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< Back to current issue of Immigration Daily < Back to current issue of Immigrant's Weekly

Dear Editor:

My earlier letter obviously was not clear enough for Mr. Frecker or Mr. Alexander.

I didn't say we should just throw the borders open, or anything along those lines. Nor did I discuss the amount of time a tourist should have for visiting the United States.

I discussed a paradox and problem of our immigration system. I pointed out an issue of hypocrisy in that we talk about liking legal immigrants but we have a system that forces people to come illegally (see my earlier letter for details).

Rather than talk about how employers "who can find employees locally should do just that", consider the fact that most "do just that", and only advertise locally and search locally. I would like Mr. Alexander to look at item #3, that MOST employers only hire locally. The number of employers looking overseas and bringing in workers illegally is small (how often do we read about it in the news?). It is because of this practice that people wishing to immigrate to the United States are forced to come illegally.

The idea that the Internet, and telecommunications makes it possible for workers to find employers here is a fallacy. The Internet has not penetrated as far in other societies, to as many classes of people. It ignores the fact that many people are educated in a trade by having spent years doing the work, not years getting a formal education. Also, consider how many employers are willing to hire someone sight unseen, without an opportunity to see their work, and who is unable to stop by for an interview. Even with the Internet, most sponsors only sponsor people they know, because they want to do a favor.

Perhaps the saddest and most frustrating thing about the whole immigration debate is the number of falsehoods, half truths, and idealized situations are mentioned again and again. It is only by looking at reality that a reasonable, equitable, and workable system can be developed. I hope that by pointing out one of the common fallacies, and contradiction of current policy we can start to build a better system.

Charles Yates


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