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< Back to current issue of Immigration Daily < Back to current issue of Immigrant's Weekly

Back to NORTH CAROLINA
 VICTIMS OF CRIME ACT 
VICTIM ASSISTANCE GRANT PROGRAM 
2001 NORTH CAROLINA STATE WIDE ASSISTANCE REPORT 
Prepared By: North Carolina Department of Crime Control & Public Safety - Governor's Crime Commission
1201 Front Street, Suite 200
Raleigh, NC  27609-7220
tel: (919)733-4564


STATE FUNDING INFORMATION


A. THE ANNUAL AMOUNT ALLOCATED TO THE VICTIM ASSISTANCE PROJECTS:
 1. Appropriations                                   $           0
 2. Criminal Fines and Penalities                    $           0
 3. Assessments                                      $           0
 4. Other                                            $           0
                                               TOTAL:$           0


B. TOTAL NUMBER OF AGENCIES FUNDED FROM THE FEDERAL GRANT:      78

C. NUMBER OF SUBGRANTS FUNDED FROM THIS FEDERAL GRANT:         106


VICTIM STATISTICS

A. THE NUMBER OF VICTIMS SERVED BY TYPE OF VICTIMIZATION:

    NO. OF                                                                                         NO. OF
VICTIMS SERVED                                                                      VICTIMS SERVED

         3,361  1. Child Physical Abuse                 1,282   7. Adults Molested as Children
         2,968  2. Child Sexual Abuse                     535   8. Survivors of Homicide Victims
           148  3. DUI/DWI Crashes                        625   9. Robbery
        30,108  4. Domestic Violence                    2,313  10. Assualt
         2,622  5. Adult Sexual Assault                14,405  11. Other
           256  6. Elder Abuse
                                             TOTAL:    58,623


B. THE NUMBER OF VICTIMS WHO RECEIVED THE FOLLOWING SERVICES:

    NO. OF    
VICTIMS SERVED

           21,288   1. Crisis Counseling       
           26,747   2. Followup                
            5,573   3. Therapy                 
           12,371   4. Group Treatment/Support 
            6,733   5. Shelter/Safehouse       
           25,395   6. Information/Referral (in-person)
           19,953   7. Criminal Justice Support/Advocacy
            1,448   8. Emergency Financial Assistance
           12,951   9. Emergency Legal Advocacy
            1,622  10. Assistance in filing Compensation Claims
           18,325  11. Personal Advocacy
           51,549  12. Telephone contact Informational/Referral
           25,689  13. Other
TOTAL:    229,644



A. EFFORTS TO PROMOTE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE AID TO CRIME VICTIMS:
New to last year’s responses of multi-disciplinary response team efforts,
and public and private funding efforts, there are additional trends in the
arena of public and private partnerships.  There are:
1)      a greater involvement of churches in victims’ issues, and
2)      a greater collaboration between domestic violence victim service
providers and the field of mental health, developmental disabilities and
substance abuse

Additionally the private, statewide victim assistance agency, NC Victim
Assistance Network, has spear-headed a collaborative effort of certifying
victim service providers to raise the level of professionalism in the field
and ensure the quality of services for victims.  The training will be
offered twice a year for qualifying candidates.  This is an exciting new
endeavor with future possibilities and impact in the victim services arena.

The statewide Legal Services of NC has continued its implementation of a
project providing emergency civil legal assistance for domestic violence
victims in most NC counties.  As the national legal services organization
reduced funding for this purpose, the Victims’ Services Committee of the
Governor’s Crime Commission felt strongly that this service was a truly
necessary vehicle for victims to escape domestic violence; and therefore,
they have continued funding this program.  The few independent legal
services organizations receive funds for this purpose as well.

Our domestic violence service providers continue to collaborate with
private companies as is evidenced by the many providers who participate in
the ADT Security program where security systems and alarm pendants are
donated to victims and Alltel’s national program which donates cell phones
for dialing 911.

B. EFFORTS TAKEN TO SERVE FEDERAL CRIME VICTIMS:
From the responses to this question, more needs to be done to increase the
quantity and quality of relationships between the victim service providers
and US Attorney’s and their victim witness assistants.  Those with obvious
territory under federal jurisdiction have formed the better relationships,
and it could be assumed these relationships were formed out of necessity.
Meanwhile, victim service providers who do not have these territories in
their service area generally have not developed these relationships.

Additionally, the same is true for military installations in a provider’s
service area.  While some providers have established good relationships
others have become frustrated in their attempts.  In one area, the provider
is working with the military’s FAP (family advocacy program) to identify
federal victims and this aids in obtaining military protective orders.
Others find the military condones or at least turns a blind eye to the
behaviors of their personnel.

An increase in the use of the internet for child pornography and child
solicitation for the purposes of kidnapping and sexual assault is on the
rise and many service providers are seeing this.  The Attorney General, Roy
Cooper, has made cybercrimes one of his top agenda items since coming into
office this past year.

Law enforcement agencies are increasingly enforcing federal statutes
relating to firearm possessions while under a protective order.  One such
agency is the Pitt County Sheriff’s Department, and Sgt. John Guard made a
compelling presentation to both the Victim’s Services Committee of the
Governor’s Crime Commission and to the Commission itself regarding the need
for safe storage of these arms given the magnitude of violations they are
aggressively pursuing.

With Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) funds, NC will be holding three
conferences this year to train criminal justice and non-criminal justice
professionals on issues related to Full Faith and Credit.  These
conferences will increase the enforcement of the federal laws as outlined
in VAWA.

C. ACTIVITIES TO IMPROVE THE DELIVERY OF VICTIM SERVICES:
Please also see answers to other questions above and below.  Professional
training in the areas of child maltreatment services is increasing.  A
study by the NC Child Advocay Institute entitled “Not Invisible . . . Not
in Vain; a Manual for the Professionals and Agencies who Respond to Child
Maltreatment Deaths - Child Maltreatment Fatalities: Guidelines for
Response” is an amazing work which should be utilized by all professionals
responding to child abuse in NC.  Horrifically, the statistic of 366 known
child victims of murder by a caregiver is evidenced in this document.

State of the art victim data management software provides excellent case
management and tracking of the increasing numbers of primary and secondary
victims of crime.  This results in improved and timely production of
statistics.

Anecdotally, victims informational mediums continue to be translated into
Spanish while an increase in the number of Spanish-speaking victim service
providers and volunteers is evident.  Providers work with local departments
of social service to alleviate financial concerns of those in NC’s welfare
system, Work First, by extending the period of time for which they can
receive benefits in the face of domestic violence.  Another provider has
produced victim information sheets which are attached to all blank domestic
violence protective orders.

We also see the extension of training about victimization issues beyond the
traditional service provider to medical personnel, probation personnel,
clergy and substance abuse professionals.

There is a growing awareness for the need for supervised visitation
services when domestic violence offenders are awarded visitation by the
courts.

Training, referral systems and statutory changes are being planned for
addressing the needs of victims with disabilities.

Automated victim notifications have been extended beyond correctional
release, transfer and escape to include court event notifications.

Of course, in the wake of Columbine and 9/11, NC must begin making a more
concerted effort to address the response to criminal mass victimization.
Additionally, NC must seek to better coordinate the efforts of VOCA
Assistance and Compensation programs.

D. WAYS VOCA FUNDS HAVE BEEN USED TO ASSIST CRIME VICTIMS:
1.  Case history of legal services provided to stalking by former domestic
partner.
2.  Thank you note from parents of a sexual assualt victim.
3.  Thank you from rape victim for Sexual Assualt Nurse Examiner (SANE)
services.
4.  Case history of services provided to an adult who molested as a child.
5.  Case of victim who was provided services through the use of Mexican
sign language.
6.  Case history of victim of identity theft.

E. ISSUES OR TRENDS IMPACTING CRIME VICTIM SERVICES:
The trends for victim services are so numerous that they have been listed
in a bullet format.

SAVAN [Statewide Automated Victim Assistance and Notification] and NC Sex
Offender Registry gives victims a measure of safety not previously afforded
them; however, a grantee noted a delay in registry information appearing
online
increasing hispanic population both immigrant and undocumented, makes
evident the improving and yet insufficient lack of Latino - friendly
services
lack of funding for victim services
language barriers between spanish speaking victims and all agencies and
organizations with which they need to interact i.e. police, prosecution,
victims service providers, medical staff, etc.
victims are not getting their restitution because they move and the court
does not have a new address for reasons of confidentiality [in order to get
restitution a victim must register an address and this is information is
then accessible to the defendant]
computer automation of records is increasingly necessary
lack of affordable housing for victims to transition to when they leave a
shelter
need for training of judiciary personnel about elderly and disabled victims
backlog of 6 months or more for longer term mental health services via
local mental health departments
judges not wanting to settle custody or visitation when a protective order
is issued
judges ordering domestic violence victims to mediation even though there is
a new state law that batterers must be sentenced to an approved batterer’s
treatment program
financial crimes against the elderly by workers in home health care
professions
reserrvation casino’s per capita check being taken from the elderly by
family and caretakers
the “savvy” batterer, a subcommitte of the NC Bar Association may be
looking at abuses of the domestic violence statutes by batterers; there is
a proliferation of retaliatory criminal cross warrants
the use of civil issues by batterer to keep the mother/wife/girlfriend tied
to him/her
military systems promoting violence, minimizing assaults to preserve their
personnel’s careers, large use of “couples counseling” in this population,
also the military is not recognizing or dealing with personnel who aren’t
married yet assault a girlfriend
more people are aware of domestic violence and asking “why doesn’t he stop
hitting her” versus “why doesn’t she leave”
increase in victims in same sex relationships coming forward to providers
the limbo of standards and accountability for abuser treatment programs
departments of social services placing demands on domestic violence victims
without giving assistance in obtaining the resources necessary to leave
greater involvement of grandparents in domestic violence proceedings;
offender and his/her parents partner to vie for custody of children against
the victim or the victim’s parents want custody of the grandchildren even
after the victim has left the abuser
increased number of juvenile sex offenders
increased cases of internet pornography and child sexual abuse, child
prostitution
increased number of teen minorities being seen for statutory rape
victimizations
increased use of date rape drugs
need to increase the medical practices’ knowledge of abuse issues
lack of spanish speaking 911 dispatchers and law enforcement officers
lack of funds for victim to relocate to safety
absence of emergency shelters for male victims
poorly trained magistrates
a procedure has been developed that allows the victim to request that the
division of prisons place the offender in a prison outside the county where
the victim resides or is employed
increased collaboration of housing authorities and HUD and victim service
providers
post-release supervision and parole commission offers victims the
opportunity to participate in video conferencing for hearings – this
greatly reduces the victim’s cost, travel, missed work, and child care
needs
victim service providers need training on immigration concerns, especially
as it relates to working with undocumented immigrants
increasingly schools are requesting services for teen dating violence
the national fundraising efforts have hurt the local fundraising ability of
victims service agencies

Finally, we found the following quote interesting, yet disconcerting:
“We noticed after the Sept. 11 terror attacks, our shelter saw a decline in
residents.  Also, our crisis line calls were low.  Just as other people in
relationships were pulled together in a tragedy, battered women feel that
same pull.  They’re already in a very vulnerable situation, but at least
they are with ‘somebody’, no matter what, so maybe the violence of the
relationship is not such a big deal compared with a huge national tragedy.”

F. USE OF VOCA ADMINISTRATIVE FUNDS:
The State continues to not provide funding for administering VOCA funds.
As such, these funds are invaluable to the disbursement of desperately
needed grants to local service providers who are the true substance of
victim services in North Carolina.  Currently, three planners and three
grants managers are employed and trained with these funds.

Back to NORTH CAROLINA

.

This document was last updated on May 15, 2002


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