or under the ``family first preference 
category''.
  H.R. 1209 would protect the status of children of United States 
citizens who ``age-out'' while awaiting the processing and adjudication 
of immediate relative petitions.
  The ``child'' of a U.S. citizen is eligible for admission as an 
``immediate relative.'' ``Immediate relatives'' of U.S. citizens are 
not subject to any numerical restrictions. That is, visas are 
immediately available to them under the statute, subject only to the 
processing time required to adjudicate the immediate relative visa 
petition. Thus, the only wait that such children are required to endure 
is the time it takes to process their paperwork.
  Under current law once children reach 21 years of age, they are no 
longer considered immediate relatives under the INA. Thus, instead of 
being entitled to admission without

[[Page H4992]]

numerical limitation, the U.S. citizen's sons or daughters are placed 
in the back of the line for one of the INS's backlogged family 
preference categories of immigrants. This can be particularly difficult 
when there are just over 23,000 family-first preference visas available 
each year to the adult, unmarried sons and daughters of citizens and a 
waiting list which at times has been in excess of over 90,000 people. 
It is not uncommon for people to wait on this waiting list for years.
  The Senate expanded the bill to cover other situations where alien 
children lose immigration benefits by ``aging-out'' as a result of INS 
processing delays. The Senate amendment expands age-out protection to 
cover:


                    children of permanent residents

  Under current law, when a child of a permanent resident turns 21, he 
or she goes from the second preference ``A'' waiting list to the second 
preference ``B'' waiting list, which is much longer.


  children of family and employer-sponsored immigrants and diversity 
                            lottery winners

  Under current law, when an alien receives permanent residence as a 
preference-visa recipient or a winner of the diversity lottery, a minor 
child receives permanent residence at the same time. After the child 
turns 21, the parent would have to apply for him or her to be put on 
the second preference ``B'' waiting list.


                    children of asylees and refugees

  Under current law, when an alien receives asylum or is granted 
refugee status, a minor child receives permanent residence at the same 
time as the parent. After the child turns 21, the parent would have to 
apply for him or her to be put on the second preference ``B'' waiting 
list.
  The Senate amendment also fixes an anomaly in our immigration laws. 
Under current law, when a permanent resident naturalizes who has 
sponsored adult sons and daughters for preference visas, they move from 
the second preference ``B'' category (for the adult sons and daughters 
of permanent residents) to the first preference category (for the adult 
sons and daughters of citizens).
  Normally, the wait for a first preference visa is much shorter than 
the wait for a second preference ``B'' visa. However, currently this is 
not the case for the sons and daughters of immigrants from the 
Philippines. The line actually gets longer for the sons and daughters 
when the parent naturalizes. This outcome is caused by two factors: (1) 
no one country can receive more than a certain percentage of visas in 
family-preference categories, and (2) there is a relatively higher 
demand among naturalized citizens from the Philippines for preference 
visas for their adult sons and daughters than there is among permanent 
residents from the Philippines. In any event, it is certainly 
unfortunate that immigrants are in effect being penalized for becoming 
citizens. The Senate amendment provides relief by allowing an adult son 
or daughter of a naturalized citizen who has already been sponsored for 
permanent residence to choose not to be transferred from the second 
preference ``B'' category to the first preference category.
  This bill will solve the ``age out'' problem without displacing 
others who have been waiting patiently in other visa categories by 
allowing the child to use the date at the time the date of the parent's 
application. I would like to thank our Subcommittee Chairman, 
Congressman George Gekas and Chairman Sensenbrenner for moving this 
matter through the Congress. I look forward to further bi-partisan 
agreements in the future.
  Mr. GEKAS. Mr. Speaker, I introduced H.R. 1209, the ``Child Status 
Protection Act'', in March of 2001 along with Sheila Jackson Lee. I was 
moved by stories of the children of U.S. citizens, constituents of my 
own and of other members, who were being punished because of the 
inability of the INS to process applications for adjustment of status 
to permanent residency in a timely manner.
  I am gratified to see us today on the verge of passing this bill for 
a second time and sending it to President Bush for his signature. I 
want to thank Senator Dianne Feinstein for all her help in getting this 
bill passed by the Senate and for her efforts to make it even better.
  Aliens who are eligible to receive an immigrant visa and who are in 
the United States are eligible to adjust to permanent resident status 
with the INS. However, the adjustment of status process has become a 
black hole. Almost a million adjustment of status applications are 
pending and the consequent processing delay can last up to three years. 
For the children of U.S. citizens, such delay can have major 
consequences.
  An unlimited number of visas are available each year for the minor 
children of U.S. citizens, who are considered immediate relatives. 
However, a finite number of visas are available for the adult children 
of U.S. citizens.
  The date at which the age of a child is measured is the date their 
adjustment of status application is processed--not the date that an 
immigrant visa petition was filed on their behalf. Thus, with the INS 
taking up to three years to process applications, children who were 
under 21 when their petitions were filed may find themselves over 21 by 
the time their applications are processed. When a child of a U.S. 
citizen ``ages out'' by turning 21, the child automatically shifts from 
the immediate relative category to the family first preference 
category. This puts him or her at the end of long waiting list for a 
visa.
  Because demand for first preference visas far exceeds the number of 
visas available each year, petitions are processed in the order they 
were filed. For applicants from most countries, the wait for a family 
first preference visa is about seven years, but for applicants from 
Mexico or the Philippines, the wait can be much longer. This is in 
addition to the time it takes INS to process he adjustment of status 
application.
  H.R. 1209, ``the Child Status Protection Act'', allows the children 
of U.S. citizens whose visa petitions were filed before they reached 
21, but turn 21 before their adjustment of status applications are 
processed, to adjust status without having to wait for years. Pursuant 
to the bill, they will still be considered minor children of U.S. 
citizens, thus avoiding the first preference backlog.
  This bill protects the children of American citizens whose 
opportunity to receive a visa quickly has been lost because of INS 
delays. It will also apply to those rare cases where a child ``ages 
out'' overseas during the usually more expeditious State Department 
visa processing.
  The bill was modified in the Senate to provide relief to other 
children who lose out when the INS takes too long to process their 
adjustment of status applications--such as the children of permanent 
residents and of asylees and refugees. I want to commend Senator 
Feinstein for these changes.
  The bill will also benefit Philippine immigrants who become 
naturalized citizens. For some of them, naturalization now means that 
they will have to wait longer to reunite with their adult children. Our 
complex immigration laws and the law of supply and demand currently 
lead to the odd result that the waiting list is longer for the adult 
child of a naturalized citizen from the Philippines than for the adult 
child of a permanent resident from the Philippines. As a result, 
Filipino permanent residents with adult children are being punished for 
becoming citizens of the United States. H.R. 1209 sets things right by 
simply allowing the adult children to choose to stay in the shorter 
line.
  I urge my colleagues to support H.R. 1209.
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. SENSENBRENNER. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Sensenbrenner) that the House suspend the 
rules and concur in the Senate amendment to the bill, H.R. 1209.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds having voted in favor 
thereof) the rules were suspended and the Senate amendment was 
concurred in.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________






Immigration Daily: the news source for
legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers
Enter your email address here: