ILW.COM - the immigration portal Immigration Daily

Immigration Daily: the news source for legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers

Home Page

Advanced search


Immigration Daily

Archives

Processing times

Immigration forms

Discussion board

Resources

Blogs

Twitter feed

Immigrant Nation

Attorney2Attorney

CLE Workshops

Immigration books

Advertise on ILW

VIP Network

EB-5

Chinese Immig. Daily

About ILW.COM

Connect to us

Make us Homepage

Questions/Comments


SUBSCRIBE

Immigration Daily

 

Chinese Immig. Daily



The leading
immigration law
publisher - over
50000 pages of free
information!

Copyright
©1995-
ILW.COM,
American
Immigration LLC.

Immigration Daily: the news source for
legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers
Enter your email address here:



< Back to current issue of Immigration Daily < Back to current issue of Immigrant's Weekly

[Congressional Record: May 22, 2002 (House)]
[Page H2902-H2926]
From the Congressional Record Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:cr22my02-106]                         



 
PERMISSION TO INCLUDE EXTRANEOUS MATERIAL DURING CONSIDERATION OF HOUSE 
                             RESOLUTION 428

  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that I may be allowed 
to include extraneous material immediately following my remarks on the 
rule that has earlier passed.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Wisconsin?
  There was no objection.

                              {time}  1845
  2002 SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT FOR FURTHER RECOVERY FROM AND 
           RESPONSE TO TERRORIST ATTACKS ON THE UNITED STATES

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Isakson). Pursuant to House Resolution 
428 and rule XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of 
the Whole House on the State of the Union for the consideration of the 
bill, H.R. 4775.

                              {time}  1845


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the State of the Union for the consideration of the bill 
(H.R. 4775) making supplemental appropriations for further recovery 
from and response to terrorist attacks on the United States for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes, with Mr. 
Thornberry in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The CHAIRMAN. Pursuant to the rule, the bill is considered as having 
been read the first time.
  Under the rule, the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young) and the 
gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Obey) each will control 30 minutes.

[[Page H2903]]

  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young).
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  (Mr. YOUNG of Florida asked and was given permission to revise and 
extend his remarks.)
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I am pleased to bring to the 
House the 2002 Supplemental Appropriations Bill. This is the first 
appropriations bill that we will be considering this year, and it 
should prove to be an interesting experience.
  The Committee on Appropriations ordered this legislation reported 
last week. The bill is extremely important, and I believe it will enjoy 
broad bipartisan support. It is extremely important, Mr. Chairman, 
because this is a wartime supplemental appropriations bill. This is to 
pay for our wartime activities in Afghanistan and other places that our 
military troops might be deployed. This is a wartime appropriations 
bill to repay our military services for the monies they have already 
expended from their fourth quarter accounts.
  This is an extremely important bill in that it also, besides 
providing money for the Defense Department, provides for our homeland 
security. As we get further away from September 11, we may be tempted 
to forget what happened on that day in the United States of America. 
But, Mr. Chairman, we were attacked. Our people were attacked. We are 
going to fight back. We are going to finance our effort to fight back.
  The President of the United States is doing an outstanding job in 
leading our Nation in the prosecution of the military campaign. He is 
doing an outstanding job in leading our Nation in seeking out terrorist 
organizations wherever we can locate them and proceeding to bring them 
to justice. So it is a very important bill, Mr. Chairman. However, over 
the last 5 weeks, some of the focus has gotten lost on this important 
bill. It has been sort of like a ship growing barnacles. Everyone knows 
this is a must-pass bill, and there are probably 435 ideas of what 
should be added to or subtracted from it. But I want to remind everyone 
again, the focus of this bill is and must continue to be that this is a 
wartime supplemental appropriations bill. It provides money for our 
troops. It provides money for our intelligence community. It provides 
money for the safety and security of our people and our community. It 
provides support for the victims of the attack in New York at the World 
Trade Center. And it provides funds to promote the U.S. foreign policy 
to prevent future attacks.
  The committee reported a bill that provides $29.387 billion and half 
of that, or $15.8 billion, is for the Defense Department to continue to 
prosecute the war on terrorism. This bill supports the President. It 
fully funds his requirements for national security, foreign policy; and 
it provides an additional $5.5 billion in support for recovery in New 
York. There is $1.77 billion in additional funds for the Defense 
Department to pay for costs relating to the mobilization of the Guard 
and Reserve forces and to cover their operational expenses.
  It provides for our country's biggest concern, securing our homeland, 
by providing $5.8 billion. That is $522 million above the President's 
request. It ensures that our nuclear assets can be secured and that law 
enforcement and our first responders, who are so important in providing 
for the safety of our people in our community, have adequate 
information to prevent, hopefully, or, if necessary, to respond to acts 
of terrorism.
  It also gets the Transportation Security Administration up and 
running so that the traveling public will be safe. We have all heard 
the concerns raised over the past few days that the FBI had information 
that somehow was left out of security briefings for the President. The 
most important thing we can do to protect our country and our 
constituents from future attacks is to ensure that law enforcement and 
our intelligence community and the Commander in Chief, the President of 
the United States, have timely access to accurate and complete 
information.
  I have been to the FBI; and my friend and colleague, the gentleman 
from Wisconsin (Mr. Obey) has been to the FBI. We have seen firsthand 
their antiquated technology equipment that needs to be enhanced, that 
needs to be updated, that needs to be brought into today's world. We 
looked at this closely and determined that the President's request did 
not provide enough for that purpose. So in the terrorism supplemental 
last year we added $132 million above the President's request for the 
FBI's information technology, and this supplemental bill contains an 
additional $100 million above the President's request for additional 
technology enhancement for the FBI.
  At this point, there will be some who try to assess the blame. We are 
here to find solutions and to provide the funding necessary to put 
those solutions in place.
  Now, in addition to defense and homeland security, we had a shortfall 
in the Pell grant program, an important program for the education of 
our young Americans. We added $1 billion to provide funding for the 
Pell grant program.
  Our leadership, on a bipartisan basis, asked for funding to pay for 
the election reforms that we enacted earlier this year. So we added 
$450 million for that purpose. We increased the President's budget 
request for defense by $1.8 billion. In the committee, added by 
amendment, was $250 million for Israel and for humanitarian relief for 
the Palestinians. We have added $275 million over the President's 
request for veterans health care.
  Mr. Chairman, we did not just spend the money. We had offsets. We had 
offsets of $1.8 billion more than the President's budget request had 
asked for. And so, Mr. Chairman, this is a good supplemental bill. It 
is well within the budget limits placed on us by the 2002 budget 
resolution.
  I hope that we can consider this bill as what it is, a wartime 
emergency supplemental. I hope that we are not distracted by the other 
issues that were debated heatedly during the consideration of the rule. 
Let us focus today on this wartime emergency supplemental for our 
troops, for our security agencies, for our intelligence agencies, for 
the FBI and for the President of the United States to be able to do the 
things that we are demanding that he do, and that is to make America 
secure and to seek out those who perpetrate or would perpetrate 
terrorist attacks against our Nation.

                                 H.R. 4775--2002 SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                           Bill compared  with
                                         Budget  request        Recommended  in bill             request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
             CHAPTER 1
     DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Food Safety and Inspection Service  ........................                    2,000                    +2,000
 (contingent emergency)...........
Food and Nutrition Service:                          75,000                    75,000   ........................
 Special Supplemental Nutrition
 Program for Women, Infants, and
 Children (WIC)...................
Animal and Plant Health Inspection  ........................                   10,000                   +10,000
 Service: Salaries and expenses
 (contingent emergency)...........
Natural Resources Conservation                       -9,000   ........................                   +9,000
 Service: Watershed Rehabilitation
 Program (rescission).............

  DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
             SERVICES

Food and Drug Administration:       ........................                   18,000                   +18,000
 Salaries and expenses (contingent
 emergency).......................
General Provisions: Export          ........................                 -450,000                  -450.000
 Enhancement Program (limitation)
 (sec. 101).......................
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, chapter 1............                   66,000                  -345,000                  -411,000
                                   =============================================================================
             CHAPTER 2
       DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
General Administration: Salaries                      5,750                     5,750   ........................
 and expenses (emergency).........


[[Page H2904]]


         LEGAL ACTIVITIES

United States Marshals Service:     ........................                    1,000                    +1,000
 Salaries and expenses (contingent
 emergency).......................
Federal Bureau of Investigation:                     10,000                    10,000   ........................
 Salaries and expenses (emergency)
    Contingent emergency..........  ........................                  102,000                  +102,000
Immigration and Naturalization                       35,000                    35,000   ........................
 Service: Enforcement and Border
 Affairs: Salaries and expenses
 (emergency)......................
    Contingent emergency..........  ........................                   40,000                   +40,000
Office of Justice Programs:         ........................                  175,000                  +175,000
 Justice assistance (emergency)...

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND RELATED
             AGENCIES
         RELATED AGENCIES

Office of the United States Trade
 Representative:
    Salaries and expenses           ........................                    1,100                    +1,100
     (contingent emergency).......
    European Communities Music                        3,300   ........................                   -3,300
     Licensing Dispute............

      DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Export Administration: Operations                     8,700   ........................                   -8,700
 and Administration (emergency)...
National Institute of Standards                       4,000                     4,000   ........................
 and Technology: Scientific and
 Technical Research and Services
 (emergency)......................
National Oceanic and Atmospheric                    (24,000)                  (24,000)  ........................
 Administration: Fisheries Finance
 Program Account (limitation on
 direct loans)....................
    Negative subsidy..............                   -3,000                    -3,000   ........................
Departmental Management: Salaries                       400                       400   ........................
 and expenses (emergency).........

           THE JUDICIARY

Supreme Court of the United                          10,000                    10,000   ........................
 States: Care of the Buildings and
 Grounds (emergency)..............
United States Courts of Appeals                         857   ........................                     -857
 for the Federal Circuit: Salaries
 and expenses (emergency).........
Courts of Appeals, District                           3,143                     3,143   ........................
 Courts, and Other Judicial
 Services: Salaries and expenses
 (emergency)......................
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                    3,115                    +3,115

  DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED
              AGENCY
        DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Administration of Foreign Affairs:
    Diplomatic and Consular                          51,050                    51,050   ........................
     Programs (emergency).........
    Capital Investment Fund                           2,500   ........................                   -2,500
     (emergency)..................
    Educational and Cultural                         10,000                    10,000   ........................
     Exchange Programs (emergency)
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                   10,000                   +10,000
    Embassy Security,                               200,516                   200,516   ........................
     Construction, and Maintenance
     (emergency)..................
    Emergencies in the Diplomatic                     8,000   ........................                   -8,000
     and Consular Service
     (emergency)..................
International Organizations and
 Conferences:
    Contributions to International                    7,000                     7,000   ........................
     Organizations (emergency)....
    Contributions for                                43,000                    43,000   ........................
     International Peacekeeping
     Activities (emergency).......

          RELATED AGENCY

Broadcasting Board of Governors:
    International Broadcasting                        7,400                     7,400   ........................
     Operations (emergency).......
    Broadcasting capital            ........................                    7,700                    +7,700
     improvements (contingent
     emergency)...................

         RELATED AGENCIES

Securities and Exchange                              20,000                    20,000   ........................
 Commission: Salaries and expenses
  Contingent emergency............  ........................                    9,300                    +9,300
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, chapter 2............                  427,616                   753,474                  +325,858
                                   =============================================================================
             CHAPTER 3
  DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE--MILITARY

Military Personnel: Military                        206,000                   206,000   ........................
 Personnel, Air Force (emergency).
Operation and Maintenance:
    Operation and Maintenance,                      107,000                   107,000   ........................
     Army (emergency).............
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                  119,000                  +119,000
    Operation and Maintenance,                       36,500                    36,500   ........................
     Navy (emergency).............
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                   17,250                   +17,250
    Operation and Maintenance, Air                   41,000                    41,000   ........................
     Force (emergency)............
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                   19,500                   +19,500
    Operation and Maintenance,                      739,000                   739,000   ........................
     Defense-Wide (emergency).....
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                   12,975                   +12,975
    Defense Emergency Response                   11,300,000                11,300,000   ........................
     Fund (emergency).............
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                1,393,972                +1,393,972
Procurement:
    Other Procurement, Army                          79,200                    79,200   ........................
     (emergency)..................
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy                       22,800                    22,800   ........................
     (emergency)..................
    Procurement of Ammunition,                      262,000                   262,000   ........................
     Navy and Marine Corps
     (emergency)..................
    Other Procurement, Navy                           2,500                     2,500   ........................
     (emergency)..................
    Procurement, Marine Corps                         3,500                     3,500   ........................
     (emergency)..................
    Aircraft Procurement, Air                        93,000                    93,000   ........................
     Force (emergency)............
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                   36,500                   +36,500
    Procurement of Ammunition, Air                  115,000                   115,000   ........................
     Force (emergency)............
    Other Procurement, Air Force                    752,300                   735,340                   -16,960
     (emergency)..................
    Procurement, Defense-Wide                        99,500                    99,500   ........................
     (emergency)..................
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                    4,925                    +4,925
Research, Development, Test and
 Evaluation:
    RDT&E, Army (emergency).......                    8,200                     8,200   ........................
    RDT&E, Navy (emergency).......                   19,000                     9,000                   -10,000
    RDT&E, Air Force (emergency)..                   60,800                    60,800   ........................
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                   39,000                   +39,000
    RDT&E, Defense-Wide                              74,700                    52,000                   -22,700
     (emergency)..................
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                   20,000                   +20,000
General Provisions:
    General Transfer Authority                   (1,000,000)  ........................              (-1,000,000)
     (sec. 305)...................
    MH-47 Helicopters (contingent   ........................                   93,000                   +93,000
     emergency) (sec. 308)........
    Chemical Demil (contingent      ........................                  100,000                  +100,000
     emergency) (sec. 309)........
    Rescissions (sec. 310)........  ........................                  -59,000                   -59,000
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, chapter 3............               14,022,000                15,769,462                +1,747,462
                                   =============================================================================
             CHAPTER 4
       DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
    DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA FUNDS
        Operating Expenses

Division of Expenses:
    Public education system         ........................                 (-37,000)                 (-37,000)
     (rescission).................
    Human Support Services:         ........................  ........................  ........................
        Child and Family Services   ........................                  (11,000)                 (+11,000)
         Agency...................
        Department of Mental        ........................                  (26,000)                 (+26,000)
         Health...................
    Repayment of loans and          ........................                  (-7,950)                  (-7,950)
     interest (rescission)........
    Certificates of participation.  ........................                   (7,950)                  (+7,950)
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, chapter 4............  ........................  ........................  ........................
                                   =============================================================================
             CHAPTER 5
   DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE--CIVIL
      DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

Corps of Engineers--Civil:          ........................                  128,400                  +128,400
 Operation and Maintenance,
 General (contingent emergency)...


[[Page H2905]]


       DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

Energy Programs: Science            ........................                   29,000                   +29,000
 (contingent emergency)...........
National Nuclear Security
 Administration:
    Weapons Activities (emergency)                   19,400                    19,400   ........................

        Contingent emergency......  ........................                  106,000                  +106,000
    Defense Nuclear                 ........................                    5,000                    +5,000
     Nonproliferation (contingent
     emergency)...................
Environmental and Other Defense
 Activities:
    Defense Environmental           ........................                   67,000                   +67,000
     Restoration and Waste
     Management (contingent
     emergency)...................
    Defense Facilities Closure      ........................                   16,600                   +16,600
     Projects (contingent
     emergency)...................
    Other Defense Activities                          7,000                     7,000   ........................
     (emergency)..................
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, chapter 5............                   26,400                   378,400                  +352,000
                                   =============================================================================
             CHAPTER 6
   BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE
     Funds Appropriated to the
             President

United States Agency for
 International Development:
    Child Survival and Health       ........................                  200,000                  +200,000
     Programs Fund (contingent
     emergency)...................
    International Disaster                           40,000   ........................                  -40,000
     Assistance (emergency).......
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                  190,000                  +190,000
    Operating Expenses of the                         7,000                     7,000   ........................
     United States Agency for
     International Development
     (emergency)..................
Other Bilateral Economic
 Assistance:
    Economic Support Fund                           525,000                   460,000                   -65,000
     (emergency)..................
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                  250,000                  +250,000
    Assistance for the Independent                  110,000                   110,000   ........................
     States of the Former Soviet
     Union (emergency)............
Department of State:
    International Narcotics                         114,000                   120,000                    +6,000
     Control and Law Enforcement
     (emergency)..................
    Migration & Refugee Assistance  ........................                   10,000                   +10,000
     (contingent emergency).......
    Nonproliferation, Anti-                          83,000                    83,000   ........................
     Terrorism, Demining and
     Related Programs (emergency).

        MILITARY ASSISTANCE

Funds Appropriated to the
 President:
    Foreign Military Financing                      372,500                   366,500                    -6,000
     Program (emergency)..........
    Peacekeeping Operations                          28,000                    20,000                    -8,000
     (emergency)..................

 MULTILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

Funds Appropriated to the                          -157,000                  -159,000                    -2,000
 President: Special Payments to
 the International Financial
 Institutions (rescission)........
General Provisions: Rescission      ........................                  -60,000                   -60,000
 (sec. 602).......................
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, chapter 6............                1,122,500                 1,597,500                  +475,000
                                   =============================================================================
             CHAPTER 7
    DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Bureau of Land Management:          ........................                      658                      +658
 Management of Lands & Resources
 (contingent emergency)...........
United States Fish and Wildlife     ........................                    1,443                    +1,443
 Service: Resource Management
 (contingent emergency)...........
National Park Service:
    Operation of the National Park  ........................                    1,173                    +1,173
     System (contingent emergency)
    Construction (contingent        ........................                   19,300                   +19,300
     emergency)...................
United States Geological Survey:    ........................                   25,700                   +25,700
 Surveys, Investigations, and
 Research (contignent emergency)..
Bureau of Indian Affairs:
    Operation of Indian Programs    ........................                      134                      +134
     (contingent emergency).......
        Rescission................                  -10,000                    -5,000                    +5,000
    Indian trust fund management    ........................  ........................  ........................
     litigation...................
Departmental Offices: Departmental  ........................                      905                      +905
 Management: Salaries and expenses
 (contingent emergency)...........

          RELATED AGENCY

Smithsonian Institution:
    Salaries and expenses           ........................                   11,000                   +11,000
     (contingent emergency).......
    Construction (contingent        ........................                    2,000                    +2,000
     emergency)...................
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, chapter 7............                  -10,000                    57,313                   +67,313
                                   =============================================================================
             CHAPTER 8
        DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Employment and Training                             750,000                   300,000                  -450,000
 Administration: Training &
 Employment Services (contingent
 emergency).......................

  DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
             SERVICES

Health Resources and Services                       -20,000   ........................                  +20,000
 Administration: Health Resources
 and Services (rescission)........
Centers for Disease Control and     ........................                    1,000                    +1,000
 Prevention: Disease Control,
 Research, and Training
 (contingent emergency)...........
National Institutes of Health:                      -30,000                   -30,000
 Buildings and facilities
 (rescission).....................
Administration for Children and     ........................                      500                      +500
 Families: Children and Families
 Services Programs (contingent
 emergency).......................

      DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Student Financial Assistance......                1,276,000                 1,000,000                  -276,000
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, chapter 8............                1,976,000                 1,271,500                  -704,500
                                   =============================================================================
             CHAPTER 9
        LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
     House of Representatives

Committee Employees: Standing       ........................                    1,600                    +1,600
 Committees, Special and Select...
Library of Congress: Copyright                        7,500                     7,500   ........................
 Office: Salaries and expenses
 (emergency)......................

            Joint Items
       Capitol Police Board

 Capitol Police: General Expenses   ........................                   16,100                   +16,100
 (contingent emergency............
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, chapter 9............                    7,500                    25,200                   +17,700
                                   =============================================================================
            CHAPTER 10
       DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

Military Construction, Air Force    ........................                    8,505                    +8,505
 (contingent emergency............
Military Construction, Defense-     ........................                   21,500                   +21,500
 wide (contingent emergency)......
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, chapter 10...........  ........................                   30,005                   +30,005
                                   =============================================================================
            CHAPTER 11
   DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Office of the Secretary:                           (128,123)                 (128,123)  ........................
 Transportation Administrative
 Service Center (obligation
 limitation)......................
Transportation Security                           2,455,000                 2,305,000                  -150,000
 Administration: Salaries and
 expenses (emergency).............
        Contingent emergency......                1,945,000                 1,545,000                  -400,000
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                  4,400,000                 3,850,000                  -550,000
U.S. Coast Guard: Operating                         189,000                   189,000   ........................
 Expenses (emergency).............
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                   21,000                   +21,000
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page H2906]]


                                                    189,000                   210,000                   +21,000
Acquisition, Construction, &                         66,000                    66,000   ........................
 Improvements (emergency).........
        Contingent emergency......  ........................                   12,000                   +12,000
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     66,000                    78,000                   +12,000
Federal Aviation Administration:
    Operations (transfer                           (100,000)                  (25,000)                 (-75,000)
     authority)...................
    Grants-in-aid for airports      ........................                  200,000                  +200,000
     (contingent emergency).......
Federal Highway Administration:                     167,000                   167,000   ........................
 Federal-Aid Highways, Emergency
 Relief Program (Highway trust
 fund) (emergency)................
Federal Motor Carrier Safety
 Administration:
    Border Enforcement Program                       19,300                    19,300   ........................
     (Highway trust fund)
     (emergency)..................
    Hazardous materials security    ........................                    5,000                    +5,000
     (Highway trust fund)
     (contingent emergency).......
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     19,300                    24,300                    +5,000
Federal Transit Administration:                   1,800,000                 1,800,000   ........................
 Capital Investment Grants
 (emergency)......................
Research and Special Programs                         3,500   ........................                   -3,500
 Administration: Research and
 Special Programs (emergency).....
General Provisions:
    Airline loan program            ........................                 -393,000                  -393,000
     limitation (sec. 1103).......
    Air carrier compensation (sec.  ........................                 -250,000                  -250,000
     1104) (rescission)...........
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, chapter 11...........                6,644,800                 5,686,300                  -958,500
                                   =============================================================================
            CHAPTER 12
    DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

Federal Law Enforcement Training    ........................                   15,870                   +15,870
 Center (contingent emergency)....
Financial Management Service (sec.  ........................                  -14,000                   -14,000
 1201) (rescission)...............
Internal Revenue Service: Business  ........................                   14,000                   +14,000
 Systems Modernization (sec. 1201)
United States Secret Service        ........................                   46,750                   +46,750
 (contingent emergency)...........

          POSTAL SERVICE

Payment to the Postal Service Fund                   87,000                    87,000   ........................
 (emergency)......................

 EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
             AND FUNDS

Appropriated to the President:
    Office of Administration                          5,000   ........................                   -5,000
     (emergency)..................
    Office of Management and        ........................                     -750                      -750
     Budget (rescission)..........
    Election Administration Reform  ........................                  450,000                  +450,000
     and Related Expenses.........

       INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

Federal Election Commission.......  ........................                      750                      +750

  GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

Real Property Activities: Federal                    51,800                    51,800   ........................
 Buildings Fund (emergency).......
General Activities: Policy and                        2,500   ........................                   -2,500
 Operations (emergency)...........
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, chapter 12...........                  146,300                   651,420                  +505,120
                                   =============================================================================
            CHAPTER 13
  DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS

Veterans Health Administration:
    Medical Care..................                  142,000                   417,000                  +275,000
    Medical and Prosthetic                           -5,000   ........................                   +5,000
     Research (rescission)........

  DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN
            DEVELOPMENT

Public and Indian Housing: Housing  ........................                 -300,000                  -300,000
 certificate fund (rescission)....
Community Planning and
 Development:
    Rural Housing and Economic                      -20,000   ........................                  +20,000
     Development (rescission).....
    Community Development Fund                      750,000                   750,000   ........................
     (emergency)..................
Housing Programs: Rental Housing    ........................                 -300,000                  -300,000
 Assistance (rescission)..........

       INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

  DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
             SERVICES

National Institute of Health:       ........................                    8,000                    +8,000
 National Institute of
 Environmental Health Sciences
 (emergency)......................
Agency for Toxic Substances and     ........................                   11,300                   +11,300
 Disease Registry: Salaries and
 expenses (emergency).............
Environmental Protection Agency:                     12,500   ........................                  -12,500
 Hazardous Substance Superfund
 (emergency)......................
Federal Emergency Management
 Agency:
    Disaster relief (emergency)...                2,750,000                 2,750,000   ........................
    Disaster assistance for unmet   ........................                   23,320                   +23,320
     needs (contingent emergency).
    Emergency management planning                   326,728                   151,700                  -175,028
     & assistance (emergency).....
National Science Foundation:                         19,300   ........................                  -19,300
 Education and Human Resources
 (emergency)......................
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, chapter 13...........                3,975,528                 3,511,320                  -464,208
                                   =============================================================================
      Grand total (net)...........               28,404,644                29,386,894                  +982,250
          Appropriations..........               (1,513,300)               (1,975,350)                (+462,050)
          Emergency appropriations              (24,447,344)              (24,091,099)                (-356,245)
          Contingent emergency                   (2,695,000)               (5,341,195)              (+2,646,195)
           appropriations.........
          Rescissions.............                (-251,000)              (-1,177,750)                (-926,750)
          Offsets.................  ........................                (-843,000)                (-843,000)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself 10 minutes.
  Mr. Chairman, I wanted to first of all congratulate the chairman of 
the committee, the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young), for doing his 
usual good job in trying to produce a bipartisan bill.
  As members of the committee know, our committee worked for 6 weeks 
and produced a bipartisan bill. And I want to tell you some of the 
things that it did to correct some of the chaos that we see in some of 
the agencies that are dealing with counterterrorism.
  We found out that the Department of Energy had asked for $380 million 
to upgrade security so that weapons of mass destruction and nuclear 
material would be less susceptible either to terrorist attack or theft. 
OMB only approved 7 percent of that money. The committee provided the 
amount that was needed.
  We also discovered that the Immigration and Naturalization Service 
had asked for $52 million because they had the reasonable idea that we 
ought to be able to determine which immigrants, or which persons here 
on visas I should say, had overstayed their visas; visas had expired; 
they had been asked to leave the country and, yet, had refused to do 
so. The INS wanted $52 million to set up a system to stop that 
nonsense. The OMB denied it all. The committee put in enough money to 
deal with the problem.
  The FBI, the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young) has indicated that we 
discovered after September 11, the FBI had a great need for computer 
modernization. We discovered, for instance, that less than half the 
computers at the FBI could be used to send a picture of a suspected 
terrorist from one FBI office to another around the country. So last 
year, over the threat of a veto by the President of the United States,

[[Page H2907]]

we inserted enough money to see to it that that problem was corrected. 
As a result, Operation Trilogy will be up and running by the end of 
this summer, and we will have that capacity at the FBI.
  In January, the FBI asked for an additional $635 million to secure 
their records and to take other actions necessary to protect against 
terrorism. OMB denied 625 of the $635 million, and the committee 
corrected that. In the last bill last year, we provided enough funds so 
that the Corps of Engineers could provide additional security for the 
hundred most vulnerable Federal sites in the country. The Corps of 
Engineers asked for an additional $128 million to deal with threats to 
additional sites. OMB denied it. The committee moved to take care of 
it.
  We also saw the chaos at the Transportation Security Administration, 
very well described in the committee report. That planning has been so 
bad that the agency, for instance, suggested that we ought to be paying 
the guards who are looking over the shoulders of screeners at airports 
up to $84,000 a year, more than local mayors, more than airport 
directors would be paid in those same towns. It provided for 650 
additional headquarters staff people here in Washington. And yet the 
budget request provided no money to house the new screening equipment 
that airports are supposed to install. So there would have been no way 
that we could have met the deadlines for having that equipment up and 
running. And the administration requested insufficient dollars to make 
certain that cockpit doors are fully secure by the end of the calendar 
year.

                              {time}  1900

  So the committee took actions to correct that.
  The OMB also turned down the request from the Department of Defense 
for $790 million to avoid the demobilizing of 20 percent of the Guard 
and Reserve forces who presently are filling slots on the border, in 
ports, on a temporary basis until people can be trained to take their 
place, and the committee took action to fix that problem. So I think 
that we had a good bipartisan product.
  Now, there were problems with the bill after it emerged from the full 
committee. We did have an amendment offered by the distinguished 
majority whip, the gentleman from Texas (Mr. DeLay), which gave the 
President the authority to use our military forces to invade The 
Netherlands, if necessary, in order to extract Americans who might be 
held by the World Court.
  I have a chart here labeled Tom DeLay's Proposed Invasion of The 
Netherlands. Gives you some idea of where The Hague is and what will be 
required by way of carrier capacity, tanker capacity, if we were to 
invade The Netherlands. If somebody wants to take that seriously, feel 
free. I think that it leaves us open to considerable ridicule. But in 
spite of that I was willing to support this bill. But then we had the 
leadership attach this ridiculous rule to this bill which provided a 
convenient device by which the Nation's indebtedness could be raised by 
$750 billion without any Member ever having voted on it directly, and 
they also imposed the House budget resolution, which will mean, I 
guarantee you, we will not have enough resources to produce 
appropriation bills that the House will pass.
  So we have seen again, and this has happened often in this House, we 
have seen an original bipartisan piece of legislation emerge from this 
committee, and we have seen it fundamentally screwed up by adding 
extraneous items that have no business on an appropriations bill.
  So I think we are going to be here a long time because some of us 
feel that the ability of the House to proceed in an orderly and fair-
minded fashion is worth arguing about, and we will be doing that 
through a series of actions that we will be taking and amendments that 
we will be offering.
  I do ask one additional question. As I said, we have had 116 of our 
Republican friends offer a resolution requiring that a three-fifths 
vote of this House be required in order to raise the indebtedness of 
the United States, and yet we have seen this flip-flop action here 
today, and I would ask the following Members, Representatives Aderholt, 
Bachus, Barr, Barton, Bilirakis, Blunt, Bono, Brady, Bryant, Calvert, 
Cantor, Chabot, Crane, Culberson, DeLay, Doolittle, Dunn, English, 
Forbes, Gekas, Goodlatte, Graves, Hayworth, Herger, Baker, Bartlett, 
Bass, Boehner, I can't read that signature, Cannon, Castle, Chambliss, 
Cunningham, Deal, DeMint, Duncan, and all the others whose names I put 
in the Record earlier, I would ask them how they can go home to their 
constituents and tell them that they are going to vote to require a new 
higher threshold of votes on this House before the Nation can be 
plunged into more indebtedness and then engage in the flip-flop that 
they engaged in today whereby they have guaranteed that we will see a 
huge increase in national indebtedness when this bill comes back from 
the Senate?
  I find that to be quaint and interesting.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I yield 4 minutes to the 
distinguished gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Kingston), a member of the 
committee.
  Mr. KINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman from Florida (Mr. 
Young) for allowing me to speak tonight and I stand in support of this 
bill.
  This bill does 3 things, and it all goes back to that horrible day, 
9/11. This bill continues the war on terrorism. This bill continues the 
battle for homeland security, and it helps rebuild our beloved national 
city of New York.
  Just remember, the American people will never forget September 11 and 
what this Congress has done immediately after 9/11 to start the battle. 
We will never forget the brave who died. We committed ourselves almost 
immediately to make sure that Osama bin Laden and all the terrorists 
around the globe would not be victorious.
  This bill tonight is part of that battle. This bill has $15.77 
billion to support our troops, and I had the opportunity, with the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Kolbe), the chairman of the Subcommittee on 
Foreign Operations, Export Financing and Related Programs of the 
Committee on Appropriations, to go on a bipartisan basis to 
Afghanistan. We went to Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Pakistan. We visited 
4 of our bases, and we met with our troops, we met with Afghan 
soldiers, and I can say that they appreciate what the United States of 
America is doing. They are happy that we are there.
  Their biggest concern is will we stay committed, and this bill 
tonight helps show the world that we are committed, not just behind our 
troops but behind the people over there so they can have a secure 
future. But the battle is not just in central Asia; it is all over the 
streets of America.
  So the second thing this bill does is help secure our homeland. One 
of the things that it does is work with local law enforcement personnel 
to track down any potential suspicious terrorists or activities on a 
local level. This bill also helps secure everybody who is traveling; 
$850 million to help check for baggage, explosives and detection 
systems; $630 million for baggage screeners; $75 million for security 
enhancements at U.S. ports. And I just want to talk about this.
  Not all of us are traveling. Prior to 9/11 there were 1.2 million 
Americans in the air at any given day. Nowadays it is about 800,000, 
and what this does is it secures our airlines even further, but also 
our ports.
  I am from Savannah. Last year in Savannah, we had 1 million 
containers come in. Of the 1 million, only 1 percent were actually 
screened and checked as to what their contents were. This bill helps 
expand that so that our ports can be secure.
  It also strengthens our communities for any other disasters, working 
with EMS facilities and giving the local hospitals the support that 
they need and the expertise.
  Our war against terrorism is not going to be over until every city in 
America is safe. As somebody told me, this war is about making sure we 
can go to Wal-Mart and not have to worry, and I think that that is 
something we all have to keep in mind.
  Finally, in this bill is $5.5 billion to help rebuild the great New 
York City, and that is going to be a long job, and I think it is 
certainly in the national interest to do so.

[[Page H2908]]

  There are some other things in this bill that are less high profile 
but very important, and one of the things is there is $1.6 million for 
additional staff and resources for the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence, and one of the issues that has come up recently is do we 
need a blue ribbon committee to study what went wrong on 9/11 and how 
can we do a better job.
  Well, this bill addresses that because we already have an existing 
intelligence committee. It is bipartisan. One chairman is Bob Graham of 
Florida, a Democrat. Another chairman is the gentleman from Florida 
(Mr. Goss), a Republican. A bipartisan committee that has been working 
since January to look into 9/11. It is bicameral, Senate and House 
together, and it is comprised of experts. This bill addresses that, and 
I urge my colleagues to support this legislation.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 5\1/2\ minutes to the distinguished 
gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. Lowey).
  Mrs. LOWEY. Mr. Chairman, I thank the ranking member for yielding me 
the time, and I also want to take the opportunity to thank our chairman 
of the committee, and to me it has been a pleasure to work with the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Kolbe), the chairman of the Subcommittee on 
Foreign Operations, Export Financing and Related Programs, and I rise 
to address the foreign operations component of this bill.
  The foreign operations portion of the supplemental contains $1.6 
billion for various priorities and provides for the vast majority of 
the administration's requests. I am particularly pleased that the 
committee did not grant the broad waivers sought by the administration 
along with these funds but, rather, included specific waivers where 
appropriate.
  This bill will give the President the broad latitude and flexibility 
that he sought to carry out the war on terrorism. While many have 
expressed concern that unnecessary funds for foreign operations were 
added to the bill, in excess of the President's request, I believe the 
funding added by this committee is extremely important.
  In light of the fact that the committee received few details as to 
how the funding requested will actually be spent, we were well within 
our discretion to provide what we thought was necessary. I strongly 
support the additional funding in this bill for rebuilding Afghanistan, 
a long-term commitment we simply cannot shortchange, and I also support 
the additional funds provided for Israel.
  The bill contains both military and economic assistance to a number 
of countries outside the immediate area of Afghanistan, such as the 
Philippines, Georgia and Yemen, where United States troops are or will 
be engaged in training indigenous forces to combat terrorism. The 
committee has approved funding in these instances with the clear 
expectation that the administration will keep Congress fully informed 
of any change or expansion in the role of the United States forces. I 
hope this will indeed be the case.
  As I said before, I strongly support the additional assistance to 
Israel that is included in this bill. Maintaining Israel's security and 
stability has long been a fundamental priority of the United States 
foreign policy. Israel has devoted precious resources to fighting the 
terror that continues to threaten its own citizens, 3 of whom were 
murdered just this week by suicide bombers, and the country is a key 
democratic ally in our war against terror.
  This funding originally requested by the State Department as part of 
its supplemental request to OMB is essential to ensure our key partner 
in the Middle East remains strong. I urge my colleagues to oppose 
amendments to cut this funding.
  I would like to take a moment to discuss 2 specific items of concern. 
First, the current status of fiscal year 2002 funds for the United 
Nations Population Fund. The conference agreement on the fiscal year 
2002 foreign operations bill provided $34 million for the organization, 
a deal that was painstakingly negotiated. The administration knew about 
our negotiations, and after the bill passed the House by an 
overwhelming margin, the President signed it on January 10, 2002.
  Only after signing the bill did the administration express concern 
about as-yet unproven allegations that UNFPA supported coercive family 
planning practices in China in violation of U.S. law. In a direct 
challenge to clear congressional direction, the President waited 5 
months to even investigate these claims, and UNFPA was forced to cut 
its staff and curtail its life-saving programs around the world.
  During committee consideration of this bill, the gentleman from 
Arizona (Mr. Kolbe) and I offered an amendment which would have ensured 
that UNFPA received the funds intended for it by July 10, 7 months 
after the signing of the bill, unless the President determines that the 
organization is in violation of the U.S. law.
  I am deeply disappointed that the Committee on Rules left this 
provision and another dealing with UNFPA unprotected. In my judgment, 
it was inappropriate to single out this particular issue while allowing 
the bill to come to the floor with highly controversial provisions 
regarding the International Criminal Court, the budget resolution and 
Medicare provider payments.
  I anticipate the Senate bill will have something to say about UNFPA, 
and I look forward to discussing it in conference.
  I am also disappointed that the rule did not allow me to offer an 
amendment increasing funding to address the global AIDS crisis. While 
this bill already contains $200 million for HIV/AIDS, a clear 
indication that Congress recognizes the emergency nature of the crisis, 
we can and should be doing more. Applications to the Global Fund to 
Combat Infectious Diseases have far exceeded the fund's resources, and 
this situation will only get worse as time goes by. Our own bilateral 
programs, while highly effective, will reach 25 percent of affected 
areas.

                              {time}  1915

  Our response to this tragedy must be as expansive as the pandemic 
itself so that we stop the wholesale destruction that AIDS is causing 
in Africa and will cause in other areas around the world.
  As a global leader, we have the responsibility to take the 
initiative, jolting other donors into contributing more. Again, I 
anticipate that the Senate bill will far exceed ours, and I look 
forward to discussing this in conference as well.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I yield 4 minutes to the 
gentleman from Kentucky (Mr. Rogers), the distinguished chairman of the 
Subcommittee on Transportation of the Committee on Appropriations.
  Mr. ROGERS of Kentucky. Mr. Chairman, I thank the chairman for 
yielding me this time, and I rise in support of the bill.
  This bill provides much-needed appropriations for the Department of 
Transportation, particularly the new Transportation Security 
Administration and the U.S. Coast Guard. The bill also provides $1.8 
billion in additional expenses for the City of New York to address its 
transit needs in the wake of 9-11. And I am pleased that we were able 
to provide the vast majority of requested funds for all DOT agencies, 
except the TSA; and that is a special case.
  The administration requested $4.4 billion in supplemental funds, but 
the request made a curious statement. It admitted that OMB did not have 
a clue whether or not $1.9 billion, almost half of the amount, was 
necessary. It asked Congress to write a blank check for that amount and 
let OMB figure it out later. Well, Mr. Chairman, that is not the way we 
do things on the Committee on Appropriations. We expect the 
administration to justify their request, all of it, in great detail. 
While some of that material is now being developed and being presented, 
it is clear much more work remains to be done. Because of that lack of 
supporting justification, the committee was unable to support the full 
request for contingency emergency funding for TSA.
  Members should know that unless a change in direction is made, the 
TSA will be monstrous in size. When this agency was established last 
year, we thought we were creating an agency of about 33,000 people. The 
current estimate now is almost 70,000. We are planning to create a vast 
army of new Federal workers, some of whom would do nothing more than 
check your driver's license and airplane ticket or run your shoes over 
to an x-ray machine and bring them back to you. TSA plans to

[[Page H2909]]

hire over 3,000 people just to sit in a chair and make sure someone 
does not run the wrong way down an exit lane.
  Mr. Chairman, there has to be a better way. I do not intend to 
recommend funds for a 70,000-man bureaucracy full of shoe runners and 
exit-lane watchers. Technology can obviate the need for thousands of 
these positions, and others are not the purview of TSA or simply not 
essential. So I believe strongly that TSA needs to look more carefully 
at its growth plans, and I will continue to press them as the fiscal 
year 2003 appropriations process unfolds.
  This supplemental bill asks TSA to begin that review now. We provide 
full funding for the procurement and installation of bond detection 
systems at airports. In fact, we even raise those funds because the 
request, we thought, was inadequate. But we have not provided funds to 
build up that 70,000-man agency. The bill caps staffing at no more than 
45,000 full-time positions. I believe that anyone who reviews TSA's 
plans in detail, as I have, will conclude that this is sufficient for 
the first year of that agency. In fact, it is about twice the number of 
people who were performing screening activities just 1 year ago.
  I am pleased that the bill provides even more funding than requested 
by the Coast Guard, an agency on the front line of the fight for 
homeland security. We provide the FAA flexibility to address operating 
budget shortfalls which stem from extra security expenses at air 
traffic control facilities, and we provide additional funds for review 
of truck drivers who apply to drive hazardous materials within the 
country. These are all vitally needed transportation security 
improvements, and I am pleased we were able to fund them, especially 
given the tight budget constraints placed on us in this bill.
  Mr. Chairman, I think this is a good bill given the constraints 
placed on the committee, and I ask Members to support it.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 5 minutes to the distinguished 
gentleman from California (Mr. Farr).
  Mr. FARR of California. Mr. Chairman, I rise with some concern about 
the process here in the United States House of Representatives. I am a 
proud member of the Committee on Appropriations, and I am proud of the 
work we do there. I am also very proud of the Chair, who I think 
manages that committee very fairly. But something happened on the way 
through the process here that stinks.
  The committee worked very hard to try to pay for the needed costs of 
what has happened in this country since we were here last year, the 
unexpected costs; and that is why this bill is needed. This is an 
emergency bill. It provides additional funds to pay for essentially 
contingencies that were not anticipated; and as we have heard, 9-11 is 
the biggest of those. But also there is an old adage here that says 
this is the only train that is going to make it all the way to the 
White House, and if you want to be on that train, you better load up.
  I think that the committee did a good job of making sure that this 
was not a big pork process and that it did not load up too much; and 
that is always a tough bipartisan effort to put out a good bill. But 
after the bill was put out of the committee, it went to the Committee 
on Rules, and there the word came down that this bill was going to be 
beefed up. It was going to be loaded up, and it was going to take care 
of the political problems that certain Members of this House were 
having.
  I am from California, and we all know that California is facing a big 
financial problem. It is in debt. It is a big State, the biggest 
producer of taxes in the United States, and the biggest contributor of 
taxes to the Federal Government. It is a State that probably can take 
credit for the surge in the economy in the last decade, and a State 
that was hardest hit in the recession, particularly to the dot-com 
industry that was such a success.
  So that is why the State is in debt. Its revenues just did not meet 
expectations. It had incredible costs to pay for energy, costs that we 
are now seeing were not the State's problem, but a manipulation of the 
market by the private sector. Yet we find in California that we have a 
lot of hard-liners who feel that we ought to have constitutional 
amendments on requiring a balanced budget, as we do in California. The 
State is not allowed to go into debt; and, therefore, the legislature, 
at this moment, is cutting like mad and in fact doing some tough 
political things in an election year. They are even raising some new 
revenue.
  But Members of the California delegation who are here in the other 
party have come out in signing a resolution, H.J. Res. 86, introduced 
this year, to amend the United States Constitution to require a two-
thirds vote if we are to raise the debt limit. But guess what, they are 
the ones, the first ones to criticize a Democratic Governor in 
California and then turn around in this House, put their name on a 
resolution to require a constitutional amendment to do the same as 
California.
  But this bill, because of the way it was amended in the Committee on 
Rules, it allows them to essentially duck a vote on the debt increase, 
a huge debt increase, of the Federal Government. We have a dozen 
Republicans from California that are coauthors of that bill who now run 
away from the responsibility of having a balanced budget to allow the 
United States Government to go into a big deficit. That is wrong. It is 
the wrong way to handle this emergency appropriations bill.
  We will see in the debate tonight a sort of in-your-face; that if you 
do not vote for this bill, you are not voting for the soldiers; if you 
do not vote for the bill, you are not voting for the firemen; if you do 
not vote for this bill, you are not voting for a half dozen other 
particular interests out there. That is not the reason why a lot of 
people are going to vote against this bill. The reason is that this 
process has been corrupted by essentially hijacking a legitimate bill 
and making it a bill with all kinds of other political riders on it, 
the kind of process that we around here always complain about; that we 
ought to be fair and open and full of transparency. The process was 
hijacked. And it is not the fault of the appropriators; it is not the 
fault of the good work of the Committee on Appropriations. It is the 
fault of the Committee on Rules taking mandates from Republican 
leadership. That is wrong.
  I just hope that tonight, as the debate goes on, that people realize 
this was a good bill, put out by a good committee, and it was hijacked 
along the way to do wrong for the United States and to do evil in the 
budgetary process. This essentially takes money that is in our Social 
Security account, takes money that is in the Medicare account and 
requires those monies to be spent on things that should not be spent on 
by those accounts.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I yield 4 minutes to the 
distinguished gentleman from Alabama (Mr. Callahan), the chairman of 
the Subcommittee on Energy and Water.
  (Mr. CALLAHAN asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. CALLAHAN. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for yielding me 
this time.
  First, let me say I have great admiration for the chairman, the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young), and for the efforts he has put into 
this bill, as well as those of the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Obey) 
representing the minority of this House.
  Secondly, as I approach the last year of my tenure here in the 
Congress of the United States, I just want to tell my colleagues that 
today is a classic example of how great this institution is. In America 
and in every democracy, a majority rules. Just a few minutes ago I was 
in the well of this House arguing against something on a principle that 
I believe very deeply in, and I lost, because a majority rules. When 
this bill passes it will be because a majority of us will vote for it. 
And if a majority votes for it, it will go on to the Senate.
  But this is a great institution, filled with great people, with great 
minds, with great Americans, who have one thing in common, and that is 
we all want to do what is best for America.
  As I listen to the debate on this floor each week, I hear the 
Democrats on the one hand saying this is not the right avenue to take. 
And I hear my majority Republican Party saying this is the avenue we 
should take. But very seldom do we have different destinations. We are 
all trying to get to the same corner of the room. Now, the Democrats, 
in many cases, choose to go to

[[Page H2910]]

the left to get there; and the Republicans choose to go to the right to 
get to, guess what, the same destination.
  There is no doubt that we want to do everything we possibly can in 
this war on terrorism. There is no doubt that we all want to support 
the President of the United States to make certain that the 
administration has ample facilities and ample resources to provide the 
services they need to provide to the American people. It is only right 
that we disagree, but it is only right that a majority rules. And while 
I was defeated in my quest to change the rule to move in a different 
direction, a majority of the Members of this House voted to tell me 
that they disagreed with me, and I respect that.
  I will have amendments tonight to change the direction of this bill, 
amendments that will reduce some sections of this bill I do not like. 
But guess what, I have $378 million for energy and water in this bill, 
which is vitally needed by the areas of government that my committee 
has jurisdiction over. There are so many good things in this bill, and 
there are a few things that I wish were not in there. So a majority 
should prevail there too, Mr. Chairman.
  As we debate this issue tonight to decide whether we ought to vote 
``yes'' or ``no'' on final passage, we weigh the good over the bad. And 
while these are some things that I disagree with in here, the good in 
this particular case outweighs the bad.
  So as I leave, I respect this institution. I respect all of my 
colleagues. I respect the great tradition of this House. And I respect 
that we live in a democracy where we can differ, but, nevertheless, in 
a democracy where a majority rules. And that is what America is all 
about.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Lewis), the distinguished deputy whip.
  Mr. LEWIS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I want to thank my friend and my 
colleague, the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Obey), for yielding me 
this time.
  This evening, I rise in strong opposition to raising the debt limit.

                              {time}  1930

  The Republicans are trying to sneak in a provision that increases the 
debt ceiling without a full, fair, open and honest debate. Apparently 
the other side, the majority party, are hiding something. What are they 
hiding? What is the great secret?
  The American people deserve to know that the funds for a debt limit 
increase will come directly from the Social Security trust fund. We 
need to protect Social Security and ensure that we meet our obligations 
today. Instead, the majority party, the Republicans, are stealing from 
the Social Security trust fund and increasing our national debt every 
chance they get. For the next 10 years, we will increase the debt by 
more than $300 billion. Something is wrong with that.
  This party, the Republicans, are mortgaging the future of our 
children. They are ripping away the safety for our Nation's seniors. 
Increasing the debt limit is like increasing the credit limit on your 
credit card. What does this do? It just puts you in a deeper and deeper 
hole. That is what the Republicans are doing. So do not be fooled. They 
are putting us in deeper debt and it is their obligation to get us out 
of it. We should not spend Social Security on anything other than 
Social Security. American families work hard to pay into a system that 
they should be able to count on when they retire. Social Security is a 
sacred trust, a sacred covenant between the American people and our 
government. We must never, never, ever take away the security out of 
Social Security. Let us keep our promise to the American people.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman 
from Ohio (Mr. Regula), the distinguished chairman of the Subcommittee 
on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education.
  (Mr. REGULA asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. REGULA. I thank the gentleman for yielding me this time.
  Mr. Chairman, I want to point out to my colleagues that this bill 
contains $1 billion for the Pell grants. Why? Because more Americans 
are seeking these grants. This amount ensures that every qualified 
student applicant will receive a Pell grant and this can spell the 
difference of more opportunities for a better job and a chance to 
participate more fully in the American dream. I think it is vitally 
important that we approve the legislation with this particular feature 
in the bill.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the 
distinguished gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Wolf), chairman of the 
Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, State and Judiciary.
  Mr. WOLF. Mr. Chairman, I rise in strong support of this legislation. 
The bill includes $112 million for the FBI, which is $102 million above 
the request of the administration; but it will help the FBI do what 
they have to do. The recommendation also includes $10 million for the 
foreign terrorist tracking task force, a multiagency effort to prevent 
terrorists from coming into the country. We certainly need that as 
quickly as possible.
  $75 million is recommended for the INS, $40 million above the 
request. Again the administration was low in its request. You cannot 
complain about the INS and then not fund its necessary programs, 
including $49 million to address the shortfall in the immigration 
inspection account; $25 million to bolster efforts to track and 
apprehend people who have absconded on deportation orders; and $1 
million to continue development of an entry-exit system.
  The bill also has $175 million for the Justice Department for State 
and local first responder equipment, training and planning needs. This 
funding is provided to the Department of Justice as authorized by the 
USA Patriot instead of being provided to FEMA as requested.
  For the State Department and the Broadcasting Board of Governors, the 
bill includes a total of $337 million for critical embassy security and 
public diplomacy needs. After September 11, a lot of attention has been 
paid to the inadequacy of public diplomacy efforts. We are not doing an 
adequate job of telling America's story to the world and communicating 
effectively with the foreign public. To improve this effort, the bill 
includes $52.6 million for information, exchange and broadcasting 
programs of the State Department and the Broadcasting Board of 
Governors, $27.7 million above the request. The amount also includes 
$17.5 million for information programs, $20 million for international 
exchange programs, $7.4 million for the continuation of the Radio Free 
Afghanistan, and $7.7 million to expand the reach of the Middle East 
Radio Network.
  Then in closing, the bill also includes $20 million for 100 
additional positions at the SEC to address the immediate and urgent 
need for increased oversight of the accounting industry.
  Finally, the bill includes a provision authorizing the closed circuit 
transmission of the Moussaoui trial to victims of the September 11 
attacks, and we also provide the requisite funding for that.
  Mr. Chairman, this is a very important and an emergency issue. I urge 
quick passage of the bill, hopefully through the Senate and to the 
President for his signature.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Washington (Mr. Dicks).
  Mr. DICKS. Mr. Chairman, I rise to engage in a colloquy with the 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Wolf) and the gentleman from New York (Mr. 
Serrano) concerning INS fee collections.
  Mr. WOLF. Mr. Chairman, will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. DICKS. I yield to the gentleman from Virginia.
  Mr. WOLF. I would be pleased to engage in a colloquy with the 
gentleman from Washington and the gentleman from New York.
  Mr. DICKS. Mr. Chairman, the fiscal year 2002 Commerce Justice State 
appropriations bill authorizes the Attorney General to charge and 
collect a $3 fee per individual for immigration inspection and 
preinspection activities related to commercial ships.
  It is my understanding that it was not the intent of this provision 
to levy additional costs on regularized commuter ferry traffic between 
foreign countries and the United States and that it was this concern 
that led the committee to include an exemption for

[ ... ]

Copyright © 1999-2002 American Immigration LLC, ILW.COM


Immigration Daily: the news source for
legal professionals. Free! Join 35000+ readers
Enter your email address here: