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[Congressional Record: December 15, 2000 (House)]
[Page H12100-H12150]
From the Congressional Record Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:cr15de00-39]                         
 
CONFERENCE REPORT ON H.R. 4577, DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN 
 SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2001

  Mr. YOUNG of Florida submitted the following conference report and 
statement on the bill (H.R. 4577) making appropriations for the 
Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and 
Related Agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and for 
other purposes:

                 Conference Report (H. Rept. 106-1033)

       The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the 
     two Houses on the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 
     4577) ``making appropriations for the Departments of Labor, 
     Health and Human Services, and Education, and related 
     agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and 
     for other purposes'', having met, after full and free 
     conference, have agreed to recommend and do recommend to 
     their respective Houses as follows:
       That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
     amendment of the Senate, and agree to the same with 
     amendments, as follows:
       In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
     amendment, insert:
       Section 1. (a) The provisions of the following bills of the 
     106th Congress are hereby enacted into law:
       (1) H.R. 5656, as introduced on December 14, 2000.
       (2) H.R. 5657, as introduced on December 14, 2000.
       (3) H.R. 5658, as introduced on December 14, 2000.
       (4) H.R. 5666, as introduced on December 15, 2000.
       (5) H.R. 5660, as introduced on December 14, 2000.
       (6) H.R. 5661, as introduced on December 14, 2000.
       (7) H.R. 5662, as introduced on December 14, 2000.
       (8) H.R. 5663, as introduced on December 14, 2000.
       (9) H.R. 5667, as introduced on December 15, 2000.
       (b) In publishing this Act in slip form and in the United 
     States Statutes at Large pursuant to section 112 of title 1, 
     United States Code, the Archivist of the United States shall 
     include after the date of approval at the end appendixes 
     setting forth the texts of the bills referred to in 
     subsection (a) of this section and the text of any other bill 
     enacted into law by reference by reason of the enactment of 
     this Act.
       Sec. 2. (a) Notwithstanding Rule 3 of the Budget 
     Scorekeeping Guidelines set forth in the joint explanatory 
     statement of the committee of conference accompanying 
     Conference Report 105-217, legislation enacted in section 505 
     of the Department of Transportation and Related Agencies 
     Appropriations Act, 2001, section 312 of the Legislative 
     Branch Appropriations Act, 2001, titles X and XI of H.R. 5548 
     (106th Congress) as enacted by H.R. 4942 (106th Congress), 
     Division B of H.R. 5666 (106th Congress) as enacted by this 
     Act, and sections 1(a)(5) through 1(a)(9) of this Act that 
     would have been estimated by the Office of Management and 
     Budget as changing direct spending or receipts under section 
     252 of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act 
     of 1985 were it included in an Act other than an 
     appropriations Act shall be treated as direct spending or 
     receipts legislation, as appropriate, under section 252 of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.
       (b) In preparing the final sequestration report required by 
     section 254(f)(3) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985 for fiscal year 2001, in addition 
     to the information required by that section, the Director of 
     the Office of Management and Budget shall change any balance 
     of direct spending and receipts legislation for fiscal year 
     2001 under section 252 of that Act to zero.
       This Act may be cited as the ``Consolidated Appropriations 
     Act, 2001''.
       Amend the title of the bill so as to read:
       ``An Act making consolidated appropriations for the fiscal 
     year ending September 30, 2001, and for other purposes.''.
     And the Senate agree to the same.
     John Edward Porter,

[[Page H12101]]

     C.W. Bill Young,
     Henry Bonilla,
     Ernest J. Istook, Jr.,
     Dan Miller,
     Jay Dickey,
     Roger F. Wicker,
     Anne M. Northup,
     Randy ``Duke'' Cunningham,
     David R. Obey,
     Steny H. Hoyer,
     Nancy Pelosi,
     Nita M. Lowey,
     Rosa L. DeLauro,
     Jesse L. Jackson, Jr.
       (Except elimination of LIHEAP and CCDBG advanced funding; 
     immigration and charitable choice provisions.)
                                Managers on the Part of the House.

     Arlen Specter,
     Thad Cochran,
     Slade Gorton,
     Judd Gregg,
     Kay Bailey Hutchison,
     Ted Stevens,
     Pete V. Domenici,
     Tom Harkin,
     Ernest F. Hollings,
     Daniel K. Inouye,
     Harry Reid,
     Herb Kohl,
     Patty Murray,
     Dianne Feinstein,
     Robert C. Byrd,
                               Managers on the Part of the Senate.

       JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE COMMITTEE OF CONFERENCE

       The managers on the part of the House and Senate at the 
     conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the 
     amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 4577) making 
     appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
     Services, and Education, and Related Agencies, and for other 
     purposes, submit the following joint statement of the House 
     and Senate in explanation of the effect of the action agreed 
     upon by the managers and recommended in the accompanying 
     conference report.
       This conference agreement includes more than the 
     Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and 
     Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001. The 
     conference agreement has been expanded to including the 
     Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2001; the Treasury and 
     General Government Appropriations Act, 2001; the 
     Miscellaneous Appropriations Act, 2001; the Commodity Futures 
     Modernization Act of 2000; the Medicare, Medicaid, and SCHIP 
     Benefits Improvement and Protection Act of 2000; the 
     Community Renewal Tax Relief Act of 2000; the New Markets 
     Venture Capital Program Act of 2000; and the Small Business 
     Reauthorization Act of 2000; as well as the Departments of 
     Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related 
     Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001. The provisions of all of 
     these Acts have been enacted into law by reference in this 
     conference report; however, a copy of the referenced 
     legislation has been included in this statement for 
     convenience.

  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
                    RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS

       The conference agreement would enact the provisions of H.R. 
     5656 as introduced on December 14, 2000. The text of that 
     bill follows:
     A BILL Making appropriations for the Departments of Labor, 
     Health and Human Services, and Education, and related 
     agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and 
     for other purposes.
       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the 
     following sums are appropriated, out of any money in the 
     Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the Departments of 
     Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and related 
     agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and 
     for other purposes, namely:

                      TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

                 Employment and Training Administration


                    Training and Employment Services

       For necessary expenses of the Workforce Investment Act, 
     including the purchase and hire of passenger motor vehicles, 
     the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and 
     other facilities, and the purchase of real property for 
     training centers as authorized by the Workforce Investment 
     Act; the Women in Apprenticeship and Nontraditional 
     Occupations Act; and the National Skill Standards Act of 
     1994; $3,207,805,000 plus reimbursements, of which 
     $1,808,465,000 is available for obligation for the period 
     July 1, 2001 through June 30, 2002; of which $1,377,965,000 
     is available for obligation for the period April 1, 2001 
     through June 30, 2002, including $1,102,965,000 to carry out 
     chapter 4 of the Workforce Investment Act and $275,000,000 to 
     carry out section 169 of such Act; and of which $20,375,000 
     is available for the period July 1, 2001 through June 30, 
     2004 for necessary expenses of construction, rehabilitation, 
     and acquisition of Job Corps centers: Provided, That 
     $9,098,000 shall be for carrying out section 172 of the 
     Workforce Investment Act, and $3,500,000 shall be for 
     carrying out the National Skills Standards Act of 1994: 
     Provided further, That no funds from any other appropriation 
     shall be used to provide meal services at or for Job Corps 
     centers: Provided further, That funds provided to carry out 
     section 171(d) of such Act may be used for demonstration 
     projects that provide assistance to new entrants in the 
     workforce and incumbent workers: Provided further, That 
     funding provided to carry out projects under section 171 of 
     the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 that are identified in 
     the Conference Agreement, shall not be subject to the 
     requirements of section 171(b)(2)(B) of such Act, the 
     requirements of section 171(c)(4)(D) of such Act, or the 
     joint funding requirements of sections 171(b)(2)(A) and 
     171(c)(4)(A) of such Act: Provided further, That funding 
     appropriated herein for Dislocated Worker Employment and 
     Training Activities under section 132(a)(2)(A) of the 
     Workforce Investment Act of 1998 may be distributed for 
     Dislocated Worker Projects under section 171(d) of the Act 
     without regard to the 10 percent limitation contained in 
     section 171(d) of the Act: Provided further, That of the 
     funds made available for Job Corps operating expenses in the 
     Department of Labor Appropriations Act, 2000, as enacted by 
     section 1000(a)(4) of Public Law 106-113, $586,487 shall be 
     paid to the city of Vergennes, Vermont in settlement of the 
     city's claim: Provided further, That $4,600,000 provided 
     herein for dislocated worker employment and training 
     activities shall be made available to the New Mexico 
     Telecommunications Call Center Training Consortium for 
     training in telecommunications-related occupations.
       For necessary expenses of the Workforce Investment Act, 
     including the purchase and hire of passenger motor vehicles, 
     the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and 
     other facilities, and the purchase of real property for 
     training centers as authorized by the Workforce Investment 
     Act; $2,463,000,000 plus reimbursements, of which 
     $2,363,000,000 is available for obligation for the period 
     October 1, 2001 through June 30, 2002, and of which 
     $100,000,000 is available for the period October 1, 2001 
     through June 30, 2004, for necessary expenses of 
     construction, rehabilitation, and acquisition of Job Corps 
     centers.


            Community Service Employment for Older Americans

       To carry out title V of the Older Americans Act of 1965, as 
     amended, $440,200,000.


              Federal Unemployment Benefits and Allowances

       For payments during the current fiscal year of trade 
     adjustment benefit payments and allowances under part I; and 
     for training, allowances for job search and relocation, and 
     related State administrative expenses under part II, 
     subchapters B and D, chapter 2, title II of the Trade Act of 
     1974, as amended, $406,550,000, together with such amounts as 
     may be necessary to be charged to the subsequent 
     appropriation for payments for any period subsequent to 
     September 15 of the current year.


     State Unemployment Insurance and Employment Service Operations

       For authorized administrative expenses, $193,452,000, 
     together with not to exceed $3,172,246,000 (including not to 
     exceed $1,228,000 which may be used for amortization payments 
     to States which had independent retirement plans in their 
     State employment service agencies prior to 1980), which may 
     be expended from the Employment Security Administration 
     account in the Unemployment Trust Fund including the cost of 
     administering section 51 of the Internal Revenue Code of 
     1986, as amended, section 7(d) of the Wagner-Peyser Act, as 
     amended, the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, the Immigration 
     Act of 1990, and the Immigration and Nationality Act, as 
     amended, and of which the sums available in the allocation 
     for activities authorized by title III of the Social Security 
     Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 502-504), and the sums 
     available in the allocation for necessary administrative 
     expenses for carrying out 5 U.S.C. 8501-8523, shall be 
     available for obligation by the States through December 
     31, 2001, except that funds used for automation 
     acquisitions shall be available for obligation by the 
     States through September 30, 2003; and of which 
     $193,452,000, together with not to exceed $773,283,000 of 
     the amount which may be expended from said trust fund, 
     shall be available for obligation for the period July 1, 
     2001 through June 30, 2002, to fund activities under the 
     Act of June 6, 1933, as amended, including the cost of 
     penalty mail authorized under 39 U.S.C. 3202(a)(1)(E) made 
     available to States in lieu of allotments for such 
     purpose: Provided, That to the extent that the Average 
     Weekly Insured Unemployment (AWIU) for fiscal year 2001 is 
     projected by the Department of Labor to exceed 2,396,000, 
     an additional $28,600,000 shall be available for 
     obligation for every 100,000 increase in the AWIU level 
     (including a pro rata amount for any increment less than 
     100,000) from the Employment Security Administration 
     Account of the Unemployment Trust Fund: Provided further, 
     That funds appropriated in this Act which are used to 
     establish a national one-stop career center system, or 
     which are used to support the national activities of the 
     Federal-State unemployment insurance programs, may be 
     obligated in contracts, grants or agreements with non-
     State entities: Provided further, That funds appropriated 
     under this Act for activities authorized under the Wagner-
     Peyser Act, as amended, and title III of the Social 
     Security Act, may be used by the States to fund integrated 
     Employment Service and Unemployment Insurance automation 
     efforts, notwithstanding cost allocation principles 
     prescribed under Office of Management and Budget Circular 
     A-87.


        Advances to the Unemployment Trust Fund and Other Funds

       For repayable advances to the Unemployment Trust Fund as 
     authorized by sections 905(d) and 1203 of the Social Security 
     Act, as amended, and to the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund 
     as authorized by section 9501(c)(1) of the Internal

[[Page H12102]]

     Revenue Code of 1954, as amended; and for nonrepayable 
     advances to the Unemployment Trust Fund as authorized by 
     section 8509 of title 5, United States Code, and to the 
     ``Federal unemployment benefits and allowances'' account, to 
     remain available until September 30, 2002, $435,000,000.
       In addition, for making repayable advances to the Black 
     Lung Disability Trust Fund in the current fiscal year after 
     September 15, 2001, for costs incurred by the Black Lung 
     Disability Trust Fund in the current fiscal year, such sums 
     as may be necessary.


                         Program Administration

       For expenses of administering employment and training 
     programs, $110,651,000, including $6,431,000 to support up to 
     75 full-time equivalent staff, the majority of which will be 
     term Federal appointments lasting no more than 1 year, to 
     administer welfare-to-work grants, together with not to 
     exceed $48,507,000, which may be expended from the Employment 
     Security Administration account in the Unemployment Trust 
     Fund.

              Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration


                         Salaries and Expenses

       For necessary expenses for the Pension and Welfare Benefits 
     Administration, $107,832,000.

                  Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation


               Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation Fund

       The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation is authorized to 
     make such expenditures, including financial assistance 
     authorized by section 104 of Public Law 96-364, within limits 
     of funds and borrowing authority available to such 
     Corporation, and in accord with law, and to make such 
     contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year 
     limitations as provided by section 104 of the Government 
     Corporation Control Act, as amended (31 U.S.C. 9104), as may 
     be necessary in carrying out the program through September 
     30, 2001, for such Corporation: Provided, That not to exceed 
     $11,652,000 shall be available for administrative expenses of 
     the Corporation: Provided further, That expenses of such 
     Corporation in connection with the termination of pension 
     plans, for the acquisition, protection or management, and 
     investment of trust assets, and for benefits administration 
     services shall be considered as non-administrative expenses 
     for the purposes hereof, and excluded from the above 
     limitation.

                  Employment Standards Administration


                         Salaries and Expenses

       For necessary expenses for the Employment Standards 
     Administration, including reimbursement to State, Federal, 
     and local agencies and their employees for inspection 
     services rendered, $361,491,000, together with $1,985,000 
     which may be expended from the Special Fund in accordance 
     with sections 39(c), 44(d) and 44(j) of the Longshore and 
     Harbor Workers' Compensation Act: Provided, That $2,000,000 
     shall be for the development of an alternative system for the 
     electronic submission of reports required to be filed under 
     the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959, as 
     amended, and for a computer database of the information for 
     each submission by whatever means, that is indexed and easily 
     searchable by the public via the Internet: Provided 
     further, That the Secretary of Labor is authorized to 
     accept, retain, and spend, until expended, in the name of 
     the Department of Labor, all sums of money ordered to be 
     paid to the Secretary of Labor, in accordance with the 
     terms of the Consent Judgment in Civil Action No. 91-0027 
     of the United States District Court for the District of 
     the Northern Mariana Islands (May 21, 1992): Provided 
     further, That the Secretary of Labor is authorized to 
     establish and, in accordance with 31 U.S.C. 3302, collect 
     and deposit in the Treasury fees for processing 
     applications and issuing certificates under sections 11(d) 
     and 14 of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as amended 
     (29 U.S.C. 211(d) and 214) and for processing applications 
     and issuing registrations under title I of the Migrant and 
     Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act (29 U.S.C. 
     1801 et seq.).


                            Special Benefits

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For the payment of compensation, benefits, and expenses 
     (except administrative expenses) accruing during the current 
     or any prior fiscal year authorized by title 5, chapter 81 of 
     the United States Code; continuation of benefits as provided 
     for under the heading ``Civilian War Benefits'' in the 
     Federal Security Agency Appropriation Act, 1947; the 
     Employees' Compensation Commission Appropriation Act, 1944; 
     sections 4(c) and 5(f) of the War Claims Act of 1948 (50 
     U.S.C. App. 2012); and 50 percent of the additional 
     compensation and benefits required by section 10(h) of the 
     Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act, as amended, 
     $56,000,000 together with such amounts as may be necessary to 
     be charged to the subsequent year appropriation for the 
     payment of compensation and other benefits for any period 
     subsequent to August 15 of the current year: Provided, That 
     amounts appropriated may be used under section 8104 of title 
     5, United States Code, by the Secretary of Labor to reimburse 
     an employer, who is not the employer at the time of injury, 
     for portions of the salary of a reemployed, disabled 
     beneficiary: Provided further, That balances of 
     reimbursements unobligated on September 30, 2000, shall 
     remain available until expended for the payment of 
     compensation, benefits, and expenses: Provided further, That 
     in addition there shall be transferred to this appropriation 
     from the Postal Service and from any other corporation or 
     instrumentality required under section 8147(c) of title 5, 
     United States Code, to pay an amount for its fair share of 
     the cost of administration, such sums as the Secretary 
     determines to be the cost of administration for employees of 
     such fair share entities through September 30, 2001: Provided 
     further, That of those funds transferred to this account from 
     the fair share entities to pay the cost of administration, 
     $34,910,000 shall be made available to the Secretary as 
     follows: (1) for the operation of and enhancement to the 
     automated data processing systems, including document 
     imaging, medical bill review, and periodic roll management, 
     in support of Federal Employees' Compensation Act 
     administration, $23,371,000; (2) for conversion to a 
     paperless office, $7,005,000; (3) for communications 
     redesign, $1,750,000; (4) for information technology 
     maintenance and support, $2,784,000; and (5) the remaining 
     funds shall be paid into the Treasury as miscellaneous 
     receipts: Provided further, That the Secretary may require 
     that any person filing a notice of injury or a claim for 
     benefits under chapter 81 of title 5, United States Code, or 
     33 U.S.C. 901 et seq., provide as part of such notice and 
     claim, such identifying information (including Social 
     Security account number) as such regulations may prescribe.


                    black lung disability trust fund

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For payments from the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund, 
     $1,028,000,000, of which $975,343,000 shall be available 
     until September 30, 2002, for payment of all benefits as 
     authorized by section 9501(d)(1), (2), (4), and (7) of the 
     Internal Revenue Code of 1954, as amended, and interest on 
     advances as authorized by section 9501(c)(2) of that Act, and 
     of which $30,393,000 shall be available for transfer to 
     Employment Standards Administration, Salaries and Expenses, 
     $21,590,000 for transfer to Departmental Management, Salaries 
     and Expenses, $318,000 for transfer to Departmental 
     Management, Office of Inspector General, and $356,000 for 
     payment into miscellaneous receipts for the expenses of the 
     Department of Treasury, for expenses of operation and 
     administration of the Black Lung Benefits program as 
     authorized by section 9501(d)(5) of that Act: Provided, That, 
     in addition, such amounts as may be necessary may be charged 
     to the subsequent year appropriation for the payment of 
     compensation, interest, or other benefits for any period 
     subsequent to August 15 of the current year.

             Occupational Safety and Health Administration


                         Salaries and Expenses

       For necessary expenses for the Occupational Safety and 
     Health Administration, $425,983,000, including not to exceed 
     $88,493,000 which shall be the maximum amount available for 
     grants to States under section 23(g) of the Occupational 
     Safety and Health Act, which grants shall be no less than 50 
     percent of the costs of State occupational safety and health 
     programs required to be incurred under plans approved by the 
     Secretary under section 18 of the Occupational Safety and 
     Health Act of 1970; and, in addition, notwithstanding 31 
     U.S.C. 3302, the Occupational Safety and Health 
     Administration may retain up to $750,000 per fiscal year 
     of training institute course tuition fees, otherwise 
     authorized by law to be collected, and may utilize such 
     sums for occupational safety and health training and 
     education grants: Provided, That, notwithstanding 31 
     U.S.C. 3302, the Secretary of Labor is authorized, during 
     the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, to collect and 
     retain fees for services provided to Nationally Recognized 
     Testing Laboratories, and may utilize such sums, in 
     accordance with the provisions of 29 U.S.C. 9a, to 
     administer national and international laboratory 
     recognition programs that ensure the safety of equipment 
     and products used by workers in the workplace: Provided 
     further, That none of the funds appropriated under this 
     paragraph shall be obligated or expended to prescribe, 
     issue, administer, or enforce any standard, rule, 
     regulation, or order under the Occupational Safety and 
     Health Act of 1970 which is applicable to any person who 
     is engaged in a farming operation which does not maintain 
     a temporary labor camp and employs 10 or fewer employees: 
     Provided further, That no funds appropriated under this 
     paragraph shall be obligated or expended to administer or 
     enforce any standard, rule, regulation, or order under the 
     Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 with respect to 
     any employer of 10 or fewer employees who is included 
     within a category having an occupational injury lost 
     workday case rate, at the most precise Standard Industrial 
     Classification Code for which such data are published, 
     less than the national average rate as such rates are most 
     recently published by the Secretary, acting through the 
     Bureau of Labor Statistics, in accordance with section 24 
     of that Act (29 U.S.C. 673), except--
       (1) to provide, as authorized by such Act, consultation, 
     technical assistance, educational and training services, and 
     to conduct surveys and studies;
       (2) to conduct an inspection or investigation in response 
     to an employee complaint, to issue a citation for violations 
     found during such inspection, and to assess a penalty for 
     violations which are not corrected within a reasonable 
     abatement period and for any willful violations found;
       (3) to take any action authorized by such Act with respect 
     to imminent dangers;
       (4) to take any action authorized by such Act with respect 
     to health hazards;
       (5) to take any action authorized by such Act with respect 
     to a report of an employment accident which is fatal to one 
     or more employees or which results in hospitalization of two 
     or more employees, and to take any action pursuant to such 
     investigation authorized by such Act; and
       (6) to take any action authorized by such Act with respect 
     to complaints of discrimination against employees for 
     exercising rights under such Act:
     Provided further, That the foregoing proviso shall not apply 
     to any person who is engaged in a farming operation which 
     does not maintain a

[[Page H12103]]

     temporary labor camp and employs 10 or fewer employees.

                 Mine Safety and Health Administration


                         Salaries and Expenses

       For necessary expenses for the Mine Safety and Health 
     Administration, $246,747,000, including purchase and bestowal 
     of certificates and trophies in connection with mine rescue 
     and first-aid work, and the hire of passenger motor vehicles; 
     including up to $1,000,000 for mine rescue and recovery 
     activities, which shall be available only to the extent that 
     fiscal year 2001 obligations for these activities exceed 
     $1,000,000; in addition, not to exceed $750,000 may be 
     collected by the National Mine Health and Safety Academy for 
     room, board, tuition, and the sale of training materials, 
     otherwise authorized by law to be collected, to be available 
     for mine safety and health education and training activities, 
     notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302; and, in addition, the Mine 
     Safety and Health Administration may retain up to $1,000,000 
     from fees collected for the approval and certification of 
     equipment, materials, and explosives for use in mines, and 
     may utilize such sums for such activities; the Secretary is 
     authorized to accept lands, buildings, equipment, and other 
     contributions from public and private sources and to 
     prosecute projects in cooperation with other agencies, 
     Federal, State, or private; the Mine Safety and Health 
     Administration is authorized to promote health and safety 
     education and training in the mining community through 
     cooperative programs with States, industry, and safety 
     associations; and any funds available to the department may 
     be used, with the approval of the Secretary, to provide for 
     the costs of mine rescue and survival operations in the event 
     of a major disaster.

                       Bureau of Labor Statistics


                         Salaries and Expenses

       For necessary expenses for the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 
     including advances or reimbursements to State, Federal, and 
     local agencies and their employees for services rendered, 
     $374,327,000, together with not to exceed $67,257,000, which 
     may be expended from the Employment Security Administration 
     account in the Unemployment Trust Fund; and $10,000,000 which 
     shall be available for obligation for the period July 1, 2001 
     through June 30, 2002, for Occupational Employment 
     Statistics.

                        Departmental Management


                         Salaries and Expenses

       For necessary expenses for Departmental Management, 
     including the hire of three sedans, and including the 
     management or operation, through contracts, grants or other 
     arrangements of Departmental bilateral and multilateral 
     foreign technical assistance, of which the funds designated 
     to carry out bilateral assistance under the international 
     child labor initiative shall be available for obligation 
     through September 30, 2002, and $37,000,000 for the 
     acquisition of Departmental information technology, 
     architecture, infrastructure, equipment, software and related 
     needs which will be allocated by the Department's Chief 
     Information Officer in accordance with the Department's 
     capital investment management process to assure a sound 
     investment strategy; $380,529,000; together with not to 
     exceed $310,000, which may be expended from the Employment 
     Security Administration account in the Unemployment Trust 
     Fund: Provided, That no funds made available by this Act may 
     be used by the Solicitor of Labor to participate in a review 
     in any United States court of appeals of any decision made by 
     the Benefits Review Board under section 21 of the Longshore 
     and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act (33 U.S.C. 921) where 
     such participation is precluded by the decision of the United 
     States Supreme Court in Director, Office of Workers' 
     Compensation Programs v. Newport News Shipbuilding, 115 S. 
     Ct. 1278 (1995), notwithstanding any provisions to the 
     contrary contained in Rule 15 of the Federal Rules of 
     Appellate Procedure: Provided further, That no funds made 
     available by this Act may be used by the Secretary of Labor 
     to review a decision under the Longshore and Harbor Workers' 
     Compensation Act (33 U.S.C. 901 et seq.) that has been 
     appealed and that has been pending before the Benefits Review 
     Board for more than 12 months: Provided further, That any 
     such decision pending a review by the Benefits Review Board 
     for more than 1 year shall be considered affirmed by the 
     Benefits Review Board on the 1-year anniversary of the filing 
     of the appeal, and shall be considered the final order of the 
     Board for purposes of obtaining a review in the United States 
     courts of appeals: Provided further, That these provisions 
     shall not be applicable to the review or appeal of any 
     decision issued under the Black Lung Benefits Act (30 U.S.C. 
     901 et seq.): Provided further, That beginning in fiscal year 
     2001, there is established in the Department of Labor an 
     office of disability employment policy which shall, under the 
     overall direction of the Secretary, provide leadership, 
     develop policy and initiatives, and award grants furthering 
     the objective of eliminating barriers to the training and 
     employment of people with disabilities. Such office shall be 
     headed by an assistant secretary: Provided further, That of 
     amounts provided under this head, not more than $23,002,000 
     is for this purpose.


                    Veterans Employment and Training

       Not to exceed $186,913,000 may be derived from the 
     Employment Security Administration account in the 
     Unemployment Trust Fund to carry out the provisions of 38 
     U.S.C. 4100-4110A, 4212, 4214, and 4321-4327, and Public Law 
     103-353, and which shall be available for obligation by the 
     States through December 31, 2001. To carry out the Stewart B. 
     McKinney Homeless Assistance Act and section 168 of the 
     Workforce Investment Act of 1998, $24,800,000, of which 
     $7,300,000 shall be available for obligation for the period 
     July 1, 2001, through June 30, 2002.


                      Office of Inspector General

       For salaries and expenses of the Office of Inspector 
     General in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector 
     General Act of 1978, as amended, $50,015,000, together with 
     not to exceed $4,770,000, which may be expended from the 
     Employment Security Administration account in the 
     Unemployment Trust Fund.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

       Sec. 101. None of the funds appropriated in this title for 
     the Job Corps shall be used to pay the compensation of an 
     individual, either as direct costs or any proration as an 
     indirect cost, at a rate in excess of Executive Level II.


                          (transfer of funds)

       Sec. 102. Not to exceed 1 percent of any discretionary 
     funds (pursuant to the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985, as amended) which are appropriated for 
     the current fiscal year for the Department of Labor in this 
     Act may be transferred between appropriations, but no such 
     appropriation shall be increased by more than 3 percent by 
     any such transfer: Provided, That the Appropriations 
     Committees of both Houses of Congress are notified at least 
     15 days in advance of any transfer.
       Sec. 103. Section 403(a)(5)(C)(viii) of the Social Security 
     Act (42 U.S.C. 603(a)(5)(C)(viii)) (as amended by section 
     801(b)(1)(A) of the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
     Services, and Education, and Related Agencies 
     Appropriations Act, 2000 (as enacted into law by section 
     1000(a)(4) of Public Law 106-113)) is amended by striking 
     ``3 years'' and inserting ``5 years''.
       Sec. 104. No funds appropriated in this Act or any other 
     Act making appropriations for fiscal year 2001 may be used to 
     implement or enforce the proposed and final regulations 
     appearing in 65 Fed. Reg. 43528-43583, regarding temporary 
     alien labor certification applications and petitions for 
     admission of nonimmigrant workers, or any similar or 
     successor rule with an effective date prior to October 1, 
     2001: Provided, That nothing in this section shall prohibit 
     the development or revision of such a rule, or the 
     publication of any similar or successor proposed or final 
     rule, or the provision of training or technical assistance, 
     or other activities necessary and appropriate in preparing to 
     implement such a rule with an effective date after September 
     30, 2001.
       Sec. 105. Section 218(c)(4) of the Immigration and 
     Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1188(c)(4)) is amended by adding at 
     the end the following new sentence: ``The determination as to 
     whether the housing furnished by an employer for an H-2A 
     worker meets the requirements imposed by this paragraph must 
     be made prior to the date specified in paragraph (3)(A) by 
     which the Secretary of Labor is required to make a 
     certification described in subsection (a)(1) with respect to 
     a petition for the importation of such worker.''.
       Sec. 106. Section 286(s)(6) of the Immigration and 
     Naturalization Act (8 U.S.C. 1356(s)(6)) is amended by 
     inserting, ``and section 212(a)(5)(A)'' after the second 
     reference to ``section 212(n)(1)''.
       Sec. 107. (a) Section 403(a)(5) of the Social Security Act 
     (as amended by section 806(b) of the Departments of Labor, 
     Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related 
     Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000 (as enacted into law by 
     section 1000(a)(4) of Public Law 106-113)) is amended by 
     striking subparagraph (E) and redesignating subparagraphs (F) 
     through (K) as subparagraphs (E) through (J), respectively.
       (b) The Social Security Act (as amended by section 806(b) 
     of the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and 
     Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000 (as 
     enacted into law by section 1000(a)(4) of Public Law 106-
     113)) is further amended as follows:
       (1) Section 403(a)(5)(A)(i) (42 U.S.C. 603(a)(5)(A)(i)) is 
     amended by striking ``subparagraph (I)'' and inserting 
     ``subparagraph (H)''.
       (2) Subclause (I) of each of subparagraphs (A)(iv) and 
     (B)(v) of section 403(a)(5) (42 U.S.C. 603(a)(5)(A)(iv)(I) 
     and (B)(v)(I)) is amended--
       (A) in item (aa)--
       (i) by striking ``(I)'' and inserting ``(H)''; and
       (ii) by striking ``(G), and (H)'' and inserting ``and 
     (G)''; and
       (B) in item (bb), by striking ``(F)'' and inserting 
     ``(E)''.
       (3) Section 403(a)(5)(B)(v) (42 U.S.C. 603(a)(5)(B)(v)) is 
     amended in the matter preceding subclause (I) by striking 
     ``(I)'' and inserting ``(H)''.
       (4) Subparagraphs (E), (F), and (G)(i) of section 403(a)(5) 
     (42 U.S.C. 603(a)(5)), as so redesignated by subsection (a) 
     of this section, are each amended by striking ``(I)'' and 
     inserting ``(H)''.
       (5) Section 412(a)(3)(A) (42 U.S.C. 612(a)(3)(A)) is 
     amended by striking ``403(a)(5)(I)'' and inserting 
     ``403(a)(5)(H)''.
       (c) Section 403(a)(5)(H)(i)(II) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 
     603(a)(5)(H)(i))(II) (as redesignated by subsection (a) of 
     this section and as amended by section 806(b) of the 
     Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and 
     Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000 (as 
     enacted into law by section 1000(a)(4) of Public Law 106-
     113)) is further amended by striking ``$1,450,000,000'' and 
     inserting ``$1,400,000,000''.
       (d) The amendments made by subsections (a), (b), and (c) of 
     this section shall take effect on October 1, 2000.
       This title may be cited as the ``Department of Labor 
     Appropriations Act, 2001''.

[[Page H12104]]

           TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

              Health Resources and Services Administration


                     health resources and services

       For carrying out titles II, III, VII, VIII, X, XII, XIX, 
     and XXVI of the Public Health Service Act, section 427(a) of 
     the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act, title V and 
     section 1820 of the Social Security Act, the Health Care 
     Quality Improvement Act of 1986, as amended, the Native 
     Hawaiian Health Care Act of 1988, as amended, and the Poison 
     Control Center Enhancement and Awareness Act, $5,525,476,000, 
     of which $226,224,000 shall be available for the construction 
     and renovation of health care and other facilities, and of 
     which $25,000,000 from general revenues, notwithstanding 
     section 1820(j) of the Social Security Act, shall be 
     available for carrying out the Medicare rural hospital 
     flexibility grants program under section 1820 of such Act: 
     Provided, That the Division of Federal Occupational Health 
     may utilize personal services contracting to employ 
     professional management/administrative and occupational 
     health professionals: Provided further, That of the funds 
     made available under this heading, $250,000 shall be 
     available until expended for facilities renovations at the 
     Gillis W. Long Hansen's Disease Center: Provided further, 
     That in addition to fees authorized by section 427(b) of the 
     Health Care Quality Improvement Act of 1986, fees shall be 
     collected for the full disclosure of information under the 
     Act sufficient to recover the full costs of operating the 
     National Practitioner Data Bank, and shall remain available 
     until expended to carry out that Act: Provided further, That 
     fees collected for the full disclosure of information under 
     the ``Health Care Fraud and Abuse Data Collection Program,'' 
     authorized by section 1128E(d)(2) of the Social Security Act, 
     shall be sufficient to recover the full costs of operating 
     the program, and shall remain available until expended to 
     carry out that Act: Provided further, That no more than 
     $5,000,000 is available for carrying out the provisions of 
     Public Law 104-73: Provided further, That of the funds made 
     available under this heading, $253,932,000 shall be for the 
     program under title X of the Public Health Service Act to 
     provide for voluntary family planning projects: Provided 
     further, That amounts provided to said projects under such 
     title shall not be expended for abortions, that all pregnancy 
     counseling shall be nondirective, and that such amounts shall 
     not be expended for any activity (including the publication 
     or distribution of literature) that in any way tends to 
     promote public support or opposition to any legislative 
     proposal or candidate for public office: Provided further, 
     That $589,000,000 shall be for State AIDS Drug Assistance 
     Programs authorized by section 2616 of the Public Health 
     Service Act: Provided further, That of the amount provided 
     under this heading, $700,000 shall be for the American 
     Federation of Negro Affairs Education and Research Fund of 
     Philadelphia, $900,000 shall be for the Des Moines University 
     Osteopathic Medical Center, $250,000 shall be for the 
     University of Alaska, Anchorage, to train Alaska Natives as 
     psychologists, $900,000 shall be for Northeastern University 
     in Boston, Massachusetts to train doctors to serve in low-
     income communities, $500,000 shall be for the University of 
     Alaska, Anchorage, to recruit and train nurses in rural 
     areas, and $230,000 shall be for the Illinois Poison Center: 
     Provided further, That, notwithstanding section 502(a)(1) of 
     the Social Security Act, not to exceed $113,728,000 is 
     available for carrying out special projects of regional and 
     national significance pursuant to section 501(a)(2) of such 
     Act, of which $5,000,000 is for Columbia Hospital for Women 
     Medical Center in Washington, D.C., to support community 
     outreach programs for women, $5,000,000 is for continuation 
     of the traumatic brain injury State demonstration projects, 
     and $100,000 is for St. Joseph's Health Services of Rhode 
     Island for the Providence Smiles dental program for low-
     income children.
       For special projects of regional and national significance 
     under section 501(a)(2) of the Social Security Act, 
     $30,000,000, which shall become available on October 1, 2001, 
     and shall remain available until September 30, 2002: 
     Provided, That such amount shall not be counted toward 
     compliance with the allocation required in section 502(a)(1) 
     of such Act: Provided further, That such amount shall be used 
     only for making competitive grants to provide abstinence 
     education (as defined in section 510(b)(2) of such Act) to 
     adolescents and for evaluations (including longitudinal 
     evaluations) of activities under the grants and for Federal 
     costs of administering the grants: Provided further, That 
     grants shall be made only to public and private entities 
     which agree that, with respect to an adolescent to whom the 
     entities provide abstinence education under such grant, the 
     entities will not provide to that adolescent any other 
     education regarding sexual conduct, except that, in the case 
     of an entity expressly required by law to provide health 
     information or services the adolescent shall not be precluded 
     from seeking health information or services from the entity 
     in a different setting than the setting in which the 
     abstinence education was provided: Provided further, That the 
     funds expended for such evaluations may not exceed 3.5 
     percent of such amount.


               health education assistance loans program

       Such sums as may be necessary to carry out the purpose of 
     the program, as authorized by title VII of the Public Health 
     Service Act, as amended. For administrative expenses to carry 
     out the guaranteed loan program, including section 709 of the 
     Public Health Service Act, $3,679,000.


             vaccine injury compensation program trust fund

       For payments from the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program 
     Trust Fund, such sums as may be necessary for claims 
     associated with vaccine-related injury or death with respect 
     to vaccines administered after September 30, 1988, pursuant 
     to subtitle 2 of title XXI of the Public Health Service Act, 
     to remain available until expended: Provided, That for 
     necessary administrative expenses, not to exceed $2,992,000 
     shall be available from the Trust Fund to the Secretary of 
     Health and Human Services.

               Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


                Disease Control, Research, and Training

       To carry out titles II, III, VII, XI, XV, XVII, XIX and 
     XXVI of the Public Health Service Act, sections 101, 102, 
     103, 201, 202, 203, 301, and 501 of the Federal Mine Safety 
     and Health Act of 1977, sections 20, 21, and 22 of the 
     Occupational Safety and Health Act, of 1970, title IV of the 
     Immigration and Nationality Act and section 501 of the 
     Refugee Education Assistance Act of 1980; including insurance 
     of official motor vehicles in foreign countries; and hire, 
     maintenance, and operation of aircraft, $3,868,027,000, of 
     which $175,000,000 shall remain available until expended for 
     the facilities master plan for equipment and construction and 
     renovation of facilities, and in addition, such sums as may 
     be derived from authorized user fees, which shall be credited 
     to this account, and of which $104,527,000 for international 
     HIV/AIDS programs shall remain available until September 30, 
     2002: Provided, That in addition to amounts provided herein, 
     up to $71,690,000 shall be available from amounts available 
     under section 241 of the Public Health Service Act to carry 
     out the National Center for Health Statistics Surveys: 
     Provided further, That none of the funds made available for 
     injury prevention and control at the Centers for Disease 
     Control and Prevention may be used to advocate or promote gun 
     control: Provided further, That the Director may redirect the 
     total amount made available under authority of Public Law 
     101-502, section 3, dated November 3, 1990, to activities the 
     Director may so designate: Provided further, That the 
     Congress is to be notified promptly of any such transfer: 
     Provided further, That not to exceed $10,000,000 may be 
     available for making grants under section 1509 of the Public 
     Health Service Act to not more than 15 States: Provided 
     further, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, a 
     single contract or related contracts for development and 
     construction of facilities may be employed which collectively 
     include the full scope of the project: Provided further, That 
     the solicitation and contract shall contain the clause 
     ``availability of funds'' found at 48 CFR 52.232-18: Provided 
     further, That funds obligated for influenza vaccine stockpile 
     in fiscal year 2000 and fiscal year 2001 shall be considered 
     as appropriated under Section 3 of Public Law 101-502.

                     National Institutes of Health


                       National Cancer Institute

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to cancer, $3,757,242,000.


               National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to cardiovascular, lung, and 
     blood diseases, and blood and blood products, $2,299,866,000.


         National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to dental disease, 
     $306,448,000.


    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to diabetes and digestive and 
     kidney disease, $1,303,385,000.


        National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to neurological disorders and 
     stroke, $1,176,482,000.


         National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to allergy and infectious 
     diseases, $2,043,208,000.


             National Institute of General Medical Sciences

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to general medical sciences, 
     $1,535,823,000.


        National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to child health and human 
     development, $976,455,000.


                         National Eye Institute

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to eye diseases and visual 
     disorders, $510,611,000.


          National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

       For carrying out sections 301 and 311 and title IV of the 
     Public Health Service Act with respect to environmental 
     health sciences, $502,549,000.


                      National Institute on Aging

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to aging, $786,039,000.


 National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to arthritis and 
     musculoskeletal and skin diseases, $396,687,000.


    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to

[[Page H12105]]

     deafness and other communication disorders, $300,581,000.


                 National Institute of Nursing Research

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to nursing research, 
     $104,370,000.


           National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to alcohol abuse and 
     alcoholism, $340,678,000.


                    National Institute on Drug Abuse

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to drug abuse, $781,327,000.


                  National Institute of Mental Health

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to mental health, 
     $1,107,028,000.


                National Human Genome Research Institute

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to human genome research, 
     $382,384,000.


                 National Center for Research Resources

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to research resources and 
     general research support grants, $817,475,000: Provided, That 
     none of these funds shall be used to pay recipients of the 
     general research support grants program any amount for 
     indirect expenses in connection with such grants: Provided 
     further, That $75,000,000 shall be for extramural facilities 
     construction grants.


                  John E. Fogarty International Center

       For carrying out the activities at the John E. Fogarty 
     International Center, $50,514,000.


                      National Library of Medicine

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to health information 
     communications, $246,801,000, of which $4,000,000 shall be 
     available until expended for improvement of information 
     systems: Provided, That in fiscal year 2001, the Library may 
     enter into personal services contracts for the provision of 
     services in facilities owned, operated, or constructed under 
     the jurisdiction of the National Institutes of Health.


       National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to complementary and 
     alternative medicine, $89,211,000.


       National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities

       For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
     Health Service Act with respect to minority health and health 
     disparities research, $130,200,000.


                         Office of the Director

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For carrying out the responsibilities of the Office of the 
     Director, National Institutes of Health, $213,581,000, of 
     which $48,271,000 shall be for the Office of AIDS Research: 
     Provided, That funding shall be available for the purchase of 
     not to exceed 20 passenger motor vehicles for replacement 
     only: Provided further, That the Director may direct up to 1 
     percent of the total amount made available in this or any 
     other Act to all National Institutes of Health appropriations 
     to activities the Director may so designate: Provided 
     further, That no such appropriation shall be decreased by 
     more than 1 percent by any such transfers and that the 
     Congress is promptly notified of the transfer: Provided 
     further, That the National Institutes of Health is authorized 
     to collect third party payments for the cost of clinical 
     services that are incurred in National Institutes of Health 
     research facilities and that such payments shall be 
     credited to the National Institutes of Health Management 
     Fund: Provided further, That all funds credited to the 
     National Institutes of Health Management Fund shall remain 
     available for one fiscal year after the fiscal year in 
     which they are deposited: Provided further, That up to 
     $500,000 shall be available to carry out section 499 of 
     the Public Health Service Act: Provided further, That, 
     notwithstanding section 499(k)(10) of the Public Health 
     Service Act, funds from the Foundation for the National 
     Institutes of Health may be transferred to the National 
     Institutes of Health.


                        buildings and facilities

       For the study of, construction of, and acquisition of 
     equipment for, facilities of or used by the National 
     Institutes of Health, including the acquisition of real 
     property, $153,790,000, to remain available until expended, 
     of which $47,300,000 shall be for the National Neuroscience 
     Research Center: Provided, That notwithstanding any other 
     provision of law, a single contract or related contracts for 
     the development and construction of the first phase of the 
     National Neuroscience Research Center may be employed which 
     collectively include the full scope of the project: Provided 
     further, That the solicitation and contract shall contain the 
     clause ``availability of funds'' found at 48 CFR 52.232-18.

       Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration


               substance abuse and mental health services

       For carrying out titles V and XIX of the Public Health 
     Service Act with respect to substance abuse and mental health 
     services, the Protection and Advocacy for Mentally Ill 
     Individuals Act of 1986, and section 301 of the Public Health 
     Service Act with respect to program management, 
     $2,958,001,000, of which $24,605,000 shall be available for 
     the projects and in the amounts specified in the statement of 
     the managers on the conference report accompanying this Act.

               Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality


                    healthcare research and quality

       For carrying out titles III and IX of the Public Health 
     Service Act, and part A of title XI of the Social Security 
     Act, $104,963,000; in addition, amounts received from Freedom 
     of Information Act fees, reimbursable and interagency 
     agreements, and the sale of data shall be credited to this 
     appropriation and shall remain available until expended: 
     Provided, That the amount made available pursuant to section 
     926(b) of the Public Health Service Act shall not exceed 
     $164,980,000.

                  Health Care Financing Administration


                     Grants to States for Medicaid

       For carrying out, except as otherwise provided, titles XI 
     and XIX of the Social Security Act, $93,586,251,000, to 
     remain available until expended.
       For making, after May 31, 2001, payments to States under 
     title XIX of the Social Security Act for the last quarter of 
     fiscal year 2001 for unanticipated costs, incurred for the 
     current fiscal year, such sums as may be necessary.
       For making payments to States or in the case of section 
     1928 on behalf of States under title XIX of the Social 
     Security Act for the first quarter of fiscal year 2002, 
     $36,207,551,000, to remain available until expended.
       Payment under title XIX may be made for any quarter with 
     respect to a State plan or plan amendment in effect during 
     such quarter, if submitted in or prior to such quarter and 
     approved in that or any subsequent quarter.


                  Payments to Health Care Trust Funds

       For payment to the Federal Hospital Insurance and the 
     Federal Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust Funds, as 
     provided under sections 217(g) and 1844 of the Social 
     Security Act, sections 103(c) and 111(d) of the Social 
     Security Amendments of 1965, section 278(d) of Public Law 97-
     248, and for administrative expenses incurred pursuant to 
     section 201(g) of the Social Security Act, $70,381,600,000.


                           Program Management

       For carrying out, except as otherwise provided, titles XI, 
     XVIII, XIX, and XXI of the Social Security Act, titles XIII 
     and XXVII of the Public Health Service Act, and the Clinical 
     Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988, not to exceed 
     $2,246,326,000, to be transferred from the Federal Hospital 
     Insurance and the Federal Supplementary Medical Insurance 
     Trust Funds, as authorized by section 201(g) of the Social 
     Security Act; together with all funds collected in accordance 
     with section 353 of the Public Health Service Act and such 
     sums as may be collected from authorized user fees and the 
     sale of data, which shall remain available until expended, 
     and together with administrative fees collected relative to 
     Medicare overpayment recovery activities, which shall remain 
     available until expended: Provided, That all funds derived in 
     accordance with 31 U.S.C. 9701 from organizations established 
     under title XIII of the Public Health Service Act shall be 
     credited to and available for carrying out the purposes of 
     this appropriation: Provided further, That $18,000,000 
     appropriated under this heading for the managed care system 
     redesign shall remain available until expended: Provided 
     further, That $20,000,000 of the amount available for 
     research, demonstration, and evaluation activities shall be 
     available to continue carrying out demonstration projects on 
     Medicaid coverage of community-based attendant care services 
     for people with disabilities which ensures maximum control by 
     the consumer to select and manage their attendant care 
     services: Provided further, That the Secretary of Health and 
     Human Services is directed to enter into an agreement with 
     the Mind-Body Institute of Boston, Massachusetts to 
     conduct a demonstration of a lifestyle modification 
     program: Provided further, That $2,800,000 of the amount 
     available for research, demonstration, and evaluation 
     activities shall be awarded for administration, 
     evaluation, quality monitoring and peer review of this 
     lifestyle modification demonstration: Provided further, 
     That $2,800,000 of the amount available for research, 
     demonstration, and evaluation activities shall be awarded 
     to a joint application from the University of Pittsburgh, 
     Case Western Reserve in Cleveland, Ohio, and Mt. Sinai 
     Hospital in Miami, Florida, to use integrated nursing 
     services and technology to implement daily monitoring of 
     congestive heart failure patients in underserved 
     populations in accordance with established clinical 
     guidelines: Provided further, That $500,000 of the amount 
     available for research, demonstration, and evaluation 
     activities shall be awarded to the University of 
     Pittsburgh Medical Center and University of Pennsylvania 
     for a study of the efficacy of surgical versus non-
     surgical management of abdominal aneurysms: Provided 
     further, That $650,000 of the amount available for 
     research, demonstration, and evaluation activities shall 
     be awarded to the Vascular Surgery Outcome Initiative at 
     Dartmouth College: Provided further, That up to $300,000 
     of the amount available for research, demonstration, and 
     evaluation activities shall be awarded to the United 
     States-Mexico Border Counties Coalition for a study to 
     determine the unreimbursed costs incurred to treat 
     undocumented aliens for medical emergencies in southwest 
     border States, their border counties, and hospitals within 
     the jurisdiction of these States and counties: Provided 
     further, That $1,700,000 of the amount available for 
     research, demonstration, and evaluation activities shall 
     be awarded to the AIDS Healthcare Foundation in Los 
     Angeles for a demonstration of residential and outpatient 
     treatment facilities: Provided further, That $350,000 of 
     the amount available for research, demonstration, and 
     evaluation activities shall be awarded to the Cook County, 
     Illinois Bureau of Health for the Asthma Champion 
     Initiative demonstration to reduce morbidity and mortality 
     from asthma in high prevalence areas: Provided further, 
     That $1,000,000 of the amount available

[[Page H12106]]

     for research, demonstration, and evaluation activities 
     shall be awarded to the West Virginia University School of 
     Medicine's Eye Center to test interventions and improve 
     the quality of life for individuals with low vision, with 
     a particular focus on the elderly: Provided further, That 
     $1,000,000 of the amount available for research, 
     demonstration, and evaluation activities shall be awarded 
     to the Iowa Department of Public Health for the 
     establishment and operation of a mercantile prescription 
     drug purchasing cooperative or non-profit corporation 
     demonstration: Provided further, That $691,000 of the 
     amount available for research, demonstration, and 
     evaluation activities shall be awarded to Ohio State 
     University to determine the benefits of compliance 
     packaging: Provided further, That $855,000 of the amount 
     available for research, demonstration and evaluation 
     activities shall be awarded to Children's Hospice 
     International for a demonstration project to provide a 
     continuum of care for children with life-threatening 
     conditions and their families: Provided further, That 
     $921,000 of the amount available for research, 
     demonstration, and evaluation activities shall be awarded 
     to Equip for Equality for a demonstration project to 
     document the impact of an independent investigative unit 
     that will examine deaths or other serious allegations of 
     abuse and neglect of people with disabilities at 
     facilities in Illinois: Provided further, That $1,000,000 
     of the amount available for research, demonstration, and 
     evaluation activities shall be awarded to Duke University 
     Medical Center to demonstrate the potential savings in the 
     Medicare program of a reimbursement system based on 
     preventative care: Provided further, That $1,843,000 of 
     the amount available for research, demonstration, and 
     evaluation activities shall be awarded to Bucks County, 
     Pennsylvania, for a health improvement project: Provided 
     further, That $255,000 of the amount available for 
     research, demonstration, and evaluation activities shall 
     be awarded to the LA Care Health Plan in Los Angeles, 
     California for a demonstration program to improve clinical 
     data coordination among Medicaid providers: Provided 
     further, That $646,000 of the amount available for 
     research, demonstration, and evaluation activities shall 
     be for the Shelby County Regional Medical Center to 
     establish a Master Patient Index to determine patient 
     Medicaid/TennCare eligibility: Provided further, That the 
     Secretary of Health and Human Services is directed to 
     collect fees in fiscal year 2001 from Medicare+Choice 
     organizations pursuant to section 1857(e)(2) of the Social 
     Security Act and from eligible organizations with risk-
     sharing contracts under section 1876 of that Act pursuant 
     to section 1876(k)(4)(D) of that Act.


      health maintenance organization loan and loan guarantee fund

       For carrying out subsections (d) and (e) of section 1308 of 
     the Public Health Service Act, any amounts received by the 
     Secretary in connection with loans and loan guarantees under 
     title XIII of the Public Health Service Act, to be available 
     without fiscal year limitation for the payment of outstanding 
     obligations. During fiscal year 2001, no commitments for 
     direct loans or loan guarantees shall be made.

                Administration for Children and Families


  payments to states for child support enforcement and family support 
                                programs

       For making payments to States or other non-Federal entities 
     under titles I, IV-D, X, XI, XIV, and XVI of the Social 
     Security Act and the Act of July 5, 1960 (24 U.S.C. ch. 9), 
     $2,441,800,000, to remain available until expended; and for 
     such purposes for the first quarter of fiscal year 2002, 
     $1,000,000,000, to remain available until expended.
       For making payments to each State for carrying out the 
     program of Aid to Families with Dependent Children under 
     title IV-A of the Social Security Act before the effective 
     date of the program of Temporary Assistance to Needy Families 
     (TANF) with respect to such State, such sums as may be 
     necessary: Provided, That the sum of the amounts available to 
     a State with respect to expenditures under such title IV-A in 
     fiscal year 1997 under this appropriation and under such 
     title IV-A as amended by the Personal Responsibility and Work 
     Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 shall not exceed the 
     limitations under section 116(b) of such Act.
       For making, after May 31 of the current fiscal year, 
     payments to States or other non-Federal entities under titles 
     I, IV-D, X, XI, XIV, and XVI of the Social Security Act and 
     the Act of July 5, 1960 (24 U.S.C. ch. 9), for the last 3 
     months of the current year for unanticipated costs, incurred 
     for the current fiscal year, such sums as may be necessary.


                   low income home energy assistance

       For making payments under title XXVI of the Omnibus Budget 
     Reconciliation Act of 1981, in addition to amounts already 
     appropriated for fiscal year 2001, $300,000,000.
       For making payments under title XXVI of the Omnibus 
     Reconciliation Act of 1981, $300,000,000: Provided, That 
     these funds are hereby designated by the Congress to be 
     emergency requirements pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985: Provided further, That these funds shall be made 
     available only after submission to the Congress of a formal 
     budget request by the President that includes designation of 
     the entire amount of the request as an emergency requirement 
     as defined in such Act.


                     Refugee and Entrant Assistance

       For making payments for refugee and entrant assistance 
     activities authorized by title IV of the Immigration and 
     Nationality Act and section 501 of the Refugee Education 
     Assistance Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-422), $423,109,000: 
     Provided, That funds appropriated pursuant to section 414(a) 
     of the Immigration and Nationality Act for fiscal year 2001 
     shall be available for the costs of assistance provided and 
     other activities through September 30, 2003: Provided 
     further, That up to $5,000,000 is available to carry out the 
     Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000.
       For carrying out section 5 of the Torture Victims Relief 
     Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-320), $10,000,000.


   Payments to States for the Child Care and Development Block Grant

       For carrying out sections 658A through 658R of the Omnibus 
     Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981 (The Child Care and 
     Development Block Grant Act of 1990), in addition to amounts 
     already appropriated for fiscal year 2001, $817,328,000, such 
     funds shall be used to supplement, not supplant state general 
     revenue funds for child care assistance for low-income 
     families: Provided, That of the funds appropriated for fiscal 
     year 2001, $19,120,000 shall be available for child care 
     resource and referral and school-aged child care activities, 
     of which $1,000,000 shall be for the Child Care Aware toll 
     free hotline: Provided further, That of the funds 
     appropriated for fiscal year 2001, in addition to the amounts 
     required to be reserved by the States under section 658G, 
     $272,672,000 shall be reserved by the States for activities 
     authorized under section 658G, of which $100,000,000 shall be 
     for activities that improve the quality of infant and toddler 
     child care: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated 
     for fiscal year 2001, $10,000,000 shall be for use by the 
     Secretary for child care research, demonstration, and 
     evaluation activities.


                      social services block grant

       For making grants to States pursuant to section 2002 of the 
     Social Security Act, $1,725,000,000: Provided, That 
     notwithstanding section 2003(c) of such Act, as amended, the 
     amount specified for allocation under such section for fiscal 
     year 2001 shall be $1,725,000,000: Provided further, That, 
     notwithstanding subparagraph (B) of section 404(d)(2) of such 
     Act, the applicable percent specified under such subparagraph 
     for a State to carry out State programs pursuant to title XX 
     of such Act shall be 10 percent.


                children and families services programs

                        (including rescissions)

       For carrying out, except as otherwise provided, the Runaway 
     and Homeless Youth Act, the Developmental Disabilities 
     Assistance and Bill of Rights Act, the Head Start Act, the 
     Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, the Native 
     American Programs Act of 1974, title II of Public Law 95-
     266 (adoption opportunities), the Adoption and Safe 
     Families Act of 1997 (Public Law 105-89), the Abandoned 
     Infants Assistance Act of 1988, the Early Learning 
     Opportunities Act, part B(1) of title IV and sections 413, 
     429A, 1110, and 1115 of the Social Security Act, and 
     sections 40155, 40211, and 40241 of Public law 103-322; 
     for making payments under the Community Services Block 
     Grant Act, section 473A of the Social Security Act, and 
     title IV of Public Law 105-285, and for necessary 
     administrative expenses to carry out said Acts and titles 
     I, IV, X, XI, XIV, XVI, and XX of the Social Security Act, 
     the Act of July 5, 1960 (24 U.S.C. ch. 9), the Omnibus 
     Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981, title IV of the 
     Immigration and Nationality Act, section 501 of the 
     Refugee Education Assistance Act of 1980, section 5 of the 
     Torture Victims Relief Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-320), 
     sections 40155, 40211, and 40241 of Public Law 103-322 and 
     section 126 and titles IV and V of Public Law 100-485, 
     $7,956,345,000, of which $43,000,000, to remain available 
     until September 30, 2002, shall be for grants to States 
     for adoption incentive payments, as authorized by section 
     473A of title IV of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 
     670-679) and may be made for adoptions completed in fiscal 
     years 1999 and 2000; of which $682,876,000 shall be for 
     making payments under the Community Services Block Grant 
     Act; and of which $6,200,000,000 shall be for making 
     payments under the Head Start Act, of which $1,400,000,000 
     shall become available October 1, 2001 and remain 
     available through September 30, 2002: Provided, That to 
     the extent Community Services Block Grant funds are 
     distributed as grant funds by a State to an eligible 
     entity as provided under the Act, and have not been 
     expended by such entity, they shall remain with such 
     entity for carryover into the next fiscal year for 
     expenditure by such entity consistent with program 
     purposes: Provided further, That the Secretary shall 
     establish procedures regarding the disposition of 
     intangible property which permits grant funds, or 
     intangible assets acquired with funds authorized under 
     section 680 of the Community Services Block Grant Act, as 
     amended, to become the sole property of such grantees 
     after a period of not more than 12 years after the end of 
     the grant for purposes and uses consistent with the 
     original grant.
       Funds appropriated for fiscal year 2001 under section 
     429A(e), part B of title IV of the Social Security Act shall 
     be reduced by $6,000,000.
       Funds appropriated for fiscal year 2001 under section 
     413(h)(1) of the Social Security Act shall be reduced by 
     $15,000,000.


                   promoting safe and stable families

       For carrying out section 430 of the Social Security Act, 
     $305,000,000.


       payments to states for foster care and adoption assistance

       For making payments to States or other non-Federal entities 
     under title IV-E of the Social Security Act, $4,863,100,000.
       For making payments to States or other non-Federal entities 
     under title IV-E of the Social Security Act, for the first 
     quarter of fiscal year 2002, $1,735,900,000.

                        Administration on Aging


                        Aging Services Programs

       For carrying out, to the extent not otherwise provided, the 
     Older Americans Act of 1965, as amended, and section 398 of 
     the Public Health

[[Page H12107]]

     Service Act, $1,103,135,000, of which $5,000,000 shall be 
     available for activities regarding medication management, 
     screening, and education to prevent incorrect medication and 
     adverse drug reactions: Provided,  That notwithstanding 
     section 308(b)(1) of the Older Americans Act of 1965, as 
     amended, the amounts available to each State for 
     administration of the State plan under title III of such Act 
     shall be reduced not more than 5 percent below the amount 
     that was available to such State for such purpose for fiscal 
     year 1995.

                        Office of the Secretary


                    general departmental management

       For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided, for general 
     departmental management, including hire of six sedans, and 
     for carrying out titles III, XVII, and XX of the Public 
     Health Service Act, and the United States-Mexico Border 
     Health Commission Act, $285,224,000, together with 
     $5,851,000, to be transferred and expended as authorized by 
     section 201(g)(1) of the Social Security Act from the 
     Hospital Insurance Trust Fund and the Supplemental Medical 
     Insurance Trust Fund: Provided further, That of the funds 
     made available under this heading for carrying out title XX 
     of the Public Health Service Act, $10,377,000 shall be for 
     activities specified under section 2003(b)(2), of which 
     $10,157,000 shall be for prevention service demonstration 
     grants under section 510(b)(2) of title V of the Social 
     Security Act, as amended, without application of the 
     limitation of section 2010(c) of said title XX: Provided 
     further, That no funds shall be obligated for minority AIDS 
     prevention and treatment activities until the Department of 
     Health and Human Services submits an operating plan to the 
     House and Senate Committees on Appropriations.


                      office of inspector general

       For expenses necessary for the Office of Inspector General 
     in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act 
     of 1978, as amended, $33,849,000: Provided, That of such 
     amount, necessary sums are available for providing protective 
     services to the Secretary and investigating non-payment of 
     child support cases for which non-payment is a Federal 
     offense under 18 U.S.C. 228, each of which activities is 
     hereby authorized in this and subsequent fiscal years.


                        office for civil rights

       For expenses necessary for the Office for Civil Rights, 
     $24,742,000, together with not to exceed $3,314,000, to be 
     transferred and expended as authorized by section 201(g)(1) 
     of the Social Security Act from the Hospital Insurance Trust 
     Fund and the Supplemental Medical Insurance Trust Fund.


                            policy research

       For carrying out, to the extent not otherwise provided, 
     research studies under section 1110 of the Social Security 
     Act, $16,738,000.


     retirement pay and medical benefits for commissioned officers

       For retirement pay and medical benefits of Public Health 
     Service Commissioned Officers as authorized by law, for 
     payments under the Retired Serviceman's Family Protection 
     Plan and Survivor Benefit Plan, for medical care of 
     dependents and retired personnel under the Dependents' 
     Medical Care Act (10 U.S.C. ch. 55), and for payments 
     pursuant to section 229(b) of the Social Security Act (42 
     U.S.C. 429(b)), such amounts as may be required during the 
     current fiscal year.


            public health and social services emergency fund

       For expenses necessary to support activities related to 
     countering potential biological, disease and chemical threats 
     to civilian populations, $241,231,000: Provided, That this 
     amount is distributed as follows: Centers for Disease Control 
     and Prevention, $181,131,000, of which $32,000,000 shall be 
     for the Health Alert Network and $18,040,000 shall be for the 
     continued study of the anthrax vaccine; and Office of 
     Emergency Preparedness, $60,100,000.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

       Sec. 201. Funds appropriated in this title shall be 
     available for not to exceed $37,000 for official reception 
     and representation expenses when specifically approved by the 
     Secretary.
       Sec. 202. The Secretary shall make available through 
     assignment not more than 60 employees of the Public Health 
     Service to assist in child survival activities and to work in 
     AIDS programs through and with funds provided by the Agency 
     for International Development, the United Nations 
     International Children's Emergency Fund or the World Health 
     Organization.
       Sec. 203. None of the funds appropriated under this Act may 
     be used to implement section 399L(b) of the Public Health 
     Service Act or section 1503 of the National Institutes of 
     Health Revitalization Act of 1993, Public Law 103-43.
       Sec. 204. None of the funds appropriated in this Act for 
     the National Institutes of Health and the Substance Abuse and 
     Mental Health Services Administration shall be used to pay 
     the salary of an individual, through a grant or other 
     extramural mechanism, at a rate in excess of Executive Level 
     I.
       Sec. 205. None of the funds appropriated in this Act may be 
     expended pursuant to section 241 of the Public Health Service 
     Act, except for funds specifically provided for in this Act, 
     or for other taps and assessments made by any office located 
     in the Department of Health and Human Services, prior to the 
     Secretary's preparation and submission of a report to the 
     Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and of the House 
     detailing the planned uses of such funds.


                          (transfer of funds)

       Sec. 206. Not to exceed 1 percent of any discretionary 
     funds (pursuant to the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985, as amended) which are appropriated for 
     the current fiscal year for the Department of Health and 
     Human Services in this Act may be transferred between 
     appropriations, but no such appropriation shall be increased 
     by more than 3 percent by any such transfer: Provided, That 
     the Appropriations Committees of both Houses of Congress are 
     notified at least 15 days in advance of any transfer.
       Sec. 207. The Director of the National Institutes of 
     Health, jointly with the Director of the Office of AIDS 
     Research, may transfer up to 3 percent among institutes, 
     centers, and divisions from the total amounts identified by 
     these two Directors as funding for research pertaining to the 
     human immunodeficiency virus: Provided, That the Congress is 
     promptly notified of the transfer.
       Sec. 208. Of the amounts made available in this Act for the 
     National Institutes of Health, the amount for research 
     related to the human immunodeficiency virus, as jointly 
     determined by the Director of the National Institutes of 
     Health and the Director of the Office of AIDS Research, 
     shall be made available to the ``Office of AIDS Research'' 
     account. The Director of the Office of AIDS Research shall 
     transfer from such account amounts necessary to carry out 
     section 2353(d)(3) of the Public Health Service Act.
       Sec. 209. None of the funds appropriated in this Act may be 
     made available to any entity under title X of the Public 
     Health Service Act unless the applicant for the award 
     certifies to the Secretary that it encourages family 
     participation in the decision of minors to seek family 
     planning services and that it provides counseling to minors 
     on how to resist attempts to coerce minors into engaging in 
     sexual activities.
       Sec. 210. None of the funds appropriated by this Act 
     (including funds appropriated to any trust fund) may be used 
     to carry out the Medicare+Choice program if the Secretary 
     denies participation in such program to an otherwise eligible 
     entity (including a Provider Sponsored Organization) because 
     the entity informs the Secretary that it will not provide, 
     pay for, provide coverage of, or provide referrals for 
     abortions: Provided, That the Secretary shall make 
     appropriate prospective adjustments to the capitation payment 
     to such an entity (based on an actuarially sound estimate of 
     the expected costs of providing the service to such entity's 
     enrollees): Provided further, That nothing in this section 
     shall be construed to change the Medicare program's coverage 
     for such services and a Medicare+Choice organization 
     described in this section shall be responsible for informing 
     enrollees where to obtain information about all Medicare 
     covered services.
       Sec. 211. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no 
     provider of services under title X of the Public Health 
     Service Act shall be exempt from any State law requiring 
     notification or the reporting of child abuse, child 
     molestation, sexual abuse, rape, or incest.
       Sec. 212. The Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and 
     Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1990 (Public Law 101-
     167) is amended--
       (1) in section 599D (8 U.S.C. 1157 note)--
       (A) in subsection (b)(3), by striking ``1997, 1998, 1999, 
     and 2000'' and inserting ``1997, 1998, 1999, 2000 and 2001''; 
     and
       (B) in subsection (e), by striking ``October 1, 2000'' each 
     place it appears and inserting ``October 1, 2001''; and
       (2) in section 599E (8 U.S.C. 1255 note) in subsection 
     (b)(2), by striking ``September 30, 2000'' and inserting 
     ``September 30, 2001''.
       Sec. 213. None of the funds provided in this Act or in any 
     other Act making appropriations for fiscal year 2001 may be 
     used to administer or implement in Arizona or in the Kansas 
     City, Missouri or in the Kansas City, Kansas area the 
     Medicare Competitive Pricing Demonstration Project (operated 
     by the Secretary of Health and Human Services).
       Sec. 214. (a) Except as provided by subsection (e) none of 
     the funds appropriated by this Act may be used to withhold 
     substance abuse funding from a State pursuant to section 1926 
     of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 300x-26) if such 
     State certifies to the Secretary of Health and Human Services 
     by March 1, 2001 that the State will commit additional State 
     funds, in accordance with subsection (b), to ensure 
     compliance with State laws prohibiting the sale of tobacco 
     products to individuals under 18 years of age.
       (b) The amount of funds to be committed by a State under 
     subsection (a) shall be equal to 1 percent of such State's 
     substance abuse block grant allocation for each percentage 
     point by which the State misses the retailer compliance rate 
     goal established by the Secretary of Health and Human 
     Services under section 1926 of such Act.
       (c) The State is to maintain State expenditures in fiscal 
     year 2001 for tobacco prevention programs and for compliance 
     activities at a level that is not less than the level of such 
     expenditures maintained by the State for fiscal year 2000, 
     and adding to that level the additional funds for tobacco 
     compliance activities required under subsection (a). The 
     State is to submit a report to the Secretary on all fiscal 
     year 2000 State expenditures and all fiscal year 2001 
     obligations for tobacco prevention and compliance activities 
     by program activity by July 31, 2001.
       (d) The Secretary shall exercise discretion in enforcing 
     the timing of the State obligation of the additional funds 
     required by the certification described in subsection (a) as 
     late as July 31, 2001.
       (e) None of the funds appropriated by this Act may be used 
     to withhold substance abuse funding pursuant to section 1926 
     from a territory that receives less than $1,000,000.
       Sec. 215. Section 448 of the Public Health Service Act (42 
     U.S.C. 285g) is amended by inserting ``gynecologic health,'' 
     after ``with respect to''.
       Sec. 216. None of the funds appropriated under this Act 
     shall be expended by the National Institutes of Health on a 
     contract for the care of the 288 chimpanzees acquired by the 
     National Institutes of Health from the Coulston

[[Page H12108]]

     Foundation, unless the contractor is accredited by the 
     Association for the Assessment and Accreditation of 
     Laboratory Animal Care International or has a Public 
     Health Services assurance, and has not been charged 
     multiple times with egregious violations of the Animal 
     Welfare Act: Provided, That the requirements of section 
     481(A)(e)(1) shall not apply to funds awarded to nonhuman 
     primate research facilities of special interest to NIH.
       Sec. 217. No grants may be awarded under the first 
     paragraph under the heading ``Department of Health and Human 
     Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, 
     Health Resources and Services'' in chapter 4 of title II of 
     the Emergency Supplemental Act, 2000 (Public Law 106-246, 
     division B) until March 1, 2001.
       Sec. 218. (a) The second sentence of section 5948(d) of 
     title 5, United States Code, is amended to read as follows: 
     ``No agreement shall be entered into under this section later 
     than September 30, 2005, nor shall any agreement cover a 
     period of service extending beyond September 30, 2007.''.
       (b) Section 3 of the Federal Physicians Comparability 
     Allowance Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. 5948 note) is amended by 
     striking ``September 30, 2002'' and inserting ``September 30, 
     2007''.
       Sec. 219. (a) Congress makes the following findings:
       (1) Organ procurement organizations play an important role 
     in the effort to increase organ donation in the United 
     States.
       (2) The current process for the certification and 
     recertification of organ procurement organizations conducted 
     by the Department of Health and Human Services has created a 
     level of uncertainty that is interfering with the 
     effectiveness of organ procurement organizations in raising 
     the level of organ donation.
       (3) The General Accounting Office, the Institute of 
     Medicine, and the Harvard School of Public Health have 
     identified substantial limitations in the organ procurement 
     organization certification and recertification process and 
     have recommended changes in that process.
       (4) The limitations in the recertification process include:
       (A) An exclusive reliance on population-based measures of 
     performance that do not account for the potential in the 
     population for organ donation and do not permit consideration 
     of other outcome and process standards that would more 
     accurately reflect the relative capability and performance of 
     each organ procurement organization.
       (B) A lack of due process to appeal to the Secretary of 
     Health and Human Services for recertification on either 
     substantive or procedural grounds.
       (5) The Secretary of Health and Human Services has the 
     authority under section 1138(b)(1)(A)(i) of the Social 
     Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1320b-8(b)(1)(A)(i)) to extend the 
     period for recertification of an organ procurement 
     organization from 2 to 4 years on the basis of its past 
     practices in order to avoid the inappropriate disruption of 
     the nation's organ system.
       (6) The Secretary of Health and Human Services can use the 
     extended period described in paragraph (5) for 
     recertification of all organ procurement organizations to--
       (A) develop improved performance measures that would 
     reflect organ donor potential and interim outcomes, and to 
     test these measures to ensure that they accurately measure 
     performance differences among the organ procurement 
     organizations; and
       (B) improve the overall certification process by 
     incorporating process as well as outcome performance 
     measures, and developing equitable processes for appeals.
       (b) Section 371(b)(1) of the Public Health Service Act (42 
     U.S.C. 273(b)(1)) is amended--
       (1) by redesignating subparagraphs (D) through (G) as 
     subparagraphs (E) through (H), respectively;
       (2) by realigning the margin of subparagraph (F) (as so 
     redesignated) so as to align with subparagraph (E) (as so 
     redesignated); and
       (3) by inserting after subparagraph (C) the following:
       ``(D) notwithstanding any other provision of law, has met 
     the other requirements of this section and has been certified 
     or recertified by the Secretary within the previous 4-year 
     period as meeting the performance standards to be a qualified 
     organ procurement organization through a process that 
     either--
       ``(i) granted certification or recertification within such 
     4-year period with such certification or recertification in 
     effect as of January 1, 2000, and remaining in effect through 
     the earlier of--
       ``(I) January 1, 2002; or
       ``(II) the completion of recertification under the 
     requirements of clause (ii); or
       ``(ii) is defined through regulations that are promulgated 
     by the Secretary by not later than January 1, 2002, that--
       ``(I) require recertifications of qualified organ 
     procurement organizations not more frequently than once every 
     4 years;
       ``(II) rely on outcome and process performance measures 
     that are based on empirical evidence, obtained through 
     reasonable efforts, of organ donor potential and other 
     related factors in each service area of qualified organ 
     procurement organizations;
       ``(III) use multiple outcome measures as part of the 
     certification process; and
       ``(IV) provide for a qualified organ procurement 
     organization to appeal a decertification to the Secretary on 
     substantive and procedural grounds;''.
       Sec. 220. (a) In order for the Centers for Disease Control 
     and Prevention to carry out international HIV/AIDS and other 
     infectious disease, chronic and environmental disease, and 
     other health activities abroad during fiscal year 2001, the 
     Secretary of Health and Human Services is authorized to--
       (1) utilize the authorities contained in subsection 2(c) of 
     the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956, as 
     amended, subject to the limitations set forth in subsection 
     (b), and
       (2) enter into reimbursable agreements with the Department 
     of State using any funds appropriated to the Department of 
     Health and Human Services, for the purposes for which the 
     funds were appropriated in accordance with authority granted 
     to the Secretary of Health and Human Services or under 
     authority governing the activities of the Department of 
     State.
       (b) In exercising the authority set forth in subsection 
     (a)(1), the Secretary of Health and Human Services--
       (1) shall not award contracts for performance of an 
     inherently governmental function; and
       (2) shall follow otherwise applicable Federal procurement 
     laws and regulations to the maximum extent practicable.
       Sec. 221. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
     Director, National Institutes of Health, may enter into and 
     administer a long-term lease for facilities for the purpose 
     of providing laboratory, office and other space for 
     biomedical and behavioral research at the Bayview Campus in 
     Baltimore, Maryland: Provided, That the House and Senate 
     Appropriations Committees will be notified of the terms and 
     conditions of the lease upon its execution.
       Sec. 222. Of the funds appropriated in this Act for the 
     National Institutes of Health, $5,800,000 shall be 
     transferred to the Office of the Secretary, General 
     Departmental Management to support the newly established 
     Office for Human Research Protections.
       Sec. 223. Section 487E(a)(1) of the Public Health Service 
     Act is amended by striking ``as employees of the National 
     Institutes of Health''.
       Sec. 224. Notwithstanding any other provision of law 
     relating to vacancies in offices for which appointments must 
     be made by the President, including any time limitation on 
     serving in an acting capacity, the Acting Director of the 
     National Institutes of Health as of January 12, 2000, may 
     serve in that position until a new Director of the National 
     Institutes of Health is confirmed by the Senate.
       Sec. 225. The National Neuroscience Research Center to be 
     constructed on the National Institutes of Health Bethesda 
     campus is hereby named the John Edward Porter Neuroscience 
     Research Center.
       This title may be cited as the ``Department of Health and 
     Human Services Appropriations Act, 2001''.

                   TITLE III--DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


                            Education Reform

       For carrying out activities authorized by title IV of the 
     Goals 2000: Educate America Act as in effect prior to 
     September 30, 2000, and sections 3122, 3132, 3136, and 3141, 
     parts B, C, and D of title III, and section 10105 and part I 
     of title X of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
     1965, $1,880,710,000, of which $38,000,000 shall be for the 
     Goals 2000: Educate America Act, and of which $191,950,000 
     shall be for section 3122: Provided, That up to one-half of 1 
     percent of the amount available under section 3132 shall be 
     set aside for the outlying areas, to be distributed on the 
     basis of their relative need as determined by the Secretary 
     in accordance with the purposes of the program: Provided 
     further, That if any State educational agency does not apply 
     for a grant under section 3132, that State's allotment under 
     section 3131 shall be reserved by the Secretary for grants to 
     local educational agencies in that State that apply directly 
     to the Secretary according to the terms and conditions 
     published by the Secretary in the Federal Register: Provided 
     further, That with respect to all funds appropriated to carry 
     out section 10901 et seq. in this Act, the Secretary shall 
     strongly encourage applications for grants that are to be 
     submitted jointly by a local educational agency (or a 
     consortium of local educational agencies) and a community-
     based organization that has experience in providing before- 
     and after-school services and all applications submitted to 
     the Secretary shall contain evidence that the project 
     contains elements that are designed to assist students in 
     meeting or exceeding state and local standards in core 
     academic subjects, as appropriate to the needs of 
     participating children: Provided further, That $125,000,000, 
     which shall become available on July 1, 2001, and remain 
     available through September 30, 2002, shall be available to 
     support activities under section 10105 of part A of title X 
     of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, of 
     which up to 6 percent shall become available October 1, 2000, 
     and be available for evaluation, technical assistance, school 
     networking, peer review of applications, and program outreach 
     activities: Provided further, That funds made available to 
     local educational agencies under this section shall be used 
     only for activities related to establishing smaller learning 
     communities in high schools: Provided further, That 
     $46,328,000 of the funds available to carry out section 3136 
     of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, 
     $8,768,000 of the funds available to carry out part B of 
     title III of that Act and $20,614,000 of the funds available 
     to carry out part I of title X of that Act shall be available 
     for the projects and in the amounts specified in the 
     statement of the managers on the conference report 
     accompanying this Act.


                    Education for the Disadvantaged

       For carrying out title I of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965, and section 418A of the Higher 
     Education Act of 1965, $9,532,621,000, of which 
     $2,731,921,000 shall become available on July 1, 2001, and 
     shall remain available through September 30, 2002, and of 
     which $6,758,300,000 shall become available on October 1, 
     2001 and shall remain available through September 30, 2002, 
     for academic year 2001-2002: Provided, That $7,332,721,000 
     shall be available for basic grants under section 1124:

[[Page H12109]]

     Provided further, That $225,000,000 of these funds shall be 
     allocated among the States in the same proportion as funds 
     are allocated among the States under section 1122, to carry 
     out section 1116(c): Provided further, That 100 percent of 
     these funds shall be allocated by states to local educational 
     agencies for the purposes of carrying out section 1116(c): 
     Provided further, That all local educational agencies 
     receiving an allocation under the preceding proviso, and all 
     other local educational agencies that are within a State that 
     receives funds under part A of title I of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965 (other than a local 
     educational agency within a State receiving a minimum grant 
     under section 1124(d) or 1124A(a)(1)(B) of such Act), shall 
     provide all students enrolled in a school identified under 
     section 1116(c) with the option to transfer to another public 
     school within the local educational agency, including a 
     public charter school, that has not been identified for 
     school improvement under section 1116(c), unless such option 
     to transfer is prohibited by State law, or local law, which 
     includes school board-approved local educational agency 
     policy: Provided further, That if the local educational 
     agency demonstrates to the satisfaction of the State 
     educational agency that the local educational agency lacks 
     the capacity to provide all students with the option to 
     transfer to another public school, and after giving notice to 
     the parents of children affected that it is not possible, 
     consistent with State and local law, to accommodate the 
     transfer request of every student, the local educational 
     agency shall permit as many students as possible (who shall 
     be selected by the local educational agency on an equitable 
     basis) to transfer to a public school that has not been 
     identified for school improvement under section 1116(c): 
     Provided further, That up to $3,500,000 of these funds shall 
     be available to the Secretary on October 1, 2000, to obtain 
     updated local educational agency level census poverty data 
     from the Bureau of the Census: Provided further, That 
     $1,364,000,000 shall be available for concentration grants 
     under section 1124A: Provided further, That grant awards 
     under sections 1124 and 1124A of title I of the Elementary 
     and Secondary Education Act of 1965 shall be not less than 
     the greater of 100 percent of the amount each State and 
     local educational agency received under this authority for 
     fiscal year 2000 or the amount such State and local 
     educational agency would receive if $6,883,503,000 for 
     Basic Grants and $1,222,397,000 for Concentration Grants 
     were allocated in accordance with section 1122(c)(3) of 
     title I: Provided further, That notwithstanding any other 
     provision of law, grant awards under section 1124A of 
     title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
     1965 shall be made to those local educational agencies 
     that received a Concentration Grant under the Department 
     of Education Appropriations Act, 2000, but are not 
     eligible to receive such a grant for fiscal year 2001: 
     Provided further, That the Secretary shall not take into 
     account the hold harmless provisions in this section in 
     determining State allocations under any other program 
     administered by the Secretary in any fiscal year: Provided 
     further, That $8,900,000 shall be available for 
     evaluations under section 1501 and not more than 
     $8,500,000 shall be reserved for section 1308, of which 
     not more than $3,000,000 shall be reserved for section 
     1308(d): Provided further, That $210,000,000 shall be 
     available under section 1002(g)(2) to demonstrate 
     effective approaches to comprehensive school reform to be 
     allocated and expended in accordance with the instructions 
     relating to this activity in the statement of the managers 
     on the conference report accompanying Public Law 105-78 
     and in the statement of the managers on the conference 
     report accompanying Public Law 105-277: Provided further, 
     That in carrying out this initiative, the Secretary and 
     the States shall support only approaches that show the 
     most promise of enabling children served by title I to 
     meet challenging State content standards and challenging 
     State student performance standards based on reliable 
     research and effective practices, and include an emphasis 
     on basic academics and parental involvement.


                               impact aid

       For carrying out programs of financial assistance to 
     federally affected schools authorized by title VIII of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, $993,302,000, 
     of which $882,000,000 shall be for basic support payments 
     under section 8003(b), $50,000,000 shall be for payments for 
     children with disabilities under section 8003(d), $12,802,000 
     shall be for construction under section 8007, $40,500,000 
     shall be for Federal property payments under section 8002, 
     and $8,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be 
     for facilities maintenance under section 8008: Provided, That 
     $6,802,000 of the funds for section 8007 shall be available 
     for the local educational agencies and in the amounts 
     specified in the statement of the managers on the conference 
     report accompanying this Act: Provided further, That from the 
     amount appropriated for section 8002, the Secretary shall 
     treat as timely filed, and shall process for payment, an 
     application for a fiscal year 1999 payment from Academy 
     School District 20, Colorado, under that section if the 
     Secretary has received that application not later than 30 
     days after the enactment of this Act: Provided further, That 
     the Secretary of Education shall consider the local 
     educational agency serving the Kadoka School District, 35-1, 
     in South Dakota, eligible for payments under section 8002 for 
     fiscal year 2001 and each succeeding fiscal year, with 
     respect to land in Washabaugh and Jackson Counties, South 
     Dakota, that is owned by the Department of Defense and used 
     as a bombing range: Provided further, That from the amount 
     appropriated for section 8002, the Secretary shall first 
     increase the payment of any local educational agency that was 
     denied funding or had its payment reduced under that section 
     for fiscal year 1998 due to section 8002(b)(1)(C) to the 
     amount that would have been made without the limitation of 
     that section: Provided further, That from the amount 
     appropriated for section 8002, $500,000 shall be for 
     subsection 8002(j).


                      School Improvement Programs

       For carrying out school improvement activities authorized 
     by titles II, IV, V-A and B, VI, IX, X, and XIII of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (``ESEA''); 
     the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act; and the Civil 
     Rights Act of 1964 and part B of title VIII of the Higher 
     Education Amendments of 1998; $4,872,084,000, of which 
     $2,403,750,000 shall become available on July 1, 2001, and 
     remain available through September 30, 2002, and of which 
     $1,765,000,000 shall become available on October 1, 2001 and 
     shall remain available through September 30, 2002 for 
     academic year 2001-2002: Provided, That $485,000,000 shall be 
     available for Eisenhower professional development State 
     grants under part B of title II of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965: Provided further, That each 
     local educational agency shall use funds in excess of the 
     allocation it received under such part for the preceding 
     fiscal year to improve teacher quality by reducing the 
     percentage of teachers who do not have State certification or 
     are certified through emergency or provisional means; are 
     teaching out of field in some or all of the subject areas and 
     grade levels in which they teach; or who lack sufficient 
     content knowledge to teach effectively in the areas they 
     teach to obtain that knowledge: Provided further, That 
     the local educational agency may also use such excess 
     funds for: activities authorized under section 2210 of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965; mentoring 
     programs for new teachers; providing opportunities for 
     teachers to attend multi-week institutes, such as those 
     provided in the summer months, that provide intensive 
     professional development in partnership with local 
     educational agencies; and carrying out initiatives to 
     promote the retention of highly qualified teachers who 
     have a record of success in helping low-achieving students 
     improve their academic success: Provided further, That 
     each State educational agency may use such excess funds to 
     carry out activities under section 2207 of the Elementary 
     and Secondary Education Act of 1965: Provided further, 
     That each State agency for higher education may use such 
     excess funds to carry out activities under section 2211 of 
     the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965: 
     Provided further, That both State educational agencies and 
     State agencies for higher education may also use such 
     excess funds for multi-week institutes, such as those 
     provided in the summer months, that provide intensive 
     professional development in partnership with local 
     educational agencies; and grants to partnerships of such 
     entities as local educational agencies, institutions of 
     higher education, and private business, to recruit, and 
     prepare, and provide professional development to, and help 
     retain, school principals and superintendents, especially 
     for such individuals who serve, or are preparing to serve, 
     in high-poverty, low-performing schools and local 
     educational agencies: Provided further, That such 
     activities may be undertaken in consortium with other 
     States: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated 
     for part B of title II of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965, $45,000,000 shall be available to 
     States and allocated in accordance with section 2202(b) of 
     that Act (except that the requirements of section 2203 
     shall not apply): Provided further, That notwithstanding 
     any other provision of law, each State shall use the 
     amount made available under the preceding proviso to 
     support efforts to meet the requirements for State 
     eligibility for the Ed-Flex Partnership Act of 1999 or the 
     requirements under section 1111 of title I of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965: Provided 
     further, That $44,000,000 shall be available for national 
     activities under section 2102 of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965: Provided further, That of 
     the amount available in the preceding proviso, $3,000,000 
     shall be made available to the Secretary for the Troops-
     to-Teachers Program for transfer to the Defense Activity 
     for Non-Traditional Education Support of the Department of 
     Defense: Provided further, That the funds transferred 
     under the preceding proviso shall be used by the Secretary 
     of Defense to administer the Troops-to-Teachers Program, 
     including the selection of participants in the Program 
     under the Troops-to-Teachers Program Act of 1999 (title 
     XVII of Public Law 106-65; 20 U.S.C. 9301 et seq.): 
     Provided further, That for purposes of sections 1702(b) 
     and (c) of the Troops-to-Teachers Program Act of 1999, the 
     Secretary of Education shall be the administering 
     Secretary and may, at the Secretary's discretion, carry 
     out the activities under section 1702(c) of that Act and 
     retain a portion of the funds made available for the 
     Troops-to-Teachers Program to carry out section 1702(b) 
     and (c) of that Act: Provided further, That of the amount 
     made available under this heading for national activities 
     under section 2102 of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965, the Secretary is authorized to use 
     a portion of such funds to carry out activities to improve 
     the knowledge and skills of early childhood educators and 
     caregivers who work in urban or rural communities with 
     high concentrations of young children living in poverty: 
     Provided further, That of the amount appropriated, 
     $3,208,000,000 shall be for title VI of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965 and to carry out 
     activities under part B of the Individuals with 
     Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1411 et seq.): 
     Provided further, That of the amount made available for 
     title VI,

[[Page H12110]]

     $1,623,000,000 shall be available, notwithstanding any 
     other provision of law, in accordance with section 306 of 
     this Act in order to reduce class size, particularly in 
     the early grades, using highly qualified teachers to 
     improve educational achievement for regular and special 
     needs children: Provided further, That of the amount made 
     available for title VI, $1,200,000,000 shall be available, 
     notwithstanding any other provision of law, for grants for 
     school repair and renovation, activities under part B of 
     the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 
     1411 et seq.), and technology activities, in accordance 
     with section 321 of this Act: Provided further, That funds 
     made available under this heading to carry out section 
     6301(b) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
     1965 shall be available for education reform projects that 
     provide same gender schools and classrooms, consistent 
     with applicable law: Provided further, That of the amount 
     made available to carry out activities authorized under 
     part C of title IX of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965, $1,000,000 shall be for the Alaska 
     Humanities Forum for operation of the Rose student 
     exchange program and $1,000,000 shall be for the Alaska 
     Native Heritage Center to support its program of cultural 
     education activities: Provided further, That of the amount 
     made available for subpart 2 of part A of title IV of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, 
     $10,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be 
     for Project School Emergency Response to Violence to 
     provide education-related services to local educational 
     agencies in which the learning environment has been 
     disrupted due to a violent or traumatic crisis.


                           reading excellence

       For necessary expenses to carry out the Reading Excellence 
     Act, $91,000,000, which shall become available on July 1, 
     2001 and shall remain available through September 30, 2002 
     and $195,000,000 which shall become available on October 1, 
     2001 and remain available through September 30, 2002.


                            Indian Education

       For expenses necessary to carry out, to the extent not 
     otherwise provided, title IX, part A of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, $115,500,000.


                   Bilingual and Immigrant Education

       For carrying out, to the extent not otherwise provided, 
     bilingual, foreign language and immigrant education 
     activities authorized by parts A and C and section 7203 of 
     title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
     1965, $460,000,000: Provided, That State educational agencies 
     may use all, or any part of, their part C allocation for 
     competitive grants to local educational agencies.


                           special education

       For carrying out the Individuals with Disabilities 
     Education Act, $7,439,948,000, of which $2,090,452,000 shall 
     become available for obligation on July 1, 2001, and shall 
     remain available through September 30, 2002, and of which 
     $5,072,000,000 shall become available on October 1, 2001 and 
     shall remain available through September 30, 2002, for 
     academic year 2001-2002: Provided, That $9,500,000 shall be 
     for Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic to support the 
     development, production, and circulation of recorded 
     educational materials: Provided further, That $1,500,000 
     shall be for the recipient of funds provided by Public Law 
     105-78 under section 687(b)(2)(G) of the Act to provide 
     information on diagnosis, intervention, and teaching 
     strategies for children with disabilities: Provided further, 
     That $7,353,000 of the funds for section 672 of the Act shall 
     be available for the projects and in the amounts specified in 
     the statement of the managers on the conference report 
     accompanying this Act.


            Rehabilitation Services and Disability Research

       For carrying out, to the extent not otherwise provided, the 
     Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Assistive Technology Act of 
     1998, and the Helen Keller National Center Act, 
     $2,805,339,000: Provided, That the funds provided for title I 
     of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 (``the AT Act'') 
     shall be allocated notwithstanding section 105(b)(1) of the 
     AT Act: Provided further, That each State shall be provided 
     $50,000 for activities under section 102 of the AT Act: 
     Provided further, That $15,000,000 shall be used to support 
     grants for up to three years to States under title III of the 
     AT Act, of which the Federal share shall not exceed 75 
     percent in the first year, 50 percent in the second year, and 
     25 percent in the third year, and that the requirements in 
     section 301(c)(2) and section 302 of that Act shall not apply 
     to such grants: Provided further, That $4,600,000 of the 
     funds for section 303 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 shall 
     be available for the projects and in the amounts specified in 
     the statement of the managers on the conference report 
     accompanying this Act: Provided further, That $400,000 of the 
     funds for title II of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 shall be 
     for the Cerebral Palsy Research Foundation in Wichita, Kansas 
     for the establishment of a Rehabilitation Research and 
     Training Center to study and recommend incentives for 
     employers to hire persons with significant disabilities.

           Special Institutions for Persons With Disabilities


                 american printing house for the blind

       For carrying out the Act of March 3, 1879, as amended (20 
     U.S.C. 101 et seq.), $12,000,000.


               national technical institute for the deaf

       For the National Technical Institute for the Deaf under 
     titles I and II of the Education of the Deaf Act of 1986 (20 
     U.S.C. 4301 et seq.), $53,376,000, of which $5,376,000 shall 
     be for construction and shall remain available until 
     expended: Provided, That from the total amount available, the 
     Institute may at its discretion use funds for the endowment 
     program as authorized under section 207.


                          gallaudet university

       For the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School, the Model 
     Secondary School for the Deaf, and the partial support of 
     Gallaudet University under titles I and II of the Education 
     of the Deaf Act of 1986 (20 U.S.C. 4301 et seq.), 
     $89,400,000: Provided, That from the total amount available, 
     the University may at its discretion use funds for the 
     endowment program as authorized under section 207.


                     Vocational and Adult Education

       For carrying out, to the extent not otherwise provided, the 
     Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act, the 
     Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, and title VIII-D of 
     the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, and Public Law 
     102-73, $1,825,600,000, of which $1,000,000 shall remain 
     available until expended, and of which $1,028,000,000 shall 
     become available on July 1, 2001 and shall remain available 
     through September 30, 2002 and of which $791,000,000 shall 
     become available on October 1, 2001 and shall remain 
     available through September 30, 2002: Provided, That of the 
     amounts made available for the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and 
     Technical Education Act, $5,600,000 shall be for tribally 
     controlled postsecondary vocational and technical 
     institutions under section 117: Provided further, That 
     $9,000,000 shall be for carrying out section 118 of such Act: 
     Provided further, That of the amounts made available for the 
     Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act, 
     $5,000,000 shall be for demonstration activities authorized 
     by section 207: Provided further, That of the amount provided 
     for Adult Education State Grants, $70,000,000 shall be made 
     available for integrated English literacy and civics 
     education services to immigrants and other limited English 
     proficient populations: Provided further, That of the amount 
     reserved for integrated English literacy and civics 
     education, notwithstanding section 211 of the Adult Education 
     and Family Literacy Act, 65 percent shall be allocated to 
     States based on a State's absolute need as determined by 
     calculating each State's share of a 10-year average of the 
     Immigration and Naturalization Service data for immigrants 
     admitted for legal permanent residence for the 10 most 
     recent years, and 35 percent allocated to States that 
     experienced growth as measured by the average of the 3 
     most recent years for which Immigration and Naturalization 
     Service data for immigrants admitted for legal permanent 
     residence are available, except that no State shall be 
     allocated an amount less than $60,000: Provided further, 
     That of the amounts made available for the Adult Education 
     and Family Literacy Act, $14,000,000 shall be for national 
     leadership activities under section 243 and $6,500,000 
     shall be for the National Institute for Literacy under 
     section 242: Provided further, That $22,000,000 shall be 
     for Youth Offender Grants, of which $5,000,000 shall be 
     used in accordance with section 601 of Public Law 102-73 
     as that section was in effect prior to the enactment of 
     Public Law 105-220.


                      Student Financial Assistance

       For carrying out subparts 1, 3 and 4 of part A, section 
     428K, part C and part E of title IV of the Higher Education 
     Act of 1965, as amended, $10,674,000,000, which shall remain 
     available through September 30, 2002.
       The maximum Pell Grant for which a student shall be 
     eligible during award year 2001-2002 shall be $3,750: 
     Provided, That notwithstanding section 401(g) of the Act, if 
     the Secretary determines, prior to publication of the payment 
     schedule for such award year, that the amount included within 
     this appropriation for Pell Grant awards in such award year, 
     and any funds available from the fiscal year 2000 
     appropriation for Pell Grant awards, are insufficient to 
     satisfy fully all such awards for which students are 
     eligible, as calculated under section 401(b) of the Act, the 
     amount paid for each such award shall be reduced by either a 
     fixed or variable percentage, or by a fixed dollar amount, as 
     determined in accordance with a schedule of reductions 
     established by the Secretary for this purpose.


             Federal Family Education Loan Program Account

       For Federal administrative expenses to carry out guaranteed 
     student loans authorized by title IV, part B, of the Higher 
     Education Act of 1965, as amended, $48,000,000.


                            higher education

       For carrying out, to the extent not otherwise provided, 
     section 121 and titles II, III, IV, V, VI, and VII of the 
     Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, section 1543 of the 
     Higher Education Amendments of 1992 and title VIII of the 
     Higher Education Amendments of 1998, and the Mutual 
     Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, 
     $1,911,710,000, of which $10,000,000 for interest subsidies 
     authorized by section 121 of the Higher Education Act of 
     1965, shall remain available until expended: Provided, That 
     $10,000,000, to remain available through September 30, 2002, 
     shall be available to fund fellowships for academic year 
     2002-2003 under part A, subpart 1 of title VII of said Act, 
     under the terms and conditions of part A, subpart 1: Provided 
     further, That $3,000,000 is for data collection and 
     evaluation activities for programs under the Higher Education 
     Act of 1965, including such activities needed to comply with 
     the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993: Provided 
     further, That $15,000,000 shall be available for tribally 
     controlled colleges and universities under section 316 of the 
     Higher Education Act of 1965, of which $5,000,000 shall be 
     used for construction and renovation: Provided further, That 
     $250,000 shall be for the Web-Based Education Commission to 
     continue activities authorized under part

[[Page H12111]]

     J of title VIII of the Higher Education Amendments of 1998: 
     Provided further, That $115,487,000 of the funds for part B 
     of title VII of the Higher Education Act of 1965 shall be 
     available for the projects and in the amounts specified in 
     the statement of the managers on the conference report 
     accompanying this Act.


                           howard university

       For partial support of Howard University (20 U.S.C. 121 et 
     seq.), $232,474,000, of which not less than $3,600,000 shall 
     be for a matching endowment grant pursuant to the Howard 
     University Endowment Act (Public Law 98-480) and shall remain 
     available until expended.


         College Housing and Academic Facilities Loans Program

       For Federal administrative expenses authorized under 
     section 121 of the Higher Education Act of 1965, $762,000 to 
     carry out activities related to existing facility loans 
     entered into under the Higher Education Act of 1965.


  Historically Black College and University Capital Financing Program 
                                Account

       The total amount of bonds insured pursuant to section 344 
     of title III, part D of the Higher Education Act of 1965 
     shall not exceed $357,000,000, and the cost, as defined in 
     section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, of such 
     bonds shall not exceed zero.
       For administrative expenses to carry out the Historically 
     Black College and University Capital Financing Program 
     entered into pursuant to title III, part D of the Higher 
     Education Act of 1965, as amended, $208,000.


            Education Research, Statistics, and Improvement

       For carrying out activities authorized by the Educational 
     Research, Development, Dissemination, and Improvement Act of 
     1994, including part E; the National Education Statistics Act 
     of 1994, including sections 411 and 412; section 2102 of 
     title II, parts A, B, K, and L and sections 10102 and 10601 
     of title X, and part C of title XIII of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, and title VI of 
     Public Law 103-227, $732,721,000: Provided, That of the funds 
     appropriated for part A of title X of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, $5,000,000 shall 
     be made available for a high school reform program of grants 
     to State educational agencies to improve academic performance 
     and provide technical skills training: Provided further, That 
     of the funds appropriated for part A of title X of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, 
     $5,000,000 shall be made available to carry out part L of 
     title X of the Act: Provided further, That of the amount 
     available for part A of title X of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, $5,000,000 shall 
     be available for grants to State and local educational 
     agencies, in collaboration with other agencies and 
     organizations, for school dropout prevention programs 
     designed to address the needs of populations or communities 
     with the highest dropout rates: Provided further, That of the 
     amount made available for part A of title X of the Elementary 
     and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, $50,000,000 
     shall be made available to enable the Secretary of Education 
     to award grants to develop, implement, and strengthen 
     programs to teach American history (not social studies) as a 
     separate subject within school curricula: Provided further, 
     That $53,000,000 of the amount available for the national 
     education research institutes shall be allocated 
     notwithstanding section 912(m)(1)(B-F) and subparagraphs (B) 
     and (C) of section 931(c)(2) of Public Law 103-227 and 
     $20,000,000 of that $53,000,000 shall be made available for 
     the Interagency Education Research Initiative: Provided 
     further, That of the funds appropriated for part A of title X 
     of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended, 
     $50,000,000 shall be available to demonstrate effective 
     approaches to comprehensive school reform, to be allocated 
     and expended in accordance with the instructions relating to 
     this activity in the statement of managers on the conference 
     report accompanying Public Law 105-78 and in the statement of 
     the managers on the conference report accompanying Public Law 
     105-277: Provided further, That the funds made available for 
     comprehensive school reform shall become available on July 1, 
     2001, and remain available through September 30, 2002, and in 
     carrying out this initiative, the Secretary and the States 
     shall support only approaches that show the most promise of 
     enabling children to meet challenging State content standards 
     and challenging State student performance standards based on 
     reliable research and effective practices, and include an 
     emphasis on basic academics and parental involvement: 
     Provided further, That $139,624,000 of the funds for section 
     10101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 
     shall be available for the projects and in the amounts 
     specified in the statement of the managers on the conference 
     report accompanying this Act: Provided further, That of the 
     funds appropriated under section 10601 of title X of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, 
     $2,000,000 shall be used to conduct a violence prevention 
     demonstration program: Provided further, That of the funds 
     available for section 10601 of title X of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, $150,000 shall 
     be awarded to the Center for Educational Technologies to 
     complete production and distribution of an effective CD-ROM 
     product that would complement the ``We the People: The 
     Citizen and the Constitution'' curriculum: Provided further, 
     That, of the funds for title VI of Public Law 103-227 and 
     notwithstanding the provisions of section 601(c)(1)(C) of 
     that Act, $1,200,000 shall be available to the Center for 
     Civic Education to conduct a civic education program with 
     Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland and, consistent 
     with the civics and Government activities authorized in 
     section 601(c)(3) of Public Law 103-227, to provide civic 
     education assistance to democracies in developing countries. 
     The term ``developing countries'' shall have the same meaning 
     as the term ``developing country'' in the Education for the 
     Deaf Act.

                        Departmental Management


                         Program Administration

       For carrying out, to the extent not otherwise provided, the 
     Department of Education Organization Act, including rental of 
     conference rooms in the District of Columbia and hire of two 
     passenger motor vehicles, $413,184,000.


                        Office for Civil Rights

       For expenses necessary for the Office for Civil Rights, as 
     authorized by section 203 of the Department of Education 
     Organization Act, $76,000,000.


                    Office of the Inspector General

       For expenses necessary for the Office of the Inspector 
     General, as authorized by section 212 of the Department of 
     Education Organization Act, $36,500,000.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

       Sec. 301. No funds appropriated in this Act may be used for 
     the transportation of students or teachers (or for the 
     purchase of equipment for such transportation) in order to 
     overcome racial imbalance in any school or school system, or 
     for the transportation of students or teachers (or for the 
     purchase of equipment for such transportation) in order to 
     carry out a plan of racial desegregation of any school or 
     school system.
       Sec. 302. None of the funds contained in this Act shall be 
     used to require, directly or indirectly, the transportation 
     of any student to a school other than the school which is 
     nearest the student's home, except for a student requiring 
     special education, to the school offering such special 
     education, in order to comply with title VI of the Civil 
     Rights Act of 1964. For the purpose of this section an 
     indirect requirement of transportation of students includes 
     the transportation of students to carry out a plan involving 
     the reorganization of the grade structure of schools, the 
     pairing of schools, or the clustering of schools, or any 
     combination of grade restructuring, pairing or clustering. 
     The prohibition described in this section does not include 
     the establishment of magnet schools.
       Sec. 303. No funds appropriated under this Act may be used 
     to prevent the implementation of programs of voluntary prayer 
     and meditation in the public schools.


                          (transfer of funds)

       Sec. 304. Not to exceed 1 percent of any discretionary 
     funds (pursuant to the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985, as amended) which are appropriated for 
     the Department of Education in this Act may be transferred 
     between appropriations, but no such appropriation shall be 
     increased by more than 3 percent by any such transfer: 
     Provided, That the Appropriations Committees of both Houses 
     of Congress are notified at least 15 days in advance of any 
     transfer.
       Sec. 305. The Comptroller General of the United States 
     shall evaluate the extent to which funds made available under 
     part A of title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education 
     Act of 1965 are allocated to schools and local educational 
     agencies with the greatest concentrations of school-age 
     children from low-income families, the extent to which 
     allocations of such funds adjust to shifts in concentrations 
     of pupils from low-income families in different regions, 
     States, and substate areas, the extent to which the 
     allocation of such funds encourages the targeting of State 
     funds to areas with higher concentrations of children from 
     low-income families, and the implications of current 
     distribution methods for such funds, shall make formula and 
     other policy recommendations to improve the targeting of such 
     funds to more effectively serve low-income children in both 
     rural and urban areas, and shall prepare interim and final 
     reports based on the results of the study, to be submitted to 
     Congress not later than February 1, 2001, and April 1, 2001.
       Sec. 306. (a) From the amount appropriated for title VI of 
     the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 in 
     accordance with this section, the Secretary of Education--
       (1) shall make available a total of $6,000,000 to the 
     Secretary of the Interior (on behalf of the Bureau of Indian 
     Affairs) and the outlying areas for activities under this 
     section; and
       (2) shall allocate the remainder by providing each State 
     the same percentage of that remainder as it received of the 
     funds allocated to States under section 307(a)(2) of the 
     Department of Education Appropriations Act, 1999.
       (b)(1) Each State that receives funds under this section 
     shall distribute 100 percent of such funds to local 
     educational agencies, of which--
       (A) 80 percent of such amount shall be allocated to such 
     local educational agencies in proportion to the number of 
     children, aged 5 to 17, who reside in the school district 
     served by such local educational agency from families with 
     incomes below the poverty line (as defined by the Office of 
     Management and Budget and revised annually in accordance with 
     section 673(2) of the Community Services Block Grant Act (42 
     U.S.C. 9902(2))) applicable to a family of the size involved 
     for the most recent fiscal year for which satisfactory data 
     are available compared to the number of such individuals who 
     reside in the school districts served by all the local 
     educational agencies in the State for that fiscal year; and
       (B) 20 percent of such amount shall be allocated to such 
     local educational agencies in accordance with the relative 
     enrollments of children, aged 5 to 17, in public and private 
     nonprofit elementary and secondary schools within the 
     boundaries of such agencies.
       (2) Notwithstanding paragraph (1), if the award to a local 
     educational agency under this

[[Page H12112]]

     section is less than the starting salary for a new fully 
     qualified teacher in that agency, who is certified within the 
     State (which may include certification through State or local 
     alternative routes), has a baccalaureate degree, and 
     demonstrates the general knowledge, teaching skills, and 
     subject matter knowledge required to teach in his or her 
     content areas, that agency may use funds under this 
     section to (A) help pay the salary of a full- or part-time 
     teacher hired to reduce class size, which may be in 
     combination with other Federal, State, or local funds; or 
     (B) pay for activities described in subsection 
     (c)(2)(A)(iii) which may be related to teaching in smaller 
     classes.
       (c)(1) The basic purpose and intent of this section is to 
     reduce class size with fully qualified teachers. Each local 
     educational agency that receives funds under this section 
     shall use such funds to carry out effective approaches to 
     reducing class size with fully qualified teachers who are 
     certified within the State, including teachers certified 
     through State or local alternative routes, and who 
     demonstrate competency in the areas in which they teach, to 
     improve educational achievement for both regular and special 
     needs children, with particular consideration given to 
     reducing class size in the early elementary grades for which 
     some research has shown class size reduction is most 
     effective.
       (2)(A) Each such local educational agency may use funds 
     under this section for--
       (i) recruiting (including through the use of signing 
     bonuses, and other financial incentives), hiring, and 
     training fully qualified regular and special education 
     teachers (which may include hiring special education teachers 
     to team-teach with regular teachers in classrooms that 
     contain both children with disabilities and non-disabled 
     children) and teachers of special-needs children who are 
     certified within the State, including teachers certified 
     through State or local alternative routes, have a 
     baccalaureate degree and demonstrate the general knowledge, 
     teaching skills, and subject matter knowledge required to 
     teach in their content areas;
       (ii) testing new teachers for academic content knowledge 
     and to meet State certification requirements that are 
     consistent with title II of the Higher Education Act of 1965; 
     and
       (iii) providing professional development (which may include 
     such activities as those described in section 2210 of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, opportunities 
     for teachers to attend multi-week institutes, such as those 
     made available during the summer months that provide 
     intensive professional development in partnership with local 
     educational agencies and initiatives that promote retention 
     and mentoring), to teachers, including special education 
     teachers and teachers of special-needs children, in order to 
     meet the goal of ensuring that all instructional staff have 
     the subject matter knowledge, teaching knowledge, and 
     teaching skills necessary to teach effectively in the content 
     area or areas in which they provide instruction, consistent 
     with title II of the Higher Education Act of 1965.
       (B)(i) Except as provided under clause (ii), a local 
     educational agency may use not more than a total of 25 
     percent of the award received under this section for 
     activities described in clauses (ii) and (iii) of 
     subparagraph (A).
       (ii) A local educational agency in which 10 percent or more 
     of teachers in elementary schools, as defined by section 
     14101(14) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
     1965, have not met applicable State and local certification 
     requirements (including certification through State or local 
     alternative routes), or if such requirements have been 
     waived, may use more than 25 percent of the funds it receives 
     under this section for activities described in subparagraph 
     (A)(iii) to help teachers who are not certified by the State 
     become certified, including through State or local 
     alternative routes, or to help teachers affected by class 
     size reduction who lack sufficient content knowledge to teach 
     effectively in the areas they teach to obtain that knowledge, 
     if the local educational agency notifies the State 
     educational agency of the percentage of the funds that it 
     will use for the purpose described in this clause.
       (C) A local educational agency that has already reduced 
     class size in the early grades to 18 or less children (or has 
     already reduced class size to a State or local class size 
     reduction goal that was in effect on the day before the 
     enactment of the Department of Education Appropriations Act, 
     2000, if that State or local educational agency goal is 20 or 
     fewer children) may use funds received under this section--
       (i) to make further class size reductions in grades 
     kindergarten through 3;
       (ii) to reduce class size in other grades; or
       (iii) to carry out activities to improve teacher quality 
     including professional development.
       (D) If a local educational agency has already reduced class 
     size in the early grades to 18 or fewer children and intends 
     to use funds provided under this section to carry out 
     professional development activities, including activities to 
     improve teacher quality, then the State shall make the award 
     under subsection (b) to the local educational agency.
       (3) Each such agency shall use funds under this section 
     only to supplement, and not to supplant, State and local 
     funds that, in the absence of such funds, would otherwise 
     be spent for activities under this section.
       (4) No funds made available under this section may be used 
     to increase the salaries or provide benefits, other than 
     participation in professional development and enrichment 
     programs, to teachers who are not hired under this section. 
     Funds under this section may be used to pay the salary of 
     teachers hired under section 307 of the Department of 
     Education Appropriations Act, 1999, or under section 310 of 
     the Department of Education Appropriations Act, 2000.
       (d)(1) Each State receiving funds under this section shall 
     report on activities in the State under this section, 
     consistent with section 6202(a)(2) of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965.
       (2) Each State and local educational agency receiving funds 
     under this section shall publicly report to parents on its 
     progress in reducing class size, increasing the percentage of 
     classes in core academic areas taught by fully qualified 
     teachers who are certified within the State and demonstrate 
     competency in the content areas in which they teach, and on 
     the impact that hiring additional highly qualified teachers 
     and reducing class size, has had, if any, on increasing 
     student academic achievement.
       (3) Each school receiving funds under this section shall 
     provide to parents, upon request, the professional 
     qualifications of their child's teacher.
       (e) If a local educational agency uses funds made available 
     under this section for professional development activities, 
     the agency shall ensure for the equitable participation of 
     private nonprofit elementary and secondary schools in such 
     activities. Section 6402 of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965 shall not apply to other activities 
     under this section.
       (f) A local educational agency that receives funds under 
     this section may use not more than 3 percent of such funds 
     for local administrative costs.
       (g) Each local educational agency that desires to receive 
     funds under this section shall include in the application 
     required under section 6303 of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965 a description of the agency's program 
     to reduce class size by hiring additional highly qualified 
     teachers.
       (h) No funds under this section may be used to pay the 
     salary of any teacher hired with funds under section 307 of 
     the Department of Education Appropriations Act, 1999, unless, 
     by the start of the 2001-2002 school year, the teacher is 
     certified within the State (which may include certification 
     through State or local alternative routes) and demonstrates 
     competency in the subject areas in which he or she teaches.
       (i) Not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment 
     of this Act, the Secretary shall provide specific 
     notification to each local educational agency eligible to 
     receive funds under this part regarding the flexibility 
     provided under subsection (c)(2)(B)(ii) and the ability to 
     use such funds to carry out activities described in 
     subsection (c)(2)(A)(iii).
       Sec. 307. Section 412 of the National Education Statistics 
     Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-382) is amended--
       (1) in subsection 412(c)(1), after ``period of'' and before 
     ``years,'', by striking ``3'' and inserting ``4''; and
       (2) after ``expiration of such term.'', by adding the 
     following new subsection:
       ``(4) Conforming provision.--Members of the Board 
     previously granted 3 year terms, whose terms are in effect on 
     the date of enactment of the Department of Education 
     Appropriations Act, 2001, shall have their terms extended by 
     one year.''.
       Sec. 308. (a) Section 435(a)(2) of the Higher Education Act 
     of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1085(a)(2)) is amended by adding at the 
     end thereof the following new subparagraph:
       ``(D) Notwithstanding the first sentence of subparagraph 
     (A), the Secretary shall restore the eligibility to 
     participate in a program under subpart 1 of part A, part B, 
     or part D of an institution that did not appeal its loss of 
     eligibility within 30 days of receiving notification if the 
     Secretary determines, on a case-by-case basis, that the 
     institution's failure to appeal was substantially justified 
     under the circumstances, and that--
       ``(i) the institution made a timely request that the 
     appropriate guaranty agency correct errors in the draft data 
     used to calculate the institution's cohort default rate;
       ``(ii) the guaranty agency did not correct the erroneous 
     data in a timely fashion; and
       ``(iii) the institution would have been eligible if the 
     erroneous data had been corrected by the guaranty agency.''.
       (b) The amendment made by subsection (a) of this section 
     shall be effective for cohort default rate calculations for 
     fiscal years 1997 and 1998.
       Sec. 309. Section 439(r)(2) of the Higher Education Act of 
     1965 (20 U.S.C. 1087-2(r)(2)) is amended--
       (1) in clause (A)(i), by striking ``auditors and 
     examiners'' and inserting ``and fix the compensation of such 
     auditors and examiners as may be necessary''; and
       (2) by inserting at the end of subparagraph (E) the 
     following new subparagraph:
       ``(F) Compensation of auditors and examiners.--
       ``(i) Rates of pay.--Rates of basic pay for all auditors 
     and examiners appointed pursuant to subparagraph (A) may be 
     set and adjusted by the Secretary of the Treasury without 
     regard to the provisions of chapter 51 or subchapter III of 
     chapter 53 of title 5, United States Code.
       ``(ii) Comparability.--

       ``(I) In general.--Subject to section 5373 of title 5, 
     United States Code, the Secretary of the Treasury may provide 
     additional compensation and benefits to auditors and 
     examiners appointed pursuant to subparagraph (A) if the same 
     type of compensation or benefits are then being provided by 
     any agency referred to in section 1206 of the Financial 
     Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 
     (12 U.S.C. 1833b) or, if not then being provided, could be 
     provided by such an agency under applicable provisions of 
     law, rule, or regulation.
       ``(II) Consultation.--In setting and adjusting the total 
     amount of compensation and benefits for auditors and 
     examiners appointed pursuant to subparagraph (A), the 
     Secretary of the Treasury shall consult with, and seek to 
     maintain comparability with, the agencies referred to in 
     section 1206 of the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, 
     and Enforcement Act of 1989 (12 U.S.C. 1833b).''.

[[Page H12113]]

       Sec. 310. Section 117(i) of the Carl D. Perkins Vocational 
     and Technical Education Act of 1998 (20 U.S.C. 2327(i)) is 
     amended by inserting ``such sums as may be necessary for'' 
     before ``each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.''.
       Sec. 311. Section 432(m)(1) of the Higher Education Act of 
     1965 (20 U.S.C. 1082(m)(1)) is amended--
       (1) by striking clause (iv) of subparagraph (D); and
       (2) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:
       ``(E) Perfection of security interests in student loans.--
       ``(i) In general.--Notwithstanding the provisions of any 
     State law to the contrary, including the Uniform Commercial 
     Code as in effect in any State, a security interest in loans 
     made under this part, on behalf of any eligible lender (as 
     defined in section 435(d)) shall attach, be perfected, and be 
     assigned priority in the manner provided by the applicable 
     State's law for perfection of security interests in accounts, 
     as such law may be amended from time to time (including 
     applicable transition provisions). If any such State's law 
     provides for a statutory lien to be created in such loans, 
     such statutory lien may be created by the entity or entities 
     governed by such State law in accordance with the applicable 
     statutory provisions that created such a statutory lien.
       ``(ii) Collateral description.--In addition to any other 
     method for describing collateral in a legally sufficient 
     manner permitted under the laws of the State, the description 
     of collateral in any financing statement filed pursuant to 
     this subparagraph shall be deemed legally sufficient if it 
     lists such loans, or refers to records (identifying such 
     loans) retained by the secured party or any designee of the 
     secured party identified in such financing statement, 
     including the debtor or any loan servicer.
       ``(iii) Sales.--Notwithstanding clauses (i) and (ii) and 
     any provisions of any State law to the contrary, other than 
     any such State's law providing for creation of a statutory 
     lien, an outright sale of loans made under this part shall be 
     effective and perfected automatically upon attachment as 
     defined in the Uniform Commercial Code of such State.''.
       Sec. 312. Section 435(a)(5) of the Higher Education Act of 
     1965 (20 U.S.C. 1085(a)(5)) is amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (A)(i), by striking ``July 1, 2002,'' 
     and inserting ``July 1, 2004,'';
       (2) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``1999, 2000, and 
     2001'' and inserting ``1999 through 2003''.
       Sec. 313. From the amounts made available for the ``Fund 
     for the Improvement of Education'' under the heading 
     ``Education Research, Statistics, and Improvement'', 
     $10,000,000, to remain available until expended, shall be 
     available to the Secretary of Education to be transferred to 
     the Secretary of the Interior for an award to the National 
     Constitution Center for construction activities authorized 
     under Public Law 100-433.
       Sec. 314. Section 4116(b)(4) of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965 is amended by striking 
     subparagraph (D) and inserting in lieu thereof: ``(D) the 
     development and implementation of character education and 
     training programs that reflect the values of parents, 
     teachers, and local communities, and incorporate elements of 
     good character, including honesty, citizenship, courage, 
     justice, respect, personal responsibility, and 
     trustworthiness; and''.
       Sec. 315. The Secretary of Education shall review the 
     nursing program operated by Graceland University in Lamoni, 
     Iowa, and may exercise the waiver authority provided in 
     section 102(a)(3)(B) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, 
     without regard to the provisions of 34 CFR 600.7(b)(3)(ii), 
     if the Secretary determines that such a waiver is 
     appropriate.
       Sec. 316. Section 415 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 
     is amended--
       (1) in section 415A(a)(2), by striking ``section 415F'' and 
     inserting ``section 415E'';
       (2) in section 415E, by striking 415E(c) and inserting in 
     lieu thereof the following:
       ``(c) Authorized Activities.--Each State receiving a grant 
     under this section may use the grant funds for--
       ``(1) making awards that--
       ``(A) supplement grants received under section 415C(b)(2) 
     by eligible students who demonstrate financial need; or
       ``(B) provide grants under section 415C(b)(2) to additional 
     eligible students who demonstrate financial need;
       ``(2) providing scholarships for eligible students--
       ``(A) who demonstrate financial need; and
       ``(B) who--
       ``(i) desire to enter a program of study leading to a 
     career in--

       ``(I) information technology;
       ``(II) mathematics, computer science, or engineering;
       ``(III) teaching; or
       ``(IV) another field determined by the State to be critical 
     to the State's workforce needs; or

       ``(ii) demonstrate merit or academic achievement; and
       ``(3) making awards that--
       ``(A) supplement community service work-study awards 
     received under section 415C(b)(2) by eligible students who 
     demonstrate financial need; or
       ``(B) provide community service work-study awards under 
     section 415C(b)(2) to additional eligible students who 
     demonstrate financial need.''.
       (3) in section 415E, adding at the end the following new 
     subsections:
       ``(f) Special Rule.--Notwithstanding subsection (d), for 
     purposes of determining a State's share of the cost of the 
     authorized activities described in subsection (c), the State 
     shall consider only those expenditures from non-Federal 
     sources that exceed its total expenditures for need-based 
     grants, scholarships, and work-study assistance for fiscal 
     year 1999 (including any such assistance provided under this 
     subpart).
       ``(g) Use of Funds for Administrative Costs Prohibited.--A 
     State receiving a grant under this section shall not use any 
     of the grant funds to pay administrative costs associated 
     with any of the authorized activities described in subsection 
     (c).''.
       Sec. 317. (a) Section 402D of the Higher Education Act of 
     1965 (20 U.S.C. 1070a-14) is amended--
       (1) by redesignating subsection (c) as subsection (d); and
       (2) by inserting after subsection (b) the following new 
     subsection:
       ``(c) Special Rule.--
       ``(1) Use for student aid.--A recipient of a grant that 
     undertakes any of the permissible services identified in 
     subsection (b) may, in addition, use such funds to provide 
     grant aid to students. A grant provided under this paragraph 
     shall not exceed the maximum appropriated Pell Grant or, be 
     less than the minimum appropriated Pell Grant, for the 
     current academic year. In making grants to students under 
     this subsection, an institution shall ensure that adequate 
     consultation takes place between the student support 
     service program office and the institution's financial aid 
     office.
       ``(2) Eligible students.--For purposes of receiving grant 
     aid under this subsection, eligible students shall be current 
     participants in the student support services program offered 
     by the institution and be--
       ``(A) students who are in their first 2 years of 
     postsecondary education and who are receiving Federal Pell 
     Grants under subpart 1; or
       ``(B) students who have completed their first 2 years of 
     postsecondary education and who are receiving Federal Pell 
     Grants under subpart 1 if the institution demonstrates to the 
     satisfaction of the Secretary that--
       ``(i) these students are at high risk of dropping out; and
       ``(ii) it will first meet the needs of all its eligible 
     first- and second-year students for services under this 
     paragraph.
       ``(3) Determination of need.--A grant provided to a student 
     under paragraph (1) shall not be considered in determining 
     that student's need for grant or work assistance under this 
     title, except that in no case shall the total amount of 
     student financial assistance awarded to a student under this 
     title exceed that student's cost of attendance, as defined in 
     section 472.
       ``(4) Matching required.--A recipient of a grant who uses 
     such funds for the purpose described in paragraph (1) shall 
     match the funds used for such purpose, in cash, from non-
     Federal funds, in an amount that is not less than 33 percent 
     of the total amount of funds used for that purpose. This 
     paragraph shall not apply to any grant recipient that is an 
     institution of higher education eligible to receive funds 
     under part A or B of title III or title V.
       ``(5) Reservation.--In no event may a recipient use more 
     than 20 percent of the funds received under this section for 
     grant aid.
       ``(6) Supplement, not supplant.--Funds received by a grant 
     recipient that are used under this subsection shall be used 
     to supplement, and not supplant, non-Federal funds expended 
     for student support services programs.''.
       (b) The amendments made by subsection (a) shall apply with 
     respect to student support services grants awarded on or 
     after the date of enactment of this Act.
       Sec. 318. (a) Subparagraph (B) of section 427A(c)(4) of the 
     Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1077a(c)(4)) is 
     amended to read as follows:
       ``(B)(i) For any 12-month period beginning on July 1 and 
     ending on or before June 30, 2001, the rate determined under 
     this subparagraph is determined on the preceding June 1 and 
     is equal to--
       ``(I) the bond equivalent rate of 52-week Treasury bills 
     auctioned at the final auction held prior to such June 1; 
     plus
       ``(II) 3.25 percent.
       ``(ii) For any 12-month period beginning on July 1 of 2001 
     or any succeeding year, the rate determined under this 
     subparagraph is determined on the preceding June 26 and is 
     equal to--
       ``(I) the weekly average 1-year constant maturity Treasury 
     yield, as published by the Board of Governors of the Federal 
     Reserve System, for the last calendar week ending on or 
     before such June 26; plus
       ``(II) 3.25 percent.''.
       (b) Subparagraph (A) of section 455(b)(4) of such Act (20 
     U.S.C. 1087e(b)(4)) is amended to read as follows:
       ``(A)(i) For Federal Direct PLUS Loans for which the first 
     disbursement is made on or after July 1, 1994, the applicable 
     rate of interest shall, during any 12-month period beginning 
     on July 1 and ending on or before June 30, 2001, be 
     determined on the preceding June 1 and be equal to--
       ``(I) the bond equivalent rate of 52-week Treasury bills 
     auctioned at final auction held prior to such June 1; plus
       ``(II) 3.1 percent,
     except that such rate shall not exceed 9 percent.
       ``(ii) For any 12-month period beginning on July 1 of 2001 
     or any succeeding year, the applicable rate of interest 
     determined under this subparagraph shall be determined on the 
     preceding June 26 and be equal to--
       ``(I) the weekly average 1-year constant maturity Treasury 
     yield, as published by the Board of Governors of the 
     Federal Reserve System, for the last calendar week ending 
     on or before such June 26; plus
       ``(II) 3.1 percent,
     except that such rate shall not exceed 9 percent.''.
       Sec. 319. Section 1543 of the Higher Education Amendments 
     of 1992 (20 U.S.C. 1070 note) is

[[Page H12114]]

     amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
       ``(e) Designation.--Scholarships awarded under this section 
     shall be known as `B. J. Stupak Olympic Scholarships'.''.
       Sec. 320. (a) Subject to subsection (c), the Secretary of 
     Education shall release the reversionary interests that were 
     retained by the United States, as part of the conveyance of 
     certain real property situated in the County of Marin, State 
     of California, in an April 3, 1978 Quitclaim Deed, which was 
     filed for record on June 5, 1978, in Book 3384, at page 33, 
     of the official Records of Marin County, California.
       (b) The Secretary shall execute the release of the 
     reversionary interests under subsection (a) without 
     consideration.
       (c) The Secretary shall execute and file in the appropriate 
     office or offices a deed of release, amended deed, or other 
     appropriate instruments effectuating the release of the 
     reversionary interests under subsection (a). In all other 
     respects the provisions of the April 3, 1978 Quitclaim Deed 
     shall remain intact.
       Sec. 321. (a) Grants to Native American Schools and State 
     Educational Agencies.--
       (1) Allocation of funds.--Of the amount made available 
     under the heading ``School improvement programs'' for grants 
     made in accordance with this section for school repair and 
     renovation, activities under part B of the Individuals with 
     Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1411 et seq.), and 
     technology activities, the Secretary of Education shall 
     allocate--
       (A) $75,000,000 for grants to impacted local educational 
     agencies (as defined in paragraph (3)) for school repair, 
     renovation, and construction;
       (B) $3,250,000 for grants to outlying areas for school 
     repair and renovation in high-need schools and communities, 
     allocated on such basis, and subject to such terms and 
     conditions, as the Secretary determines appropriate;
       (C) $25,000,000 for grants to public entities, private 
     nonprofit entities, and consortia of such entities, for use 
     in accordance with subpart 2 of part C of title X of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965; and
       (D) the remainder to State educational agencies in 
     proportion to the amount each State received under part A of 
     title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 
     (20 U.S.C. 6311 et seq.) for fiscal year 2000, except that no 
     State shall receive less than 0.5 percent of the amount 
     allocated under this subparagraph.
       (2) Determination of grant amount.--
       (A) Determination of weighted student units.--For purposes 
     of computing the grant amounts under paragraph (1)(A) for 
     fiscal year 2001, the Secretary shall determine the results 
     obtained by the computation made under section 8003 of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     7703) with respect to children described in subsection 
     (a)(1)(C) of such section and computed under subsection 
     (a)(2)(B) of such section for such year--
       (i) for each impacted local educational agency that 
     receives funds under this section; and
       (ii) for all such agencies together.
       (B) Computation of payment.--For fiscal year 2001, the 
     Secretary shall calculate the amount of a grant to an 
     impacted local educational agency by--
       (i) dividing the amount described in paragraph (1)(A) by 
     the results of the computation described in subparagraph 
     (A)(ii); and
       (ii) multiplying the number derived under clause (i) by the 
     results of the computation described in subparagraph (A)(i) 
     for such agency.
       (3) Definition.--For purposes of this section, the term 
     ``impacted local educational agency'' means, for fiscal year 
     2001--
       (A) a local educational agency that receives a basic 
     support payment under section 8003(b) of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7703(b)) for such 
     fiscal year; and
       (B) with respect to which the number of children determined 
     under section 8003(a)(1)(C) of such Act for the preceding 
     school year constitutes at least 50 percent of the total 
     student enrollment in the schools of the agency during such 
     school year.
       (b) Within-State Allocations.--
       (1) Administrative costs.--
       (A) State educational agency administration.--Except as 
     provided in subparagraph (B), each State educational agency 
     may reserve not more than 1 percent of its allocation under 
     subsection (a)(1)(D) for the purpose of administering the 
     distribution of grants under this subsection.
       (B) State entity administration.--If the State educational 
     agency transfers funds to a State entity described in 
     paragraph (2)(A), the agency shall transfer to such entity 
     0.75 of the amount reserved under this paragraph for the 
     purpose of administering the distribution of grants under 
     this subsection.
       (2) Reservation for competitive school repair and 
     renovation grants to local educational agencies.--
       (A) In general.--Subject to the reservation under paragraph 
     (1), of the funds allocated to a State educational agency 
     under subsection (a)(1)(D), the State educational agency 
     shall distribute 75 percent of such funds to local 
     educational agencies or, if such State educational agency is 
     not responsible for the financing of education facilities, 
     the agency shall transfer such funds to the State entity 
     responsible for the financing of education facilities 
     (referred to in this section as the ``State entity'') for 
     distribution by such entity to local educational agencies in 
     accordance with this paragraph, to be used, consistent with 
     subsection (c), for school repair and renovation.
       (B) Competitive grants to local educational agencies.--
       (i) In general.--The State educational agency or State 
     entity shall carry out a program of competitive grants to 
     local educational agencies for the purpose described in 
     subparagraph (A). Of the total amount available for 
     distribution to such agencies under this paragraph, the State 
     educational agency or State entity, shall, in carrying out 
     the competition--

       (I) award to high poverty local educational agencies 
     described in clause (ii), in the aggregate, at least an 
     amount which bears the same relationship to such total amount 
     as the aggregate amount such local educational agencies 
     received under part A of title I of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965 for fiscal year 2000 bears to 
     the aggregate amount received for such fiscal year under such 
     part by all local educational agencies in the State;
       (II) award to rural local educational agencies in the 
     State, in the aggregate, at least an amount which bears the 
     same relationship to such total amount as the aggregate 
     amount such rural local educational agencies received under 
     part A of title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education 
     Act of 1965 for fiscal year 2000 bears to the aggregate 
     amount received for such fiscal year under such part by all 
     local educational agencies in the State; and
       (III) award the remaining funds to local educational 
     agencies not receiving an award under subclause (I) or (II), 
     including high poverty and rural local educational agencies 
     that did not receive such an award.

       (ii) High poverty local educational agencies.--A local 
     educational agency is described in this clause if--

       (I) the percentage described in subparagraph (C)(i) with 
     respect to the agency is 30 percent or greater; or
       (II) the number of children described in such subparagraph 
     with respect to the agency is at least 10,000.

       (C) Criteria for awarding grants.--In awarding competitive 
     grants under this paragraph, a State educational agency or 
     State entity shall take into account the following criteria:
       (i) The percentage of poor children 5 to 17 years of age, 
     inclusive, in a local educational agency.
       (ii) The need of a local educational agency for school 
     repair and renovation, as demonstrated by the condition of 
     its public school facilities.
       (iii) The fiscal capacity of a local educational agency to 
     meet its needs for repair and renovation of public school 
     facilities without assistance under this section, including 
     its ability to raise funds through the use of local bonding 
     capacity and otherwise.
       (iv) In the case of a local educational agency that 
     proposes to fund a repair or renovation project for a charter 
     school or schools, the extent to which the school or schools 
     have access to funding for the project through the financing 
     methods available to other public schools or local 
     educational agencies in the State.
       (v) The likelihood that the local educational agency will 
     maintain, in good condition, any facility whose repair or 
     renovation is assisted under this section.
       (D) Possible matching requirement.--
       (i) In general.--A State educational agency or State entity 
     may require local educational agencies to match funds awarded 
     under this subsection.
       (ii) Match amount.--The amount of a match described in 
     clause (i) may be established by using a sliding scale that 
     takes into account the relative poverty of the population 
     served by the local educational agency.
       (3) Reservation for competitive idea or technology grants 
     to local educational agencies.--
       (A) In general.--Subject to the reservation under paragraph 
     (1), of the funds allocated to a State educational agency 
     under subsection (a)(1)(D), the State educational agency 
     shall distribute 25 percent of such funds to local 
     educational agencies through competitive grant processes, to 
     be used for the following:
       (i) To carry out activities under part B of the Individuals 
     with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1411 et seq.).
       (ii) For technology activities that are carried out in 
     connection with school repair and renovation, including--

       (I) wiring;
       (II) acquiring hardware and software;
       (III) acquiring connectivity linkages and resources; and
       (IV) acquiring microwave, fiber optics, cable, and 
     satellite transmission equipment.

       (B) Criteria for awarding idea grants.--In awarding 
     competitive grants under subparagraph (A) to be used to carry 
     out activities under part B of the Individuals with 
     Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1411 et seq.), a State 
     educational agency shall take into account the following 
     criteria:
       (i) The need of a local educational agency for additional 
     funds for a student whose individually allocable cost for 
     expenses related to the Individuals with Disabilities 
     Education Act substantially exceeds the State's average per-
     pupil expenditure (as defined in section 14101(2) of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     8801(2))).
       (ii) The need of a local educational agency for additional 
     funds for special education and related services under part B 
     of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 
     1411 et seq.).
       (iii) The need of a local educational agency for additional 
     funds for assistive technology devices (as defined in section 
     602 of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 
     U.S.C. 1401)) or assistive technology services (as so 
     defined) for children being served under part B of the 
     Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1411 
     et seq.).
       (iv) The need of a local educational agency for additional 
     funds for activities under part

[[Page H12115]]

     B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 
     U.S.C. 1411 et seq.) in order for children with disabilities 
     to make progress toward meeting the performance goals and 
     indicators established by the State under section 612(a)(16) 
     of such Act (20 U.S.C. 1412).
       (C) Criteria for awarding technology grants.--In awarding 
     competitive grants under subparagraph (A) to be used for 
     technology activities that are carried out in connection with 
     school repair and renovation, a State educational agency 
     shall take into account the need of a local educational 
     agency for additional funds for such activities, including 
     the need for the activities described in subclauses (I) 
     through (IV) of subparagraph (A)(ii).
       (c) Rules Applicable to School Repair and Renovation.--With 
     respect to funds made available under this section that are 
     used for school repair and renovation, the following rules 
     shall apply:
       (1) Permissible uses of funds.--School repair and 
     renovation shall be limited to one or more of the following:
       (A) Emergency repairs or renovations to public school 
     facilities only to ensure the health and safety of students 
     and staff, including--
       (i) repairing, replacing, or installing roofs, electrical 
     wiring, plumbing systems, or sewage systems;
       (ii) repairing, replacing, or installing heating, 
     ventilation, or air conditioning systems (including 
     insulation); and
       (iii) bringing public schools into compliance with fire and 
     safety codes.
       (B) School facilities modifications necessary to render 
     public school facilities accessible in order to comply with 
     the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 
     et seq.).
       (C) School facilities modifications necessary to render 
     public school facilities accessible in order to comply with 
     section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 
     794).
       (D) Asbestos abatement or removal from public school 
     facilities.
       (E) Renovation, repair, and acquisition needs related to 
     the building infrastructure of a charter school.
       (2) Impermissible uses of funds.--No funds received under 
     this section may be used for--
       (A) payment of maintenance costs in connection with any 
     projects constructed in whole or part with Federal funds 
     provided under this section;
       (B) the construction of new facilities, except for 
     facilities for an impacted local educational agency (as 
     defined in subsection (a)(3)); or
       (C) stadiums or other facilities primarily used for 
     athletic contests or exhibitions or other events for which 
     admission is charged to the general public.
       (3) Charter schools.--A public charter school that 
     constitutes a local educational agency under State law shall 
     be eligible for assistance under the same terms and 
     conditions as any other local educational agency (as defined 
     in section 14101(18) of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 8801(18))).
       (4) Supplement, not supplant.--Excluding the uses described 
     in subparagraphs (B) and (C) of paragraph (1), a local 
     educational agency shall use Federal funds subject to this 
     subsection only to supplement the amount of funds that would, 
     in the absence of such Federal funds, be made available from 
     non-Federal sources for school repair and renovation.
       (d) Special Rule.--Each local educational agency that 
     receives funds under this section shall ensure that, if it 
     carries out repair or renovation through a contract, any such 
     contract process ensures the maximum number of qualified 
     bidders, including small, minority, and women-owned 
     businesses, through full and open competition.
       (e) Public Comment.--Each local educational agency 
     receiving funds under paragraph (2) or (3) of subsection 
     (b)--
       (1) shall provide parents, educators, and all other 
     interested members of the community the opportunity to 
     consult on the use of funds received under such paragraph;
       (2) shall provide the public with adequate and efficient 
     notice of the opportunity described in paragraph (1) in a 
     widely read and distributed medium; and
       (3) shall provide the opportunity described in paragraph 
     (1) in accordance with any applicable State and local law 
     specifying how the comments may be received and how the 
     comments may be reviewed by any member of the public.
       (f) Reporting.--
       (1) Local reporting.--Each local educational agency 
     receiving funds under subsection (a)(1)(D) shall submit a 
     report to the State educational agency, at such time as the 
     State educational agency may require, describing the use of 
     such funds for--
       (A) school repair and renovation (and construction, in the 
     case of an impacted local educational agency (as defined in 
     subsection (a)(3)));
       (B) activities under part B of the Individuals with 
     Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1411 et seq.); and
       (C) technology activities that are carried out in 
     connection with school repair and renovation, including the 
     activities described in subclauses (I) through (IV) of 
     subsection (b)(3)(A)(ii).
       (2) State reporting.--Each State educational agency shall 
     submit to the Secretary of Education, not later than December 
     31, 2002, a report on the use of funds received under 
     subsection (a)(1)(D) by local educational agencies for--
       (A) school repair and renovation (and construction, in the 
     case of an impacted local educational agency (as defined in 
     subsection (a)(3)));
       (B) activities under part B of the Individuals with 
     Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1411 et seq.); and
       (C) technology activities that are carried out in 
     connection with school repair and renovation, including the 
     activities described in subclauses (I) through (IV) of 
     subsection (b)(3)(A)(ii).
       (3) Additional Reports.--Each entity receiving funds 
     allocated under subsection (a)(1)(A) or (B) shall submit to 
     the Secretary, not later than December 31, 2002, a report on 
     its uses of funds under this section, in such form and 
     containing such information as the Secretary may require.
       (g) Applicability of Part B of IDEA.--If a local 
     educational agency uses funds received under this section to 
     carry out activities under part B of the Individuals with 
     Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1411 et seq.), such 
     part (including provisions respecting the participation of 
     private school children), and any other provision of law that 
     applies to such part, shall apply to such use.
       (h) Reallocation.--If a State educational agency does not 
     apply for an allocation of funds under subsection (a)(1)(D) 
     for fiscal year 2001, or does not use its entire allocation 
     for such fiscal year, the Secretary may reallocate the amount 
     of the State educational agency's allocation (or the 
     remainder thereof, as the case may be) to the remaining State 
     educational agencies in accordance with subsection (a)(1)(D).
       (i) Participation of Private Schools.--
       (1) In general.--Section 6402 of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7372) shall apply 
     to subsection (b)(2) in the same manner as it applies to 
     activities under title VI of such Act, except that--
       (A) such section shall not apply with respect to the title 
     to any real property renovated or repaired with assistance 
     provided under this section;
       (B) the term ``services'' as used in section 6402 of such 
     Act with respect to funds under this section shall be 
     provided only to private, nonprofit elementary or secondary 
     schools with a rate of child poverty of at least 40 percent 
     and may include for purposes of subsection (b)(2) only--
       (i) modifications of school facilities necessary to meet 
     the standards applicable to public schools under the 
     Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et 
     seq.);
       (ii) modifications of school facilities necessary to meet 
     the standards applicable to public schools under section 504 
     of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794); and
       (iii) asbestos abatement or removal from school facilities; 
     and
       (C) notwithstanding the requirements of section 6402(b) of 
     the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     7372(b)), expenditures for services provided using funds made 
     available under subsection (b)(2) shall be considered equal 
     for purposes of such section if the per-pupil expenditures 
     for services described in subparagraph (B) for students 
     enrolled in private nonprofit elementary and secondary 
     schools that have child poverty rates of at least 40 percent 
     are consistent with the per-pupil expenditures under this 
     section for children enrolled in the public schools in the 
     school district of the local educational agency receiving 
     funds under this section.
       (2) Remaining funds.--If the expenditure for services 
     described in paragraph (1)(B) is less than the amount 
     calculated under paragraph (1)(C) because of insufficient 
     need for such services, the remainder shall be available to 
     the local educational agency for renovation and repair of 
     public school facilities.
       (3) Application.--If any provision of this section, or the 
     application thereof, to any person or circumstances is 
     judicially determined to be invalid, the provisions of the 
     remainder of the section and the application to other persons 
     or circumstances shall not be affected thereby.
       (j) Definitions.--For purposes of this section:
       (1) Charter school.--The term ``charter school'' has the 
     meaning given such term in section 10310(1) of the Elementary 
     and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 8066(1)).
       (2) Elementary school.--The term ``elementary school'' has 
     the meaning given such term in section 14101(14) of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     8801(14)).
       (3) Local educational agency.--The term ``local educational 
     agency'' has the meaning given such term in subparagraphs (A) 
     and (B) of section 14101(18) of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 8801(18)).
       (4) Outlying area.--The term ``outlying area'' has the 
     meaning given such term in section 14101(21) of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 8801(21)).
       (5) Poor children and child poverty.--The terms ``poor 
     children'' and ``child poverty'' refer to children 5 to 17 
     years of age, inclusive, who are from families with incomes 
     below the poverty line (as defined by the Office of 
     Management and Budget and revised annually in accordance with 
     section 673(2) of the Community Services Block Grant (42 
     U.S.C. 9902(2)) applicable to a family of the size involved 
     for the most recent fiscal year for which data satisfactory 
     to the Secretary are available.
       (6) Rural local educational agency.--The term ``rural local 
     educational agency'' means a local educational agency that 
     the State determines is located in a rural area using 
     objective data and a commonly employed definition of the term 
     ``rural''.
       (7) Secondary school.--The term ``secondary school'' has 
     the meaning given such term in section 14101(25) of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     8801(25)).
       (8) State.--The term ``State'' means each of the 50 states, 
     the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto 
     Rico.
       Sec. 322. (a) Part C of title X of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 8061 et seq.) is 
     amended--

[[Page H12116]]

       (1) by inserting after the part heading the following:

           ``Subpart 1--Basic Charter School Grant Program'';

     and
       (2) by adding at the end the following:

 ``Subpart 2--Credit Enhancement Initiatives To Assist Charter School 
           Facility Acquisition, Construction, and Renovation

     ``SEC. 10321. PURPOSE.

       ``The purpose of this subpart is to provide one-time grants 
     to eligible entities to permit them to demonstrate innovative 
     credit enhancement initiatives that assist charter schools to 
     address the cost of acquiring, constructing, and renovating 
     facilities.

     ``SEC. 10322. GRANTS TO ELIGIBLE ENTITIES.

       ``(a) In General.--The Secretary shall use 100 percent of 
     the amount available to carry out this subpart to award not 
     less than 3 grants to eligible entities having applications 
     approved under this subpart to demonstrate innovative methods 
     of assisting charter schools to address the cost of 
     acquiring, constructing, and renovating facilities by 
     enhancing the availability of loans or bond financing.
       ``(b) Grantee Selection.--The Secretary shall evaluate each 
     application submitted, and shall make a determination of 
     which are sufficient to merit approval and which are not. The 
     Secretary shall award at least one grant to an eligible 
     entity described in section 10330(2)(A), at least one grant 
     to an eligible entity described in section 10330(2)(B), and 
     at least one grant to an eligible entity described in section 
     10330(2)(C), if applications are submitted that permit the 
     Secretary to do so without approving an application that is 
     not of sufficient quality to merit approval.
       ``(c) Grant Characteristics.--Grants under this subpart 
     shall be of a sufficient size, scope, and quality so as to 
     ensure an effective demonstration of an innovative means of 
     enhancing credit for the financing of charter school 
     acquisition, construction, or renovation.
       ``(d) Special Rule.--In the event the Secretary determines 
     that the funds available are insufficient to permit the 
     Secretary to award not less than 3 grants in accordance with 
     subsections (a) through (c), such 3-grant minimum and the 
     second sentence of subsection (b) shall not apply, and the 
     Secretary may determine the appropriate number of grants to 
     be awarded in accordance with subsection (c).

     ``SEC. 10323. APPLICATIONS.

       ``(a) In General.--To receive a grant under this subpart, 
     an eligible entity shall submit to the Secretary an 
     application in such form as the Secretary may reasonably 
     require.
       ``(b) Contents.--An application under subsection (a) shall 
     contain--
       ``(1) a statement identifying the activities proposed to be 
     undertaken with funds received under this subpart, including 
     how the applicant will determine which charter schools will 
     receive assistance, and how much and what types of assistance 
     charter schools will receive;
       ``(2) a description of the involvement of charter schools 
     in the application's development and the design of the 
     proposed activities;
       ``(3) a description of the applicant's expertise in capital 
     market financing;
       ``(4) a description of how the proposed activities will 
     leverage the maximum amount of private-sector financing 
     capital relative to the amount of government funding used and 
     otherwise enhance credit available to charter schools;
       ``(5) a description of how the applicant possesses 
     sufficient expertise in education to evaluate the likelihood 
     of success of a charter school program for which facilities 
     financing is sought;
       ``(6) in the case of an application submitted by a State 
     governmental entity, a description of the actions that the 
     entity has taken, or will take, to ensure that charter 
     schools within the State receive the funding they need to 
     have adequate facilities; and
       ``(7) such other information as the Secretary may 
     reasonably require.

     ``SEC. 10324. CHARTER SCHOOL OBJECTIVES.

       ``An eligible entity receiving a grant under this subpart 
     shall use the funds deposited in the reserve account 
     established under section 10325(a) to assist one or more 
     charter schools to access private sector capital to 
     accomplish one or both of the following objectives:
       ``(1) The acquisition (by purchase, lease, donation, or 
     otherwise) of an interest (including an interest held by a 
     third party for the benefit of a charter school) in improved 
     or unimproved real property that is necessary to commence or 
     continue the operation of a charter school.
       ``(2) The construction of new facilities, or the 
     renovation, repair, or alteration of existing facilities, 
     necessary to commence or continue the operation of a charter 
     school.

     ``SEC. 10325. RESERVE ACCOUNT.

       ``(a) Use of Funds.--To assist charter schools to 
     accomplish the objectives described in section 10324, an 
     eligible entity receiving a grant under this subpart shall, 
     in accordance with State and local law, directly or 
     indirectly, alone or in collaboration with others, deposit 
     the funds received under this subpart (other than funds used 
     for administrative costs in accordance with section 10326) in 
     a reserve account established and maintained by the entity 
     for this purpose. Amounts deposited in such account shall be 
     used by the entity for one or more of the following purposes:
       ``(1) Guaranteeing, insuring, and reinsuring bonds, notes, 
     evidences of debt, loans, and interests therein, the proceeds 
     of which are used for an objective described in section 
     10324.
       ``(2) Guaranteeing and insuring leases of personal and real 
     property for an objective described in section 10324.
       ``(3) Facilitating financing by identifying potential 
     lending sources, encouraging private lending, and other 
     similar activities that directly promote lending to, or for 
     the benefit of, charter schools.
       ``(4) Facilitating the issuance of bonds by charter 
     schools, or by other public entities for the benefit of 
     charter schools, by providing technical, administrative, and 
     other appropriate assistance (including the recruitment of 
     bond counsel, underwriters, and potential investors and the 
     consolidation of multiple charter school projects within a 
     single bond issue).
       ``(b) Investment.--Funds received under this subpart and 
     deposited in the reserve account shall be invested in 
     obligations issued or guaranteed by the United States or a 
     State, or in other similarly low-risk securities.
       ``(c) Reinvestment of Earnings.--Any earnings on funds 
     received under this subpart shall be deposited in the reserve 
     account established under subsection (a) and used in 
     accordance with such subsection.

     ``SEC. 10326. LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS.

       ``An eligible entity may use not more than 0.25 percent of 
     the funds received under this subpart for the administrative 
     costs of carrying out its responsibilities under this 
     subpart.

     ``SEC. 10327. AUDITS AND REPORTS.

       ``(a) Financial Record Maintenance and Audit.--The 
     financial records of each eligible entity receiving a grant 
     under this subpart shall be maintained in accordance with 
     generally accepted accounting principles and shall be subject 
     to an annual audit by an independent public accountant.
       ``(b) Reports.--
       ``(1) Grantee annual reports.--Each eligible entity 
     receiving a grant under this subpart annually shall submit to 
     the Secretary a report of its operations and activities under 
     this subpart.
       ``(2) Contents.--Each such annual report shall include--
       ``(A) a copy of the most recent financial statements, and 
     any accompanying opinion on such statements, prepared by the 
     independent public accountant reviewing the financial records 
     of the eligible entity;
       ``(B) a copy of any report made on an audit of the 
     financial records of the eligible entity that was conducted 
     under subsection (a) during the reporting period;
       ``(C) an evaluation by the eligible entity of the 
     effectiveness of its use of the Federal funds provided under 
     this subpart in leveraging private funds;
       ``(D) a listing and description of the charter schools 
     served during the reporting period;
       ``(E) a description of the activities carried out by the 
     eligible entity to assist charter schools in meeting the 
     objectives set forth in section 10324; and
       ``(F) a description of the characteristics of lenders and 
     other financial institutions participating in the activities 
     undertaken by the eligible entity under this subpart during 
     the reporting period.
       ``(3) Secretarial report.--The Secretary shall review the 
     reports submitted under paragraph (1) and shall provide a 
     comprehensive annual report to the Congress on the activities 
     conducted under this subpart.

     ``SEC. 10328. NO FULL FAITH AND CREDIT FOR GRANTEE 
                   OBLIGATIONS.

       ``No financial obligation of an eligible entity entered 
     into pursuant to this subpart (such as an obligation under a 
     guarantee, bond, note, evidence of debt, or loan) shall be an 
     obligation of, or guaranteed in any respect by, the United 
     States. The full faith and credit of the United States is not 
     pledged to the payment of funds which may be required to be 
     paid under any obligation made by an eligible entity pursuant 
     to any provision of this subpart.

     ``SEC. 10329. RECOVERY OF FUNDS.

       ``(a) In General.--The Secretary, in accordance with 
     chapter 37 of title 31, United States Code, shall collect--
       ``(1) all of the funds in a reserve account established by 
     an eligible entity under section 10325(a) if the Secretary 
     determines, not earlier than 2 years after the date on which 
     the entity first received funds under this subpart, that the 
     entity has failed to make substantial progress in carrying 
     out the purposes described in section 10325(a); or
       ``(2) all or a portion of the funds in a reserve account 
     established by an eligible entity under section 10325(a) if 
     the Secretary determines that the eligible entity has 
     permanently ceased to use all or a portion of the funds in 
     such account to accomplish any purpose described in section 
     10325(a).
       ``(b) Exercise of Authority.--The Secretary shall not 
     exercise the authority provided in subsection (a) to collect 
     from any eligible entity any funds that are being properly 
     used to achieve one or more of the purposes described in 
     section 10325(a).
       ``(c) Procedures.--The provisions of sections 451, 452, and 
     458 of the General Education Provisions Act (20 U.S.C. 1234 
     et seq.) shall apply to the recovery of funds under 
     subsection (a).
       ``(d) Construction.--This section shall not be construed to 
     impair or affect the authority of the Secretary to recover 
     funds under part D of the General Education Provisions Act 
     (20 U.S.C. 1234 et seq.).

     ``SEC. 10330. DEFINITIONS.

       ``In this subpart:
       ``(1) The term `charter school' has the meaning given such 
     term in section 10310.
       ``(2) The term `eligible entity' means--
       ``(A) a public entity, such as a State or local 
     governmental entity;
       ``(B) a private nonprofit entity; or
       ``(C) a consortium of entities described in subparagraphs 
     (A) and (B).

     ``SEC. 10331. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       ``For the purpose of carrying out this subpart, there are 
     authorized to be appropriated $100,000,000 for fiscal year 
     2001.''.

[[Page H12117]]

       (b) Part C of title X of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 8061 et seq.) is amended in 
     each of the following provisions by striking ``part'' each 
     place such term appears and inserting ``subpart'':
       (1) Sections 10301 through 10305.
       (2) Section 10307.
       (3) Sections 10309 through 10311.
       Sec. 323. (a) Section 8003(b)(2)(F) of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7703(b)(2)(F)) is 
     amended--
       (1) by striking ``the Secretary shall use'' and inserting 
     ``the Secretary--
       ``(i) shall use'';
       (2) by striking the period at the end and inserting ``; 
     and''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(ii) except as provided in subparagraph (C)(i)(I), shall 
     include all of the children described in subparagraphs (F) 
     and (G) of subsection (a)(1) enrolled in schools of the local 
     educational agency in determining (I) the eligibility of the 
     agency for assistance under this paragraph, and (II) the 
     amount of such assistance if the number of such children meet 
     the requirements of subsection (a)(3).''.
       (b) Section 8003(b)(2) of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7703(b)(2)) is amended by 
     adding at the end the following:
       ``(G) Determination of average tax rates for general fund 
     purposes.--For the purpose of determining average tax rates 
     for general fund purposes for local educational agencies in a 
     State under this paragraph (except under subparagraph 
     (C)(i)(II)(bb)), the Secretary shall use either--
       ``(i) the average tax rate for general fund purposes for 
     comparable local educational agencies, as determined by the 
     Secretary in regulations; or
       ``(ii) the average tax rate of all the local educational 
     agencies in the State.''.
       This title may be cited as the ``Department of Education 
     Appropriations Act, 2001''.

                       TITLE IV--RELATED AGENCIES

                      Armed Forces Retirement Home

       For expenses necessary for the Armed Forces Retirement Home 
     to operate and maintain the United States Soldiers' and 
     Airmen's Home and the United States Naval Home, to be paid 
     from funds available in the Armed Forces Retirement Home 
     Trust Fund, $69,832,000, of which $9,832,000 shall remain 
     available until expended for construction and renovation of 
     the physical plants at the United States Soldiers' and 
     Airmen's Home and the United States Naval Home: Provided, 
     That, notwithstanding any other provision of law, a single 
     contract or related contracts for development and 
     construction, to include construction of a long-term care 
     facility at the United States Naval Home, may be employed 
     which collectively include the full scope of the project: 
     Provided further, That the solicitation and contract shall 
     contain the clause ``availability of funds'' found at 48 CFR 
     52.232-18 and 252.232-7007, Limitation of Government 
     Obligations.

             Corporation for National and Community Service


        Domestic Volunteer Service Programs, Operating Expenses

       For expenses necessary for the Corporation for National and 
     Community Service to carry out the provisions of the Domestic 
     Volunteer Service Act of 1973, as amended, $303,850,000: 
     Provided, That none of the funds made available to the 
     Corporation for National and Community Service in this Act 
     for activities authorized by part E of title II of the 
     Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973 shall be used to 
     provide stipends or other monetary incentives to volunteers 
     or volunteer leaders whose incomes exceed 125 percent of the 
     national poverty level.

                  Corporation for Public Broadcasting

       For payment to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, as 
     authorized by the Communications Act of 1934, an amount which 
     shall be available within limitations specified by that Act, 
     for the fiscal year 2003, $365,000,000: Provided, That no 
     funds made available to the Corporation for Public 
     Broadcasting by this Act shall be used to pay for receptions, 
     parties, or similar forms of entertainment for Government 
     officials or employees: Provided further, That none of the 
     funds contained in this paragraph shall be available or used 
     to aid or support any program or activity from which any 
     person is excluded, or is denied benefits, or is 
     discriminated against, on the basis of race, color, national 
     origin, religion, or sex: Provided further, That in addition 
     to the amounts provided above, $20,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended, shall be for digitalization, 
     pending enactment of authorizing legislation.

               Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service


                         Salaries and Expenses

       For expenses necessary for the Federal Mediation and 
     Conciliation Service to carry out the functions vested in it 
     by the Labor Management Relations Act, 1947 (29 U.S.C. 171-
     180, 182-183), including hire of passenger motor vehicles; 
     for expenses necessary for the Labor-Management Cooperation 
     Act of 1978 (29 U.S.C. 175a); and for expenses necessary for 
     the Service to carry out the functions vested in it by the 
     Civil Service Reform Act, Public Law 95-454 (5 U.S.C. ch. 
     71), $38,200,000, including $1,500,000, to remain available 
     through September 30, 2002, for activities authorized by the 
     Labor-Management Cooperation Act of 1978 (29 U.S.C. 175a): 
     Provided, That notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302, fees charged, 
     up to full-cost recovery, for special training activities and 
     other conflict resolution services and technical assistance, 
     including those provided to foreign governments and 
     international organizations, and for arbitration services 
     shall be credited to and merged with this account, and shall 
     remain available until expended: Provided further, That fees 
     for arbitration services shall be available only for 
     education, training, and professional development of the 
     agency workforce: Provided further, That the Director of the 
     Service is authorized to accept and use on behalf of the 
     United States gifts of services and real, personal, or other 
     property in the aid of any projects or functions within the 
     Director's jurisdiction.

            Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission


                         Salaries and Expenses

       For expenses necessary for the Federal Mine Safety and 
     Health Review Commission (30 U.S.C. 801 et seq.), $6,320,000.

                Institute of Museum and Library Services


         Office of Library Services: Grants and Administration

       For carrying out subtitle B of the Museum and Library 
     Services Act, $207,219,000: Provided, That of the amount 
     provided, $1,000,000 shall be awarded to the National Museum 
     of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C., $700,000 shall be 
     awarded to the University of Idaho Institute for the Historic 
     Study of Jazz, $2,600,000 shall be awarded to Southeast 
     Missouri State University River Campus and Museum, $900,000 
     shall be awarded to the Heritage Harbor Museum in Rhode 
     Island, $500,000 shall be awarded to the Alaska Native 
     Heritage Center, $576,000 shall be awarded to the Franklin 
     Institute in Philadelphia, $925,000 shall be awarded to the 
     Please Touch Museum, $250,000 shall be awarded to the 
     Pittsburgh Children's Museum, $510,000 shall be awarded to 
     the Temple University Library, $1,800,000 shall be awarded to 
     Franklin Pierce College in New Hampshire, $500,000 shall be 
     awarded to the Louisville Zoo in Kentucky, $150,000 shall be 
     awarded to the Oregon Historical Society, $1,200,000 shall be 
     awarded to the Mississippi River Museum and Discovery Center 
     in Dubuque, Iowa, $650,000 shall be awarded to the Salisbury 
     House Foundation in Des Moines, Iowa, $150,000 shall be 
     awarded to the History Center for the Linn County Historical 
     Museum in Iowa, $4,000,000 shall be awarded to the Newsline 
     for the Blind, of which $100,000 shall be awarded to the Iowa 
     Newsline for the Blind and $100,000 shall be awarded to the 
     West Virginia Newsline for the Blind, $1,000,000 shall be 
     awarded to the Clay Center for the Arts and Sciences, 
     $650,000 shall be awarded to Bishops Museum in Hawaii, 
     $500,000 shall be awarded to the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, 
     $250,000 shall be awarded to the Natural History Museum of 
     Los Angeles, $400,000 shall be awarded to the Perkins Geology 
     Museum at the University of Vermont, $400,000 shall be 
     awarded to the Walt Whitman Cultural Arts Center in Camden, 
     New Jersey, $400,000 shall be awarded to the Plainfield 
     Public Library in Plainfield, New Jersey, $150,000 shall be 
     awarded to the Ducktown Arts District in Atlantic City, 
     New Jersey, $400,000 shall be awarded to the Lake 
     Champlain Science Center in Vermont, $250,000 shall be 
     awarded to the Foundation for the Arts, Music, and 
     Entertainment of Shreveport-Bossier, Inc., $100,000 shall 
     be awarded to Bryant College in Rhode Island, $120,000 
     shall be awarded to the Fenton Historical Museum of 
     Jamestown, New York, $921,000 shall be awarded to the 
     Mariners' Museum in Newport News, Virginia, $461,000 shall 
     be awarded to DuPage County Children's Museum in 
     Naperville, Illinois, $369,000 shall be awarded to the 
     National Baseball Hall of Fame Library in Cooperstown, New 
     York, $92,000 shall be awarded to the City of Corona, 
     Riverside, California, $6,000 shall be awarded to the City 
     of Murrieta, California Public Library, $1,382,000 shall 
     be awarded to the Sierra Madre, California Public Library, 
     $23,000 shall be awarded to the Brooklyn Public Library in 
     Brooklyn, New York, $46,000 shall be awarded to the New 
     York Public Library Staten Island branch, $266,000 shall 
     be awarded to the Edward H. Nabb Research Center at 
     Salisbury State University in Salisbury, Maryland, 
     $461,000 shall be awarded to Texas Tech University, 
     $230,000 shall be awarded to the City of Ontario, 
     California Public Library, $461,000 shall be awarded to 
     the Southern Oregon University in Ashland, Oregon, 
     $1,106,000 shall be awarded to Christopher Newport 
     University in Newport News, Virginia, $128,000 shall be 
     awarded to the Nassau County Museum of Art in Roslyn 
     Harbor, New York, $850,000 shall be awarded to the 
     Children's Museum of Los Angeles, $43,000 shall be awarded 
     to Sumter County Library in Sumter, South Carolina, 
     $298,000 shall be awarded to Columbia College Center for 
     Black Music Research in Chicago, Illinois, $723,000 shall 
     be awarded to Old Sturbridge Village in Sturbridge, 
     Massachusetts, $723,000 shall be awarded to New Bedford 
     Whaling Museum in Massachusetts, $298,000 shall be awarded 
     to Mystic Seaport Museum of America and the Sea in 
     Connecticut, $468,000 shall be awarded to the City of 
     Houston Public Library, $128,000 shall be awarded to the 
     Roberson Museum and Science Center in Binghampton, New 
     York, $850,000 shall be awarded to Berman Museum of Art at 
     Ursinus College in Collegeville, Pennsylvania, $680,000 
     shall be awarded to AMISTAD Research Center at Tulane 
     University, $2,125,000 shall be awarded to Silas Bronson 
     Library in Waterbury, Connecticut, $213,000 shall be 
     awarded to Fitchburg Art Museum in Fitchburg, 
     Massachusetts, $128,000 shall be awarded to North Carolina 
     Museum of Life and Science, $2,435,000 shall be awarded to 
     New York Public Library, $85,000 shall be awarded to the 
     New York Botanical Garden in Bronx, New York, $170,000 
     shall be awarded to George Eastman House in Rochester, New 
     York, $425,000 shall be awarded to The National Aviary in 
     Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, $723,000 shall be awarded to the 
     George C. Page Museum in Los Angeles, California, $461,000 
     shall be awarded to the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial 
     Commission, and $410,000 shall be awarded to the AE Seaman 
     Mineral Museum in Houghton, Michigan.

[[Page H12118]]

                  Medicare Payment Advisory Commission


                         salaries and expenses

       For expenses necessary to carry out section 1805 of the 
     Social Security Act, $8,000,000, to be transferred to this 
     appropriation from the Federal Hospital Insurance and the 
     Federal Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust Funds.

        National Commission on Libraries and Information Science


                         Salaries and Expenses

       For necessary expenses for the National Commission on 
     Libraries and Information Science, established by the Act of 
     July 20, 1970 (Public Law 91-345, as amended), $1,495,000.

                     National Council on Disability


                         Salaries and Expenses

       For expenses necessary for the National Council on 
     Disability as authorized by title IV of the Rehabilitation 
     Act of 1973, as amended, $2,615,000.

                     National Education Goals Panel

       For expenses necessary for the National Education Goals 
     Panel, as authorized by title II, part A of the Goals 2000: 
     Educate America Act, $1,500,000.

                     National Labor Relations Board


                         Salaries and Expenses

       For expenses necessary for the National Labor Relations 
     Board to carry out the functions vested in it by the Labor-
     Management Relations Act, 1947, as amended (29 U.S.C. 141-
     167), and other laws, $216,438,000: Provided, That no part of 
     this appropriation shall be available to organize or assist 
     in organizing agricultural laborers or used in connection 
     with investigations, hearings, directives, or orders 
     concerning bargaining units composed of agricultural laborers 
     as referred to in section 2(3) of the Act of July 5, 1935 (29 
     U.S.C. 152), and as amended by the Labor-Management Relations 
     Act, 1947, as amended, and as defined in section 3(f) of the 
     Act of June 25, 1938 (29 U.S.C. 203), and including in said 
     definition employees engaged in the maintenance and operation 
     of ditches, canals, reservoirs, and waterways when maintained 
     or operated on a mutual, nonprofit basis and at least 95 
     percent of the water stored or supplied thereby is used for 
     farming purposes.

                        National Mediation Board


                         Salaries and Expenses

       For expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of the 
     Railway Labor Act, as amended (45 U.S.C. 151-188), including 
     emergency boards appointed by the President, $10,400,000.

            Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission


                         Salaries and Expenses

       For expenses necessary for the Occupational Safety and 
     Health Review Commission (29 U.S.C. 661), $8,720,000.

                       Railroad Retirement Board


                     dual benefits payments account

       For payment to the Dual Benefits Payments Account, 
     authorized under section 15(d) of the Railroad Retirement Act 
     of 1974, $160,000,000, which shall include amounts becoming 
     available in fiscal year 2001 pursuant to section 
     224(c)(1)(B) of Public Law 98-76; and in addition, an amount, 
     not to exceed 2 percent of the amount provided herein, shall 
     be available proportional to the amount by which the product 
     of recipients and the average benefit received exceeds 
     $160,000,000: Provided, That the total amount provided herein 
     shall be credited in 12 approximately equal amounts on the 
     first day of each month in the fiscal year.


          Federal Payments to the Railroad Retirement Accounts

       For payment to the accounts established in the Treasury for 
     the payment of benefits under the Railroad Retirement Act for 
     interest earned on unnegotiated checks, $150,000, to remain 
     available through September 30, 2002, which shall be the 
     maximum amount available for payment pursuant to section 417 
     of Public Law 98-76.


                      limitation on administration

       For necessary expenses for the Railroad Retirement Board 
     for administration of the Railroad Retirement Act and the 
     Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act, $95,000,000, to be 
     derived in such amounts as determined by the Board from the 
     railroad retirement accounts and from moneys credited to the 
     railroad unemployment insurance administration fund.


             Limitation on the Office of Inspector General

       For expenses necessary for the Office of Inspector General 
     for audit, investigatory and review activities, as authorized 
     by the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, not more 
     than $5,700,000, to be derived from the railroad retirement 
     accounts and railroad unemployment insurance account: 
     Provided, That none of the funds made available in any other 
     paragraph of this Act may be transferred to the Office; used 
     to carry out any such transfer; used to provide any office 
     space, equipment, office supplies, communications facilities 
     or services, maintenance services, or administrative services 
     for the Office; used to pay any salary, benefit, or award for 
     any personnel of the Office; used to pay any other operating 
     expense of the Office; or used to reimburse the Office for 
     any service provided, or expense incurred, by the Office.

                     Social Security Administration


                Payments to Social Security Trust Funds

       For payment to the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance 
     and the Federal Disability Insurance trust funds, as provided 
     under sections 201(m), 228(g), and 1131(b)(2) of the Social 
     Security Act, $20,400,000.


               Special Benefits for Disabled Coal Miners

       For carrying out title IV of the Federal Mine Safety and 
     Health Act of 1977, $365,748,000, to remain available until 
     expended.
       For making, after July 31 of the current fiscal year, 
     benefit payments to individuals under title IV of the Federal 
     Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977, for costs incurred in the 
     current fiscal year, such amounts as may be necessary.
       For making benefit payments under title IV of the Federal 
     Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 for the first quarter of 
     fiscal year 2002, $114,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended.


                  Supplemental Security Income Program

       For carrying out titles XI and XVI of the Social Security 
     Act, section 401 of Public Law 92-603, section 212 of Public 
     Law 93-66, as amended, and section 405 of Public Law 95-216, 
     including payment to the Social Security trust funds for 
     administrative expenses incurred pursuant to section 
     201(g)(1) of the Social Security Act, $23,043,000,000, to 
     remain available until expended: Provided, That any portion 
     of the funds provided to a State in the current fiscal year 
     and not obligated by the State during that year shall be 
     returned to the Treasury.
       In addition, $210,000,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2002, for payment to the Social Security trust 
     funds for administrative expenses for continuing disability 
     reviews as authorized by section 103 of Public Law 104-121 
     and section 10203 of Public Law 105-33. The term ``continuing 
     disability reviews'' means reviews and redeterminations as 
     defined under section 201(g)(1)(A) of the Social Security 
     Act, as amended.
       For making, after June 15 of the current fiscal year, 
     benefit payments to individuals under title XVI of the Social 
     Security Act, for unanticipated costs incurred for the 
     current fiscal year, such sums as may be necessary.
       For making benefit payments under title XVI of the Social 
     Security Act for the first quarter of fiscal year 2002, 
     $10,470,000,000, to remain available until expended.


                 limitation on administrative expenses

       For necessary expenses, including the hire of two passenger 
     motor vehicles, and not to exceed $10,000 for official 
     reception and representation expenses, not more than 
     $6,583,000,000 may be expended, as authorized by section 
     201(g)(1) of the Social Security Act, from any one or all of 
     the trust funds referred to therein: Provided, That not less 
     than $1,800,000 shall be for the Social Security Advisory 
     Board: Provided further, That unobligated balances at the end 
     of fiscal year 2001 not needed for fiscal year 2001 shall 
     remain available until expended to invest in the Social 
     Security Administration information technology and 
     telecommunications hardware and software infrastructure, 
     including related equipment and non-payroll administrative 
     expenses associated solely with this information 
     technology and telecommunications infrastructure: Provided 
     further, That reimbursement to the trust funds under this 
     heading for expenditures for official time for employees 
     of the Social Security Administration pursuant to section 
     7131 of title 5, United States Code, and for facilities or 
     support services for labor organizations pursuant to 
     policies, regulations, or procedures referred to in 
     section 7135(b) of such title shall be made by the 
     Secretary of the Treasury, with interest, from amounts in 
     the general fund not otherwise appropriated, as soon as 
     possible after such expenditures are made.
       From funds provided under the previous paragraph, 
     notwithstanding the provision under this heading in Public 
     Law 106-113 regarding unobligated balances at the end of 
     fiscal year 2000 not needed for such fiscal year, an amount 
     not to exceed $50,000,000 from such unobligated balances 
     shall, in addition to funding already available under this 
     heading for fiscal year 2001, be available for necessary 
     expenses.
       From funds provided under the first paragraph, not less 
     than $200,000,000 shall be available for conducting 
     continuing disability reviews.
       In addition to funding already available under this 
     heading, and subject to the same terms and conditions, 
     $450,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2002, 
     for continuing disability reviews as authorized by section 
     103 of Public Law 104-121 and section 10203 of Public Law 
     105-33. The term ``continuing disability reviews'' means 
     reviews and redeterminations as defined under section 
     201(g)(1)(A) of the Social Security Act, as amended.
       In addition, $91,000,000 to be derived from administration 
     fees in excess of $5.00 per supplementary payment collected 
     pursuant to section 1616(d) of the Social Security Act or 
     section 212(b)(3) of Public Law 93-66, which shall remain 
     available until expended. To the extent that the amounts 
     collected pursuant to such section 1616(d) or 212(b)(3) in 
     fiscal year 2001 exceed $91,000,000, the amounts shall be 
     available in fiscal year 2002 only to the extent provided in 
     advance in appropriations Acts.
       From funds previously appropriated for this purpose, any 
     unobligated balances at the end of fiscal year 2000 shall be 
     available to continue Federal-State partnerships which will 
     evaluate means to promote Medicare buy-in programs targeted 
     to elderly and disabled individuals under titles XVIII and 
     XIX of the Social Security Act.
       From funds provided under the first paragraph, up to 
     $6,000,000 shall be available for implementation, 
     development, evaluation, and other costs associated with 
     administration of section 302 of the Ticket to Work and Work 
     Incentives Improvement Act.


                      Office of Inspector General

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For expenses necessary for the Office of Inspector General 
     in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act 
     of 1978, as amended, $16,944,000, together with not to exceed 
     $52,500,000, to be transferred and expended as authorized by 
     section 201(g)(1) of the Social Security Act from the Federal 
     Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal 
     Disability Insurance Trust Fund.

[[Page H12119]]

       In addition, an amount not to exceed 3 percent of the total 
     provided in this appropriation may be transferred from the 
     ``Limitation on Administrative Expenses'', Social Security 
     Administration, to be merged with this account, to be 
     available for the time and purposes for which this account is 
     available: Provided, That notice of such transfers shall be 
     transmitted promptly to the Committees on Appropriations of 
     the House and Senate.

                    United States Institute of Peace


                           Operating Expenses

       For necessary expenses of the United States Institute of 
     Peace as authorized in the United States Institute of Peace 
     Act, $15,000,000.

                      TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

       Sec. 501. The Secretaries of Labor, Health and Human 
     Services, and Education are authorized to transfer unexpended 
     balances of prior appropriations to accounts corresponding to 
     current appropriations provided in this Act: Provided, That 
     such transferred balances are used for the same purpose, and 
     for the same periods of time, for which they were originally 
     appropriated.
       Sec. 502. No part of any appropriation contained in this 
     Act shall remain available for obligation beyond the current 
     fiscal year unless expressly so provided herein.
       Sec. 503. (a) No part of any appropriation contained in 
     this Act shall be used, other than for normal and recognized 
     executive-legislative relationships, for publicity or 
     propaganda purposes, for the preparation, distribution, or 
     use of any kit, pamphlet, booklet, publication, radio, 
     television, or video presentation designed to support or 
     defeat legislation pending before the Congress or any State 
     legislature, except in presentation to the Congress or any 
     State legislature itself.
       (b) No part of any appropriation contained in this Act 
     shall be used to pay the salary or expenses of any grant or 
     contract recipient, or agent acting for such recipient, 
     related to any activity designed to influence legislation or 
     appropriations pending before the Congress or any State 
     legislature.
       Sec. 504. The Secretaries of Labor and Education are 
     authorized to make available not to exceed $20,000 and 
     $15,000, respectively, from funds available for salaries and 
     expenses under titles I and III, respectively, for official 
     reception and representation expenses; the Director of the 
     Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service is authorized to 
     make available for official reception and representation 
     expenses not to exceed $2,500 from the funds available for 
     ``Salaries and expenses, Federal Mediation and Conciliation 
     Service''; and the Chairman of the National Mediation Board 
     is authorized to make available for official reception and 
     representation expenses not to exceed $2,500 from funds 
     available for ``Salaries and expenses, National Mediation 
     Board''.
       Sec. 505. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, 
     no funds appropriated under this Act shall be used to carry 
     out any program of distributing sterile needles or syringes 
     for the hypodermic injection of any illegal drug.
       Sec. 506. (a) It is the sense of the Congress that, to the 
     greatest extent practicable, all equipment and products 
     purchased with funds made available in this Act should be 
     American-made.
       (b) In providing financial assistance to, or entering into 
     any contract with, any entity using funds made available in 
     this Act, the head of each Federal agency, to the greatest 
     extent practicable, shall provide to such entity a notice 
     describing the statement made in subsection (a) by the 
     Congress.
       (c) If it has been finally determined by a court or Federal 
     agency that any person intentionally affixed a label bearing 
     a ``Made in America'' inscription, or any inscription with 
     the same meaning, to any product sold in or shipped to the 
     United States that is not made in the United States, the 
     person shall be ineligible to receive any contract or 
     subcontract made with funds made available in this Act, 
     pursuant to the debarment, suspension, and ineligibility 
     procedures described in sections 9.400 through 9.409 of title 
     48, Code of Federal Regulations.
       Sec. 507. When issuing statements, press releases, requests 
     for proposals, bid solicitations and other documents 
     describing projects or programs funded in whole or in part 
     with Federal money, all grantees receiving Federal funds 
     included in this Act, including but not limited to State and 
     local governments and recipients of Federal research grants, 
     shall clearly state: (1) the percentage of the total costs of 
     the program or project which will be financed with Federal 
     money; (2) the dollar amount of Federal funds for the project 
     or program; and (3) percentage and dollar amount of the total 
     costs of the project or program that will be financed by non-
     governmental sources.
       Sec. 508. (a) None of the funds appropriated under this 
     Act, and none of the funds in any trust fund to which funds 
     are appropriated under this Act, shall be expended for any 
     abortion.
       (b) None of the funds appropriated under this Act, and none 
     of the funds in any trust fund to which funds are 
     appropriated under this Act, shall be expended for health 
     benefits coverage that includes coverage of abortion.
       (c) The term ``health benefits coverage'' means the package 
     of services covered by a managed care provider or 
     organization pursuant to a contract or other arrangement.
       Sec. 509. (a) The limitations established in the preceding 
     section shall not apply to an abortion--
       (1) if the pregnancy is the result of an act of rape or 
     incest; or
       (2) in the case where a woman suffers from a physical 
     disorder, physical injury, or physical illness, including a 
     life-endangering physical condition caused by or arising from 
     the pregnancy itself, that would, as certified by a 
     physician, place the woman in danger of death unless an 
     abortion is performed.
       (b) Nothing in the preceding section shall be construed as 
     prohibiting the expenditure by a State, locality, entity, or 
     private person of State, local, or private funds (other than 
     a State's or locality's contribution of Medicaid matching 
     funds).
       (c) Nothing in the preceding section shall be construed as 
     restricting the ability of any managed care provider from 
     offering abortion coverage or the ability of a State or 
     locality to contract separately with such a provider for such 
     coverage with State funds (other than a State's or locality's 
     contribution of Medicaid matching funds).
       Sec. 510. (a) None of the funds made available in this Act 
     may be used for--
       (1) the creation of a human embryo or embryos for research 
     purposes; or
       (2) research in which a human embryo or embryos are 
     destroyed, discarded, or knowingly subjected to risk of 
     injury or death greater than that allowed for research on 
     fetuses in utero under 45 CFR 46.208(a)(2) and section 498(b) 
     of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 289g(b)).
       (b) For purposes of this section, the term ``human embryo 
     or embryos'' includes any organism, not protected as a human 
     subject under 45 CFR 46 as of the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, that is derived by fertilization, parthenogenesis, 
     cloning, or any other means from one or more human gametes or 
     human diploid cells.
       Sec. 511. (a) None of the funds made available in this Act 
     may be used for any activity that promotes the legalization 
     of any drug or other substance included in schedule I of the 
     schedules of controlled substances established by section 202 
     of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812).
       (b) The limitation in subsection (a) shall not apply when 
     there is significant medical evidence of a therapeutic 
     advantage to the use of such drug or other substance or that 
     federally sponsored clinical trials are being conducted to 
     determine therapeutic advantage.
       Sec. 512. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be obligated or expended to enter into or renew a contract 
     with an entity if--
       (1) such entity is otherwise a contractor with the United 
     States and is subject to the requirement in section 4212(d) 
     of title 38, United States Code, regarding submission of an 
     annual report to the Secretary of Labor concerning employment 
     of certain veterans; and
       (2) such entity has not submitted a report as required by 
     that section for the most recent year for which such 
     requirement was applicable to such entity.
       Sec. 513. (a) Section 403(a)(5)(H)(iii) of the Social 
     Security Act (42 U.S.C. 603(a)(5)(H)(iii)) is amended by 
     striking ``2001'' and inserting ``2005''.
       (b) Section 403(a)(5)(H) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 
     603(a)(5)(G)) is amended by adding at the end the following:
       ``(iv) Interim report.--Not later than January 1, 2002, the 
     Secretary shall submit to the Congress an interim report on 
     the evaluations referred to in clause (i).''.
       Sec. 514. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
     be used to promulgate or adopt any final standard under 
     section 1173(b) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1320d-
     2(b)) providing for, or providing for the assignment of, a 
     unique health identifier for an individual (except in an 
     individual's capacity as an employer or a health care 
     provider), until legislation is enacted specifically 
     approving the standard.
       Sec. 515. Section 410(b) of The Ticket to Work and Work 
     Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (Public Law 106-170) is 
     amended by striking ``2009'' both places it appears and 
     inserting ``2001''.
       Sec. 516. Part B of title III of the Public Health Services 
     Act (42 U.S.C. 243 et seq.) is amended by inserting before 
     section 318 the following section:


                         ``HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS

       ``Sec. 317P. (a) Surveillance.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Secretary, acting through the 
     Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shall--
       ``(A) enter into cooperative agreements with States and 
     other entities to conduct sentinel surveillance or other 
     special studies that would determine the prevalence in 
     various age groups and populations of specific types of human 
     papillomavirus (referred to in this section as `HPV') in 
     different sites in various regions of the United States, 
     through collection of special specimens for HPV using a 
     variety of laboratory-based testing and diagnostic tools; and
       ``(B) develop and analyze data from the HPV sentinel 
     surveillance system described in subparagraph (A).
       ``(2) Report.--The Secretary shall make a progress report 
     to the Congress with respect to paragraph (1) no later than 
     one year after the effective date of this section.
       ``(b) Prevention Activities; Education Program.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Secretary, acting through the 
     Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shall conduct 
     prevention research on HPV, including--
       ``(A) behavioral and other research on the impact of HPV-
     related diagnosis on individuals;
       ``(B) formative research to assist with the development of 
     educational messages and information for the public, for 
     patients, and for their partners about HPV;
       ``(C) surveys of physician and public knowledge, attitudes, 
     and practices about genital HPV infection; and
       ``(D) upon the completion of and based on the findings 
     under subparagraphs (A) through (C), develop and disseminate 
     educational materials for the public and health care 
     providers regarding HPV and its impact and prevention.

[[Page H12120]]

       ``(2) Report; final proposal.--The Secretary shall make a 
     progress report to the Congress with respect to paragraph (1) 
     not later than one year after the effective date of this 
     section, and shall develop a final report not later than 
     three years after such effective date, including a detailed 
     summary of the significant findings and problems and the best 
     strategies to prevent future infections, based on available 
     science.
       ``(c) HPV Education and Prevention.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Secretary shall prepare and 
     distribute educational materials for health care providers 
     and the public that include information on HPV. Such 
     materials shall address--
       ``(A) modes of transmission;
       ``(B) consequences of infection, including the link between 
     HPV and cervical cancer;
       ``(C) the available scientific evidence on the 
     effectiveness or lack of effectiveness of condoms in 
     preventing infection with HPV; and
       ``(D) the importance of regular Pap smears, and other 
     diagnostics for early intervention and prevention of cervical 
     cancer purposes in preventing cervical cancer.
       ``(2) Medically accurate information.--Educational material 
     under paragraph (1), and all other relevant educational and 
     prevention materials prepared and printed from this date 
     forward for the public and health care providers by the 
     Secretary (including materials prepared through the Food and 
     Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and 
     Prevention, and the Health Resources and Services 
     Administration), or by contractors, grantees, or subgrantees 
     thereof, that are specifically designed to address STDs 
     including HPV shall contain medically accurate information 
     regarding the effectiveness or lack of effectiveness of 
     condoms in preventing the STD the materials are designed to 
     address. Such requirement only applies to materials mass 
     produced for the public and health care providers, and not to 
     routine communications.''.

     SEC. 4. LABELING OF CONDOMS.

       The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall reexamine 
     existing condom labels that are authorized pursuant to the 
     Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act to determine whether the 
     labels are medically accurate regarding the overall 
     effectiveness or lack of effectiveness of condoms in 
     preventing sexually transmitted diseases, including HPV.
       Sec. 517. Section 403(o) of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic 
     Act (21 U.S.C. 343(o)) is repealed. Subsections (c) and (d) 
     of section 4 of the Saccharin Study and Labeling Act are 
     repealed.
       Sec. 518. (a) Title VIII of the Social Security Act is 
     amended by inserting after section 810 (42 U.S.C. 1010) the 
     following new section:

     ``SEC. 810A. OPTIONAL FEDERAL ADMINISTRATION OF STATE 
                   RECOGNITION PAYMENTS.

       ``(a) In General.--The Commissioner of Social Security may 
     enter into an agreement with any State (or political 
     subdivision thereof) that provides cash payments on a regular 
     basis to individuals entitled to benefits under this title 
     under which the Commissioner of Social Security shall make 
     such payments on behalf of such State (or subdivision).
       ``(b) Agreement terms.--
       ``(1) In general.--Such agreement shall include such terms 
     as the Commissioner of Social Security finds necessary to 
     achieve efficient and effective administration of both this 
     title and the State program.
       ``(2) Financial terms.--Such agreement shall provide for 
     the State to pay the Commissioner of Social Security, at such 
     times and in such installments as the parties may specify--
       ``(A) an amount equal to the expenditures made by the 
     Commissioner of Social Security pursuant to such agreement as 
     payments to individuals on behalf of such State; and
       ``(B) an administration fee to reimburse the administrative 
     expenses incurred by the Commissioner of Social Security in 
     making payments to individuals on behalf of the State.
       ``(c) Special Disposition of Administration Fees.--
     Administration fees, upon collection, shall be credited to a 
     special fund established in the Treasury of the United States 
     for State recognition payments for certain World War II 
     veterans. The amounts so credited, to the extent and in the 
     amounts provided in advance in appropriations Acts, shall be 
     available to defray expenses incurred in carrying out this 
     title.''.
       (b) Conforming Amendments.--
       (1) The Table of Contents of title VIII of the Social 
     Security Act is amended by inserting after ``Sec. 810. Other 
     administrative provisions.'' the following:

``Sec. 810A. Optional federal administration of State recognition 
              payments.''.

       (2) Section 1129A(e) of the Social Security (42 U.S.C. 
     1320a-8a(e)) is amended--
       (A) by inserting ``VIII or'' after ``benefits under'';
       (B) by inserting ``810A or'' after ``agreement under 
     section'';
       (C) by inserting ``1010A or'' before ``1382(e)(a)''; and
       (D) by inserting ``, as the case may be'' immediately 
     before the period.
       Sec. 519. Section 1612(a)(1) of the Social Security Act (42 
     U.S.C. 1382(a) is amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (A), by inserting ``but without the 
     application of section 210(j)(3)'' immediately before the 
     semicolon; and
       (2) in subparagraph (B), by--
       (A) striking ``and the last'' and inserting ``the last'', 
     and
       (B) inserting ``, and section 210(j)(3)'' after 
     ``subsection (a)''.
       Sec. 520. Amounts made available under this Act for the 
     administrative and related expenses for departmental 
     management for the Department of Labor, the Department of 
     Health and Human Services, and the Department of Education 
     shall be reduced on a pro rata basis by $25,000,000: 
     Provided, That this provision shall not apply to the Food and 
     Drug Administration and the Indian Health Service.

                   TITLE VI--ASSETS FOR INDEPENDENCE

     SECTION 601. SHORT TITLE.

       That this title may be cited as the ``Assets for 
     Independence Act Amendments of 2000''.

      SEC. 602. MATCHING CONTRIBUTIONS UNAVAILABLE FOR EMERGENCY 
                   WITHDRAWALS.

       Section 404(5)(A)(v) of the Assets for Independence Act (42 
     U.S.C. 604 note) is amended by striking ``, or enabling the 
     eligible individual to make an emergency withdrawal''.

      SEC. 603. ADDITIONAL QUALIFIED ENTITIES.

       Section 404(7)(A) of the Assets for Independence Act (42 
     U.S.C. 604 note) is amended--
       (1) in clause (i), by striking ``or'' at the end thereof;
       (2) in clause (ii), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``; or''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following new clause:
       ``(iii) an entity that--

       ``(I) is--

       ``(aa) a credit union designated as a low-income credit 
     union by the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA); or
       ``(bb) an organization designated as a community 
     development financial institution by the Secretary of the 
     Treasury (or the Community Development Financial Institutions 
     Fund); and

       ``(II) can demonstrate a collaborative relationship with a 
     local community-based organization whose activities are 
     designed to address poverty in the community and the needs of 
     community members for economic independence and stability.''.

      SEC. 604. HOME PURCHASE COSTS.

       Section 404(8)(B)(i) of the Assets for Independence Act (42 
     U.S.C. 604 note) is amended by striking `` 100'' and 
     inserting ``120''.

     SEC. 605. INCREASED SET-ASIDE FOR ECONOMIC LITERACY TRAINING 
                   AND ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS.

       Section 407(c)(3) of the Assets for Independence Act (42 
     U.S.C. 604 note) is amended--
       (1) by striking ``9.5'' and inserting ``15''; and
       (2) by inserting after the first sentence the following: 
     ``Of the total amount specified in this paragraph, not more 
     than 7.5 percent shall be used for administrative functions 
     under paragraph (1)(C), including program management, 
     reporting requirements, recruitment and enrollment of 
     individuals, and monitoring. The remainder of the total 
     amount specified in this paragraph (not including the amount 
     specified for use for the purposes described in paragraph 
     (1)(D)) shall be used for nonadministrative functions 
     described in paragraph (1)(A), including case management, 
     budgeting. economic literacy, and credit counseling. If the 
     cost of nonadministrative functions described in paragraph 
     (1)(A) is less than 5.5 percent of the total amount specified 
     in this paragraph, such excess funds may be used for 
     administrative functions.''.

     SEC. 606. ALTERNATIVE ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA.

       Section 408(a)(1) of the Assets for Independence Act (42 
     U.S.C. 604 note) is amended by striking ``does not exceed'' 
     and inserting ``is equal to or less than 200 percent of the 
     poverty line (as determined by the Office of Management and 
     Budget) or''.

     SEC. 607. REVISED ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT DEADLINE.

       (a) In General.--Section 412(c) of the Assets for 
     Independence Act (42 U.S.C. 604 note) is amended by striking 
     ``calendar'' and inserting ``project''.
       (b) Transitional Deadline.--Notwithstanding the amendment 
     made by subsection (a), the submission of the initial report 
     of a qualified entity under section 412(c) shall not be 
     required prior to the date that is 90 days after the date of 
     enactment of this title.

     SEC. 608. REVISED INTERIM EVALUATION REPORT DEADLINE.

       (a) In General.--Section 414(d)(1) of the Assets for 
     Independence Act (42 U.S.C. 604 note) is amended by striking 
     ``calendar'' and inserting ``project''.
       (b) Transitional Deadline.--Notwithstanding the amendment 
     made by subsection (a), the submission of the initial interim 
     report of the Secretary under section 412(c) shall not be 
     required prior to the date that is 90 days after the date of 
     enactment of this title.

     SEC. 609. INCREASED APPROPRIATIONS FOR EVALUATION EXPENSES.

       Subsection (e) of section 414 of the Assets for 
     Independence Act (42 U.S.C. 604 note) is amended to read as 
     follows:
       ``(e) Evaluation Expenses.--Of the amount appropriated 
     under section 416 for a fiscal year, the Secretary may expend 
     not more than $500,000 for such fiscal year to carry out the 
     objectives of this section.''.

     SEC. 610. NO REDUCTION IN BENEFITS.

       Section 415 of the Assets for Independence Act (42 U.S.C. 
     604 note) is amended to read as follows:

     ``SEC. 415. NO REDUCTION IN BENEFITS.

       ``Notwithstanding any other provision of Federal law (other 
     than the Internal Revenue Code of 1986) that requires 
     consideration of 1 or more financial circumstances of an 
     individual, for the purpose of determining eligibility to 
     receive, or the amount of, any assistance or benefit 
     authorized by such law to be provided to or for the benefit 
     of such individual, funds (including interest accruing) in an 
     individual development account under this Act shall be 
     disregarded for such purpose with respect to any period 
     during which such individual maintains or makes contributions 
     into such an account.''.

             TITLE VII--PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR PROGRESS ACT

       Sec. 701. Physical Education for Progress. Title X of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
     8001 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following:

[[Page H12121]]

               ``PART L--PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR PROGRESS

     ``SEC. 10999A. SHORT TITLE.

       ``This part may be cited as the `Physical Education for 
     Progress Act'.

     ``SEC. 10999B. PURPOSE.

       ``The purpose of this part is to award grants and contracts 
     to local educational agencies to enable the local educational 
     agencies to initiate, expand and improve physical education 
     programs for all kindergarten through 12th grade students.

     ``SEC. 10999C. FINDINGS.

       ``Congress makes the following findings:
       ``(1) Physical education is essential to the development of 
     growing children.
       ``(2) Physical education helps improve the overall health 
     of children by improving their cardiovascular endurance, 
     muscular strength and power, and flexibility, and by 
     enhancing weight regulation, bone development, posture, 
     skillful moving, active lifestyle habits, and constructive 
     use of leisure time.
       ``(3) Physical education helps improve the self esteem, 
     interpersonal relationships, responsible behavior, and 
     independence of children.
       ``(4) Children who participate in high quality daily 
     physical education programs tend to be more healthy and 
     physically fit.
       ``(5) The percentage of young people who are overweight has 
     more than doubled in the 30 years preceding 1999.
       ``(6) Low levels of activity contribute to the high 
     prevalence of obesity among children in the United States.
       ``(7) Obesity related diseases cost the United States 
     economy more than $100,000,000,000 every year.
       ``(8) Inactivity and poor diet cause at least 300,000 
     deaths a year in the United States.
       ``(9) Physically fit adults have significantly reduced risk 
     factors for heart attacks and stroke.
       ``(10) Children are not as active as they should be and 
     fewer than 1 in 4 children get 20 minutes of vigorous 
     activity every day of the week.
       ``(11) The Surgeon General's 1996 Report on Physical 
     Activity and Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and 
     Prevention, recommend daily physical education for all 
     students in kindergarten through grade 12.
       ``(12) Twelve years after Congress passed House Concurrent 
     Resolution 97, 100th Congress, agreed to December 11, 1987, 
     encouraging State and local governments and local educational 
     agencies to provide high quality daily physical education 
     programs for all children in kindergarten through grade 12, 
     little progress has been made.
       ``(13) Every student in our Nation's schools, from 
     kindergarten through grade 12, should have the opportunity to 
     participate in quality physical education. It is the unique 
     role of quality physical education programs to develop the 
     health-related fitness, physical competence, and cognitive 
     understanding about physical activity for all students so 
     that the students can adopt healthy and physically active 
     lifestyles.

     ``SEC. 10999D. PROGRAM AUTHORIZED.

       ``The Secretary is authorized to award grants to, and enter 
     into contracts with, local educational agencies to pay the 
     Federal share of the costs of initiating, expanding, and 
     improving physical education programs for kindergarten 
     through grade 12 students by--
       ``(1) providing equipment and support to enable students to 
     actively participate in physical education activities; and
       ``(2) providing funds for staff and teacher training and 
     education.

     ``SEC. 10999E. APPLICATIONS; PROGRAM ELEMENTS.

       ``(a) Applications.--Each local educational agency desiring 
     a grant or contract under this part shall submit to the 
     Secretary an application that contains a plan to initiate, 
     expand, or improve physical education programs in the schools 
     served by the agency in order to make progress toward meeting 
     State standards for physical education.
       ``(b) Program Elements.--A physical education program 
     described in any application submitted under subsection (a) 
     may provide--
       ``(1) fitness education and assessment to help children 
     understand, improve, or maintain their physical well-being;
       ``(2) instruction in a variety of motor skills and physical 
     activities designed to enhance the physical, mental, and 
     social or emotional development of every child;
       ``(3) development of cognitive concepts about motor skill 
     and physical fitness that support a lifelong healthy 
     lifestyle;
       ``(4) opportunities to develop positive social and 
     cooperative skills through physical activity participation;
       ``(5) instruction in healthy eating habits and good 
     nutrition; and
       ``(6) teachers of physical education the opportunity for 
     professional development to stay abreast of the latest 
     research, issues, and trends in the field of physical 
     education.
       ``(c) Special Rule.--For the purpose of this part, 
     extracurricular activities such as team sports and Reserve 
     Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) program activities shall not 
     be considered as part of the curriculum of a physical 
     education program assisted under this part.

     ``SEC. 10999F. PROPORTIONALITY.

       ``The Secretary shall ensure that grants awarded and 
     contracts entered into under this part shall be equitably 
     distributed between local educational agencies serving urban 
     and rural areas, and between local educational agencies 
     serving large and small numbers of students.

     ``SEC. 10999G. PRIVATE SCHOOL STUDENTS AND HOME-SCHOOLED 
                   STUDENTS.

       ``An application for funds under this part may provide for 
     the participation, in the activities funded under this part, 
     of--
       ``(1) homeschooled children, and their parents and 
     teachers; or
       ``(2) children enrolled in private nonprofit elementary 
     schools or secondary schools, and their parents and teachers.

     ``SEC. 10999H. REPORT REQUIRED FOR CONTINUED FUNDING.

       ``As a condition to continue to receive grant or contract 
     funding after the first year of a multiyear grant or contract 
     under this part, the administrator of the grant or contract 
     for the local educational agency shall submit to the 
     Secretary an annual report that describes the activities 
     conducted during the preceding year and demonstrates that 
     progress has been made toward meeting State standards for 
     physical education.

     ``SEC. 10999I. REPORT TO CONGRESS.

       ``The Secretary shall submit a report to Congress not later 
     than June 1, 2003, that describes the programs assisted under 
     this part, documents the success of such programs in 
     improving physical fitness, and makes such recommendations as 
     the Secretary determines appropriate for the continuation and 
     improvement of the programs assisted under this part.

     ``SEC. 10999J. ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS.

       ``Not more than 5 percent of the grant or contract funds 
     made available to a local educational agency under this part 
     for any fiscal year may be used for administrative costs.

     ``SEC. 10999K. FEDERAL SHARE; SUPPLEMENT NOT SUPPLANT.

       ``(a) Federal Share.--The Federal share under this part may 
     not exceed--
       ``(1) 90 percent of the total cost of a project for the 
     first year for which the project receives assistance under 
     this part; and
       ``(2) 75 percent of such cost for the second and each 
     subsequent such year.
       ``(b) Supplement not Supplant.--Funds made available under 
     this part shall be used to supplement and not supplant other 
     Federal, State and local funds available for physical 
     education activities.

     ``SEC. 10999L. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       ``There are authorized to be appropriated $30,000,000 for 
     fiscal year 2001, $70,000,000 for fiscal year 2002, and 
     $100,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2003 through 2005, 
     to carry out this part. Such funds shall remain available 
     until expended.''.

                TITLE VIII--EARLY LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

     SEC. 801. SHORT TITLE; FINDINGS.

       (a) Short Title.--This title may be cited as the ``Early 
     Learning Opportunities Act''.
       (b) Findings.--Congress finds that--
       (1) medical research demonstrates that adequate stimulation 
     of a young child's brain between birth and age 5 is critical 
     to the physical development of the young child's brain;
       (2) parents are the most significant and effective teachers 
     of their children, and they alone are responsible for 
     choosing the best early learning opportunities for their 
     child;
       (3) parent education and parent involvement are critical to 
     the success of any early learning program or activity;
       (4) the more intensively parents are involved in their 
     child's early learning, the greater the cognitive and 
     noncognitive benefits to their children;
       (5) many parents have difficulty finding the information 
     and support the parents seek to help their children grow to 
     their full potential;
       (6) each day approximately 13,000,000 young children, 
     including 6,000,000 infants or toddlers, spend some or all of 
     their day being cared for by someone other than their 
     parents;
       (7) quality early learning programs, including those 
     designed to promote effective parenting, can increase the 
     literacy rate, the secondary school graduation rate, the 
     employment rate, and the college enrollment rate for children 
     who have participated in voluntary early learning programs 
     and activities;
       (8) early childhood interventions can yield substantial 
     advantages to participants in terms of emotional and 
     cognitive development, education, economic well-being, and 
     health, with the latter 2 advantages applying to the 
     children's families as well;
       (9) participation in quality early learning programs, 
     including those designed to promote effective parenting, can 
     decrease the future incidence of teenage pregnancy, welfare 
     dependency, at-risk behaviors, and juvenile delinquency for 
     children;
       (10) several cost-benefit analysis studies indicate that 
     for each $1 invested in quality early learning programs, the 
     Federal Government can save over $5 by reducing the number of 
     children and families who participate in Federal Government 
     programs like special education and welfare;
       (11) for children placed in the care of others during the 
     workday, the low salaries paid to the child care staff, the 
     lack of career progression for the staff, and the lack of 
     child development specialists involved in early learning and 
     child care programs, make it difficult to attract and retain 
     the quality of staff necessary for a positive early learning 
     experience;
       (12) Federal Government support for early learning has 
     primarily focused on out-of-home care programs like those 
     established under the Head Start Act, the Child Care and 
     Development Block Grant of 1990, and part C of the 
     Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and these 
     programs--
       (A) serve far fewer than half of all eligible children;
       (B) are not primarily designed to provide support for 
     parents who care for their young children in the home; and
       (C) lack a means of coordinating early learning 
     opportunities in each community; and

[[Page H12122]]

       (13) by helping communities increase, expand, and better 
     coordinate early learning opportunities for children and 
     their families, the productivity and creativity of future 
     generations will be improved, and the Nation will be prepared 
     for continued leadership in the 21st century.

     SEC. 802. PURPOSES.

       The purposes of this title are--
       (1) to increase the availability of voluntary programs, 
     services, and activities that support early childhood 
     development, increase parent effectiveness, and promote the 
     learning readiness of young children so that young children 
     enter school ready to learn;
       (2) to support parents, child care providers, and 
     caregivers who want to incorporate early learning activities 
     into the daily lives of young children;
       (3) to remove barriers to the provision of an accessible 
     system of early childhood learning programs in communities 
     throughout the United States;
       (4) to increase the availability and affordability of 
     professional development activities and compensation for 
     caregivers and child care providers; and
       (5) to facilitate the development of community-based 
     systems of collaborative service delivery models 
     characterized by resource sharing, linkages between 
     appropriate supports, and local planning for services.

     SEC. 803. DEFINITIONS.

       In this title:
       (1) Caregiver.--The term ``caregiver'' means an individual, 
     including a relative, neighbor, or family friend, who 
     regularly or frequently provides care, with or without 
     compensation, for a child for whom the individual is not the 
     parent.
       (2) Child care provider.--The term ``child care provider'' 
     means a provider of non-residential child care services 
     (including center-based, family-based, and in-home child care 
     services) for compensation who or that is legally operating 
     under State law, and complies with applicable State and local 
     requirements for the provision of child care services.
       (3) Early learning.--The term ``early learning'', used with 
     respect to a program or activity, means learning designed to 
     facilitate the development of cognitive, language, motor, and 
     social-emotional skills for, and to promote learning 
     readiness in, young children.
       (4) Early learning program.--The term ``early learning 
     program'' means--
       (A) a program of services or activities that helps parents, 
     caregivers, and child care providers incorporate early 
     learning into the daily lives of young children; or
       (B) a program that directly provides early learning to 
     young children.
       (5) Indian tribe.--The term ``Indian tribe'' has the 
     meaning given the term in section 4 of the Indian Self-
     Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450b).
       (6) Local Council.--The term ``Local Council'' means a 
     Local Council established or designated under section 814(a) 
     that serves one or more localities.
       (7) Locality.--The term ``locality'' means a city, county, 
     borough, township, or area served by another general purpose 
     unit of local government, an Indian tribe, a Regional 
     Corporation, or a Native Hawaiian entity.
       (8) Parent.--The term ``parent'' means a biological parent, 
     an adoptive parent, a stepparent, a foster parent, or a legal 
     guardian of, or a person standing in loco parentis to, a 
     child.
       (9) Poverty line.--The term ``poverty line'' means the 
     poverty line (as defined by the Office of Management and 
     Budget, and revised annually in accordance with section 
     673(2) of the Community Services Block Grant Act (42 U.S.C. 
     9902(2))) applicable to a family of the size involved.
       (10) Regional corporation.--The term ``Regional 
     Corporation'' means an entity listed in section 419(4)(B) of 
     the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 619(4)(B)).
       (11) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
     of Health and Human Services.
       (12) State.--The term ``State'' means each of the several 
     States of the United States, the District of Columbia, and 
     the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
       (13) Training.--The term ``training'' means instruction in 
     early learning that--
       (A) is required for certification under State and local 
     laws, regulations, and policies;
       (B) is required to receive a nationally or State recognized 
     credential or its equivalent;
       (C) is received in a postsecondary education program 
     focused on early learning or early childhood development in 
     which the individual is enrolled; or
       (D) is provided, certified, or sponsored by an organization 
     that is recognized for its expertise in promoting early 
     learning or early childhood development.
       (14) Young child.--The term ``young child'' means any child 
     from birth to the age of mandatory school attendance in the 
     State where the child resides.

     SEC. 804. PROHIBITIONS.

       (a) Participation Not Required.--No person, including a 
     parent, shall be required to participate in any program of 
     early childhood education, early learning, parent education, 
     or developmental screening pursuant to the provisions of this 
     title.
       (b) Rights of Parents.--Nothing in this title shall be 
     construed to affect the rights of parents otherwise 
     established in Federal, State, or local law.
       (c) Particular Methods or Settings.--No entity that 
     receives funds under this title shall be required to provide 
     services under this title through a particular instructional 
     method or in a particular instructional setting to comply 
     with this title.
       (d) Nonduplication.--No funds provided under this title 
     shall be used to carry out an activity funded under another 
     provision of law providing for Federal child care or early 
     learning programs, unless an expansion of such activity is 
     identified in the local needs assessment and performance 
     goals under this title.

     SEC. 805. AUTHORIZATION AND APPROPRIATION OF FUNDS.

       There are authorized to be appropriated to the Department 
     of Health and Human Services to carry out this title--
       (1) $750,000,000 for fiscal year 2001;
       (2) $1,000,000,000 for fiscal year 2002;
       (3) $1,500,000,000 for fiscal year 2003; and
       (4) such sums as may be necessary for each of the fiscal 
     years 2004 and 2005.

     SEC. 806. COORDINATION OF FEDERAL PROGRAMS.

       (a) Coordination.--The Secretary and the Secretary of 
     Education shall develop mechanisms to resolve administrative 
     and programmatic conflicts between Federal programs that 
     would be a barrier to parents, caregivers, service providers, 
     or children related to the coordination of services and 
     funding for early learning programs.
       (b) Use of Equipment and Supplies.--In the case of a 
     collaborative activity funded under this title and another 
     provision of law providing for Federal child care or early 
     learning programs, the use of equipment and nonconsumable 
     supplies purchased with funds made available under this title 
     or such provision shall not be restricted to children 
     enrolled or otherwise participating in the program carried 
     out under this title or such provision, during a period in 
     which the activity is predominately funded under this title 
     or such provision.

     SEC. 807. PROGRAM AUTHORIZED.

       (a) Grants.--From amounts appropriated under section 805 
     the Secretary shall award grants to States to enable the 
     States to award grants to Local Councils to pay the Federal 
     share of the cost of carrying out early learning programs in 
     the locality served by the Local Council.
       (b) Federal Share.--
       (1) In general.--The Federal share of the cost described in 
     subsections (a) and (e) shall be 85 percent for the first and 
     second years of the grant, 80 percent for the third and 
     fourth years of the grant, and 75 percent for the fifth and 
     subsequent years of the grant.
       (2) Non-federal share.--The non-Federal share of the cost 
     described in subsections (a) and (e) may be contributed in 
     cash or in kind, fairly evaluated, including facilities, 
     equipment, or services, which may be provided from State or 
     local public sources, or through donations from private 
     entities. For the purposes of this paragraph the term 
     ``facilities'' includes the use of facilities, but the 
     term ``equipment'' means donated equipment and not the use 
     of equipment.
       (c) Maintenance of Effort.--The Secretary shall not award a 
     grant under this title to any State unless the Secretary 
     first determines that the total expenditures by the State and 
     its political subdivisions to support early learning programs 
     (other than funds used to pay the non-Federal share under 
     subsection (b)(2)) for the fiscal year for which the 
     determination is made is equal to or greater than such 
     expenditures for the preceding fiscal year.
       (d) Supplement Not Supplant.--Amounts received under this 
     title shall be used to supplement and not supplant other 
     Federal, State, and local public funds expended to promote 
     early learning.
       (e) Special Rule.--If funds appropriated to carry out this 
     title are less than $150,000,000 for any fiscal year, the 
     Secretary shall award grants for the fiscal year directly to 
     Local Councils, on a competitive basis, to pay the Federal 
     share of the cost of carrying out early learning programs in 
     the locality served by the Local Council. In carrying out the 
     preceding sentence--
       (1) subsection (c), subsections (b) and (c) of section 810, 
     and paragraphs (1), (2), and (3) of section 811(a) shall not 
     apply;
       (2) State responsibilities described in section 811(d) 
     shall be carried out by the Local Council with regard to the 
     locality;
       (3) the Secretary shall provide such technical assistance 
     and monitoring as necessary to ensure that the use of the 
     funds by Local Councils and the distribution of the funds to 
     Local Councils are consistent with this title; and
       (4) subject to paragraph (1), the Secretary shall assume 
     the responsibilities of the Lead State Agency under this 
     title, as appropriate.

     SEC. 808. USES OF FUNDS.

       (a) In General.--Subject to section 810, grant funds under 
     this title shall be used to pay for developing, operating, or 
     enhancing voluntary early learning programs that are likely 
     to produce sustained gains in early learning.
       (b) Limited Uses.--Subject to section 810, Lead State 
     Agencies and Local Councils shall ensure that funds made 
     available under this title to the agencies and Local Councils 
     are used for 3 or more of the following activities:
       (1) Helping parents, caregivers, child care providers, and 
     educators increase their capacity to facilitate the 
     development of cognitive, language comprehension, expressive 
     language, social-emotional, and motor skills, and promote 
     learning readiness.
       (2) Promoting effective parenting.
       (3) Enhancing early childhood literacy.
       (4) Developing linkages among early learning programs 
     within a community and between early learning programs and 
     health care services for young children.
       (5) Increasing access to early learning opportunities for 
     young children with special needs, including developmental 
     delays, by facilitating coordination with other programs 
     serving such young children.
       (6) Increasing access to existing early learning programs 
     by expanding the days or times that the young children are 
     served, by expanding the number of young children served, or 
     by improving the affordability of the programs for low-income 
     families.

[[Page H12123]]

       (7) Improving the quality of early learning programs 
     through professional development and training activities, 
     increased compensation, and recruitment and retention 
     incentives, for early learning providers.
       (8) Removing ancillary barriers to early learning, 
     including transportation difficulties and absence of programs 
     during nontraditional work times.
       (c) Requirements.--Each Lead State Agency designated under 
     section 810(c) and Local Councils receiving a grant under 
     this title shall ensure--
       (1) that Local Councils described in section 814 work with 
     local educational agencies to identify cognitive, social, 
     emotional, and motor developmental abilities which are 
     necessary to support children's readiness for school;
       (2) that the programs, services, and activities assisted 
     under this title will represent developmentally appropriate 
     steps toward the acquisition of those abilities; and
       (3) that the programs, services, and activities assisted 
     under this title collectively provide benefits for children 
     cared for in their own homes as well as children placed in 
     the care of others.
       (d) Sliding Scale Payments.--States and Local Councils 
     receiving assistance under this title shall ensure that 
     programs, services, and activities assisted under this title 
     which customarily require a payment for such programs, 
     services, or activities, adjust the cost of such programs, 
     services, and activities provided to the individual or the 
     individual's child based on the individual's ability to pay.

     SEC. 809. RESERVATIONS AND ALLOTMENTS.

       (a) Reservation for Indian Tribes, Alaska Natives, and 
     Native Hawaiians.--The Secretary shall reserve 1 percent of 
     the total amount appropriated under section 805 for each 
     fiscal year, to be allotted to Indian tribes, Regional 
     Corporations, and Native Hawaiian entities, of which--
       (1) 0.5 percent shall be available to Indian tribes; and
       (2) 0.5 percent shall be available to Regional Corporations 
     and Native Hawaiian entities.
       (b) Allotments.--From the funds appropriated under this 
     title for each fiscal year that are not reserved under 
     subsection (a), the Secretary shall allot to each State the 
     sum of--
       (1) an amount that bears the same ratio to 50 percent of 
     such funds as the number of children 4 years of age and 
     younger in the State bears to the number of such children in 
     all States; and
       (2) an amount that bears the same ratio to 50 percent of 
     such funds as the number of children 4 years of age and 
     younger living in families with incomes below the poverty 
     line in the State bears to the number of such children in all 
     States.
       (c) Minimum Allotment.--No State shall receive an allotment 
     under subsection (b) for a fiscal year in an amount that is 
     less than .40 percent of the total amount appropriated for 
     the fiscal year under this title.
       (d) Availability of Funds.--Any portion of the allotment to 
     a State that is not expended for activities under this title 
     in the fiscal year for which the allotment is made shall 
     remain available to the State for 2 additional years, after 
     which any unexpended funds shall be returned to the 
     Secretary. The Secretary shall use the returned funds to 
     carry out a discretionary grant program for research-based 
     early learning demonstration projects.
       (e) Data.--The Secretary shall make allotments under this 
     title on the basis of the most recent data available to the 
     Secretary.

     SEC. 810. GRANT ADMINISTRATION.

       (a) Federal Administrative Costs.--The Secretary may use 
     not more than 3 percent of the amount appropriated under 
     section 805 for a fiscal year to pay for the administrative 
     costs of carrying out this title, including the monitoring 
     and evaluation of State and local efforts.
       (b) State Administrative Costs.--A State that receives a 
     grant under this title may use--
       (1) not more than 2 percent of the funds made available 
     through the grant to carry out activities designed to 
     coordinate early learning programs on the State level, 
     including programs funded or operated by the State 
     educational agency, health, children and family, and human 
     service agencies, and any State-level collaboration or 
     coordination council involving early learning and education, 
     such as the entities funded under section 640(a)(5) of the 
     Head Start Act (42 U.S.C. 9835 (a)(5));
       (2) not more than 2 percent of the funds made available 
     through the grant for the administrative costs of carrying 
     out the grant program and the costs of reporting State and 
     local efforts to the Secretary; and
       (3) not more than 3 percent of the funds made available 
     through the grant for training, technical assistance, and 
     wage incentives provided by the State to Local Councils.
       (c) Lead State Agency.--
       (1) In general.--To be eligible to receive an allotment 
     under this title, the Governor of a State shall appoint, 
     after consultation with the leadership of the State 
     legislature, a Lead State Agency to carry out the functions 
     described in paragraph (2).
       (2) Lead state agency.--
       (A) Allocation of funds.--The Lead State Agency described 
     in paragraph (1) shall allocate funds to Local Councils as 
     described in section 812.
       (B) Functions of agency.--In addition to allocating funds 
     pursuant to subparagraph (A), the Lead State Agency shall--
       (i) advise and assist Local Councils in the performance of 
     their duties under this title;
       (ii) develop and submit the State application;
       (iii) evaluate and approve applications submitted by Local 
     Councils under section 813;
       (iv) ensure collaboration with respect to assistance 
     provided under this title between the State agency 
     responsible for education and the State agency responsible 
     for children and family services;
       (v) prepare and submit to the Secretary, an annual report 
     on the activities carried out in the State under this title, 
     which shall include a statement describing how all funds 
     received under this title are expended and documentation of 
     the effects that resources under this title have had on--

       (I) parental capacity to improve learning readiness in 
     their young children;
       (II) early childhood literacy;
       (III) linkages among early learning programs;
       (IV) linkages between early learning programs and health 
     care services for young children;
       (V) access to early learning activities for young children 
     with special needs;
       (VI) access to existing early learning programs through 
     expansion of the days or times that children are served;
       (VII) access to existing early learning programs through 
     expansion of the number of young children served;
       (VIII) access to and affordability of existing early 
     learning programs for low-income families;

       (IX) the quality of early learning programs resulting from 
     professional development, and recruitment and retention 
     incentives for caregivers; and
       (X) removal of ancillary barriers to early learning, 
     including transportation difficulties and absence of programs 
     during nontraditional work times; and

       (vi) ensure that training and research is made available to 
     Local Councils and that such training and research reflects 
     the latest available brain development and early childhood 
     development research related to early learning.

     SEC. 811. STATE REQUIREMENTS.

       (a) Eligibility.--To be eligible for a grant under this 
     title, a State shall--
       (1) ensure that funds received by the State under this 
     title shall be subject to appropriation by the State 
     legislature, consistent with the terms and conditions 
     required under State law;
       (2) designate a Lead State Agency under section 810(c) to 
     administer and monitor the grant and ensure State-level 
     coordination of early learning programs;
       (3) submit to the Secretary an application at such time, in 
     such manner, and accompanied by such information as the 
     Secretary may require;
       (4) ensure that funds made available under this title are 
     distributed on a competitive basis throughout the State to 
     Local Councils serving rural, urban, and suburban areas of 
     the State; and
       (5) assist the Secretary in developing mechanisms to ensure 
     that Local Councils receiving funds under this title comply 
     with the requirements of this title.
       (b) State Preference.--In awarding grants to Local Councils 
     under this title, the State, to the maximum extent possible, 
     shall ensure that a broad variety of early learning programs 
     that provide a continuity of services across the age spectrum 
     assisted under this title are funded under this title, and 
     shall give preference to supporting--
       (1) a Local Council that meets criteria, that are specified 
     by the State and approved by the Secretary, for qualifying as 
     serving an area of greatest need for early learning programs; 
     and
       (2) a Local Council that demonstrates, in the application 
     submitted under section 813, the Local Council's potential to 
     increase collaboration as a means of maximizing use of 
     resources provided under this title with other resources 
     available for early learning programs.
       (c) Local Preference.--In awarding grants under this title, 
     Local Councils shall give preference to supporting--
       (1) projects that demonstrate their potential to 
     collaborate as a means of maximizing use of resources 
     provided under this title with other resources available for 
     early learning programs;
       (2) programs that provide a continuity of services for 
     young children across the age spectrum, individually, or 
     through community-based networks or cooperative agreements; 
     and
       (3) programs that help parents and other caregivers promote 
     early learning with their young children.
       (d) Performance Goals.--
       (1) Assessments.--Based on information and data received 
     from Local Councils, and information and data available 
     through State resources, the State shall biennially assess 
     the needs and available resources related to the provision of 
     early learning programs within the State.
       (2) Performance goals.--Based on the analysis of 
     information described in paragraph (1), the State shall 
     establish measurable performance goals to be achieved through 
     activities assisted under this title.
       (3) Requirement.--The State shall award grants to Local 
     Councils only for purposes that are consistent with the 
     performance goals established under paragraph (2).
       (4) Report.--The State shall report to the Secretary 
     annually regarding the State's progress toward achieving the 
     performance goals established in paragraph (2) and any 
     necessary modifications to those goals, including the 
     rationale for the modifications.
       (5) Improvement plans.--If the Secretary determines, based 
     on the State report submitted under paragraph (4), that the 
     State is not making progress toward achieving the performance 
     goals described in paragraph (2), then the State shall submit 
     a performance improvement plan to the Secretary, and 
     demonstrate reasonable progress in implementing such plan, in 
     order to remain eligible for funding under this title.

     SEC. 812. LOCAL ALLOCATIONS.

       (a) In General.--The Lead State Agency shall allocate to 
     Local Councils in the State not less than 93 percent of the 
     funds provided to the State under this title for a fiscal 
     year.
       (b) Limitation.--The Lead State Agency shall allocate funds 
     provided under this title on the basis of the population of 
     the locality served by the Local Council.

[[Page H12124]]

     SEC. 813. LOCAL APPLICATIONS.

       (a) In General.--To be eligible to receive assistance under 
     this title, the Local Council shall submit an application to 
     the Lead State Agency at such time, in such manner, and 
     containing such information as the Lead State Agency may 
     require.
       (b) Contents.--Each application submitted pursuant to 
     subsection (a) shall include a statement ensuring that the 
     local government entity, Indian tribe, Regional Corporation, 
     or Native Hawaiian entity has established or designated a 
     Local Council under section 814, and the Local Council has 
     developed a local plan for carrying out early learning 
     programs under this title that includes--
       (1) a needs and resources assessment concerning early 
     learning services and a statement describing how early 
     learning programs will be funded consistent with the 
     assessment;
       (2) a statement of how the Local Council will ensure that 
     early learning programs will meet the performance goals 
     reported by the Lead State Agency under this title; and
       (3) a description of how the Local Council will form 
     collaboratives among local youth, social service, and 
     educational providers to maximize resources and concentrate 
     efforts on areas of greatest need.

     SEC. 814. LOCAL ADMINISTRATION.

       (a) Local Council.--
       (1) In general.--To be eligible to receive funds under this 
     title, a local government entity, Indian tribe, Regional 
     Corporation, or Native Hawaiian entity, as appropriate, shall 
     establish or designate a Local Council, which shall be 
     composed of--
       (A) representatives of local agencies directly affected by 
     early learning programs assisted under this title;
       (B) parents;
       (C) other individuals concerned with early learning issues 
     in the locality, such as representative entities providing 
     elementary education, child care resource and referral 
     services, early learning opportunities, child care, and 
     health services; and
       (D) other key community leaders.
       (2) Designating existing entity.--If a local government 
     entity, Indian tribe, Regional Corporation, or Native 
     Hawaiian entity has, before the date of enactment of the 
     Early Learning Opportunities Act, a Local Council or a 
     regional entity that is comparable to the Local Council 
     described in paragraph (1), the entity, tribe or corporation 
     may designate the council or entity as a Local Council under 
     this title, and shall be considered to have established a 
     Local Council in compliance with this subsection.
       (3) Functions.--The Local Council shall be responsible for 
     preparing and submitting the application described in section 
     813.
       (b) Administration.--
       (1) Administrative costs.--Not more than 3 percent of the 
     funds received by a Local Council under this title shall be 
     used to pay for the administrative costs of the Local Council 
     in carrying out this title.
       (2) Fiscal agent.--A Local Council may designate any 
     entity, with a demonstrated capacity for administering 
     grants, that is affected by, or concerned with, early 
     learning issues, including the State, to serve as fiscal 
     agent for the administration of grant funds received by the 
     Local Council under this title.

             TITLE IX--RURAL EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT PROGRAM

     SEC. 901. RURAL EDUCATION INITIATIVE.

       Subpart 2 of part J of title X of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 8291 et seq.) is 
     amended to read as follows:

                ``Subpart 2--Rural Education Initiative

     ``SEC. 10971. SHORT TITLE.

       ``This subpart may be cited as the `Rural Education 
     Achievement Program'.

     ``SEC. 10972. PURPOSE.

       ``It is the purpose of this subpart to address the unique 
     needs of rural school districts that frequently--
       ``(1) lack the personnel and resources needed to compete 
     for Federal competitive grants; and
       ``(2) receive formula allocations in amounts too small to 
     be effective in meeting their intended purposes.

     ``SEC. 10973. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       ``There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this 
     subpart $62,500,000 for fiscal year 2001.

     ``SEC. 10974. FORMULA GRANT PROGRAM AUTHORIZED.

       ``(a) Alternative Uses.--
       ``(1) In general.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
     law, an eligible local educational agency may use the 
     applicable funding, that the agency is eligible to receive 
     from the State educational agency for a fiscal year, to carry 
     out local activities authorized in part A of title I, section 
     2210(b), section 3134, or section 4116.
       ``(2) Notification.--An eligible local educational agency 
     shall notify the State educational agency of the local 
     educational agency's intention to use the applicable funding 
     in accordance with paragraph (1) not later than a date that 
     is established by the State educational agency for the 
     notification.
       ``(b) Eligibility.--A local educational agency shall be 
     eligible to use the applicable funding in accordance with 
     subsection (a) if--
       ``(1) the total number of students in average daily 
     attendance at all of the schools served by the local 
     educational agency is less than 600; and
       ``(2) all of the schools served by the local educational 
     agency are designated with a School Locale Code of 7 or 8, as 
     determined by the Secretary of Education.
       ``(c) Applicable Funding.--In this section, the term 
     `applicable funding' means funds provided under each of 
     titles II, IV, and VI, except for funds made available under 
     section 321 of the Department of Education Appropriations 
     Act, 2001.
       ``(d) Disbursal.--Each State educational agency that 
     receives applicable funding for a fiscal year shall disburse 
     the applicable funding to local educational agencies for 
     alternative uses under this section for the fiscal year at 
     the same time that the State educational agency disburses the 
     applicable funding to local educational agencies that do not 
     intend to use the applicable funding for such alternative 
     uses for the fiscal year.
       ``(e) Supplement Not Supplant.--Funds made available under 
     this section shall be used to supplement and not supplant any 
     other State or local education funds.
       ``(f) Special Rule.--References in Federal law to funds for 
     the provisions of law set forth in subsection (c) may be 
     considered to be references to funds for this section.
       ``(g) Construction.--Nothing in this subpart shall be 
     construed to prohibit a local educational agency that enters 
     into cooperative arrangements with other local educational 
     agencies for the provision of special, compensatory, or other 
     education services pursuant to State law or a written 
     agreement from entering into similar arrangements for the use 
     or the coordination of the use of the funds made available 
     under this subpart.

     ``SEC. 10975. COMPETITIVE GRANT PROGRAM AUTHORIZED.

       ``(a) In General.--The Secretary is authorized to award 
     grants to eligible local educational agencies to enable the 
     local educational agencies to carry out local activities 
     authorized in part A of title I, section 2210(b), section 
     3134, or section 4116.
       ``(b) Eligibility.--A local educational agency shall be 
     eligible to receive a grant under this section if--
       ``(1) the total number of students in average daily 
     attendance at all of the schools served by the local 
     educational agency is less than 600; and
       ``(2) all of the schools served by the local educational 
     agency are designated with a School Locale Code of 7 or 8, as 
     determined by the Secretary of Education.
       ``(c) Amount.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Secretary shall award a grant to a 
     local educational agency under this section for a fiscal year 
     in an amount equal to the amount determined under paragraph 
     (2) for the fiscal year minus the total amount received under 
     the provisions of law described under section 10974(c) for 
     the fiscal year.
       ``(2) Determination.--The amount referred to in paragraph 
     (1) is equal to $100 multiplied by the total number of 
     students in excess of 50 students that are in average daily 
     attendance at the schools served by the local educational 
     agency, plus $20,000, except that the amount may not exceed 
     $60,000.
       ``(3) Census determination.--
       ``(A) In general.--Each local educational agency desiring a 
     grant under this section shall determine for each year the 
     number of kindergarten through grade 12 students in average 
     daily attendance at the schools served by the local 
     educational agency during the period beginning or the first 
     day of classes and ending on December 1.
       ``(B) Submission.--Each local educational agency shall 
     submit the number described in subparagraph (A) to the 
     Secretary not later than March 1 of each year.
       ``(4) Penalty.--If the Secretary determines that a local 
     educational agency has knowingly submitted false information 
     under paragraph (3) for the purpose of gaining additional 
     funds under this section, then the local educational agency 
     shall be fined an amount equal to twice the difference 
     between the amount the local educational agency received 
     under this section, and the correct amount the 
     local educational agency would have received under this 
     section if the agency had submitted accurate information 
     under paragraph (3).
       ``(d) Disbursal.--The Secretary shall disburse the funds 
     awarded to a local educational agency under this section for 
     a fiscal year not later than July 1 of that year.
       ``(e) Supplement Not Supplant.--Funds made available under 
     this section shall be used to supplement and not supplant any 
     other State or local education funds.

     ``SEC. 10976. ACCOUNTABILITY.

       ``(a) Academic Achievement.--
       ``(1) In general.--Each local educational agency that uses 
     or receives funds under section 10974 or 10975 for a fiscal 
     year shall--
       ``(A) administer an assessment that is used statewide and 
     is consistent with the assessment described in section 
     1111(b), to assess the academic achievement of students in 
     the schools served by the local educational agency; or
       ``(B) in the case of a local educational agency for which 
     there is no statewide assessment described in subparagraph 
     (A), administer a test, that is selected by the local 
     educational agency, to assess the academic achievement of 
     students in the schools served by the local educational 
     agency.
       ``(2) Special rule.--Each local educational agency that 
     uses or receives funds under section 10974 or 10975 shall use 
     the same assessment or test described in paragraph (1) for 
     each year of participation in the program carried out under 
     such section.
       ``(b) State Educational Agency Determination Regarding 
     Continuing Participation.--Each State educational agency that 
     receives funding under the provisions of law described in 
     section 10974(c) shall--
       ``(1) after the third year that a local educational agency 
     in the State participates in a program authorized under 
     section 10974 or 10975

[[Page H12125]]

     and on the basis of the results of the assessments or tests 
     described in subsection (a), determine whether the students 
     served by the local educational agency participating in the 
     program performed better on the assessments or tests after 
     the third year of the participation than the students 
     performed on the assessments or tests after the first year of 
     the participation;
       ``(2) permit only the local educational agencies that 
     participated in the program and served students that 
     performed better on the assessments or tests, as described in 
     paragraph (1), to continue to participate in the program for 
     an additional period of 3 years; and
       ``(3) prohibit the local educational agencies that 
     participated in the program and served students that did not 
     perform better on the assessments or tests, as described in 
     paragraph (1), from participating in the program, for a 
     period of 3 years from the date of the determination.

     ``SEC. 10977. RATABLE REDUCTIONS IN CASE OF INSUFFICIENT 
                   APPROPRIATIONS.

       ``(a) In General.--If the amount appropriated for any 
     fiscal year and made available for grants under this subpart 
     is insufficient to pay the full amount for which all agencies 
     are eligible under this subpart, the Secretary shall ratably 
     reduce each such amount.
       ``(b) Additional Amounts.--If additional funds become 
     available for making payments under paragraph (1) for such 
     fiscal year, payments that were reduced under subsection (a) 
     shall be increased on the same basis as such payments were 
     reduced.

     ``SEC. 10978. APPLICABILITY.

       ``Sections 10951 and 10952 shall not apply to this 
     subpart.''.
       This Act may be cited as the ``Departments of Labor, Health 
     and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies 
     Appropriations Act, 2001''.

  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
                    RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS

       Following is explanatory language on H.R. 5656, as 
     introduced on December 14, 2000.
       The conferees on H.R. 4577 agree with the matter included 
     in H.R. 5656 and enacted in this conference report by 
     reference and the following description. This bill was 
     developed through negotiations by the conferees on the 
     differences in H.R. 4577. References in the following 
     description to the ``conference agreement'' mean the matter 
     included in the introduced bill enacted by this conference 
     report. References to the House bill mean the House passed 
     H.R. 4577. References to the Senate bill or to the Senate 
     amendment mean the Senate passed version of H.R. 4577.
       In implementing this agreement, the Departments and 
     agencies should comply with the language and instructions set 
     forth in House Report 106-645 and Senate Report 106-293.
       In the case where the language and instructions 
     specifically address the allocation of funds, the Departments 
     and agencies are to follow the funding levels specified in 
     the Congressional budget justifications accompanying the 
     fiscal year 2001 budget or the underlying authorizing statute 
     and should give full consideration to all items, including 
     items allocating specific funding included in the House and 
     Senate reports. With respect to the provisions in the House 
     and Senate reports that specifically allocate funds each has 
     been reviewed and those that are jointly concurred in have 
     been included in this joint statement.
       The conferees specifically endorse the provisions of the 
     House Report 105-205 directing ``* * * the Departments of 
     Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education and the 
     Social Security Administration and the Railroad Retirement 
     Board to submit operating plans with respect to discretionary 
     appropriations to the House and Senate Committees on 
     Appropriations. These plans, which are to be submitted within 
     30 days of the final passage of the bill, must be signed by 
     the respective Departmental Secretaries, the Social Security 
     Commissioner and the Chairman of the Railroad Retirement 
     Board.''
       The conferees expect the Departments and agencies covered 
     by this directive to meet with the House and Senate 
     Committees as soon as possible after enactment of the bill to 
     develop a methodology to assure adequate and timely 
     information on the allocation of funds within accounts within 
     this conference report while minimizing the need for 
     unnecessary and duplicative submissions.
       The Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and 
     Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001, put 
     in place by this bill, incorporates the following agreements 
     of the managers:

                      TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

                 Employment and Training Administration


                    Training and Employment Services

       The conference agreement includes $5,670,805,000 for 
     training and employment services instead of $5,015,495,000 as 
     proposed by the House and $5,453,141,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate. Of the amount appropriated, $2,463,000,000 is an 
     advance appropriation for fiscal year 2002. The conference 
     agreement includes $1,400,000,000, which is the House level 
     for Job Corps, but eliminates the October 1, 2000 
     availability of funds for hiring Business and Community 
     Liaisons. The conference agreement includes $15,000,000 for 
     this purpose, but the funds are made available on July 1, 
     2001, the normal funding cycle for Job Corps operations.
       The conference agreement includes $586,487 made available 
     for Job Corps operating expenses to be paid to the city of 
     Vergennes, Vermont in settlement of the city's claim.
       The conference agreement includes $1,590,040,000 for the 
     Dislocated Worker program, as a step toward providing all 
     dislocated workers who want and need assistance the resources 
     to train for or find new jobs.
       The conference agreement includes $1,102,965,000 for Youth 
     Activities. This increase will allow local communities to 
     address the reduction in the number of youth served in this 
     year's summer jobs program resulting from a shift to 
     comprehensive services, to establish new local youth 
     councils, and to implement other reforms to youth training 
     activities and services, all required under the Workforce 
     Investment Act.
       At the time the conferees acted on this bill, an increase 
     in the minimum wage had not yet been enacted by Congress. If 
     Congress enacts an increase in the minimum wage prior to the 
     beginning of program year 2001, which begins April 1, 2001 
     for the youth activities grants, the conferees expect the 
     Administration to submit a supplemental request for the 2001 
     youth program as part of its fiscal year 2002 budget request. 
     The conferees intend that the number of program participants 
     to be served will not be decreased as a result of any minimum 
     wage increase.
       The conference agreement includes $275,000,000 to expand to 
     more communities the Youth Opportunity Grants aimed at 
     increasing the long-term employment of youth who live in 
     empowerment zones, enterprise communities, and other high-
     poverty areas.
       The conference agreement includes $55,000,000 for the 
     Responsible Reintegration for Young Offenders initiative to 
     address youth offender issues. This new initiative involving 
     DOL, HHS, and DOJ, will build on work begun earlier.
       The conference agreement includes language authorizing the 
     use of funds under the dislocated workers program for 
     projects that provide assistance to new entrants in the 
     workforce and incumbent workers as proposed by the Senate. 
     The conference agreement also includes language to waive a 10 
     percent limitation in the Workforce Investment Act with 
     respect to the use of discretionary funds to carry out 
     demonstration and pilot projects, multi-service projects and 
     multi-state projects with regard to dislocated workers and to 
     waive certain other provisions in that Act. The language is 
     similar to that in the Senate bill. The House bill contained 
     no similar provisions.
       The conference agreement includes a citation to the Women 
     in Apprenticeship and Nontraditional Occupations Act as 
     proposed by the House. The Senate bill did not cite this Act.
       The conferees direct the Department, within the funds 
     appropriated for fiscal year 2000 for National Emergency 
     Grants within the Dislocated Worker program, to respond to an 
     anticipated request by the State of Wisconsin for emergency 
     funds to address layoffs in the community of Wisconsin 
     Rapids.
       The conferees direct the Department, within the funds 
     appropriated for FY 2000 for National Emergency Grants within 
     the Dislocated Worker program, to provide in response to an 
     anticipated request by the State of North Carolina for 
     $175,000 in emergency funds to address major layoffs in the 
     community of Gaston County.
       With respect to the projects listed below for both the 
     Dislocated Worker program and the Pilots and Demonstrations 
     authority, the conferees acknowledge changes under the 
     Workforce Investment Act to develop and implement techniques 
     and approaches, and demonstrate the effectiveness of 
     specialized methods of addressing the employment and training 
     needs of individuals. The conferees encourage the Department 
     to ensure that these projects are coordinated with local 
     Workforce Investment Boards. The conferees also encourage the 
     Department of Labor to ensure that project performance is 
     adequately documented and evaluated. The conference agreement 
     includes the following amounts for the following projects and 
     activities:
     Dislocated workers
       --$600,000 to develop and implement technology training 
     through the Resource Recovery Program--Campbellsville 
     University, TN;
       --$500,000 for Workforce Development project to retrain 
     older incumbent workers for Montana workforce--Montana State 
     University, Billings;
       --$1,600,000 to the Montana Tech Foundation for the 
     Northwest Regional Miner--Training and Research Facility--
     Butte, Montana;
       --$800,000 for the River Valley Machine Tool Technology 
     program to retrain displaced workers--Central Maine Technical 
     College;
       --$1,400,000 for Coastal Enterprises Inc.'s New Enterprise 
     Initiative Fund (NEIF) to provide training for dislocated 
     workers to transition into new jobs--Maine;
       --$650,000 for the Iowa Training Opportunities Program;
       --$927,000 for the JobLinks Program;
       --$50,000 for Clemson University to retrain tobacco 
     farmers;
       --$185,000 for the Hawaii Department of Labor/Kauai 
     Cooperative Extension;
       --$464,000 for High Tech Training--Maui, Hawaii;
       --$861,000 for the Clayton College and State University in 
     Georgia for a virtual education and training project;
       --$184,000 for the Adult Computer Skills Training 
     Initiative (ACSTI) through the

[[Page H12126]]

     Education and Research Consortium of Western North Carolina, 
     Inc.;
       --$464,000 for the Bethel Native Corp.--Alaska; and
       --$500,000 for the University of Alaska/Ketchikan Shipyards 
     training program for shipyard workers.
     Pilots and demonstrations
       --$1,275,000 for the Mott Community College Workforce 
     Development Institute for Manufacturing Simulation--access to 
     electronic library of technology, developed as part of DOL's 
     America's Learning Exchange--Michigan;
       --$1,000,000 for Jobs for America's Graduates, School-to-
     Work projects for at-risk young people;
       --$500,000 to the University of Mississippi for Workforce 
     training to support real time captioning initiatives for the 
     hearing disabled--Oxford, Mississippi;
       --$750,000 for Technology Tool Kit to train at-risk young 
     people in occupations related to the use of automated 
     identification technology--Mississippi Valley State 
     University;
       --$850,000 to train Northern Maine's workforce for 
     employment in the metal trades--Northern Maine Technical 
     College;
       --$691,000 to the San Diego State University Foundation to 
     implement innovative high-tech training programs;
       --$900,000 for the South Dakota Intertribal Bison 
     Cooperative;
       --$700,000 for the Greater Columbus Ohio Chamber of 
     Commerce Career Academies program--project to design and test 
     programs in partnership with workforce development system;
       --$250,000 for Job Corps of North Dakota for the Fellowship 
     Executive Training Program;
       --$276,000 to the City of Monrovia, CA to train youth in 
     information technologies;
       --$1,059,000 to the Californina State Polytechnic 
     University in Pomona, CA to develop technology training 
     programs;
       --$921,000 to Precision Manufacturing Institute in 
     Meadville, PA for training in the latest technology in the 
     tooling and machine trades;
       --$921,000 to Enterprise State Junior College in 
     Enterprise, AL for technology training in the College's 
     Center for Higher Technology;
       --$369,000 to Employment Solutions in Lexington, KY;
       --$855,000 to Florida Community College at Jacksonville for 
     aircraft maintenance training at the Aviation/Aerospace 
     Center of Excellence;
       --$92,000 to the Chesapeake Center for Youth Development in 
     Baltimore, MD for serving at-risk youth;
       --$276,000 to Benedictine Programs and Services in Ridgely, 
     MD for serving at-risk youth through the Industrial Training 
     Center;
       --$92,000 to Green Thumb, Inc. to conduct a program for 
     low-income elders to develop entrepreneurial skills that 
     utilize e-commerce and IT in Wadena, MN;
       --$500,000 for Kirkwood Community College and ACT, Inc. for 
     workforce skills development in Iowa;
       --$500,000 for SMART Partner programs high-tech skills 
     training through establishment of the Virtual Advanced 
     Manufacturing Training Center--Des Moines Area Community 
     College, Iowa;
       --$1,036,000 to the National Institue for Metalworking 
     Skills in Fairfax, VA to serve youth and adults in the area's 
     metalworking industry;
       --$464,000 for the American Indian Science and Engineering 
     Society--Rural Computer Utilizaton Training;
       --$464,000 for the Maui Economic Development Board--Rural 
     Computer Training;
       --$2,900,000 for the Remote Rural Hawaii Job Training 
     project for low income youth and adults;
       --$3,200,000 for Samoan/Asian Pacific Job Training--Hawaii;
       --$4,000,000 for Training and Education Opportunities--
     University of Hawaii at Maui;
       --$200,000 for the Vermont Information Technology Center 
     model information technology training initiative--Champlain 
     College, Burlington, VT;
       --$750,000 for the Vermont Department of Employment and 
     Training one-stop career resource centers;
       --$1,900,000 for the North Country Career Center model 
     education and training program--Newport, VT;
       --$92,000 for the Westchester-Putnam Counties Consortium 
     for Worker Education and Training, Inc. for apprenticeship 
     and training programs to serve the NY construction industry;
       --$485,000 for Waukesha, Wisconsin, workforce training for 
     economically disadvantaged youth and adults at La Casa de 
     Esperanza;
       --$550,000 for the Dream Center to provide job and training 
     skills for new labor market entrants or reentrants--LA, CA;
       --$300,000 for VT Technical College--Technology Training 
     Initiative;
       --$880,000 for Focus:HOPE in Detroit for an Information 
     Technologies Center that provides education and training 
     programs to women and minorities;
       --$691,000 to Campbellsville (KY) Industrial Authority for 
     programs to upgrade the information technology skills in the 
     KY community;
       --$230,000 to Career Visions, Inc. in Louisville, KY to 
     pilot computer-based assistive technology training;
       --$276,000 for Career Resources, Inc. in Louisville, KY to 
     develop a basic computer training program focusing on 
     workplace applications;
       --$461,000 to the University of Northern Iowa for a program 
     to integrate immigrants and refugees into the workforce;
       --$493,000 to the Greater Sacramento Urban League, CA for 
     an Urban Achievement Program targeting training, employment 
     and support for urban youth;
       --$921,000 to Jones County Junior College in Ellisville, MS 
     for development and implementation of a technology training 
     program;
       --$921,000 for Haymarket Center in Chicago, IL, to provide 
     training services through the Family Enrichment Center;
       --$921,000 to National Student Partnerships in Washington, 
     DC;
       --$92,000 to the International Agri-Center, in Tulare, CA 
     for a E-Commerce training initiative;
       --$650,000 for the UNLV Center for Workforce Development 
     and Occupational Research;
       --$100,000 for the Community Self-Empowerment & Employment 
     Program (CSEEP) (PA)--comprehensive employment readiness, job 
     development, job placement, and case management for area low-
     income residents--Pennsylvania;
       --$500,000 for Philadelphia Revitalization and Education 
     Program (PREP) to train minorities for careers in the 
     building trades through its Diversity Apprenticeship Project 
     (DAP)--Pennsylvania;
       --$921,000 to Wrightco Technologies, Inc. for information 
     technology training through a ``Fast Track to the Future'' 
     program;
       --$480,000 for hands-on manufacturing training at the 
     Manufacturing and Applied Technology Training Center (MATC)--
     Central Oregon Community College;
       --$100,000 for BASE, Inc. to provide occupational skills 
     through its Youth Competency Development Program and training 
     in the construction trades for low-income/minority women 
     through partnership with Thaddeus Stevens State College of 
     Technology--Lancaster, PA;
       --$250,000 for Green Thumb, Inc.--conduct program for low-
     income elders to develop computer skills--Pennsylvania;
       --$500,000 for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, training of 
     information technology workers;
       --$300,000 for Lehigh University Job Training for hard to 
     serve disadvantaged youth in manufacturing sector---PA;
       --$638,000 for the Collegiate Consortium for Workforce & 
     Economic Development, Philadelphia Naval Business Center--PA;
       --$232,000 for the Yukon Kushokwim Health Corporation--
     Alaska;
       --$300,000 for Koahnic Broadcasting--Alaska;
       --$550,000 for Kawerak, Inc. Vocational Training for Alaska 
     Natives--Nome, Alaska;
       --$800,000 for Ilisagvik College--Barrow, Alaska;
       --$927,000 for the Alaska Federation of Natives Foundation;
       --$900,000 for Tlingit-Haida project--job training to 
     unemployed natives in southeast Alaska;
       --$2,300,000 for Alaska Works, Construction Job Training--
     Fairbanks, Alaska;
       --$2,500,000 for the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 
     consultation with Western Alaska regional Native non-profit 
     corporations to conduct job training programs;
       --$1,250,000 for the Alaska Native Heritage Center, and 
     Bishop Museum in Hawaii;
       --$921,000 for Transylvania Vocational Services, Inc. in 
     Brevard, NC for training people with developmental 
     disabilities;
       --$184,000 for the More Opportunities for Viable Employment 
     program through the Tulare (CA) County Office of Education, 
     Services for Education and Employment Division;
       --$276,000 to the South Metro Regional Leadership Center in 
     University Park, IL;
       --$2,037,000 to the Lawton & Rhea Chiles Center for Healthy 
     Mothers and Babies in Tampa, FL for training 
     paraprofessionals in the health-care field;
       --$170,000 for Community Technology and Education Center at 
     the Los Angeles River Center and Gardens in California for a 
     job training initiative;
       --$43,000 to Signature Academy Inc., to further develop the 
     Exodus to Excellence Youth Program;
       --$850,000 for Sinclair Community College, Dayton, Ohio for 
     an out-of-school youth training project;
       --$850,000 to Kingston-Newburgh Enterprise Community, 
     Newburgh, New York, for a workforce development project;
       --$213,000 to the Sullivan-Warwarsing Rural Economic Area 
     Partnership, in Ferndale, New York for the planning and 
     development of a manufacturing technology training center;
       --$723,000 for Reading Berks Emergency Shelter, Reading, 
     Pennsylvania to provide employment and training opportunities 
     for disadvantaged individuals;
       --$213,000 to the Melwood Horticultural Training Center, 
     Upper Marlboro, Maryland, for workforce training for the 
     disabled;
       --$340,000 to the Safer Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for a 
     workplace acclimation program for ex-offenders;
       --$170,000 for South Suburban College, South Holland, 
     Illinois to expand a bus mechanic workforce development 
     program;
       --$102,000 to the Dallas Urban League, Inc. in Dallas, 
     Texas for the ACES program to provide literacy and job skills 
     to disadvantaged youth and adults;
       --$765,000 to The West Side Industrial Retention and 
     Expansion Network (WIRE-Net), Cleveland, Ohio;

[[Page H12127]]

       --$43,000 to Full Employment Council in partnership with 
     the Greater Kansas City AFL-CIO in Missouri for Project 
     Prepare;
       --$85,000 to Alderson-Broaddus College, College Hill, 
     Philippi, West Virginia for a collaborative information 
     technology training program;
       --$595,000 for the Hiram G. Andrews Rehabilitation Center 
     in Johnstown, Pennsylvania to expand a job training program 
     for people with disabilities;
       --$590,000 for the Northwest Concentrated Employment 
     Program in Ashland, Wisconsin, for an online skill matching 
     initiative tied to the O*Net database;
       --$510,000 to the Berkshire Applied Technology Council, 
     Inc., Pittsfield, Massachusetts to expand training and 
     develop distance learning;
       --$1,275,000 to the San Francisco Department of Human 
     Services, California, for its Community Jobs Initiative;
       --$616,000 to the Charity Cultural Services Center, San 
     Francisco, California, for job training;
       --$468,000 for the Rebirth of Englewood Community 
     Development Corporation in Chicago, Illinois for a job 
     training initiative in partnership with the ITT Research 
     Institute;
       --$468,000 for the Northern Great Plains Initiative for 
     Rural Development, Crookston, Minnesota, to provide education 
     and training in technology support;
       --$298,000 to Kent State University in Ohio for the Ohio 
     Employee Ownership Center, for workplace development; and
       --$425,000 to Rhode Island Department of Labor and 
     Training, Providence, Rhode Island, for a job training 
     program;
       There is a shortage of trained closed captioners to enable 
     the deaf and hard of hearing community to get news and other 
     vital information from live television. In order to meet the 
     requirements set forth by the Telecommunications Act of 1996, 
     there is an urgent need for pilot programs to increase the 
     availability of trained closed captioners. The conferees urge 
     the Employment and Training Administration to invest in and 
     support research and pilot programs, which would allow for an 
     adequate number of captioners to be trained.
       The conferees believe that the Association of Farmworker 
     Opportunity Programs provides valuable technical assistance 
     and training to grantees and has distinguished itself as a 
     tremendous resource. Its Children in the Fields Campaign 
     provides information, education, and technical assistance 
     related to child labor in agriculture. The Campaign also 
     provides other assistance related to employment, training 
     (including pesticide and other worker safety training for 
     children and adults). The Department is encouraged to 
     continue the services that the Association provides in these 
     areas.
       The conferees urge the Employment & Training Administration 
     to demonstrate programs that build upon identified best 
     practices such as the Public/Private Venture's model 
     workplace mentoring pilot program.
       The conferees are concerned with the lack of mentoring and 
     other support services available to the youth of incarcerated 
     parents or legal guardians. The conferees urge the Employment 
     and Training Administration to fund demonstration programs to 
     meet the special needs of these youth. These activities 
     should build upon identified best practices such as the U.S. 
     Dream Academy's model which helps youths with parents or 
     guardians involved in life cycles of incarceration and 
     release. Its aim is to help these youths become good and 
     productive citizens.
       The fiscal year 2000 conference report (H. Rept. 106-479) 
     included $1,000,000 for the Massachusetts Corporation for 
     Business, Work and Learning for the International 
     Shipbuilding Training Demonstration project. However, the 
     reopening of the Fore River Shipyard in Quincy has been 
     delayed. Workers dislocated from the closing of the shipyard 
     still need job training; therefore, the Department is 
     directed to use the $1,000,000 in the fiscal year 2000 
     appropriation to fund the Corporation for Business, Work and 
     Learning for the Training of workers in the Quincy area for 
     jobs within the Marine and Shipbuilding industries.


     State Unemployment Insurance and Employment Service Operations

       The conference agreement includes $3,365,698,000 for state 
     unemployment insurance and employment service operations 
     instead of $3,097,790,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $3,249,430,000 as proposed by the Senate. The agreement 
     includes $35,000,000 instead of the $25,000,000 proposed by 
     the Senate for reemployment services grants to insure that 
     unemployment insurance claimants will be able to get the 
     customized re-employment services they need to speed their 
     reentry to employment. The House provided no funding for this 
     program.
       The conference agreement includes $26,100,000 for the 
     foreign labor certification program as proposed by the House 
     instead of $25,600,000 as proposed by the Senate. For one-
     stop centers/labor market information, the agreement includes 
     $150,000,000 instead of the $110,000,000 proposed by the 
     Senate. The House provided no funding for this program. These 
     funds will be used to support infrastructure upgrades at the 
     State level for one-stop career center system operations, 
     labor market information, and integrated services to 
     employers and job seeker customers.

                         Program Administration

       The conference agreement includes $159,158,000 for program 
     administration instead of $146,000,000 as proposed by the 
     House and $156,158,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
     detailed table at the end of this joint statement reflects 
     the activity distribution agreed upon. The conference 
     agreement also includes funding for management and oversight 
     of pilot and demonstration projects and additional 
     administrative funding for backlog reduction in the alien 
     labor certification program as listed in the Senate report.

              Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration


                         Salaries and Expenses

       The conference agreement includes $107,832,000 for the 
     pension and welfare benefits administration, salaries and 
     expenses instead of $98,934,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $103,342,000 as proposed by the Senate. The increase will 
     fully fund the request for expanded health and pension 
     education and outreach efforts and enhanced pension 
     enforcement.

                  Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation

       The conference agreement includes $11,652,000 for the 
     administrative expense limitation as proposed by the Senate 
     instead of $11,148,000 as proposed by the House.

                  Employment Standards Administration


                         Salaries and Expenses

       The conference agreement includes $363,476,000 for the 
     employment standards administration, salaries and expenses 
     instead of $338,770,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $352,764,000 as proposed by the Senate. This amount fully 
     funds the request for ESA, including the Wage and Hour 
     Division's request to expand its domestic child labor 
     compliance and enforcement efforts; and the Office of Federal 
     Contractor Compliance's activities to increase outreach, 
     education, and technical assistance to federal contractors 
     through industry partnerships on equal pay issues; and a 
     customer communications initiative in the Office of Worker's 
     Compensation.
       On contracts for the provision of debt collection services, 
     the Department of Labor shall continue to recognize the 
     payment of commissions in the determination of McNamara-
     O'Hara Service Contract Act (SCA) wage rates and shall 
     continue to recognize such payments as an offset against an 
     employer's SCA prevailing wage obligation. In addition, the 
     Department is encouraged to consider the special 
     circumstances for contingency fee-based debt collection 
     contracts and the potential fluctuations in commissions, 
     particularly for less experienced employees.


                            Special Benefits

       The conference agreement includes bill language to allow 
     the Secretary to use fair share collections to fund capital 
     investment projects and special investments to strengthen 
     compensation fund control and oversight. The amounts cited in 
     the House and Senate bills have been modified to reflect 
     updated estimates of fair share collections from the non-
     appropriated agencies, such as the Postal Service, for fiscal 
     year 2001.


                    Black Lung Disability Trust Fund

       The conference agreement includes a definite annual 
     appropriation of $975,343,000 for black lung benefit payments 
     and interest payments on advances made to the Trust Fund as 
     proposed by the House instead of an indefinite permanent 
     appropriation as proposed by the Senate.

             Occupational Safety and Health Administration


                         Salaries and Expenses

       The conference agreement includes $425,983,000 for 
     occupational safety and health administration, salaries and 
     expenses as proposed by the Senate instead of $381,620,000 as 
     proposed by the House. The conference agreement does not 
     include language proposed by the Senate that would have 
     earmarked $22,200,000 of the increase over the fiscal year 
     2000 appropriation for education, training, and consultation 
     activities. The House bill contained no similar provision. 
     The detailed table at the end of this joint statement 
     reflects the conferees' agreed upon activity distribution.

                 Mine Safety and Health Administration


                         Salaries and Expenses

       The conference agreement includes $246,747,000 for mine 
     safety and health administration, salaries and expenses 
     instead of $233,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $244,747,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conference 
     agreement includes $2,500,000 over the budget request for 
     physical improvements at the National Mine Safety and Health 
     Academy.
       The conference agreement includes language proposed by the 
     Senate that allows MSHA to retain and spend up to $1,000,000 
     in fees collected for the approval and certification of mine 
     equipment and materials. The conference agreement also 
     includes language establishing a $1,000,000 contingency fund 
     for mine rescue and recovery activities. The House bill 
     contained no similar provisions.
       Concerns have been expressed about the possible 
     ramifications of a rulemaking on the use of conveyor belts in 
     underground coal mines, including concerns about the validity 
     of the testing on which the rule is based. MSHA is urged to 
     carefully examine the record and to conduct additional 
     research that may be required to address any significant 
     concerns that have been raised.
       The conferees are extremely concerned by a recent 
     catastrophe in Eastern Kentucky.

[[Page H12128]]

     Millions of gallons of slurry coal waste broke free from an 
     impoundment causing considerable damage to the environment 
     and disrupting water supply for citizens along the Big Sandy 
     and Ohio Rivers. The conferees believe this event warrants a 
     thorough examination of current coal waste disposal methods 
     and an exploration of future dumping alternatives. Therefore, 
     the conference agreement includes $2,000,000 for a contract 
     with the National Academy of Sciences to examine engineering 
     standards for coal waste impoundments, provide 
     recommendations for improving impoundment structure 
     stabilization, and evaluate potential alternatives for future 
     coal waste disposal, including the benefits of each 
     alternative. The Academy shall seek the participation of 
     representatives of relevant federal, state, and private 
     entities, to include MSHA, OSM, EPA, Corps of Engineers, 
     State mining authorities, and mining companies. Findings of 
     this study shall be conveyed to the Committees on 
     Appropriations no later than October 15, 2001.

                       Bureau of Labor Statistics


                         Salaries and Expenses

       The conference agreement includes $451,584,000 for Bureau 
     of Labor Statistics, salaries and expenses instead of 
     $440,000,000 as proposed by the House and $446,584,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate. The conference agreement also 
     includes the Senate provision making $10,000,000 available 
     for obligation on a program year basis from July 1, 2001 to 
     June 30, 2002. The House bill contained no similar provision. 
     This funding level provides increases for improvements to 
     existing economic measures, improvements in labor market 
     information mandated by WIA, and a new time use survey.

                        Departmental Management


                         Salaries and Expenses

       The conference agreement includes $380,839,000 for 
     departmental management, salaries and expenses instead of 
     $244,889,000 as proposed by the House and $337,964,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate.
       The conference agreement includes $148,150,000 for the 
     Bureau of International Labor Affairs instead of $70,000,000 
     as proposed by the House and $115,000,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate. The conference agreement also includes language 
     proposed by the Senate to authorize the expenditure of funds 
     for the management or operation of Departmental bilateral and 
     multilateral foreign technical assistance through grants and 
     contracts. The funds for bilateral assistance are made 
     available through September 30, 2002. The House bill 
     contained no similar provision. In total, the conference 
     agreement includes $82,000,000 to assist developing countries 
     with the elimination of child labor. Of this amount, 
     $45,000,000 is for expansion of ILO's International Programme 
     for the Elimination of Child Labor. In addition, $37,000,000 
     is provided for bilateral assistance to improve access to 
     basic education in international areas with a high rate of 
     abusive and exploitative child labor. These new bilateral 
     initiatives should be developed in consultation and 
     coordination with USAID to ensure these programs fit with the 
     overall foreign operations policy of the Administration and 
     are in compliance with the Foreign Assistance Act. The 
     conference agreement includes $45,000,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate to augment the capacity of Ministries of Labor to 
     enforce labor standards, to develop social safety net 
     programs, and to develop information on enforcement of labor 
     laws around the world. The conference agreement includes 
     $10,000,000 for the Global HIV-AIDS Workplace Initiative, and 
     these funds are provided in the Department of Labor 
     appropriation instead of the HHS Public Health and Social 
     Services Emergency Fund as proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees also include funding for the following 
     activities:
       --$900,000 to the University of Iowa for research on the 
     issue of abusive and exploitive child labor and other labor-
     related issues; and
       --$250,000 to the Association of Farmworker Opportunities 
     Programs for public education on abusive child labor.
       The conferees note from the recent World AIDS Conference 
     that many national economies continue to be profoundly and 
     adversely affected by the HIV-AIDS pandemic. For example, 
     employers in South Africa are now hiring two employees for 
     every one skilled job. The gross domestic product in many 
     countries in Africa and Asia is actually contracting because 
     of a shrinking adult work force attributable to HIV-AIDS 
     related deaths. At the same time, there is mounting evidence 
     that workplace-based HIV-AIDS education and prevention 
     programs can help prevent the spread of HIV, especially in 
     high-risk occupations. Such programs can help stem employers' 
     loss of skilled workers, reverse declining productivity, and 
     provide mechanisms for caring for workers living with HIV and 
     AIDS. Consequently, the conferees expect ILAB to assume a 
     leading role in developing innovative business-trade union 
     partnerships to improve HIV-AIDS prevention and to improve 
     coordination among the Labor Department, Commerce Department, 
     and USAID.
       The conference agreement includes $23,002,000 and language 
     establishing the Office of Disability Employment Policy in 
     the Department of Labor as proposed by the Senate. The House 
     bill continued funding for the President's Committee on 
     Employment of People with Disabilities, but this activity is 
     subsumed in the new Office of Disability Employment Policy.
       The conference agreement includes $37,000,000 to establish 
     a permanent, centralized information technology investment 
     fund.


                    Veterans Employment and Training

       The conference agreement includes $211,713,000 for veterans 
     employment and training instead of $201,277,000 as proposed 
     by the House and $206,713,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
     Included in this amount is $17,500,000 for the homeless 
     veterans program.


                      Office of Inspector General

       The conference agreement includes $54,785,000 for the 
     office of inspector general as proposed by the Senate instead 
     of $51,925,000 as proposed by the House.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS


                               Ergonomics

       The conference agreement does not include a provision 
     included in both the House and Senate bills relating to 
     regulations issued by the Occupational Safety and Health 
     Administration relating to ergonomic protection.


       Extended Deadline for Expenditure of Welfare to Work Funds

       The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
     the Senate extending the availability of Welfare to Work 
     funding from three to five years. The House bill contained no 
     similar provision.


                            H2A Regulations

       The conference agreement includes a modified version of the 
     Senate provision prohibiting the implementation or 
     enforcement of the pending H2A regulations, but allows for 
     all activities related to the development of revised 
     regulations. The conferees support the efforts by the 
     Secretary of Labor and the Attorney General designed to 
     streamline the H2A application process. The conferees expect 
     the Department and the Immigration and Naturalization Service 
     to work closely with the stakeholders to expeditiously 
     address concerns raised by the growers so that the 
     streamlined application process produces a more efficient new 
     system.


   Deadline for Determination on Housing Requirements for H2A Workers

       The conference agreement includes a provision regarding 
     housing inspections for H2A temporary agricultural laborers. 
     This provision ensures that the deadline for housing 
     inspections for H2A workers corresponds with the Secretary's 
     thirty day statutory deadline for making H2A temporary 
     agricultural labor certification decisions. The thirty day 
     deadline may have been effectively nullified in some cases by 
     the current regulations requiring that inspections on 
     employer provided housing need not be completed until twenty 
     days before the date the employer needs H2A workers. The 
     provision requires housing inspections to be completed in 
     time for the Secretary to make her certification decision in 
     accordance with the thirty day statutory deadline.


                       Alien Labor Certification

       The conference agreement includes a provision that 
     authorizes the use of H1B fee revenue to process permanent 
     labor certifications. This is needed because the recent 
     legislation increasing the number of H1B visas authorized 
     will result in a substantial increase in the volume of 
     permanent labor certification applications. The Department of 
     Labor has made significant progress over the past 18 months 
     to reduce the backlog of applications for permanent labor 
     certifications, and in expediting the labor condition 
     application process for the H-1B program. In order to allow 
     the Department to make further progress on timeliness of 
     labor certifications without undermining the review process, 
     the Department will be permitted to utilize a portion of fees 
     generated by the H-1B program to support the administration 
     of the permanent labor certification program.


           Elimination of Welfare to Work Performance Bonuses

       The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
     the Senate to eliminate Welfare to Work performance bonuses. 
     The House bill contained no similar provision.

           TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

              Health Resources and Services Administration


                     Health Resources and Services

       The conference agreement includes $5,525,476,000 for health 
     resources and services instead of $4,784,232,000 as proposed 
     by the House and $4,677,424,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conference agreement includes bill language identifying 
     $226,224,000 for the construction and renovation of health 
     care and other facilities instead of $10,000,000 as proposed 
     by the Senate. The House bill contained no similar provision. 
     These funds are to be used for the following projects: 
     Northwestern University Life Sciences Building; ACCESS 
     Community Health Network in Illinois; Northwestern Memorial 
     Hospital; University of Chicago Core Genetics Research 
     Facility; Condell Medical Center, Regional Center for Cardiac 
     Health Services; Lake County Health Department; University 
     Center of Lake County, Illinois; Finch University of Health 
     Sciences/Chicago Medical School; Pennington Biomedical 
     Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Texas Institute 
     for Rehabilitation and Research; Massey Cancer Center of 
     Virginia Commonwealth University; Aurelia Osborn Fox Memorial 
     Hospital in Oneonta, New York;

[[Page H12129]]

     Margaretville Memorial Hospital in Margaretville, New York; 
     Martha's Village and Kitchen Medical Clinic in Indio, 
     California; Hanson House at the Desert Regional Medical 
     Center; Nutrition Center at Wake Forest University Baptist 
     Medical Center; James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children in 
     Indianapolis, Indiana; University of South Alabama Gulf Coast 
     Cancer and Research Institute; North Baldwin Hospital Surgery 
     Center in Bay Minette, Alabama; Monroe County Hospital in 
     Monroesville, Alabama; Touro University College of 
     Osteopathic Medicine in Vallejo, California; Medical Sciences 
     Building at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center in 
     Cincinnati, Ohio; Tinnitus Center for Tinnitus Retraining 
     Therapy at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro; 
     Alfred E. Mann Institute and Biomedical Engineering Center at 
     the University of Southern California; Paradise Valley 
     Hospital in National City, California; Children's Hospital 
     and Health Center in San Diego, California; Dental Education 
     in Care of Disabled Clinic at the University of Washington; 
     Alexander Hughes Community Center in Claremont, California; 
     Biomedical Marine Research Facility at Harbor Branch; Kessler 
     Rehabilitation Research Institute in West Orange, New Jersey; 
     Child Health Institute of New Jersey; University of Nevada 
     Las Vegas Biotechnology/Bioengineering Research Facility; 
     McCready Health Services Foundation in Crisfield, Maryland; 
     Center for Health Sciences at Dominican College in Rockland 
     County, New York; Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit at 
     Cook Children's Medical Center in Fort Worth, Texas; 
     Tricounty Health Center at Northern Illinois University; 
     Aurora Primary Care Consortium; Turning Point Facility in 
     Union County, North Carolina; Gila River Indian Community 
     Diabetes Center in Arizona; Dalton Cardiovascular Research 
     Center at the University of Missouri at Columbia; Scripps 
     Memorial East County Hospital in El Cajon, California; 
     Marklund Children's Home; Misericordia Hearts of Mercy in 
     Chicago, Illinois; University of Connecticut Health Center; 
     Nassau County Health Care Corporation; Women's Health Center 
     at Proctor Hospital in Peoria, Illinois; Oklahoma Medical 
     Research Foundation; Louisiana State University Health 
     Sciences Center Feist-Weiller Cancer Center in Shreveport, 
     Louisiana; Lewis County General Hospital in Lewis County, New 
     York; Stetson University in Deland, Florida; National Center 
     for Primary Care at Morehouse School of Medicine; Springdale 
     Community Health Center in Springdale, Washington; Edgemoor 
     Geriatric Hospital in San Diego County, California; Union 
     Hospital Midwest Center for Rural Health in Terre Haute, 
     Indiana; Bennett W. Smith Family Life Wellness Center in 
     Buffalo, New York; Children's Hospital of Buffalo; Fresno 
     Community Hospital and Medical Center Regional Ambulatory 
     Care Facility in Fresno, California; Pediatric Oncology and 
     the Batchelor Children's Research Center at the University of 
     Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center; Valley Hospital Cancer 
     and Ambulatory Care Center in Paramus, New Jersey; Functional 
     Genomics Research Center at Florida Atlantic University in 
     Boca Raton, Florida; Michael and Dianne Bienes Cancer Center 
     at Holy Cross Hospital in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida; Outpatient 
     Surgery Facility at Memorial Hospital in Towanda, 
     Pennsylvania; University of Scranton Allied Health 
     Laboratory; Southern Illinois Healthcare Foundation in East 
     St. Louis, Illinois; University of St. Francis in Fort Wayne, 
     Indiana; Maricopa Integrated Health Systems in Phoenix, 
     Arizona; Albany Medical Center Breast Cancer Diagnostic and 
     Treatment Center in Albany, New York; Adirondack Medical 
     Center in Saranac Lake, New York; Mary McClellan Hospital in 
     Cambridge, New York; North Central Texas Community Health 
     Care Center in Wichita Falls, Texas; St. Joseph's Hospital 
     New York Regional Hemodialysis and Cardiac Care Enhancement 
     Center in Syracuse, New York; Stroud Regional Hospital in 
     Stroud, Oklahoma; Will County Health Center in Illinois; 
     Molecular Genetics Core for the Center for Excellence in 
     Cardiovascular-Renal Research at the University of 
     Mississippi Medical Center; Tallahatchie General Hospital and 
     Extended Care Facility in Charleston, Mississippi; Operation 
     PAR in Pinellas Park, Florida; Detroit Medical Center, 
     Women's and Children's health facility; Detroit Medical 
     Center, Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan; Big Springs 
     Medical Association in Missouri; Southeast Missouri Health 
     Network; People's Health Center in St. Louis, Missouri; 
     Denver Children's Hospital; National Jewish Medical and 
     Research Center in Denver; Breast Cancer Center at Our Lady 
     of Fatima Hospital in North Providence, Rhode Island; Jackson 
     Medical Mall, Mississippi Institute for Cancer Research; 
     Conehatta Tribal Community Health Care Clinic; Sharkey/
     Issaquena Hospital, Rolling Fork, Mississippi; Jackson 
     Laboratory Physiogenomics facility in Maine; St. Joseph's 
     Hospital in Ohio; Huron Hospital in Cleveland, Ohio; Ohio 
     Poison Control Collaborative; Boys Town National Research 
     Hospital in Omaha, Nebraska; University of Utah's Huntsman 
     Cancer Institute; University of North Carolina Genomics and 
     Bioinformatics; Burlington Community Health Center, 
     Burlington, Vermont; Red Logan Community Health Center; 
     Vermont Cancer Center; Vermont Lung Association Asthma 
     Clinic; University of Mississippi, Guyton Building Expansion; 
     Haysi Medical Clinic in Virginia; Allegheny-Clarion Valley 
     Community Health Center; University of Alabama-Birmingham, 
     Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Facility; Umatilla 
     County Public Health Facility; Bioengineering Research 
     Facility at Oregon Health Sciences University; Temple 
     University Outpatient Facility; Philadelphia College of 
     Osteopathic Medicine; Thomas Jefferson University Cancer 
     Research Facility; State of Alaska Public Health Laboratory 
     in Anchorage; ``Pathways Home'' inpatient facility for the 
     Southcentral Foundation; Montezuma Creek Health Care Center; 
     Sorenson Multicultural Health Center; Midvale/West Jordan and 
     Glendale, Utah Health Centers; St. Vincent Hospital in 
     Billings, Montana; Rocky Mountain Regional Trauma Center at 
     Denver Health and Hospital Authority; Carriozo Health Clinic; 
     Dan C. Trigg Memorial Hospital; El Pueblo Health Services; La 
     Clinica de Familia in Chaparral, New Mexico; La Clinica de 
     Familia in San Miguel, New Mexico; Las Clinical del Norte De 
     Abiquiu; Logan Family Clinic in New Mexico; Montgomery 
     Women's Health Services Clinic of Lea County; Mora 
     Community Health Service; Ruidoso Sub-station Health 
     Service; Sierra Vista Family Community Clinic; Tatum 
     Health Clinic; Children's National Medical Center in 
     Washington; Arkansas Children's Hospital; Biomedical 
     Biotechnology Center at the University of Arkansas Medical 
     School in Little Rock; University of Arkansas, 
     Fayetteville, Center for Protein Structure and Function; 
     University of Arkansas, Little Rock, Applied Biosciences 
     Program; Kansas University Human Imaging Institute; North 
     Philadelphia Health System; Children's Health Fund; 
     Crozer-Keystone Health System in Delaware County; Family 
     Care Health Center in St. Louis, Missouri; Cathedral 
     Healthcare System; Chase Brexton Health Services, Inc.; 
     Children's Hospital of Boston; Children's Hospital of 
     Wisconsin Neonatal Intensive Care Unit; Daviess County 
     Community Health Center; Family Health Centers, Inc. of 
     Orangeburg, South Carolina; Community Health facilities in 
     southeast Iowa; Hillside Hospital in Long Island, New 
     York; La Rabida Children's Hospital, Chicago; Marquette 
     University School of Dentistry; Medical University of 
     South Carolina Oncology Center; Molokai General Hospital; 
     New York University School of Medicine; Palmer College of 
     Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa; Pioneer Valley Life 
     Sciences Joint Venture between the University of 
     Massachusetts and Baystate Medical Center; Rio Arriba 
     County Residential Treatment Facility; Rutland Regional 
     Medical Center; Sea Island Comprehensive Health Care 
     Corporation; St. Mary's Healthcare Promotion Center in 
     Huntington, West Virginia; St. Mary's Women and Infants 
     Center of Dorchester; the Neurosciences program at West 
     Virginia University; Tufts University Center for Nutrition 
     Research; University of South Carolina School of Public 
     Health; University of Vermont College of Medicine and 
     Fletcher Allen Health Care; University of Nevada, Las 
     Vegas Cancer Center; University of Montana Center for 
     Environmental Health Sciences; University of Florida 
     Genetics Institute; Hackensack University Medical Center 
     in Hackensack, New Jersey; Brandeis University National 
     Center for the Study of Behavioral Genetics and Genomics; 
     Marlborough Hospital in Marlborough, Massachusetts; West 
     Virginia University Eastern Panhandle Clinical Campus in 
     Martinsburg; St. Mary's Hospital for Children, Bayside, 
     New York; Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, 
     Washington; Memorial Hospital of Lafayette County, 
     Darlington, Wisconsin; Saginaw Cooperative Hospitals, 
     Inc., Saginaw, Michigan; El Sereno Family Health Center, 
     El Sereno, Los Angeles; Community College of Southern 
     Nevada Medical Careers Center, North Las Vegas, Nevada; 
     Columbia County Senior Services, Lake City, Florida; San 
     Luis Obispo medical therapy unit, California; Greene 
     County Health Care, Inc., Snow Hill, North Carolina; St. 
     Clair County, Belleville, Illinois, senior center and 
     wellness clinic; Sunshine House, New Haven, Connecticut; 
     City of Culver City, California, senior health and social 
     services center; Community Partners Healthnet Inc., Snow 
     Hill, North Carolina; North Shore Long Island Jewish 
     Health System, Hillside Hospital Campus, Glen Oaks, New 
     York; Cooper Green Hospital, Birmingham, Alabama; Whitman-
     Walker Clinic, Inc., Washington, DC; Prince George's 
     Hospital Center, Cheverly, Maryland; Roseland Community 
     Hospital, Chicago, Illinois; Metropolitan Family Services, 
     Chicago, Illinois, mental and public health facility; 
     South Suburban Family Shelter Inc., Homewood, Illinois; 
     Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, 
     Illinois; Lake Charles Memorial Hospital, Lake Charles, 
     Louisiana; West End Medical Centers, Atlanta, Georgia; New 
     York Structural Biology Center, New York, New York; 
     Memorial Freeport-Roosevelt Health Center, Roosevelt, New 
     York; University of North Carolina at Wilmington School of 
     Nursing, Wilmington, North Carolina; Joseph P. Addabbo 
     Family Health Center, Arverne, New York; Los Angeles Eye 
     Institute, Los Angeles, California, Boston College, 
     Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts; West Liberty State College 
     Dental Hygiene Clinic, West Liberty, West Virginia; 
     Grafton City Hospital, Grafton, West Virginia; New York 
     University Downtown Hospital, New York City, New York; 
     Saint Michael's Hospital, Stevens Point, Wisconsin; 
     Holyoke Health Center, Holyoke, Massachusetts; Montefiore 
     Medical Center, Bronx, New York; Christopher Rural Health 
     Planning Corporation, Christopher, Illinois; Centro de 
     Salud Familiar La Fe, El Paso,

[[Page H12130]]

     Texas; Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, Englewood, 
     New Jersey; Plaza Community Center, Inc., Los Angeles, 
     California, children's health and social services center; 
     Fairview University Medical Center, Minneapolis, 
     Minnesota; Asian Human Services community health center, 
     Chicago, Illinois; Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, 
     New York; University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little 
     Rock, Arkansas; Trinity Health Systems, Detroit, Michigan; 
     Henderson County Rural Health Center in Oquawka, Illinois; 
     and City of Summersville, West Virginia, senior health and 
     social services facility.
       The conferees are supportive of the efforts of the Academic 
     Medicine Development Corporation to implement a strategic 
     initiative for human genetics research in New York.
       The conference agreement includes bill language identifying 
     $253,932,000 for family planning instead of $238,932,000 as 
     proposed by the House and $253,932,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate. The conferees concur with Senate report language 
     regarding the distribution of funds appropriated for Title X.
       The conference agreement includes bill language to provide 
     $30,000,000 for abstinence education in fiscal year 2002 as 
     proposed by the House. The Senate bill contained no similar 
     provision.
       The conference agreement includes $1,168,700,000 for 
     community health centers as proposed by the Senate instead of 
     $1,100,000,000 as proposed by the House. Within the total 
     provided, $6,250,000 is for native Hawaiian health programs.
       The conferees recognize the long-standing commitment and 
     expertise of the University of Hawaii in addressing the 
     unique health care needs of the Pacific Basin region.
       The conferees urge HRSA to give full and fair consideration 
     to proposals to support expanded services to reach priority 
     populations in under-served communities in Kane, Marion, 
     Saline, and Will, Illinois counties on the southwest side of 
     Chicago and in the AAPI community on the north side of 
     Chicago.
       The conference agreement includes $41,523,000 for the 
     national health service corps, field placements instead of 
     $39,823,000 as proposed by the House and $38,116,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate.
       The conference agreement includes $87,924,000 for national 
     health service corps, recruitment instead of $81,524,000 as 
     proposed by the House and $78,625,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate. Within the total provided, $4,000,000 is for State 
     offices of rural health. The conferees recommend that 
     national health service corps loan repayment awards continue 
     to be made in areas of greatest need.
       The conference agreement includes $638,048,000 for health 
     professions instead of $410,987,000 as proposed by the House 
     and $230,714,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within the total 
     provided, $235,000,000 is for children's graduate medical 
     education. Also within the total provided for allied health 
     special projects, $921,000 is for expansion of the Illinois 
     Community College Board's program, in coordination with the 
     Illinois Department of Human Services, to train and place 
     welfare recipients in the allied health field using distance 
     technology. The amount provided does not include funding to 
     continue the demonstration project by the Utah area health 
     education centers.
       The conferees concur with House and Senate report language 
     regarding priority consideration for health careers 
     opportunities program (H-COP) grants to minority health 
     professions institutions.
       The conferees urge HRSA to give full and fair consideration 
     to proposals to expand access to primary and dental care 
     services for medically underserved populations located in the 
     areas of St. Louis City, and the Missouri counties of 
     Jefferson, Lafayette, Greene, and Douglas.
       The conference agreement includes $18,016,000 for Hansen's 
     disease services instead of $17,016,000 as proposed by both 
     the House and the Senate. Within the total provided, $900,000 
     is for the Diabetes Lower Extremity Amputation Prevention 
     program at the University of South Alabama.
       The conference agreement includes $714,230,000 for the 
     maternal and child health block grant instead of $709,130,000 
     as proposed by both the House and the Senate. The conference 
     agreement includes bill language designating $113,728,000 of 
     the funds provided for the block grant for special projects 
     of regional and national significance (SPRANS) as proposed by 
     the House. It is intended that $5,000,000 of the SPRANS 
     amount will be used for the continuation of the traumatic 
     brain injury State demonstration projects as authorized by 
     title XII of the Public Health Service Act. The Senate bill 
     contained no similar provision, instead it provided 
     $5,000,000 as a separate line item in the table for traumatic 
     brain injury. It is also intended that $5,000,000 of the 
     SPRANS amount will be used for Columbia Hospital for Women 
     Medical Center in Washington, DC to support community 
     outreach programs for women and $100,000 will be used for the 
     St. Joseph's Health Services of Rhode Island for the 
     Providence Smiles dental program for low-income children.
       The conferees are supportive of HRSA's efforts in 
     preventing youth suicides. HRSA has made reducing the rate of 
     youth suicide a priority for State MCH agencies, requiring 
     States to address the crisis of suicide with their block 
     grant funding.
       The conference agreement includes $90,000,000 for healthy 
     start as proposed by both the House and Senate. It is 
     intended that these projects will be evaluated and those 
     activities that are proven successful and can be replicated 
     will be incorporated into the mission of the maternal and 
     child health block grant program.
       The conference agreement includes $8,000,000 for newborn 
     and infant hearing screening as proposed by the House instead 
     of $4,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conference agreement includes $15,000,000 for organ 
     transplantation as proposed by the Senate instead of 
     $10,000,000 as proposed by the House.
       The conference agreement includes $22,000,000 for the bone 
     marrow program as proposed by the House instead of 
     $17,959,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conferees continue 
     to be aware of the life saving success of the National Marrow 
     Donor Program, which now includes more than 4,000,000 
     potential volunteer donors. The conferees recognize the 
     continuing need to increase minority representation in the 
     national registry and support expansion of the National 
     Marrow Donor Program's cord blood bank initiative, which 
     provides another major source of donors for patients, 
     particularly minority patients, in need of a marrow or blood 
     stem cell transplant.
       The conference agreement includes $58,218,000 for rural 
     health outreach grants instead of $30,867,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $38,892,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
     conferees are supportive of HRSA providing heart 
     defibrillators to rural areas.
       The conferees include the following amounts for the 
     following projects and activities in fiscal year 2001:
       --$50,000 for the La Crosse Health Science Consortium for a 
     demonstration to increase access to dental care in La Crosse 
     county;
       --$85,000 for the Tillamook County Health Department, 
     Oregon, to expand primary and dental health services for 
     underserved populations;
       --$850,000 for AIDS Alliance for Children, Youth, and 
     Families;
       --$115,000 for the Anderson Valley Health Center, Inc., 
     Boonville, California, to expand dental and health care 
     services;
       --$128,000 for the Partnership for the Children in San Luis 
     Obispo County, California, for a low income dental clinic;
       --$170,000 for Northern Counties Health Care, Inc., St. 
     Johnsbury, Vermont for a rural outreach initiative;
       --$213,000 for the Mercer County Health Department in 
     Aledo, Illinois, to extend dental care services to rural 
     underserved populations;
       --$300,000 for Blackstone Valley Community Health Care, 
     Inc.;
       --$359,000 for outreach activities of the Blue Ridge 
     Community Health Service;
       --$400,000 for the Kentucky Emergency Medical Services 
     Academy;
       --$450,000 for CAP Services in Stevens Point, Wisconsin to 
     extend dental health services to underserved populations;
       --$500,000 for St. Luke's Free Clinic in Hopkinsville, 
     Kentucky;
       --$500,000 for the Texas A&M HERO program;
       --$500,000 for State and University of Alaska to train 
     emergency medical personnel in rural areas;
       --$500,000 for Inland Health Northwest;
       --$425,000 for Campbellton-Graceville Hospital in 
     Graceville, Florida, to expand clinical and preventive health 
     care services to low income, rural populations;
       --$550,000 for Langlade Memorial Hospital, Antigo, 
     Wisconsin, for a four county dental health initiative;
       --$700,000 for the Western Kentucky University mobile 
     health screening program;
       --$1,311,000 for outreach activities of the Lourdes Health 
     Network in Pasco, Washington;
       --$900,000 for Iowa Department of Public Health to develop 
     and demonstrate the use of technology for public health 
     nurses working in rural areas;
       --$921,000 to continue and expand the development of the 
     Center for Acadiana Genetics and Hereditary Health Care at 
     Louisiana State University Medical Center;
       --$800,000 for the University of Southern Mississippi 
     Center for Sustainable Health Outreach;
       --$1,106,000 for Carondelet Health Network of Arizona to 
     improve the health status of multi-cultural and medically 
     disenfranchised populations through increased community 
     health access and comprehensive continuum of care;
       --$1,200,000 for Southern Illinois University;
       --$1,318,000 for Voorhees College in Denmark, South 
     Carolina for a Center of Excellence for rural health;
       --$1,800,000 for the University of Colorado School of 
     Dentistry to conduct an oral health prevention and treatment 
     program in Shannon, Jackson, Bennett, and Todd counties in 
     South Dakota;
       --$1,900,000 for the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation's 
     health care delivery system; and
       --$2,300,000 for the Mississippi State University Rural 
     Health Safety and Security Institute.
       The conference agreement includes $13,439,000 for rural 
     health research instead of $11,713,000 as proposed by the 
     House and $5,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees include the following amounts for the 
     following projects and activities in fiscal year 2001:
       --$143,000 for the University of Pittsburgh Center for 
     Rural Health Practice;
       --$170,000 for Madison Community Health Center, Madison, 
     Wisconsin, for a model preventive health program for hard to 
     reach and at-risk populations;

[[Page H12131]]

       --$250,000 for the multiple sclerosis disease state 
     management program at the University of Mississippi Center 
     for Pharmaceutical Marketing;
       --$306,000 for the Texas Tech University Health Sciences 
     Center at El Paso and the University of Texas at El Paso for 
     joint research on health problems of migrant workers;
       --$400,000 for the McLaughlin Research Institute cancer 
     education program;
       --$500,000 for the University of Alaska to develop a 
     research and evaluation agenda for health care delivery;
       --$840,000 for the Marshfield Clinic in Marshfield, 
     Wisconsin, for scientific, ethical and citizen advisory 
     groups and education programs in connection with the 
     development of a personalized medicine program;
       --$921,000 for the Virginia Center for Sustainable Health 
     Outreach at James Madison University;
       --$921,000 for Atlantic City Medical Center for prevention 
     services and medical education activities;
       --$1,275,000 for the University of North Dakota School of 
     Medicine, Grand Forks, North Dakota for a rural health 
     program in preventive medicine and behavioral sciences; and
       --$1,612,000 for the Carolina's Community Health Initiative 
     for its community health assessment plan.
       The conferees encourage the National Human Genome Research 
     Institute and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality 
     to provide any necessary technical assistance to HRSA in 
     supporting the Marshfield Clinic project.
       The conference agreement includes $35,981,000 for 
     telehealth instead of $25,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
     The House provided funding for this program within rural 
     health research.
       The conferees include the following amounts for the 
     following projects and activities in fiscal year 2001:
       --$14,000 for networking capabilities of the Cullman Area, 
     Alabama, Mental Health Authority;
       --$43,000 for Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, Colton, 
     California, for a telemedicine regional network;
       --$85,000 for the New York Primary Care Health Foundation, 
     Inc., Flushing, New York, for a telehealth initiative;
       --$111,000 for Staten Island University Hospital to support 
     a teleconferencing initiative to improve and strengthen 
     linkages within campuses;
       --$184,000 for the Union Hospital Telehealth Demonstration 
     project in Terre Haute, Indiana;
       --$300,000 for the University of Michigan Emergency 
     Telemedicine Network;
       --$350,000 for Molokai General Hospital to use the latest 
     technology advances to provide health care in rural areas;
       --$340,000 for Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health 
     Sciences, Worcester, Massachusetts for a telehealth 
     initiative;
       --$361,000 for the Center for Telehealth and Distance 
     Education at the University of Texas Medical Branch, 
     Galveston, Texas for a telehealth initiative;
       --$430,000 for Daemen College in Amherst, New York to 
     continue a project to provide distance learning/medical 
     linkages to rural counties in Western New York State;
       --$500,000 for a telehealth project at Magee-Women's 
     Hospital;
       --$500,000 for the Susquehanna Health Systems telemedicine 
     project;
       --$468,000 for the Southern Illinois University School of 
     Medicine telemedicine and rural health initiative project;
       --$489,000 for the La Crosse Medical Health Science 
     Consortium, Inc., Wisconsin for a telehealth initiative;
       --$750,000 for a joint New Mexico-Hawaii Telehealth 
     Outreach for Unified Community Health;
       --$638,000 for Children's Hospital and Regional Medical 
     Center in Seattle, Washington;
       --$737,000 for the Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium 
     in Louisiana for continued development of a regional 
     telehealth network;
       --$783,000 for the Memorial Telehealth Network in 
     Springfield, Illinois;
       --$723,000 for Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, California, 
     for a telemedicine initiative;
       --$737,000 for the Rural Telehealth and Community Education 
     Network at Central Michigan University;
       --$900,000 for the Southwest Alabama Rural Telehealth 
     Network at the University of South Alabama;
       --$850,000 for New York Presbyterian Hospital for a 
     telehealth initiative;
       --$850,000 for the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center 
     Information Technology project;
       --$1,000,000 for the University of Florida Human Brain 
     Functional Imaging Technology project;
       --$800,000 for the University of Nebraska telemedicine 
     outreach program;
       --$850,000 for the Fairview Lakes Regional Medical Center 
     in Wyoming, Minnesota telemedicine project;
       --$1,020,000 for the Northern California Telemedicine 
     Network, Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital, Santa Rosa, 
     California;
       --$1,290,000 for a telemedicine program for downstate 
     Illinois through the Southern Illinois University Medical 
     School in Springfield, Illinois;
       --$1,335,000 for the University of Nevada Las Vegas 
     Telemedicine Network;
       --$1,770,000 for the Idaho Telehealth Integrated Care 
     Center to establish a comprehensive telehealth clinic to 
     support care in rural and frontier areas;
       --$1,843,000 for the Telehealth Deployment Research Testbed 
     program;
       --$1,800,000 for a project to link Rocky Mountain College 
     and Deaconess Billings Clinic with telemedicine capabilities;
       --$1,700,000 for the Saint Vincent Hospital in Billings, 
     Montana for its Telemedicine Model;
       --$2,418,000 for the Northeast Ohio Outreach Network to 
     expand health services to rural residents in northeastern 
     Ohio; and
       --$3,400,000 for the Alaska Federal Health Care Access 
     Network.
       The conference agreement includes $19,000,000 for emergency 
     medical services for children as proposed by the House 
     instead of $15,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conference agreement includes $20,000,000 for poison 
     control instead of $6,600,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $26,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Funds are provided to 
     support activities authorized in the Poison Control Center 
     Enhancement and Awareness Act.
       The conference agreement includes $6,000,000 for black lung 
     clinics as proposed by the Senate instead of $5,943,000 as 
     proposed by the House.
       The conference agreement includes $3,000,000 for trauma 
     care as proposed by the Senate. The House bill contained no 
     similar provision.
       The conference agreement includes a total of $1,807,700,000 
     for Ryan White programs instead of $1,725,000,000 as proposed 
     by the House and $1,650,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
     Included in this amount is $604,200,000 for emergency 
     assistance, $911,000,000 for comprehensive care, $185,900,000 
     for early intervention, $65,000,000 for pediatric HIV/AIDS, 
     $10,000,000 for dental services, and $31,600,000 for 
     education and training centers.
       The conference agreement includes bill language identifying 
     $589,000,000 for the Ryan White Title II State AIDS drug 
     assistance programs instead of $554,000,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $538,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
     conferees concur with Senate report language regarding the 
     Institute of Medicine study to evaluate the effectiveness of 
     the current role and structure of the Ryan White CARE Act and 
     the efforts to create a national consumer and provider 
     education center within pediatric HIV/AIDS.
       The conference agreement includes $109,200,000 for Ryan 
     White AIDS activities that are targeted to address the trend 
     of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in communities of color, based on 
     the most recent estimated living AIDS cases, HIV infections 
     and AIDS mortality among ethnic and racial minorities as 
     reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 
     These funds are allocated as follows:
       Within Ryan White Title I, the agreement provides 
     $34,000,000 to the competitive supplemental allocation 
     targeted to minority community based organizations, as 
     defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 
     and directs that these funds be allocated through the 
     established planning council processes of eligible 
     metropolitan areas. These funds are designed to reduce the 
     HIV related health disparities and improve the health 
     outcomes for HIV infected African Americans, Latinos, Native 
     Americans, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific 
     Islanders. These funds are expected to expand medical and 
     supportive service capacity in communities of color, and 
     expand peer treatment education that is both culturally and 
     linguistically appropriate to individuals living with HIV/
     AIDS.
       Within Ryan White Title II, the agreement provides 
     $7,000,000 for State HIV care grants to support educational 
     and outreach grants to minority community-based organizations 
     to increase the number of minorities participating in the 
     AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP). The continuing under 
     representation of African Americans, Latinos, Native 
     Americans, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific 
     Islanders in state run ADAP contributes to their persistently 
     poor health outcomes in comparison to other communities.
       Within Ryan White Title III, the agreement provides 
     $44,400,000 for planning grants, early intervention service 
     (EIS) grants to minority community-based health care and 
     service providers with a history of service provision to 
     communities of color. Funds should also be made available to 
     national, regional and local organizations representing 
     people of color to provide technical assistance 
     collaborations, and linkages designed to strengthen HIV/AIDS 
     systems of care. Funds are intended to support the 
     implementation of the plans developed by minority community 
     based and health care organizations. The conferees expect 
     that fiscal year 2001 increases to Title III should be 
     directed primarily towards providing early intervention 
     service grants to those organizations that received Title III 
     planning grants in the previous fiscal year and enhancing the 
     service capacity of existing minority EIS providers.
       Within Ryan White Title IV, the agreement provides 
     $15,700,000 to fund traditional minority community-based 
     providers of services to minority children, youth and 
     families to develop and implement culturally competent and 
     linguistically appropriate research-based interventions that 
     provide additional HIV/AIDS care, services and linkages. 
     Funds are also intended to directly fund minority community 
     based organizations and providers to expand or implement 
     programs specifically designed to provide

[[Page H12132]]

     youth, adolescent, and young adult-focused HIV/AIDS care and 
     services.
       The agreement provides $7,700,000 to AIDS education and 
     training centers. These funds are intended to increase 
     training of community-based minority health care 
     professionals in AIDS-related treatments, standards of care, 
     guidelines for the use of antiretroviral and other effective 
     clinical interventions, and treatment adherence for HIV/AIDS 
     infected adults, adolescents and children, as developed by 
     the U.S. Public Health Service. The training of minority 
     providers is to be implemented through collaborations with 
     Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) and 
     Hispanic Serving Institutions, and Tribal Colleges. These 
     efforts are designed to increase the treatment expertise and 
     HIV knowledge of minority front-line providers serving 
     individuals living with HIV/AIDS. Funds are also intended to 
     support minority community based organizations to train 
     minority providers to deliver culturally competent and 
     language appropriate treatment education services.
       The conferees intend that at least ninety percent of total 
     title IV funding be provided to grantees. The conferees 
     expect the agency to use the funding increases for title IV, 
     with the exception of any increases provided through the CBC/
     Minority AIDS Initiative, to provide, at a minimum, 
     additional funds to existing grantees to reflect the 
     increases in the costs of providing comprehensive care. The 
     agency should use a significant portion of the remaining 
     funds to expand comprehensive services for youth, both 
     through existing and new grantees. The conferees believe that 
     the agency should expand efforts to facilitate ongoing 
     communication with grantees so that prospective changes in 
     the administration of the program can be discussed.
       From within the increase provided to pediatric AIDS 
     demonstrations, the conferees encourage HRSA to target funds 
     towards approved but unfunded applications from the previous 
     fiscal year.
       The conference agreement includes $140,000,000 for health 
     care access for the uninsured instead of $25,000,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate. The House bill did not contain 
     funding for this unauthorized program. Of this amount, 
     $125,000,000 is included to provide grants to public, 
     private, and non-profit health entities to develop and expand 
     integrated systems of care and address service gaps within 
     such integrated systems with a focus on primary care, mental 
     health services and substance abuse services. The program 
     will supplement existing categorical safety net programs to 
     assist communities in better harnessing their current 
     capabilities and resources. The national health care safety 
     net is under enormous strain and the demand for this 
     initiative large.
       The remaining $15,000,000 is to continue the initiative 
     that was begun in fiscal year 2000 to help states identify 
     the characteristics of the uninsured within the state and 
     approaches for providing all uninsured with health coverage 
     through an expanded state, Federal and private partnership. 
     States have shown great interest in committing to the 
     initiative and a second year of funding will produce a more 
     comprehensive set of designs for providing insurance coverage 
     for the uninsured. Sufficient funds are included to support 
     up to ten new state grants, provide technical assistance to 
     grantees and, if necessary, provide limited supplemental 
     funding to states funded in fiscal year 2000 to complete 
     their work. The Secretary is requested to submit a final 
     report on state findings no later than December 1, 2001. The 
     report should provide state by state summaries on baseline 
     information, the process by which the state developed 
     recommendations, including a description of data collection 
     and partnerships, characteristics of the uninsured within the 
     state, the proposed approaches for providing all uninsured 
     with health coverage, and the estimated public and private 
     cost of providing coverage. The report should also highlight 
     and summarize common findings, policy development efforts and 
     approaches identified by the states.
       The conference agreement includes $9,900,000 for an 
     adoption awareness program as authorized in the Child Health 
     Act of 2000.
       The conference agreement includes $10,000,000 for 
     authorized health-related activities of the Denali 
     Commission.
       The conference agreement includes $139,246,000 for program 
     management instead of $128,123,000 as proposed by the House 
     and $135,766,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees include the following amounts for the 
     following projects and activities in fiscal year 2001:
       --$230,000 for the Illinois Poison Center;
       --$250,000 for the University of Alaska to establish an 
     INPSYCH Center to train Alaska natives as psychologists to 
     practice in Alaska villages;
       --$500,000 for the University of Alaska, Anchorage to 
     recruit and train nurses;
       --$700,000 to support the efforts of the American 
     Federation for Negro Affairs Education and Research Fund of 
     Philadelphia;
       --$900,000 for Northeastern University in Boston, 
     Massachusetts to train doctors to serve low-income 
     communities; and
       --$900,000 for Des Moines University Osteopathic Medical 
     Center for development of a model program for training and 
     education in the field of geriatrics.
       The Child Health Act of 2000 authorizes oral health 
     activities intended to improve the oral health of children 
     under six years of age who are eligible for services provided 
     under a Federal health program. These activities should 
     increase the utilization of dental services by such children 
     and decrease the incidence of early childhood and baby bottle 
     tooth decay. The conferees are supportive of these efforts.

               Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


                Disease Control, Research, and Training

       The conference agreement includes $3,868,027,000 for 
     disease control, research, and training instead of 
     $3,386,369,000 as proposed by the House and $3,251,996,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate.
       The conference agreement includes $175,000,000 for 
     equipment, construction, and renovation of facilities as 
     proposed by the Senate instead of $145,000,000 as proposed by 
     the House. The conference agreement includes bill language to 
     allow CDC to enter into a single contract or related 
     contracts for the full scope of development and construction 
     of facilities as proposed by the Senate. The House bill 
     provided this authority only for laboratory building 18.
       The conference agreement includes a total of $97,354,000 
     for the National Center for Health Statistics instead of 
     $86,759,000 as proposed by the House and $105,110,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate. The conference agreement also 
     includes bill language designating $71,690,000 of the total 
     to be available to the Center under the Public Health Service 
     Act one percent evaluation set-aside as proposed by the House 
     instead of $91,129,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conference agreement includes bill language to allow 
     funds recouped from fiscal years 2000 and 2001 obligations 
     for the influenza vaccine stockpile to be used in fiscal year 
     2001 for childhood vaccine purchase.
       The conference agreement does not include language proposed 
     by the Senate to allow funds made available for section 317A 
     of the Public Health Service Act to be used at Early Head 
     Start program sites. The House bill contained no similar 
     provision.
       The conference agreement consolidates the salaries and 
     expenses of CDC into a single account. Salaries and expenses 
     activities encompass all non-extramural activities with the 
     exception of program support services, centrally managed 
     services, and buildings and facilities. The agency may 
     allocate administrative funds for extramural program 
     activities according to its judgment. Funds should be 
     apportioned and allocated consistent with the table, and any 
     changes in funding are subject to the normal notification 
     procedures.
       The conference agreement includes $175,969,000 for the 
     prevention health services block grant instead of 
     $175,964,000 as proposed by the House and $175,124,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate. Within the total provided, 
     $44,225,000 is for rape prevention and education activities 
     previously funded through the Crime Trust Fund.
       The conference agreement includes $23,012,000 for 
     prevention centers instead of $23,000,000 as proposed by the 
     House and $14,080,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees include $700,000 for the Roger Williams 
     Medical Center Healthlink program in Providence, Rhode Island 
     to develop and implement a comprehensive health promotion 
     initiative for senior retirees.
       The conference agreement includes $529,461,000 for 
     childhood immunization instead of $472,966,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $499,005,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
     Included in this amount is an increase of $42,487,000 for 
     operation/infrastructure activities, $5,000,000 for global 
     polio eradication activities, and $20,000,000 for vaccine 
     purchase. The conferees intend that funds available for 
     vaccine purchase are for all currently licensed and 
     recommended vaccines. In addition, the Vaccines for Children 
     (VFC) program funded through the Medicaid program is expected 
     to provide $469,054,000 in vaccine purchases and distribution 
     support in fiscal year 2001, for a total program level of 
     $1,016,528,000.
       The conferees recommend that CDC discontinue immunization 
     incentive grants and that CDC award the $33,000,000 
     previously committed for this program as part of the entire 
     operations funding to support State grantees cumulative core 
     budgets. Incorporating incentive grants into States' base 
     operations award would allow more States to receive a greater 
     proportion of their core budget and help improve their 
     overall immunization coverage levels. The conferees recommend 
     that CDC use grant funding made available due to the 
     completion of Congressionally-directed demonstration projects 
     to ensure that all States receive at least the same level of 
     operational funding received in fiscal year 2000, thereby 
     holding them harmless during this funding shift from a 
     formula based approach.
       Funding for measles vaccine for supplemental measles 
     immunization campaigns and epidemiological, laboratory, and 
     programmatic/operational support to the World Health 
     Organziation and its member countries is included in measles 
     eradication funding not polio eradication funding as 
     identified in the Senate report.
       The conference agreement includes $767,246,000 for HIV/AIDS 
     instead of $673,367,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $640,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Included in this 
     amount is an additional

[[Page H12133]]

     $3,000,000 to maintain the current hematologic and blood 
     safety program commitments and to expand support for the 
     treatment centers network in carrying out initiatives to 
     address the complications of hemophilia, including HIV/AIDS, 
     blood safety surveillance and monitoring, and the needs of 
     women with bleeding disorders.
       The conferees recognize the devastating impact of the 
     global AIDS epidemic upon individuals, families and 
     communities in Africa and Asia and have included $104,527,000 
     for global HIV/AIDS activities at CDC, which shall be 
     available until September 30, 2002. This amount is an 
     increase of $69,527,000 over the fiscal year 2000 
     appropriation. With funding received in fiscal year 2000, 
     CDC, in collaboration with USAID and other federal agencies, 
     has begun to combat the AIDS epidemic in 14 of the hardest 
     hit countries in Africa and in India. The conferees urge CDC 
     to continue to work in collaboration with USAID and other 
     departments such as the Department of Defense and the 
     Department of Labor, and other DHHS agencies especially HRSA, 
     as well as international agencies, non-governmental 
     organizations and country governments to halt the spread of 
     the epidemic and lessen its impact. In those countries where 
     CDC already has a presence, CDC, in collaboration with USAID 
     and HRSA, should assist in implementing country-wide care and 
     prevention programs. This will include partnering with HRSA 
     to develop health care services focused on mobilizing 
     communities for the development of palliative care, basic 
     treatment, and support services. In addition, CDC should 
     begin to assist other areas at high risk for severe epidemics 
     including other African countries, Southeast Asia, and the 
     Caribbean/Latin American region. Finally, CDC should support 
     targeted anti-retroviral treatment demonstration projects in 
     countries where sufficient care and treatment infrastructures 
     exist. Within the total for international HIV/AIDS 
     activities, the conferees provide $3,000,000 through CDC to 
     support HRSA activities aimed at improving professional 
     education and training relating to this initiative. The 
     conferees have also included language to extend certain 
     authorities of the Department of State to the Secretary of 
     HHS so that CDC may use State's administrative systems for 
     personnel, contracting and procurement, and for limited 
     renovation or construction of essential program facilities.
       As a preventive vaccine offers the world's best hope for 
     turning the tide against the global AIDS pandemic, and since 
     international collaborations are essential for this goal, the 
     conferees encourage CDC to work collaboratively with the 
     International AIDS Vaccine Initiative and other global 
     organizations to accelerate the development and testing of 
     promising vaccine candidates.
       The conferees have provided additional funds to respond to 
     the unmet needs identified through the community planning 
     process. These funds are to augment the cooperative 
     agreements between CDC and State and local health 
     departments.
       The conferees recommend that CDC allocate an increase to 
     evaluate HIV prevention service delivery programs to improve 
     funding decision-making and to implement more rapid effective 
     transfer of technology to community based service delivery 
     organizations and health departments. Approximately half of 
     this amount should support evaluation activities to track 
     service delivery by community based organizations, and 
     utilize cost-effectiveness analysis in HIV prevention. The 
     remaining funds would be used to expand technology transfer 
     regarding HIV prevention through activities such as regional 
     technical assistance, technology transfer, and training for 
     the purpose of providing links between evidence-based HIV 
     prevention science and public health departments, community 
     planning groups, healthcare providers, and prevention science 
     providers.
       The conference agreement includes $88,000,000 to fund CDC 
     activities that are designed to address the trend of the HIV/
     AIDS epidemic in communities of color, based on the most 
     recent estimated living AIDS cases, HIV infections and AIDS 
     mortality among ethnic and racial minorities as reported by 
     the CDC. The program initiative includes funds for the ''Know 
     Your Status'' campaign. The conferees have included funds for 
     the Directly Funded Minority Community Based Organization 
     program to fund grant applications from minority 
     organizations with a history of providing services to 
     communities of color to develop and expand HIV prevention 
     interventions and services targeted to highly impacted 
     minority men, women, youth and sub-populations. Funds are 
     also included to create grants under the CDC Community 
     Development Program to support needs assessments and enhance 
     community planning processes to integrate HIV, STD, TB, 
     substance abuse prevention and treatment, care and community 
     development within communities of color. Funds are to be 
     allocated for technical assistance programs for grantees 
     under the Directly Funded Minority CBO program, for Faith-
     Based Initiative Programs including community based 
     organizations interested in developing coalitions and 
     partnerships with faith based institutions. Funds are also 
     provided for CDC's HIV surveillance activities to better 
     track the epidemic and target resources. These funds are to 
     be allocated based on program priorities identified in the 
     previous fiscal year as well as new priorities.
       The conference agreement includes $126,528,000 for 
     tuberculosis (TB) instead of $120,364,000 as proposed by the 
     House and $113,413,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
     conferees intend that the increase over the President's 
     request be used to reduce the number of foreign born TB cases 
     contributing to the U.S. caseload, strengthen domestic TB 
     control programs, and provide preventive therapy to 
     individuals who have latent TB infection and are high-risk 
     for developing active, infectious TB.
       The conferees include $184,000 for Onondaga County, New 
     York Health Department to establish a prospective 
     tuberculosis control program for Central New York industries.
       The conference agreement includes $148,256,000 for sexually 
     transmitted diseases instead of $136,743,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $135,978,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
     conferees provide $6,000,000 over fiscal year 2000 funding 
     for chlamydia and $14,934,000 over fiscal year 2000 funding 
     for syphilis. Except for the administrative contribution 
     required by CDC, all of this increase for chlamydia must be 
     spent on appropriate services to patients to prevent 
     chlamydia infections using the existing partnership between 
     STD and family planning. The conferees recognize that given 
     the problem of re-infection and other factors, some of these 
     funds may be utilized to provide screening and treatment to 
     males as deemed appropriate by CDC.
       The conference agreement includes $417,039,000 for chronic 
     and environmental diseases instead of $317,374,000 as 
     proposed by the House and $319,553,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate. Programs within this account are funded (including 
     salaries and expenses) at the following levels:
Environmental Disease Prevention:
  Arctic populations...........................................$390,000
  Asthma.....................................................27,906,362
  Autism......................................................6,734,000
  Birth defects..............................................17,608,000
  Disabilities prevention....................................15,276,000
  Environmental lab and health activities....................46,593,117
  Fetal alcohol syndrome......................................9,551,843
  Folic Acid..................................................2,500,000
  Hanford Study...............................................1,679,000
  Limb Loss...................................................3,352,000
  Mild mental retardation.....................................4,396,000
  Newborn Hearing Screening...................................6,315,576
  Pfisteria...................................................9,081,000
  Radiation...................................................1,949,000
  Spina bifida................................................2,155,000
  Volcanic emissions.............................................97,000
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Subtotal, Environmental.................................155,583,898
Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion:
  Arthritis and healthy aging................................11,889,000
  Behavior risk factor surveillance...........................1,918,000
  Cancer registries..........................................36,434,297
  Cardiovascular diseases....................................35,038,825
  Chronic fatigue syndrome....................................7,000,000
  Colorectal cancer...........................................8,901,345
  Community health promotion..................................7,164,000
  Comprehensive cancer control................................3,096,000
  Diabetes...................................................58,344,038
  Epilepsy....................................................4,074,255
  Iron overload.................................................495,000
  Nutrition/Physical activity................................16,222,438
  Oral health.................................................8,460,000
  Prevention of teen pregnancies.............................13,258,000
  Prostate cancer............................................11,173,000
  School health program.......................................9,775,000
  Skin cancer.................................................1,647,000
  Tobacco (smoking and health)..............................103,355,034
  Women's health..............................................1,500,000
  Ovarian cancer..............................................2,625,870
    Subtotal, Chronic.......................................342,371,102
  Consolidated program administration.......................-80,916,000
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Total, Chronic & Environmental..........................417,039,000
       Within the total provided for arthritis, the conferees urge 
     CDC to continue research, surveillance, and health 
     communication efforts, including the impact of lupus on 
     women, within the framework of the National Arthritis Action 
     Plan.
       Within the total provided for cardiovascular diseases, the 
     conferees expect CDC to enhance professional and public 
     awareness outreach activities on pulmonary hypertension.
       Within the total provided for nutrition/physical activity, 
     the conferees expect CDC to address overweight, obesity, 
     nutrition, and sedentary lifestyles by supporting state-based 
     programs, by training health professionals to recognize the 
     signs of obesity and recommend prevention activities, by 
     educating the public concerning overweight or obesity through 
     public education campaigns, and by developing strategies for 
     use at worksites and in community health and other community 
     settings.
       Native American populations have a diabetes rate of four 
     times the national average with Hispanics following a close 
     second. The conferees urge CDC to fund pilot projects to 
     examine nutrition and prevention protocols for these 
     populations.
       The conferees look forward to the completion of the 
     evidence-based report being developed by CDC and the Agency 
     for

[[Page H12134]]

     Healthcare Research and Quality that will assess the elements 
     of epilepsy treatment as they relate to clinical outcomes. 
     CDC is expected to disseminate the findings of this report to 
     people with epilepsy, health care professionals, and the 
     general public. The Director should be prepared to provide 
     the next steps required to implement an early intervention 
     strategy including diagnosis, treatment, and referral 
     recommendations at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations 
     hearing.
       The conferees are encouraged that CDC plans to convene a 
     meeting to develop a national prostate cancer public health 
     agenda. The conferees urge the agency to continue its work 
     with voluntary public and professional organizations to 
     develop and implement a national educational and outreach 
     campaign with special attention to minority and under served 
     populations. CDC should be prepared to report on its prostate 
     cancer programs at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations 
     hearing.
       The conferees urge CDC to give full and fair consideration 
     to a proposal to develop a diversified screening 
     demonstration project with the Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate 
     Cancer Center at the Cancer Center of New Jersey and the 
     Men's Health Network designed to determine effective methods 
     for encouraging men in the underserved population to 
     participate in colorectal screening and screening for other 
     high risk diseases.
       The conferees urge CDC to provide additional support for 
     Johns Hopkins University to develop the Center for Limb Loss 
     Research.
       The conferees include the following amounts for the 
     following projects and activities in fiscal year 2001.
       Within the total provided for asthma, $213,000 is for the 
     Buffalo General Foundation, Buffalo, New York, for a study 
     examining the impact of air pollution on asthma rates and 
     respiratory illness and $921,000 is for Forum Health of 
     Youngstown, Ohio for a pediatric/adolescent asthma school 
     program.
       Within the total provided for autism, $313,000 is for the 
     Marshall University autism center in Huntington, West 
     Virginia; $921,000 is for the New Jersey Epidemiologic 
     Surveillance and Integration Center for Children with Autism; 
     and $3,000,000 is for the Center of Excellence in Autism.
       Within the total provided for birth defects, $147,000 is 
     for the Birth Defects Monitoring and Prevention Center at the 
     University of South Alabama and $461,000 is for the 
     University of Louisville Craniofacial Birth Defects Research 
     Center.
       Within the total provided for cardiovascular diseases, 
     $46,000 is for the Sisters of Charity Health Care System and 
     Staten Island University Hospital's Heart Center; $500,000 
     for the Michael DeBakey Institute for Comparative 
     Cardiovascular Science; $929,000 is for the Kettering Medical 
     Center Healthy Hearts 2001 Initiative; and $4,500,000 is for 
     The Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry to track 
     and improve the delivery of care to patients with acute 
     stroke. The conferees direct CDC to consult with the National 
     Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the 
     National Institutes of Health, the Brain Attack Coalition, 
     and other professional organizations experienced in the 
     treatment of stroke, in developing specific data points for 
     collection as well as appropriate benchmarks for analyzing 
     care. The conferees further direct CDC to include hospitals, 
     universities, state and local health departments, and other 
     appropriate partners to design and pilot test prototypes, 
     that will measure the delivery of care to patients with acute 
     stroke in order to provide real-time data and analysis to 
     reduce death and disability from stroke and improve the 
     quality of life for acute stroke survivors.
       Within the total provided for colorectal cancer, $184,000 
     is for the Sisters of Charity Health Care System to ensure 
     that patients have access to early detection of gastro-
     intestinal cancers.
       Within the total provided for community health promotion, 
     $553,000 is for the Baltimore City Health Department, 
     Maryland, to establish a Center for Chronic Diseases and 
     $900,000 is for the University of Texas, Dallas, for the 
     Southwestern Medical Center, National Multiple Sclerosis 
     Training Center.
       Within the total provided for comprehensive cancer control, 
     $425,000 is for Miami-Dade County, Florida for the Health 
     Choice Network to administer the Jesse Trice Cancer 
     Prevention Project; $921,000 is for an Appalachian cancer 
     demonstration project at the East Tennessee State University 
     James H. Quillen College of Medicine to address cancer care 
     in the rural Appalachian region; $900,000 is for the 
     University of Rhode Island Cancer Prevention Research Center 
     to provide interactive interventions of at-risk populations; 
     and $850,000 is for the University of Texas M.D. Anderson 
     Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, for a comprehensive cancer 
     control program to address minority and medically undeserved 
     populations.
       Within the total provided for diabetes, $230,000 for the 
     Fresno Community Hospital and Medical Center to support a 
     minority-focused diabetes outreach program; $213,000 is for 
     the Diabetes-Endocrinology Center of Western New York in 
     Buffalo for community education and outreach efforts to 
     improve the early detection, prevention and control of 
     diabetes; $276,000 is for a comprehensive diabetic research, 
     education and treatment program at Louisiana State Health 
     Sciences Center in Shreveport; $425,000 is for the University 
     of Puerto Rico to support surveillance, prevention research 
     and education programs at the center for diabetes in Puerto 
     Rico; $1,000,000 is for the National Diabetes Prevention 
     Center in Gallup, New Mexico to continue the prevention 
     center for American Indians; and $1,843,000 is for the Center 
     for Diabetes and Prevention Control at Texas Tech University 
     Health Sciences Center to provide a national model of 
     diabetes outreach, education, prevention and care.
       Within the total provided for disabilities prevention, 
     $3,000,000 is to establish a paralysis information and 
     support center with the Christopher Reeve Paralysis 
     Foundation and to enhance efforts on the prevention of 
     secondary complications to improve outcomes and the quality 
     of life for people living with paralysis.
       Within the total provided for environmental health 
     activities, $213,000 is for the San Antonio Metropolitan 
     Health District to expand an assessment of human exposure to 
     environmental contaminants near Kelly Air Force Base, Texas; 
     $400,000 is for the establishment of a National Mass 
     Fatalities Training Response Center, at Kirkwood Community 
     College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa; $500,000 is for the State of 
     Alaska's Department of Health and Social Services to study 
     environmental contaminants; $850,000 for a joint United 
     States/Vietnamese study on the effects of agent orange; 
     $850,000 for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
     to support additional research on animal modeling of chronic 
     human diseases such as cancer, fibrosis, hypertension, and 
     other diseases; and $1,800,000 for the Center for 
     Environmental Medicine and Toxicology at the University of 
     Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, Mississippi.
       Within the total provided for nutrition/physical activity, 
     $250,000 is for the National Youth Fitness and Obesity 
     Institute at the University of Northern Iowa; $298,000 is for 
     the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, North 
     Carolina, Institute for Health, Science and Society for the 
     Children's Healthy Life Skills Initiative; and $461,000 is 
     for the Grenada Lake Medical Center in Grenada, Mississippi 
     to conduct a demonstration on physical fitness in rural 
     areas.
       Within the total provided for school health program, 
     $140,000 is for Proviso East High School in Maywood, Illinois 
     in collaboration with Loyola University of Chicago and the 
     Cook County Board of Health to improve the delivery of on-
     site primary care, preventive care, and health outreach to 
     low-income parents and students in the community.
       Within the total provided for tobacco, $900,000 is for the 
     University of Rhode Island Tobacco Cessation Program to 
     compare media and policy interventions on smoking cessation 
     and adoption of no smoking policies in the home.
       The conference agreement includes $173,928,000 for breast 
     and cervical cancer screening instead of $160,941,000 as 
     proposed by the House and $167,016,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate. The conference agreement includes bill language to 
     allow the agency to expand the WISEWOMAN program to not more 
     than 15 States as proposed by the Senate. The House bill 
     allowed the agency to expand the program to not more than 10 
     States.
       The conferees urge the CDC to give full and fair 
     consideration to proposals from Access Community Health 
     Network in Chicago for delivering breast and cervical cancer 
     screening and follow-up services to minority women.
       The conferees include the following amounts for the 
     following projects and activities in fiscal year 2001:
       --$92,000 to evaluate the high incidence of breast cancer 
     in DuPage County, Illinois;
       --$213,000 for Marin County, California to evaluate the 
     high incidence of breast cancer in the San Francisco Bay 
     Area;
       --$1,671,000 for the Healthcare Association of New York 
     State for a breast cancer demonstration project to develop an 
     integrated model for the delivery of comprehensive breast 
     cancer services in a coordinated setting.
       The conference agreement includes $181,701,000 for 
     infectious diseases instead of $111,622,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $112,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within 
     the total provided, $25,000,000 is for the establishment of 
     partnerships between CDC and academic institutions and State 
     and local public health departments to carry out pilot 
     programs for antimicrobial resistance detection, 
     surveillance, education and prevention, and to conduct 
     research on resistance mechanisms and new or more effective 
     antimicrobial compounds.
       The conferees commend CDC for its initiative to work with 
     hospitals in identifying and responding to the risk of 
     hospital-acquired infections and the emergence of 
     antimicrobial resistance in the pediatric population, 
     including its successful development of the largest hospital-
     based infection control network in the country. The conferees 
     encourage CDC to continue its effort to work with pediatric 
     hospital networks to improve infection control efforts for 
     children, particularly high-risk children.
       Within the total provided, $25,000,000 is to continue 
     planned activities and to expand efforts to control the West 
     Nile virus, an increase of $20,000,000 above the President's 
     request. The conferees direct CDC to ensure an equitable 
     distribution of these funds based on the impact of the West 
     Nile virus in particular states and localities during 
     calendar year 2000. The criteria should include: the date of 
     first positive findings, intensity of wildlife transmission, 
     occurrence of human illness, geographic extent of positive 
     findings, laboratory testing/activities, and employment of 
     control measures, including spraying.

[[Page H12135]]

       Also within the total provided is $34,577,000 for NEDSS/EID 
     and an increase of $4,000,000 for malaria programs.
       The conferees urge CDC to give full and fair consideration 
     to a proposal by Advance Paradigm to demonstrate the role of 
     provider utilization of information technology to improve 
     patient safety through management of polypharmacy outcomes.
       The conferees include the following amounts for the 
     following projects and activities in fiscal year 2001:
       --$149,000 for Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, 
     Ohio for prion disease surveillance;
       --$250,000 for the Institute for Clinical Evaluation for 
     the reduction of medical errors through the development and 
     demonstration of virtual reality medical technology 
     simulation for training health care workers in medical 
     procedures;
       --$300,000 for the Fletcher Allen Health Care, Burlington, 
     Vermont for a demonstration to reduce medical errors;
       --$500,000 for the Iowa Department of Public Health for a 
     demonstration to identify and develop strategies to reduce 
     adverse medical events;
       --$961,000 for the University of Texas Medical Branch, 
     Galveston, Texas, Tyler Border Infectious Disease Monitoring 
     Program;
       --$921,000 for the Emerging Infectious Diseases Center at 
     the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque to develop a 
     network-based surveillance system; and
       --$1,843,000 to develop a comprehensive, statewide 
     electronic public health reporting system in the State of 
     Delaware.
       The conference agreement includes $34,933,000 for lead 
     poisoning prevention instead of $31,019,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $30,978,000 as proposed by the Senate. CDC is 
     encouraged to work with Early Head Start in developing a 
     strategy identify and target resources for childhood lead 
     poisoning prevention to high-risk populations.
       The conference agreement includes $77,332,000 for injury 
     control instead of $66,298,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $69,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees have provided an additional $3,000,000 for 
     CDC to strengthen its focus on violence by supporting 
     initiatives directed at the prevention of physical and 
     emotional injuries associated with child abuse and neglect. 
     The conferees note that CDC convened a group of experts on 
     child maltreatment to identify future directions for 
     prevention. Increased funds are provided to begin to improve 
     information on child maltreatment through mechanisms such as 
     state-based surveillance, the development of uniform 
     definitions, and survey information from victims and 
     perpetrators. The conferees also support the evaluation and 
     dissemination of effective interventions and urge CDC to 
     develop and distribute an evaluation primer, a resource guide 
     for evaluated child maltreatment interventions, and 
     educational materials on child maltreatment prevention.
       The conferees include $2,000,000 to support a joint effort 
     by CDC and the Consumer Product Safety Commission to identify 
     products that contribute to common injuries. The conferees 
     understand that this effort includes collecting information 
     from hospitals that currently offer 24-hour trauma service. 
     The conferees agree that any research and/or study undertaken 
     shall address all products contributing to injuries found in 
     these areas and that all existing restrictions on CDC funding 
     and the Consumer Product Safety Commission apply to all 
     aspects of this effort.
       CDC is urged to conduct evaluation research on sleepiness, 
     sleep deprivation, and injury prevention associated with 
     fatigue.
       The conferees concur with Senate report language regarding 
     the development of population-based injury reporting systems 
     and recognize the efforts of the University of Maryland, 
     College Park.
       The conferees include the following amounts for the 
     following projects and activities in fiscal year 2001:
       --$92,000 for the Rebuild program at Inova Fairfax Hospital 
     that will enable trauma system doctors and nurses to work 
     effectively with the families of trauma victims;
       --$200,000 for the National Children's Center of Rural 
     Agricultural Health;
       --$250,000 for the American Trauma Society for a trauma 
     information and exchange program;
       --$425,000 for the National SAFE KIDS Campaign, Washington, 
     DC to improve child health through parental training and 
     technical assistance in public housing sites and communities;
       --$750,000 for an Alaska Injury Prevention Center of which 
     $250,000 is for collaboration with the State of Alaska 
     Department of Health and Social Services and $500,000 is to 
     develop a statewide childhood injury prevention program;
       --$850,000 for the Kennedy Krieger National Center for 
     Research on Behavior of Children and Youth, Baltimore, 
     Maryland for a youth violence prevention project; and
       --$921,000 for the Save A Life Foundation to expand the 
     training of its basic life supporting first aid program.
       The conference agreement includes $119,375,000 for the 
     national occupational safety and health program instead of 
     $86,346,000 as proposed by the House and $105,000,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees provide an increase over the request of 
     $10,000,000 for the National Occupational Research Agenda, 
     $9,000,000 for respirator research and personal protective 
     technology, and $1,000,000 for Education and Resource 
     Centers.
       The conferees urge NIOSH to be supportive of developing a 
     Pacific basin focus at the University of Hawaii at Hilo.
       The conferees include $723,000 for Purdue University in 
     West Lafayette, Indiana, to support the Construction Safety 
     Alliance for a national program in construction safety and 
     health.
       The conference agreement includes $174,851,000 for epidemic 
     services instead of $155,338,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $30,254,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within the total 
     provided, $125,000,000 is for a National Campaign to Change 
     Children's Health Behaviors as described in the House report, 
     including promoting mental health. The campaign is designed 
     to clearly communicate messages that will help kids develop 
     habits that foster good health over a lifetime. The conferees 
     expect the goals of the campaign will also address the 
     growing problem of obesity in this country. By displacing the 
     opportunity for young people to make bad choices during 
     after-school and weekend hours (such as being physically 
     inactive) with opportunities to engage in positive goal-
     directed activities (such as sports and other physical 
     activity) the campaign will reduce the proportion of children 
     and adolescents who are overweight and obese.
       The conferees commend CDC's leadership role in landmine 
     victim assistance programs and have provided an additional 
     $5,000,000 to support expansion of the landmine survivor 
     program as well as the partnership with the Landmine 
     Survivors Network to further develop peer support networks 
     that address the rehabilitative and socioeconomic needs of 
     landmine victims in mine affected countries.
       The agreement includes $14,000,000 for the safe motherhood 
     initiative. The conferees urge CDC to further its efforts to 
     prevent deaths and complications during pregnancy and reduce 
     racial disparities, with special focus on complications 
     related to a lack of access to prenatal care and community 
     support.
       The conferees include the following amounts for the 
     following projects and activities in fiscal year 2001:
       --$9,000 for the Cross Road Foundation for a pilot project 
     to sponsor singles mother self-help groups to improve 
     parenting skills;
       --$37,000 for Victory Memorial Hospital in Brooklyn, New 
     York to expand its prenatal program for uninsured, pregnant 
     women;
       --$100,000 for the Northern New Jersey Maternal Child 
     Health Consortium;
       --$184,000 for the Children's Hospital of Buffalo for 
     activities related to intestinal motility disorders in 
     infants;
       --$500,000 for the University Medical Center of Southern 
     Nevada for Maternal and Neonatal Intensive Care;
       --$900,000 for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Resources, 
     Inc., Missouri Bootheel Healthy Start project;
       --$1,000,000 for the Prince George's County Health 
     Department for Infant Mortality Prevention;
       --$1,020,000 for Jackson State University, Office of 
     Research and Development to establish an epidemiological 
     research institute;
       --$1,704,000 is for the University of Arizona, College of 
     Public Health to continue comprehensive research and 
     evaluation of the unique public health risks along the U.S.-
     Mexico border; and
       --$3,001,000 for the Lawton and Rhea Chiles Center for 
     Healthy Mothers and Babies Friendly Access program to improve 
     the quality of perinatal health service delivery.
       The conference agreement includes $13,593,000 for 
     prevention research as proposed by the House instead of 
     $13,386,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conference agreement includes $35,009,000 for health 
     disparities demonstrations instead of $32,184,000 as proposed 
     by the House and $27,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conference agreement includes $669,130,000 for program 
     administration instead of $648,774,000 as proposed by the 
     House and $626,228,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees do not include language proposed by the 
     Senate to reduce administrative expenses of the CDC. The 
     House bill contained no similar provision.

                     National Institutes of Health


                       National Cancer Institute

       The conference agreement includes $3,757,242,000 for the 
     National Cancer Institute instead of $3,793,587,000 as 
     proposed by the House and $3,804,084,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate.
       NCI is encouraged to take appropriate steps to take full 
     advantage of scientific opportunities that may be available 
     from using genealogical databases to understand, diagnose, 
     treat and prevent cancer and other diseases.


                National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

       The conference agreement includes $2,299,866,000 for the 
     National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute instead of 
     $2,321,320,000 as proposed by the House and $2,328,102,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees support research on the interaction of 
     tuberculosis and AIDS conducted through the Institute's AIDS 
     research program and encourage enhanced research in this 
     area. The conferees also urge NHLBI to continue research and 
     development efforts in the area of polynitroxylated 
     hemoglobin, a blood cell substitute being developed to 
     provide oxygen carrying capacity and adequate blood flow to 
     the critically injured.

[[Page H12136]]

         National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

       The conference agreement includes $306,448,000 for the 
     National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research 
     instead of $309,007,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $309,923,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees are concerned about the exceptionally high 
     rate of severe dental caries suffered by American Indian 
     children and encourage NIDCR to support long-term research of 
     the etiology and pathogenesis of dental caries in these 
     populations. The conferees also encourage NIDCR to conduct 
     research on effective ways to control severe caries in 
     American Indian children through all available mechanisms, as 
     appropriate, including clinical trials.


    national institute of diabetes and digestive and kidney diseases

       The conference agreement includes $1,303,385,000 for the 
     National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney 
     Diseases instead of $1,315,530,000 as proposed by the House 
     and $1,318,106,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees are concerned that the urology research 
     effort is not addressing the large public health impact of 
     urological diseases and conditions. NIDDK is strongly urged 
     to enhance its research initiatives in urology.
       The conferees encourage NIDDK to coordinate with the Office 
     of Dietary Supplements on their findings from the chromium 
     and diabetes nutrition conference held in November of 1999. 
     The Institute is encouraged to enhance basic research grants 
     to examine cellular glucose metabolism and the factors that 
     influence that metabolism, especially the influence of 
     chromium-containing compounds on glucose receptors.
       The conferees encourage NIDDK to expand research efforts 
     for treatments for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS). The conferees 
     recognize the recent progress in some areas of MPS research, 
     however the persistent challenges in development of effective 
     treatments remain. NIDDK is encouraged to work with other 
     Institutes, especially NINDS and NICHD, to research effective 
     therapies.
       The conferees are concerned regarding reports that funding 
     for two of the four recently established Interdisciplinary 
     Research Centers have been significantly reduced. The 
     conferees urge NIDDK, consistent with the PKD Strategic Plan, 
     to fully fund the four Interdisciplinary Research Centers.
       The conferees are pleased with the growth of the NIDDK 
     research portfolio on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and 
     the focus on IBD in several of the Institute's digestive 
     diseases centers. Moreover, several new initiatives are 
     planned, including efforts to create an IBD genetics 
     consortium in followup to a meeting NIDDK held in March 2000 
     on the genetics of IBD. The conferees are hopeful that IBD 
     will be one of the diseases to be studied in the soon-to-be-
     established NIDDK digestive diseases trial network. The 
     conferees urge the Institute to foster research on genetic, 
     environmental and other factors that offer promise of 
     shedding light on the underlying causes of immunologic 
     abnormalities and inflammatory mechanisms in IBD, and that 
     may help point the way to more effective therapeutic and 
     preventive strategies.


        national institute of neurological disorders and stroke

       The conference agreement includes $1,176,482,000 for the 
     National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke 
     instead of $1,185,767,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $1,189,425,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees are aware of the efforts of NINDS to identify 
     the gene that causes Mucolipidosis Type IV (ML-4), a 
     debilitating genetic metabolic disorder that prevents normal 
     development in children. The conferees encourage NINDS to 
     consider conducting workshops and expand research efforts in 
     this area.
       The conferees urge NINDS to enhance research activities on 
     the development or adaptation of electrical stimulation 
     devices to activate the reflexes of the paralyzed muscles 
     that open the airway during breathing in cases of paralyzed 
     vocal cords due to trauma or neurodegenerative disease.
       The conferees encourage NINDS to continue their 
     collaborative efforts with advocacy groups to develop 
     treatments for Friedreich's ataxia.
       Recent advances in Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) research 
     have found that activation of the SMN2 gene may benefit 
     treatment of SMA. The conferees urge NINDS to develop a SMA 
     basic and clinical research portfolio through all available 
     mechanisms, as appropriate, including clinical trials of drug 
     compounds capable of activating SMN2 expression. The 
     conferees also encourage the Institute to explore areas of 
     promising research identified in the 2000 Families of SMA 
     International Workshop.
       Mitochondrial disorders comprise a panoply of progressive, 
     neurodegenerative syndromes affecting multiple organ systems 
     and causing mild to severe disabling neurological 
     complications. At present there is no cure or therapies that 
     are effective. It is recognized that adult onset disorders 
     such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases 
     may have an associated mitochondrial defect. The conferees 
     urge NINDS and other relevant Institutes to explore the 
     potential applicability of promising new therapies for these 
     diseases in treating patients with mitochondrial disorders.
       The conferees are pleased to note that progress continues 
     to be made both with respect to the treatment and in our 
     understanding of the cause of multiple sclerosis. Recent 
     studies have provided the best evidence to date that the 
     disease is caused by over-reactivity of a person's own immune 
     response. Based on these advances, the conferees encourage 
     NINDS to expand its efforts to test new, innovative 
     therapies. Research strategies should include the use of MRI 
     and other surrogate biomarkers to help determine the stage of 
     the disease, to evaluate effective treatments, and to improve 
     diagnosis.


         National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

       The conference agreement includes $2,043,208,000 for the 
     National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases instead 
     of $2,062,126,000 as proposed by the House and $2,066,526,000 
     as proposed by the Senate.


             National Institute of General Medical Sciences

       The conference agreement includes $1,535,823,000 for the 
     National Institute of General Medical Sciences instead of 
     $1,548,313,000 as proposed by the House and $1,554,176,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate.


        National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

       The conference agreement includes $976,455,000 for the 
     National Institute of Child Health and Human Development as 
     proposed by the Senate instead of $984,300,000 as proposed by 
     the House.
       The conferees are supportive of plans to conduct a national 
     longitudinal study of environmental influences on children's 
     health. The Director of NICHD is urged to establish a 
     consortium of representatives from appropriate Federal 
     agencies, including CDC, EPA and other NIH Institutes to plan 
     and initiate pilot studies that will provide the information 
     necessary to develop and implement the full national 
     longitudinal study. To this end, the conferees have provided 
     funds to support this initiative and look forward to learning 
     of the progress made during the fiscal year 2002 
     appropriations hearing.


                         National Eye Institute

       The conference agreement includes $510,611,000 for the 
     National Eye Institute instead of $514,673,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $516,605,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       Recent progress in genetics research has opened up the 
     potential for gene-based approaches for the prevention and 
     treatment of retinal and other blinding diseases. Gene-based 
     therapies for several forms of retinal degeneration have been 
     successfully demonstrated in laboratory animal studies, and 
     preclinical work has satisfied patient safety and ethical 
     issues. The conferees urge NEI to accelerate the development 
     of these new gene-based approaches through all available 
     mechanisms, as appropriate, including clinical trials.


          National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

       The conference agreement includes $502,549,000 for the 
     National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences instead 
     of $506,730,000 as proposed by the House and $508,263,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate.
       The causes of breast cancer are largely unknown. There is 
     little agreement in the scientific community on how the 
     environment impacts breast cancer. While studies have been 
     conducted on the links between environmental factors like 
     diet, pesticides, and electromagnetic fields, no conclusive 
     evidence exists. The conferees encourage NIEHS to enhance 
     research efforts to study the links between the environment 
     and breast cancer through all available mechanisms, as 
     appropriate, including establishing centers of excellence.


                      National Institute on Aging

       The conference agreement includes $786,039,000 for the 
     National Institute on Aging instead of $790,299,000 as 
     proposed by the House and $794,625,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate.


 National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

       The conference agreement includes $396,687,000 for the 
     National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin 
     Diseases instead of $400,025,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $401,161,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), more commonly known as 
     Children's Brittle Bone Disease, is a rare genetic disorder 
     for which there is presently no cure. The conferees strongly 
     encourage NIH to expand its support for research into the 
     causes, diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and eventual cure 
     for OI and to coordinate public research efforts with those 
     supported by the private sector. The Director of NIAMS should 
     be prepared to testify on this issue at the fiscal year 2002 
     appropriations hearing.
       Important strides have been made with the establishment of 
     the Osteoporosis and Related Bone-Disease National Resource 
     Center. The conferees urge NIAMS to expand support for the 
     resource center's current activities, including developing 
     and disseminating information based on current research 
     findings that improve knowledge and understanding of the 
     prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis and 
     related bone diseases, implementing and evaluating model 
     education programs to enhance bone health and reduce future 
     risk of osteoporosis, and supporting public and private 
     efforts to broaden the base of knowledge about osteoporosis 
     and related bone diseases.

[[Page H12137]]

       The conferees commend NIAMS for its growing support of 
     research on rheumatic diseases of childhood, including the 
     recent opening of a new Pediatric Rheumatology Clinic on the 
     NIH campus. However, the conferees are concerned about the 
     cadre of pediatric rheumatologists who are trained to 
     treat and study these diseases. NIAMS is therefore 
     encouraged to work with the Secretary of HHS and other PHS 
     components, as appropriate, to assist in evaluating the 
     status of the pediatric rheumatology workforce. In 
     particular, the Institute is encouraged to take advantage 
     of opportunities to support loan repayment for researchers 
     working in the area of childhood rheumatic diseases.


    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

       The conference agreement includes $300,581,000 for the 
     National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication 
     Disorders as proposed by the Senate instead of $301,787,000 
     as proposed by the House.
       The conferees urge NIDCD to continue research on inner ear 
     hair cell regeneration with special emphasis on gene delivery 
     and gene transfer technology with specific relevance to the 
     inner ear and the development of improved hearing aids and 
     cochlear implants using digital processes. The conferees also 
     urge NIDCD to continue to recruit experts from the field of 
     molecular and cellular biology and genetics.


                 National Institute of Nursing Research

       The conference agreement includes $104,370,000 for the 
     National Institute of Nursing Research instead of 
     $102,312,000 as proposed by the House and $106,848,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate.


           National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

       The conference agreement includes $340,678,000 for the 
     National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism instead of 
     $349,216,000 as proposed by the House and $336,848,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate.


                    National Institute on Drug Abuse

       The conference agreement includes $781,327,000 for the 
     National Institute on Drug Abuse instead of $788,201,000 as 
     proposed by the House and $790,038,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate.


                  National Institute of Mental Health

       The conference agreement includes $1,107,028,000 for the 
     National Institute of Mental Health as proposed by the Senate 
     instead of $1,114,638,000 as proposed by the House.


                National Human Genome Research Institute

       The conference agreement includes $382,384,000 for the 
     National Human Genome Research Institute instead of 
     $386,410,000 as proposed by the House and $385,888,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate.


                 National Center for Research Resources

       The conference agreement includes $817,475,000 for the 
     National Center for Research Resources instead of 
     $832,027,000 as proposed by the House and $775,212,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate. The conferees include a provision to 
     waive the matching requirement for the grant or contract to 
     manage the 288 chimpanzees acquired by the Coulston 
     Foundation. The House and Senate bills contained no similar 
     provision.
       Within the total provided, $100,000,000 is for the 
     Institutional Development Awards (IDeA) program as proposed 
     by the House instead of $60,000,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate. In the implementation of these funds, the conferees 
     concur with the language contained in the House report. In 
     addition, the conferees believe that the General Clinical 
     Research Centers (GCRCs) are essential to furthering 
     biomedical research progress and have included funds for NCRR 
     above the Administration's request to permit an increase for 
     GCRCs commensurate with the overall NIH funding increase.
       The conferees urge NCRR to use a portion of the increase 
     provided for a new competition of Science Education Program 
     Awards grants. The conferees further urge that these funds be 
     used consistent with language contained in last year's House 
     and Senate reports.


                  John E. Fogarty International Center

       The conference agreement includes $50,514,000 for the John 
     E. Fogarty International Center instead of $50,299,000 as 
     proposed by the House and $61,260,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate.


                      National Library of Medicine

       The conference agreement includes $246,801,000 for the 
     National Library of Medicine instead of $256,281,000 as 
     proposed by the House and $256,953,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate.


       National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

       The conference agreement includes $89,211,000 for the 
     National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine 
     instead of $78,880,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $100,089,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees are aware of the health benefits of 
     cranberries and cranberry juice products in maintaining 
     urinary tract health as well as their positive antibacterial 
     and antioxidant effects and believe that independent 
     Federally-funded research to test and/or validate these 
     findings could add to the arsenal of health-based and 
     nutritional alternatives to wellness. The conferees encourage 
     NCCAM to study the health benefits of cranberry products.


       National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities

       While the overall health of the nation has improved over 
     the last two decades, there continues to be striking 
     disparities in the burden of illness and death experienced by 
     African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Alaska 
     Natives, and Asian-Pacific Islanders. Moreover, the largest 
     numbers of medically underserved are white individuals, and 
     many of them have the same health and access problems as do 
     members of minority groups. Overcoming such persistent and 
     perplexing health disparities, and promoting health for all 
     Americans, ranks as one of our Nation's foremost challenges.
       These disparities are believed to be the result of the 
     complex interaction among socioeconomic and biological 
     factors, the environment, and specific behaviors, as well as 
     other factors. While some of the causes of inequitable health 
     outcomes may be beyond the scope of biomedical research, the 
     conferees recognize that NIH has made research into health 
     disparities a high priority, and has already taken steps to 
     expand the role of research into why some minority groups 
     have disproportionately high rates of disease.
       Congress recently passed and the President has signed the 
     Minority Health and Health Disparities Research and Education 
     Act of 2000. The Act established the National Center on 
     Minority Health and Health Disparities, which will enable NIH 
     to move ahead more rapidly toward its goal of elucidating the 
     factors that contribute to these disparities. The Center will 
     conduct and support research through grants to support 
     programs targeting diseases and conditions that 
     disproportionately affect minority groups and other 
     populations with health disparities. The Center will build on 
     the work of the Office for Research on Minority Health and 
     the success of the Minority Health Initiative, currently 
     located in the NIH Office of the Director. This will 
     complement the ongoing research of the NIH Research 
     Institutes and Centers also aimed at reducing health 
     disparities. To emphasize the visibility of this new Center 
     and the importance of its research mission, the conferees 
     have included bill language providing $130,200,000 for the 
     Center.


                         Office of the Director

                     (Including Transfer of Funds)

       The conference agreement includes $213,581,000 for the 
     Office of the Director instead of $342,307,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $352,165,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
     agreement includes a designation in bill language of 
     $48,271,000 for the operations of the Office of AIDS 
     Research. The conferees understand that with the funds 
     allocated to NIH, the NIH expects to provide $2,266,987,000 
     in AIDS research funding.
       The agreement includes funds within the Office of the 
     Director to address the trend of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in 
     communities of color. The Office is encouraged to expand and 
     strengthen science-based HIV prevention research for African 
     Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Native 
     Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders and consideration should be 
     given to the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. The Office 
     is also encouraged to expand existing culturally competent 
     behavioral research, conducted by minority principal 
     investigators, that seeks to break the link between HIV 
     infection and high risk behaviors and that seeks to 
     decrease the rate of mortality in targeted minority 
     populations.
       The conferees continue to be interested in matching the 
     increased needs of researchers who rely upon human tissue and 
     organs to study human diseases and to search for cures. The 
     conferees are aware of a recent review by a panel of expects 
     that found that there is a rapidly expanding and unmet demand 
     for the use of human tissue samples for research purposes. 
     The conferees encourage the Director of NIH to work with the 
     relevant Institutes to consider expanding support in this 
     area and request that the Director be prepared to report on 
     its plan to meet the demand for human tissue at the fiscal 
     year 2002 appropriations hearing.
       The conferees encourage NIH to consider establishing a 
     trans-NIH coordinating committee to focus on the lymphatic 
     system, with particular emphasis on lymphedema and related 
     lymphatic disorders.
       The conferees are aware of concerns raised regarding the 
     progress of NIH research into fascioscapulohumeral muscular 
     dystrophy and fascioscapulohumeral disease and encourage NIH 
     to expand research in this area.
       The conferees concur with the language contained in the 
     Senate report regarding microbicides research.
       The conferees encourage NIA, NICHD, and NINDS to work 
     collaboratively to enhance research into Hutchison-Gilford 
     Progeria Syndrome, an illness that strikes children in their 
     first year causing them to age rapidly and prematurely and 
     for which the average life expectancy is 13 years.
       The NIH has developed a five-year Parkinson's Disease 
     Research Agenda. To carry out the plan, the professional 
     judgement budget estimates call for increases over existing 
     Parkinson's research of $71,400,000 in year one (fiscal year 
     2001). The conferees strongly urge the Director to work 
     toward implementation of the research agenda and oversee 
     coordination of all relevant Institutes, including NINDS, 
     NIEHS, NIA, and others conducting Parkinson's research. The 
     Director is requested to report by March 1, 2001 on the 
     progress towards implementation of the research agenda and to 
     submit updated professional judgement funding projections for 
     subsequent years.

[[Page H12138]]

       The conferees concur with the language in the Senate report 
     regarding a study of the structure of NIH and expect to 
     receive a report and recommendations one year from the date 
     of confirmation of the new NIH Director.
       The conferees have been made aware of the public interest 
     in securing an appropriate return on the NIH investment in 
     basic research. The conferees are also aware of the mounting 
     concern over the cost to patients of therapeutic drugs. By 
     July 2001, based on a list of such therapeutic drugs which 
     are FDA approved, have reached $500,000,000 per year in sales 
     in the United States, and have received NIH funding, NIH will 
     prepare a plan to ensure that taxpayers' interests are 
     protected.
       The Office of Dietary Supplements is urged to research the 
     relationship between chromium deficiencies and diabetes in 
     Native Americans through all available mechanisms, as 
     appropriate, including clinical trials.
       The number of Americans taking dietary supplements 
     containing ephedra has risen dramatically. The conferees 
     encourage the Office of Dietary Supplements to enhance 
     clinical research on the safety and efficacy of these 
     products.
       The conferees urge NIH to minimize the use of non-human 
     animals in nicotine or tobacco experiments, and is encouraged 
     to explore any non-human research methods that are currently 
     available or under development that may be used as an 
     alternative to using non-human animals.
       The conferees are concerned about the transfer of HIV 
     prevention interventions that have proven to be effective to 
     service programs supported by other federal agencies, such as 
     CDC and HRSA. The Office of AIDS Research (OAR) should work 
     with the ICs to increase NIH efforts in this area through the 
     establishment of programs for regional technical assistance, 
     technology transfer, and training for the purpose of 
     providing links between evidence-based HIV prevention science 
     and public health departments, community planning groups, 
     healthcare providers, and prevention service providers.
       The conferees strongly urge NIH to implement an intensified 
     research effort regarding autism consistent with the 
     Children's Health Act of 2000. The Director of NIH should 
     also provide a report to the House and Senate Appropriations 
     Committees by March 1, 2001 regarding a plan for establishing 
     the Centers of Excellence on Autism Program authorized in the 
     Children's Health Act of 2000.
       The conferees commend the Office of AIDS Research for 
     convening an external review of the Centers for AIDS Research 
     Program and for the five year plan to increase the number of 
     Centers. However, the conferees urge the NIH to consider ways 
     in which the five year plan can be modified to balance the 
     need to expand the number of Centers with the need to 
     adequately support the leading AIDS research institutions 
     with the core center mechanisms that they need to efficiently 
     pursue AIDS research.
       The conferees encourage NIH to pursue recommendations from 
     the Diabetes Research Working Group to address the specific 
     needs of minority populations.
       The conferees are aware of the National Institute of Child 
     Health and Human Development's (NICHD) efforts to establish a 
     Perinatology Research Branch (PRB) to conduct research 
     programs on pregnancy and perinatology in the greater 
     metropolitan region of the District of Columbia. After 
     several attempts, the conferees understand that NICHD now 
     intends to hold a nationwide competition for a site for the 
     PRB. The Director is requested to submit a written report by 
     March 1, 2001, explaining why the efforts to establish the 
     PRB in the greater metropolitan region of the District of 
     Columbia have to-date been unsuccessful. The District of 
     Columbia has the highest rate of infant mortality in the 
     United States, the highest rate of infants born with low 
     birthweights, and the lowest percentage of mothers receiving 
     early prenatal care. Therefore, the report should include 
     possible alternative methods for conducting research programs 
     on pregnancy and perinatology in the greater metropolitan 
     region of the District of Columbia.
       The conferees believe it appropriate for NIH to recognize 
     Paul Rogers' numerous contributions to the public health and 
     medical research. Therefore, the conferees urge the Director 
     to designate the plaza in front of the James Shannon building 
     on the NIH campus as the Paul G. Rogers Plaza and to 
     commemorate it in his honor.
       The conferees appreciate the efforts of the Director to 
     ensure that NLM's future physical needs are met and encourage 
     that sufficient funds be made available from within NLM 
     funding to meet these needs.


                        Buildings and Facilities

       The conference agreement includes $153,790,000 for 
     buildings and facilities instead of $178,700,000 as proposed 
     by the House and $148,900,000 as proposed by the Senate.

       Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration


               Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services

       The conference agreement includes $2,958,001,000 for 
     substance abuse and mental health services instead of 
     $2,727,626,000 as proposed by the House and $2,730,757,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate. Within the funds provided, the 
     conferees intend that $15,000,000 is to carry out the fetal 
     alcohol syndrome prevention and services program.
     Center for Mental Health Services
       The conference agreement includes $420,000,000 for the 
     mental health block grant instead of $416,000,000 as proposed 
     by the House and $366,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conference agreement includes $91,763,000 for 
     children's mental health instead of $86,763,000 as proposed 
     by both the House and Senate.
       The conference agreement includes $36,883,000 for grants to 
     states for the homeless (PATH) as proposed by the Senate 
     instead of $30,883,000 as proposed by the House.
       The conference agreement includes $30,000,000 for 
     protection and advocacy instead of $24,903,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $25,903,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
     conferees continue to be concerned about deaths and serious 
     injuries due to the inappropriate use of seclusion and 
     restraints in facilities that treat individuals with mental 
     illnesses and have provided additional resources so that 
     these deaths can be investigated and future incidences can be 
     prevented.
       The conference agreement includes $203,674,000 for programs 
     of regional and national significance instead of $132,749,000 
     as proposed by the House and $146,875,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate.
       Within the total provided, $90,000,000 provided under 
     section 581 of the Public Health Service Act is for the 
     support and delivery of school-based and school-related 
     mental health services for school-age youth. It is intended 
     that the Department will continue to collaborate its efforts 
     with the Department of Education to develop a coordinated 
     approach. The conferees recognize it may be necessary for the 
     agency to allocate additional resources to the Safe Schools/
     Healthy Students Action Center to expand its technical 
     assistance to serve new grantees.
       Within the total provided, $3,000,000 is for suicide 
     prevention hotlines. The conferees direct SAMHSA to undertake 
     an evaluation of the effectiveness of these hotlines in 
     preventing suicides.
       The conferees believe that SAMHSA is uniquely qualified to 
     support a clearinghouse for youth suicide prevention, 
     including a database and related files of reference materials 
     and organizations. SAMHSA, through this clearinghouse, could 
     provide training and technical assistance to States to 
     implement the Surgeon General's recommendations for suicide 
     prevention.
       Within the total provided, $10,000,000 is provided under 
     section 582 of the Public Health Service Act to support up to 
     22 grants to local mental health providers for the purposes 
     of developing knowledge of best practices and providing 
     mental health services to children and youth suffering from 
     post traumatic stress disorder as a result of having 
     witnessed or experienced a traumatic event. Grantees can 
     include psychiatric hospitals, general hospitals, outpatient 
     mental health clinics, and community and university-based 
     mental health programs. With respect to grants for knowledge 
     development, preference should be given to applicants with 
     experience in the field of trauma related mental disorders in 
     children and youth.
       Within the total provided, $2,000,000 is to support 
     professional training in restraints and seclusion in 
     residential and day treatment centers for children and youth. 
     This training initiative will support grants to non-profit 
     and public entities for the purpose of developing and 
     demonstrating the effectiveness of a best-practices training 
     model to avoid the inappropriate use of restraints and 
     seclusion.
       The conferees are supportive of efforts to develop a model 
     training demonstration project to help eliminate deaths and 
     injuries that occur in mental health facilities due to the 
     inappropriate use of seclusion and restraints. Such a model 
     training program should emphasize conflict resolution and de-
     escalation.
       Within the total provided, an increase of $2,000,000 is to 
     provide additional support for minority fellowships in mental 
     health.
       Within the total provided, $7,000,000 is for the treatment 
     of mental health disorders related to HIV disease including: 
     dementia, clinical depression and the chronic, progressive 
     neurological disabilities that often accompany HIV disease. 
     These direct services grants provided to minority community-
     based providers that operate in traditional and non-
     traditional settings are designed to strengthen their 
     capacity to provide HIV related mental health services.
       Funds are included to provide grants to local communities 
     to improve mental health screening and referrals in non-
     mental health settings and continue support for jail 
     diversion programs for non-violent mentally ill offenders.
       It is intended that funds used to make grants to States for 
     the purpose of developing data infrastructure will be used 
     for mental health only.
       The conferees include the following amounts for the 
     following projects and activities in fiscal year 2001:
       --$83,000 for the Hope Center in Lexington, Kentucky;
       --$85,000 for Steinway Child and Family Services, Inc. in 
     Queens, New York for HIV/AIDS prevention;
       --$100,000 for the American Trauma Society to support its 
     Second Trauma Program which helps train trauma system health 
     care professionals to assist individuals facing the shock of 
     an unexpected death or critical injury to their family 
     members.

[[Page H12139]]

       --$200,000 for the Concord-Assabet Family Services Center 
     for a model transitional living program for troubled youth;
       --$325,000 for Preschool Anger Management, Family 
     Communications;
       --$500,000 for the Life Quest Community Mental Health 
     Center in Wasilla, Alaska;
       --$680,000 for Pacific Clinics in Arcadia, California, to 
     support a school-based mental health demonstration program 
     for Latina adolescents in partnership with community groups, 
     mental health agencies, local governments and school systems 
     in Southeast Los Angeles county;
       --$803,000 for the Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center 
     in Lawrence, Kansas, to provide mental health services in 
     schools and other settings to prevent juvenile crime and 
     substance abuse among high-risk youth;
       --$800,000 for the Alaska Federation of Natives for 
     innovative homeless mental health services in Alaska;
       --$850,000 for the Iowa State University Extension to 
     develop a program which would provide outreach, training, and 
     counseling services in rural areas;
       --$921,000 for the United Power for Action and Justice 
     demonstration project in Chicagoland area to end the cycle of 
     homelessness;
       --$921,000 for a mentally ill offender crime reduction 
     demonstration in Ventura County, California to create the 
     building blocks for a continuum of care for mentally ill 
     offenders who enter the jail system in the county;
       --$850,000 for the University of Connecticut for an urban 
     health initiative to improve mental health services to 
     underserved high-risk individuals living in urban public 
     housing;
       --$1,007,000 for the University of Florida National Rural 
     Behavioral Health Center to train extension agents in crisis 
     intervention and stress management to better equip them to 
     deal with emotional and stress related problems;
       --$1,500,000 for the Ch'eghutsen program in interior 
     Alaska; and
       --$1,300,000 for the Alaska Federation of Natives to use 
     integrated community care to treat native Alaska children 
     with mental health disorders.
     Center for Substance Abuse Treatment
       The conference agreement includes $1,665,000,000 for the 
     substance abuse block grant instead of $1,631,000,000 as 
     proposed by both the House and the Senate.
       The conference agreement includes $256,315,000 for programs 
     of regional and national significance instead of $213,716,000 
     as proposed by the House and $249,566,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate. Within the total provided, $10,000,000 is to initiate 
     grants to local non-profit and public entities for the 
     purpose of developing and expanding substance abuse services 
     for homeless persons.
       The agreement includes $53,000,000 designed to provide 
     targeted service expansion and capacity building to minority, 
     community-based substance abuse treatment programs with a 
     history of providing services to communities of color 
     severely impacted by substance abuse and HIV/AIDS. The 
     correlation between addiction and HIV/AIDS is well 
     documented. Injection drug use alone still accounts for more 
     than 20 percent of the primary HIV infection risk for African 
     American and Latino adults. These funds are to be allocated 
     based on program priorities identified in the previous 
     fiscal year and new priorities. Funds are also included to 
     enhance state and county efforts to plan and develop 
     integrated substance abuse and HIV/AIDS treatment and 
     prevention services to communities of color.
       The conferees are supportive of the efforts of the Sunshine 
     Shelter for abused and neglected children in Natchez, 
     Mississippi in treating chemically dependent women and their 
     children and note that additional resources would allow the 
     Shelter to expand its outreach efforts.
       The conferees include the following amounts for the 
     following projects and activities in fiscal year 2001:
       --$100,000 for the Vermont Department of Health Office of 
     Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention to examine adolescent 
     residential treatment programs;
       --$106,000 for Center Point, Inc., in Marin County, 
     California, to continue support for substance abuse and 
     related services for minority, homeless and other at risk 
     populations;
       --$200,000 for Green Door in Washington, D.C. to treat 
     minority consumers with substance abuse problems and mental 
     health issues;
       --$250,000 for the Allegheny County Drug and Alcohol 
     Rehabilitation Program;
       --$500,000 for the Cook Inlet Council on Alcohol and Drug 
     Abuse Treatment;
       --$500,000 for the House of Mercy in Des Moines, Iowa to 
     support treatment programs for pregnant and post-partum 
     women;
       --$500,000 for the State of Wyoming to carry out an 
     innovative substance abuse prevention and treatment program;
       --$425,000 for Humboldt County, California, to support 
     residential substance abuse and related services for women 
     who have children;
       --$608,000 for the Hope Center in Lexington, Kentucky;
       --$645,000 for the Grove Counseling Center in Winter 
     Springs, Florida for a demonstration project of effective 
     youth substance abuse treatment methods;
       --$750,000 for the Fairbanks LifeGivers Pregnant and 
     Parenting Teens program;
       --$900,000 for the Alaska Federation of Natives to identify 
     best substance abuse treatment practices;
       --$1,105,000 for the City of San Francisco's model 
     ``Treatment on Demand'' program for the homeless; and
       --$2,210,000 for the Baltimore City Health Department to 
     use innovative methods to enhance drug treatment services.
     Center for Substance Abuse Prevention
       The conference agreement includes $175,145,000 for programs 
     of regional and national significance instead of $132,742,000 
     as proposed by the House and $127,824,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate. Within the total provided, it is intended that high-
     risk youth grants will at least be maintained at last year's 
     level.
       The agreement includes $32,100,000 for grants to minority 
     community based organizations to implement programs that 
     strengthen substance abuse prevention capacity in communities 
     of color disproportionately impacted by the HIV/AIDS 
     epidemic, based on the most recent estimated living AIDS 
     cases, HIV infections and AIDS mortality among ethnic and 
     racial minorities as reported by the CDC.
       The conferees include the following amounts for the 
     following projects and activities in fiscal year 2001:
       --$85,000 for the City of Alexandria, Virginia, substance 
     abuse prevention demonstration program for high-risk Latino 
     youth;
       --$213,000 for the Rock Island County Council on Addiction 
     in East Moline, Illinois, for a youth substance abuse 
     prevention program; and
       --$500,000 for the Drug-free Families Initiative at the 
     University of Missouri, St. Louis.
       The conferees have included sufficient funds to continue 
     the pregnant and post-partum substance abuse prevention 
     evaluations for both the Community Prevention Parnership of 
     Berks County, Inc. and the Family Planning Council of 
     Pennsylvania
     Program Management
       The conference agreement includes $79,221,000 for program 
     management instead of $58,870,000 as proposed by the House 
     and $59,943,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within the total 
     provided, $12,000,000 is for the National Household Drug 
     Survey.
       The conferees include $3,278,000 in fiscal year 2001 to 
     continue testing the effectiveness of Community Assessment 
     and Intervention Centers in providing integrated mental 
     health and substance abuse services to troubled and at-risk 
     children and youth, and their families in four Florida 
     communities. Building upon successful juvenile programs, this 
     effort responds directly to nationwide concerns about youth 
     violence, substance abuse, declining levels of service 
     availability and the inability of certain communities to 
     respond to the needs of their youth in a coordinated manner. 
     The total provided includes, $2,000,000 for mental health 
     special projects of regional and national significance; 
     $1,000,000 for substance abuse treatment special projects of 
     regional and national significance; $500,000 for substance 
     abuse prevention special projects of regional and national 
     significance; and $200,000 for program management.
       The agreement includes a general provision proposed by the 
     Senate regarding the withholding of substance abuse funds. 
     The House bill contained no similar provision. The Synar 
     amendment was included as part of the SAMHSA reorganization 
     bill in 1992. The amendment and its implementing regulation 
     required States to reduce sales of tobacco to minors within a 
     negotiated period of time and if a State fails to meet its 
     goals, reduced its substance abuse prevention and treatment 
     block grant funding by 40 percent. The conferees are 
     extremely concerned that several States, after at least four 
     years, are not in compliance with the law and continue to 
     seek an exemption to the penalty requirement. It is the 
     conferees intention that this will be the last year exemption 
     language will be carried in an appropriations bill. SAMHSA is 
     directed to notify States of this intention and work with the 
     affected States to help them come into compliance.

               Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality


                    Healthcare Research and Quality

       The conference agreement includes $104,963,000 in 
     appropriated funds instead of $123,669,000 as proposed by the 
     House. The Senate bill did not provide a direct appropriation 
     for the agency, instead it proposed to fund the agency 
     through the evaluation set-aside.
       The conference agreement designates $164,980,000 to be 
     available to the agency under the Public Health Service Act 
     one percent evaluation set-aside as proposed by the House 
     instead of $269,943,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees are troubled by the recent Institute of 
     Medicine study which found that as many as 98,000 deaths are 
     caused by medical errors each year. The conferees have 
     provided an additional $50,000,000 to the agency to determine 
     ways to reduce medical errors. The conferees are supportive 
     of a study to determine the impact of extended work hours for 
     registered nurses on patient safety.
       The agreement includes $10,000,000 for research that 
     investigates the relationship between the health care 
     workplace and its impact on medical errors and the quality of 
     care provided to patients. Efforts to restructure the health 
     care workplace, often in response to pressures to reduce 
     costs, suggest

[[Page H12140]]

     that work environment and processes have had an impact on 
     health and quality of workers' lives as well as the patients 
     for whom they care. As we have learned from the experience of 
     the aviation industry, reducing errors and promoting safety 
     are a result of improving workforce systems. Likewise, it is 
     important that workforce considerations be integrated into 
     efforts to reduce medical errors and promote patient safety. 
     The conferees believe that better understanding of these 
     workforce considerations will lead to improved workplace 
     practices and better outcomes for patients.
       The conferees support the efforts of the Agency for 
     Healthcare Research and Quality, the National Institute for 
     Occupational Safety and Health, the Department of Labor, and 
     other agencies to work jointly and coordinate their work to 
     improve healthcare quality, patient safety, and worker safety 
     in health care facilities, through such activities as the 
     October 2000 jointly sponsored conference on ``Enhancing 
     Working Conditions and Patient Safety: Best Practices.'' The 
     conferees urge that such coordinated efforts be continued.
       The conferees strongly urge the agency to enhance its 
     investigator-initiated research funding through all available 
     mechanisms, as appropriate.

                  Health Care Financing Administration


                           Program Management

       The conference agreement includes $2,246,326,000 for 
     program management instead of $1,866,302,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $2,018,500,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
     House bill assumed that the Administration's user fee 
     proposal would be enacted prior to conference. An additional 
     appropriation of $680,000,000 has been provided for the 
     Medicare Integrity Program through the Health Insurance 
     Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.
       The conferees repeat language included in last year's bill 
     related to administrative fees collected relative to Medicare 
     overpayment recovery activities.

                Research, Demonstration, and Evaluation

       The conference agreement includes $139,311,000 for 
     research, demonstration, and evaluation instead of 
     $55,000,000 as proposed by the House and $65,000,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate.
       The agreement includes $50,000,000 for Real Choice Systems 
     Change Grants to states to fund initiatives that establish 
     specific action steps and timetables to achieve enduring 
     system improvements and to provide long term services and 
     supports, including community-based attendant care, to 
     eligible individuals in the most integrated setting 
     appropriate. Grant applications should be developed jointly 
     by the State and the Consumer Task Force. The Task Force 
     should be composed of individuals with disabilities from 
     diverse backgrounds, representatives from organizations that 
     provide services to individuals with disabilities, consumers 
     of long-term services and supports, and those who advocate on 
     behalf of such individuals. Grant-funded activities should 
     focus on areas of need as determined by the State and the 
     Task Force such as needs assessment and data gathering, 
     strategies to modify policies that unnecessarily bias 
     provision of long term care services to institutional 
     settings or to health care professionals, and training and 
     technical assistance.
       The agreement includes bill language for the following 
     projects and activities for fiscal year 2001:
       --$300,000 for the United States-Mexico Border Counties 
     Coalition for a study to determine the unreimbursed costs 
     incurred to treat undocumented aliens for medical emergencies 
     in southwest border States, their border counties, and 
     hospitals within the jurisdiction of these States and 
     counties;
       --$255,000 for the LA Care Health Plan in Los Angeles, 
     California for a demonstration program to improve clinical 
     data coordination among Medicaid providers;
       --$350,000 for the Cook County, Illinois Bureau of Health 
     for the Asthma Champion Initiative demonstration to reduce 
     morbidity and mortality from asthma in high prevalence areas;
       --$500,000 to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center 
     and University of Pennsylvania for a study of the efficacy of 
     surgical versus non-surgical management of abdominal 
     aneurysms;
       --$691,000 for a Medicare demonstration project at Ohio 
     State University to determine the benefits of compliance 
     packaging;
       --$650,000 for the Vascular Surgery Outcomes Initiative at 
     Dartmouth College;
       --$646,000 for Shelby County Regional Medical Center to 
     establish a Master Patient Index to determine patient 
     Medicaid/TennCare eligibility;
       --$855,000 for the Children's Hospice International 
     demonstration program to provide a continuum of care for 
     children with life-threatening conditions and their families;
       --$921,000 for Equip for Equality for a demonstration 
     project to document the impact of an independent 
     investigative unit that will examine deaths or other serious 
     allegations of abuse or neglect of people with disabilities 
     at facilities in Illinois;
       --$1,000,000 for the West Virginia University School of 
     Medicine's Eye Center to test interventions and improve the 
     quality of life for individuals with low vision;
       --$1,000,000 for Duke University Medical Center to 
     demonstrate the potential savings in the Medicare program of 
     a reimbursement system based on preventative care.
       --$1,000,000 for the Iowa Department of Public Health for 
     the establishment and operation of a mercantile prescription 
     drug purchasing cooperative or non-profit corporation 
     demonstration;
       --$1,843,000 for the Buck's County Health Improvement 
     Project in Pennsylvania;
       --$1,700,000 for the AIDS Healthcare Foundation in Los 
     Angeles for a demonstration of residential and outpatient 
     treatment facilities;
       --$2,800,000 for the Mind-Body Institute of Boston, 
     Massachusetts to conduct a demonstration of a lifestyle 
     modification program;
       --$1,800,000 for a joint project between the University of 
     Pittsburgh, Case Western Reserve in Cleveland, Ohio, and Mt. 
     Sinai Hospital in Miami, Florida, to use integrated nursing 
     services and technology to implement daily monitoring of 
     congestive heart failure patients in underserved populations 
     in accordance with established clinical guidelines; and
       --$20,000,000 to continue demonstration projects on 
     Medicaid coverage of community-based attendant care services 
     for people with disabilities.
       HCFA is urged to conduct a demonstration project addressing 
     the extraordinary adverse health status of native Hawaiians 
     at the Waimanalo health center exploring the use of 
     preventive and indigenous health care expertise.
       HCFA is urged to work with the United States Renal Data 
     System (USRDS) to test potential savings to the Federal 
     government and to the Medicare program by comparing actual 
     Medicare/Medicaid spending for end stage renal disease (ESRD) 
     patients currently on daily hemodialysis with actual 
     Medicare/Medicaid spending for ESRD patients on other 
     treatment modalities, such as peritoneal dialysis and in-
     center hemodialysis whose demographic and other 
     characteristics match those of the daily hemodialysis 
     patients in 9 to 12 existing programs in the U.S. Such a 
     study should compare spending related to patient dialysis and 
     training, medications, vascular access, ambulance 
     transportation, physician and outpatient medical expenses not 
     related to dialysis, hospitalizations, and other medical 
     services, such as skilled nursing facilities or home health 
     care and any other spending for which data is available to 
     the USRDS.
       HCFA is encouraged to utilize edit check software programs 
     to scrub electronic data files prior to processing by the 
     respective State agency and/or fiscal intermediary. The 
     identification of errors and omissions prior to submission 
     can provide dramatic improvement in the financial condition 
     of many providers who are experiencing large losses of 
     revenue.
       The conferees are concerned that HCFA has not instituted a 
     demonstration project to test the potential savings to the 
     Federal government and to the Medicare program by comparing 
     different products used for diabetic wound care treatment as 
     referenced in last year's conference agreement. Such a 
     demonstration should compare the aggregate costs of wound 
     care treatment using different applications regimens. The 
     conferees urge HCFA to proceed with this demonstration 
     project utilizing existing research funds.
       The conferees are aware that the Health Passport pilot 
     program is helping thousands of low-income families in 
     Nevada, Wyoming and North Dakota and urges HCFA to give full 
     and fair consideration to a proposal to continue the program.
       The conferees have become increasingly concerned that many 
     people with the most severe disabilities often experience a 
     lack of quality in community residential and treatment 
     services that can result in dangerous or unhealthful 
     conditions. The conferees believe that such services should 
     be monitored by an entity that has the expertise and legal 
     authority necessary to ensure the safety and general well-
     being of this population. Accordingly, the conferees urge 
     HCFA to support the protection and advocacy system to 
     demonstrate the efficacy of such community monitoring.
     Medicare Contractors
       The conference agreement includes $1,357,000,000 for 
     Medicare contractors instead of $1,165,287,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $1,244,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Of 
     this amount, $1,305,000,000 is to support Medicare claims 
     processing contracts and $52,000,000 is for Medicare+Choice 
     information campaign.
     State Survey and Certification
       The conference agreement includes $244,147,000 for State 
     survey and certification instead of $171,147,000 as proposed 
     by the House and $219,674,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The agreement includes an increase of $10,000,000 over the 
     President's request for nursing home oversight and quality of 
     care services.
     Federal Administration
       The conference agreement includes $505,868,000 for Federal 
     administration instead of $474,868,000 as proposed by the 
     House and $489,826,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees urge HCFA to give careful consideration to 
     concerns that substance abuse (alcohol and drug) treatment 
     facilities may not have been intended to be considered 
     institutions for mental diseases exclusion under Medicaid 
     since these facilities were not common when the exclusion 
     policy was implemented. The conferees are aware that 
     restricting Medicaid medical assistance to

[[Page H12141]]

     residential substance abuse treatment facilities with 16 or 
     fewer adult treatment beds places an undue burden on the 
     publicly funded substance abuse treatment and prevention 
     infrastructure.
       The conferees concur with Senate report language urging 
     HCFA to act more expeditiously to approve new medical 
     technologies, including PET scans, for Medicare patients so 
     that seniors will have access to the latest life-saving 
     technologies and treatments.
       The conferees understand that HCFA regulations require 
     States to provide documentation and justification before 
     making changes in Medicaid reimbursements. The conferees are 
     concerned that several State Medicaid agencies are currently 
     paying or proposing to pay chain-operated pharmacies lower 
     reimbursement rates than other pharmacies for providing the 
     same prescription products and related services without 
     providing the required justification. The conferees expect 
     HCFA to enforce current regulations when reviewing and 
     approving State submissions. The conferees also believe that 
     the implementation of a different system for Medicaid 
     reimbursements of pharmaceuticals should be addressed by the 
     authorizing committees of jurisdiction. The Administrator 
     should be prepared to testify on the status of this issue at 
     the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.
       HCFA has proposed guidelines regarding the administrative 
     claims process for schools requesting reimbursement for 
     Medicaid related services. The conferees are concerned that 
     these guidelines are being developed without adequate input 
     from interested parties and will significantly alter the 
     administrative claiming program making it more difficult for 
     schools to provide services to poor and disabled children. 
     HCFA is expected to consult with school practitioners and 
     other groups to draft guidance for Medicaid allowable costs 
     under the administrative claiming section of the School Based 
     Services program. HCFA is also urged to process pending State 
     applications and to continue to review reimbursement 
     procedures until new guidelines are published. The 
     Administrator should be prepared to testify on this issue at 
     the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.

                Administration for Children and Families


  payments to states for child support enforcement and family support 
                                programs

       The conference agreement includes $2,441,800,000 for 
     payments to states for child support enforcement and family 
     support programs instead of $2,473,800,000 as proposed by the 
     House and $2,473,880,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
     conferees provide extended availability of funds as proposed 
     by the Senate. The House bill proposed no extended 
     availability.


                   low income home energy assistance

       The conference agreement includes an additional 
     $300,000,000 in fiscal year 2001 funding for the Low Income 
     Home Energy Assistance program. When combined with the 
     $1,100,000,000 already appropriated for fiscal year 2001 and 
     the $300,000,000 in emergency funding, a total of 
     $1,700,000,000 is available to support this program in fiscal 
     year 2001. The agreement includes up to $27,500,000 for the 
     leveraging incentive fund within these totals.
       The conferees are aware that average home heating fuel 
     prices have doubled in the past year, and in some areas are 
     up five-fold, while at the same time many states are expected 
     to experience extremely cold winter. The conferees are deeply 
     concerned that this will force steep reductions in the 
     relative percentage of home heating cost that LIHEAP provides 
     to low-income households. The conferees have provided a 
     $300,000,000 increase in the regular appropriation for fiscal 
     year 2001 to reduce the adverse impact of these fuel price 
     spikes.
       The conference agreement does not include advance funding 
     for fiscal year 2002 for LIHEAP as proposed by the Senate. 
     The House bill proposed $1,100,000,000 for fiscal year 2002. 
     The conferees are aware that advance funding for LIHEAP was 
     authorized by Congress in 1990 to respond to the States' need 
     to budget and plan their LIHEAP programs in advance of the 
     fall/winter heating season. States are required by statute to 
     hold public hearings in the spring and summer on their 
     proposed LIHEAP programs to determine eligibility levels, 
     establish the size of household benefits, and establish 
     parameters of crisis programs. Consequently, States must be 
     able to reliably predict the LIHEAP appropriation that 
     normally becomes available at the very beginning of the 
     heating season, but which is often delayed due to late 
     enactment of appropriations bills. As noted in the Senate 
     Report 101-421 accompanying the Human Services 
     Reauthorization Act of 1990, ``Forward funding will allow 
     states to identify clients, provide assistance, and put them 
     on responsible budget payment-plans in the summer or fall to 
     avoid the development of life-threatening situations.'' 
     Although advance funding is not included in this bill, the 
     conferees fully intend to provide at least $1,400,000,000 in 
     regular LIHEAP appropriations and $300,000,000 in emergency 
     funds in fiscal year 2002.


                     refugee and entrant assistance

       The conference agreement includes $433,109,000 for refugee 
     and entrant assistance as proposed by the House instead of 
     $425,586,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within this amount, 
     for the Torture Victims Relief Act funds, the conferees 
     provide $10,000,000 as proposed by the House instead of 
     $7,265,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within this amount, the 
     conferees provide funding to implement the Trafficking 
     Victims Protection Act of 2000, which will support efforts to 
     certify eligibility for benefits and services for trafficking 
     victims.
       The agreement includes $20,000,000 from carryover funds 
     that are to be used under social services to increase 
     educational support to schools with a significant proportion 
     of refugee children and for the development of alternative 
     cash assistance programs that involve case management 
     approaches to improve resettlement outcomes. Such support 
     should include intensive English language training and 
     cultural assimilation programs.
       The agreement also includes $26,000,000 for increased 
     support to communities with large concentrations of refugees 
     whose cultural differences make assimilation especially 
     difficult justifying a more intense level and longer duration 
     of Federal assistance.


   payments to states for the child care and development block grant

       The conference agreement includes an additional 
     $817,328,000 for child care services, together with the 
     $1,182,672,000 provided as an advance appropriation in last 
     year's bill, raising the funding level for this program to 
     $2,000,000,000 for fiscal year 2001. The agreement does not 
     provide for an advance appropriation for fiscal year 2002 as 
     proposed by the Senate; however, the conferees intend that 
     funding for the child care block grant be at least that level 
     in fiscal year 2002. The House bill proposed advance funding 
     of $2,000,000,000 for fiscal year 2002.
       The agreement also includes language specifying that funds 
     under the Child Care and Development Block Grant are to be 
     used to supplement, not to supplant, state and local child 
     care funds.
       The agreement also sets aside an additional $272,672,000 
     from fiscal year 2001 to be reserved by the States for 
     activities authorized under section 658G, of which 
     $100,000,000 shall be for activities that improve the quality 
     of infant and toddler child care. The House bill set aside 
     $172,672,000 for additional quality purposes in fiscal 
     year 2002. The Senate bill set aside $222,672,000 for 
     additional quality activities, of which $100,000,000 was 
     to be used for infant and toddler care, in fiscal year 
     2001. The agreement also sets aside $10,000,000 to be used 
     for child care research, demonstration and evaluation 
     activities. Neither the House nor the Senate contained 
     this provision. Within the funds provided for child care 
     resources and referrals, the agreement also includes 
     $1,000,000 for the Child-Care Aware toll-free hotline.

                      social services block grant

       The conference agreement includes $1,725,000,000 for the 
     social services block grant instead of $1,700,000,000 as 
     proposed by the House and $600,000,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate. The conference agreement includes a provision which 
     maintains the percentage of funds that a state may transfer 
     between the Social Services Block Grant and the Temporary 
     Assistance to Needy Families Programs at 10 percent.


                children and families services programs

                        (including rescissions)

       The conference agreement includes $7,956,345,000 for 
     children and families services programs instead of 
     $7,231,253,000 as proposed by the House and $7,895,723,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate. In addition, the agreement rescinds 
     $21,000,000 from permanent appropriations as proposed by both 
     the House and the Senate.
     Head Start
       The conference agreement includes $6,200,000,000 for Head 
     Start instead of $5,667,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $6,267,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The agreement 
     includes an advance appropriation of $1,400,000,000 for Head 
     Start for fiscal year 2002 as proposed by both the House and 
     the Senate.
       The conferees are concerned that while fifty percent of 
     children eligible for the regular Head Start program receive 
     services, only about ten percent of children of farmworkers 
     are served by Migrant Head Start. Therefore, the conferees 
     encourage the Secretary to increase funding for Migrant and 
     Seasonal Head Start in proportion to the overall funding 
     increase for Head Start. The conferees also urge the agency 
     to ensure that all children participating in the Early Head 
     Start program receive a blood lead screening test.
       The conferees urge the agency to provide funds to the 
     Alaska Federation of Natives to train Head Start teachers in 
     remote Alaska villages. The conferees also encourage the 
     agency to provide funds to the University of Alaska to 
     provide distance training for Head Start teachers through 
     Associate Degree programs.
     Runaway Youth
       The conference agreement includes $69,155,000 for runaway 
     youth as proposed by the Senate instead of $64,155,000 as 
     proposed by the House. The agreement allocates funds for the 
     runaway and homeless youth programs following the structure 
     of P.L. 106-71, the Missing, Exploited, and Runaway Children 
     Protection Act, which consolidates the programs into a single 
     funding stream.
     Adoption Incentive
       The conference agreement includes $43,000,000 for the 
     adoption incentive program as proposed by the House instead 
     of $55,928,000 as proposed by the Senate. The agreement also 
     includes language that will allow funds under this program to 
     be carried over for use in paying prior year bonuses.

[[Page H12142]]

            Social Services and Income Maintenance Research

       The conference agreement includes $37,666,000 for social 
     services and income maintenance research instead of 
     $27,491,000 as proposed by both the House and the Senate. Of 
     this total, the conferees intend that $5,000,000 be 
     transferred to the Census Bureau for continued data 
     collection on the Survey of Income and Program Participation. 
     The conferees also provide sufficient funding for the 
     following:
         --$500,000 for the National Fatherhood Initiative
         --$500,000 for the Institute for Responsible Fatherhood
         --$1,000,000 for the State Information Technology 
     Consortium
         --$175,000 for the Nation Center for Appropriate 
     Technology's information technology clearinghouse
       The conferees also include $500,000 within Social Services 
     and Income Maintenance Research to support adding LIHEAP 
     related questions to the Residential Energy Consumption 
     Survey (RECS) conducted by the Department of Energy and to 
     the Census Bureau's March current population survey to assure 
     that the low-income household component is included in the 
     surveys, and the conferees urge the expansion of the RECS 
     sample size to target LIHEAP recipients. The conferees have 
     also included $2,500,000 for grants to qualified private, 
     non-profit intermediaries to demonstrate the provision of 
     technical assistance to child care providers to improve the 
     quality and supply of child care facilities in low income 
     communities and to document the changes.
     Community Services Block Grant
       The conference agreement includes $600,000,000 for the 
     community services block grant instead of $550,000,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate and $527,700,000 as proposed by the 
     House. The conferees expect that all local entities that are 
     in good standing in the community services block grant 
     program shall receive an increase in funding for the next 
     program year that is proportionate to the overall increase in 
     the appropriation provided for the block grant.
       The agreement includes language proposed by the Senate that 
     requires the Department to establish certain procedures 
     regarding the disposition of intangible property in the 
     community economic development program under the Community 
     Services Block Grant Act. The House bill contained no similar 
     provision. The conferees also set aside $5,500,000 within the 
     community economic development program for the job creation 
     demonstration authorized under the Family Support Act.
       Within the funds provided for child abuse prevention 
     programs, the agreement includes the following items:
       $737,000 University of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC for 
     Violence Abuse Prevention and Education for Deaf and Hard of 
     Hearing Children and their Caretakers;
       $1,382,000 Public Children Services Association of Ohio, 
     Columbus, OH for child abuse prevention activities;
       $46,000 New Directions Housing Corp., Louisville, KY for 
     the Homeless Youth Development Program;
       $230,000 Neighbor to Family, Des Plaines, IL for foster 
     care training program;
       $524,000 Robert A. Pascal Youth and Family Services Inc., 
     Severna Park, Maryland for the Healthy Families program;
       $1,773,000 Foster Parents Association, Spokane, WA for the 
     Foster Family Support System;
       $230,000 Dave Thomas Center for Adoption Law at Capital 
     University Law School, Columbus OH for development of an 
     adoption law online database;
       $75,000 Operation Breakthrough in Kansas City;
       $400,000 Parent-to-Parent of Winooski, Vermont;
       $200,000 Family Friends for respite services for families 
     with disabled children;
       $900,000 Alaska Native Health Board Child abuse prevention 
     program;
       $2,500,000 early childhood services- Alaska Seed program;
       $2,500,000 to continue the Healthy Families Home Visiting 
     Program in Alaska;
       $550,000 Early Childhood Development Center at Texas Tech 
     University;
       $900,000 Celeste Foundation for a pilot program to bring 
     in-home professional services via video and audio to 
     disruptive at-risk children in foster home placements;
       $600,000 Farm Resource Center in West Virginia to provide a 
     mechanism of early intervention for rural families in crisis;
       $100,000 Phoenix House Domestic Violence Center in Council 
     Bluffs, Iowa;
       $1,562,000 Indian Oaks Academy in Manteno, IL for a 
     demonstration project serving children and adolescents who 
     are victims of child abuse;
       $500,000 Strengthen Our Sisters in West Milford, New Jersey 
     to expand services.
       Within the funds provided for developmental disabilities, 
     special projects $200,000 is included for the Allegheny 
     County Respite Care Coalition to provide respite services for 
     parents with disabled children.
       Within the funds provided for Native American programs, the 
     agreement includes the following:
       --$700,000 for the Cook Inlet Tribal Council;
       --$300,000 for Kawerak, Inc.
       --$500,000 for the Alaska Federation of Natives to 
     coordinate social service resources in native villages:
       --$100,000 for the South Dakota Native American Community 
     Board to establish a Dakota language preservation program.
       The conferees support the idea that a national adoption 
     website could include all youngsters available for adoption 
     and will increase the likelihood that children will find 
     loving, stable homes. The conferees recognize that the 
     National Adoption Center has been at the forefront of 
     developing technology-based resources to facilitate adoptions 
     and is uniquely situated to create a single, national 
     adoption website. The conferees have included sufficient 
     funds for the National Adoption Center to continue to develop 
     and sustain a national adoption photo listing service on the 
     Internet.


       payments to states for foster care and adoption assistance

       The conference agreement includes $4,863,100,000 for 
     payments to states for foster care and adoption assistance as 
     proposed by the House instead of $4,868,100,000 as proposed 
     by the Senate.

                        Administration on Aging


                        aging services programs

       The conference agreement includes $1,103,135,000 for aging 
     services programs instead of $925,805,000 as proposed by the 
     House and $954,619,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conferees include $125,000,000 to provide critically 
     needed services for family caregivers under title III E and 
     title VI C of the Older Americans Act as amended. The 
     conferees intend that $5,000,000 of these funds be dedicated 
     for Native American caregivers. According to the 
     Administration on Aging, over seven million Americans are 
     providing care for disabled seniors in households across the 
     nation. Funds will be provided to states to use their aging 
     networks to provide quality respite care and other support 
     services such as information on available resources; 
     assistance with locating services; and caregiver training, 
     counseling and support. Such services improve the caregiver's 
     ability to provide care, help preserve the family unit, 
     prevent abuse and neglect, and minimize out-of-home 
     placements. Caregiver support services also delay nursing 
     home stays among care recipients.
       The conferees intend that $5,000,000 be made available from 
     preventive health services for activities regarding 
     medication management, screening, and education to prevent 
     incorrect medication and adverse drug reactions.
       The agreement includes the following amounts under aging 
     research and training:
       $961,000 Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 
     Lubbock, TX for the Institute for Healthy Aging;
       $691,000 Florida International University, Miami, FL, 
     National Policy and Research Center on Nutrition and Aging 
     for ``Nutrition 2030'' program;
       $2,000 Bay Ridge Center for Older Adults, Brooklyn, NY for 
     a demonstration program;
       $3,000 Staten Island Community Services Friendship Clubs, 
     Inc., Staten Island, NY for a demonstration program in senior 
     centers;
       $921,000 Mecklenburg County Department of Social Services, 
     Services for Adults Division in Charlotte, NC for Nutrition 
     2000 program;
       $461,000 Metropolitan Family Services, Chicago, IL for a 
     community based caregiver training program;
       $369,000 Ocean County New Jersey, Office of Senior Services 
     for a demonstration program;
       $369,000 Burlington County New Jersey, Office on Aging for 
     a demonstration program;
       $184,000 Camden County New Jersey, Division of Senior 
     Services for a demonstration program;
       $427,000 Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL for 
     Anne and Louis Green Alzheimer's Care and Research Center;
       $886,000 St. Petersburg Junior College in FL for Services 
     for Caregivers of Seniors program;
       $250,000 Access Community Health Network's Senior Outreach 
     Program;
       $1,400,000 Deaconess-Billings Northwest Area Center for 
     Studies on Aging;
       $100,000 An elderly meals demonstration program at 
     Progresso Latino in Central Falls, Rhode Island;
       $100,000 The Senior Fitness and Wellness Program in East 
     Providence;
       $100,000 Southwest General Health Center Gatekeeper 
     Program;
       $100,000 An additional $100,000 for the National Asian 
     Pacific Center on Aging;
       $344,000 Northwest Parkinson's Foundation;
       $400,000 Champlain Valley Area Agency on Aging mental 
     health project;
       $500,000 Albert Einstein Life Center in Germantown;
       $3,685,000 Social research into Alzheimer's disease care 
     options, best practices and other Alzheimer's research 
     priorities as specified in the House report;
       $100,000 Champlain Senior Center for adult day programming 
     and a technology initiative;
       $200,000 Brandeis University Center on Women and Aging to 
     conduct research on caregiving, health and financial security 
     among seniors;
       $64,000 LIFESPAN of Greater Rochester, Inc., New York, to 
     enhance a life course planning initiative to help older 
     adults make informed choices to prepare for retirement; 
     $85,000 San Luis Obispo Medical Society in California for 
     volunteers in health to support a demonstration program to 
     provide prescription drugs for low income, uninsured seniors;

[[Page H12143]]

       $120,000 Marathon County, Wisconsin to continue an 
     initiative to provide respite care services;
       $170,000 Walk the Walk, Inc, in Long Island City, New York 
     for Mary's House, an elder abuse center in Glendale, New 
     York;
       $425,000 St. Louis County, Missouri for a seniors job 
     training demonstration program;
       $468,000 National Association of Home Builders, National 
     Center for Seniors' Housing Research, for a project to 
     improve safety and access for senior housing;
       $510,000 The University of Akron College of Nursing, Akron, 
     Ohio, to develop best practices in gerontological training, 
     research and instruction;
       $723,000 Ivy Tech State College in Sellersburg, Indiana, 
     for a seniors technology learning program;
       $935,000 Landmark Medical Center in Woonsocket, Rhode 
     Island to support the Positive Aging Project to develop and 
     implement model family-centered approaches to address the 
     needs of the elderly;
       $1,000,000 West Virginia University Center on Aging to 
     conduct follow-up work to the Year 2000 Conference on Rural 
     Aging;
       $425,000 City of Compton, California for an elderly 
     assistance demonstration program to support and evaluate a 
     community approach to providing services to low income 
     senior;
       $900,000 Donald Reynolds Aging Center at the University of 
     Arkansas Medical School.
       Within the funds provided for state and local innovations/
     projects of national significance, the conferees intend that 
     funds be used for ongoing projects scheduled for refunding in 
     fiscal year 2001.

                        Office of the Secretary


                    general departmental management

       The conference agreement includes $291,075,000 for general 
     departmental management instead of $262,631,000 as proposed 
     by the House and $260,117,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       Within the total provided, $50,000,000 is for minority HIV/
     AIDS activities that strengthen the medical treatment and HIV 
     prevention capacity within communities of color 
     disproportionately impacted by the HIV/AIDS epidemic, based 
     on rates of new HIV infection and mortality from AIDS. These 
     funds are available to entities that target a specific 
     minority group or multi-ethnic minority populations that are 
     heavily impacted by HIV/AIDS, and are to complement existing 
     and planned HIV/AIDS activities in communities of color. The 
     agreement also includes bill language that requires the 
     Secretary to submit an operating plan prior to the obligation 
     of these funds.
       Within the total provided, $2,000,000 is for the United 
     States-Mexico Border Health Commission. The conferees request 
     the Secretary to provide the House and Senate Committees on 
     Appropriations with a complete history of the activities and 
     expenses of the Commission. Also within the total provided, 
     $400,000 is to continue the Surgeon General's violence 
     initiative and $400,000 is for a study on the feasibility of 
     tribe compacting for the operation of Departmental programs.
       The agreement provides $24,327,000 for the adolescent 
     family life program as proposed by the House instead of 
     $19,327,000 as proposed by the Senate. The agreement includes 
     bill language earmarking $10,377,000 under the adolescent 
     family life program for activities specified under section 
     2003(b)(2) of the Public Health Service Act, of which 
     $10,157,000 shall be for prevention grants under section 
     510(b)(2) of Title V of the Social Security Act, without 
     application of the limitation of section 2010(c) of Title XX 
     of the Public Health Service Act. The conferees intend that 
     this set-aside is only for continuation costs of ongoing 
     projects.
       The agreement provides $49,019,000 for minority health 
     instead of $38,638,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $37,638,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within this total, 
     $9,700,000 is to address the capacity and infrastructure 
     deficiencies within minority community based organizations in 
     rural and historically underserved urban communities, of 
     which $6,600,000 is for the Technical Assistance/Capacity 
     Development Grant Program to fund existing grants in rural 
     and historically underserved urban communities hardest hit by 
     HIV/AIDS; $500,000 is for continuation funding to the Bi-
     Cultural and Bilingual Demonstration Program; and $2,600,000 
     is to support existing grants through the Minority Health 
     Coalition program, designed to promote early intervention HIV 
     care in minority communities and to improve the health 
     outcomes of people of color living with HIV disease. Also 
     included is an increase of $1,000,000 for the Office of 
     Minority Health's Center for Linguistics and Cultural 
     Competence in Health Care.
       The agreement provides $17,270,000 for the office of 
     women's health instead of $16,495,000 as proposed by the 
     House and $16,895,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
     conferees urge the office to provide funds to the National 
     Osteoporosis Foundation to support its complementary 
     adolescent bone health initiative.
       The agreement provides $11,668,000 for the office of 
     emergency preparedness instead of $9,668,000 as proposed by 
     both the House and Senate.
       The conferees include the following amounts for the 
     following projects and activities in fiscal year 2001:
       --$50,000 for public service announcements regarding 
     abstinence education for the County of Bucks' Department of 
     Health in Doylestown, Pennsylvania;
       --$298,000 in the Office of Minority Health for the 
     University of Maryland, Baltimore, in partnership with the 
     Community Lead Education and Reduction Corps to prevent lead 
     poisoning among low income and minority children;
       --$375,000 in the Office of Women's Health for Spelman 
     College's African-American Women's Health and Wellness 
     Project;
       --$383,000 in the Office of Minority Health for the Trinity 
     Health Systems, Detroit, Michigan, to provide health care and 
     preventive health services for underserved minority 
     populations and low income individuals;
       --$500,000 to fund, through a contract with the National 
     Academy of Sciences, an evaluation on children's health. This 
     evaluation should assess the adequacy of currently available 
     methods for assessing risks to children, identify scientific 
     uncertainties associated with these methods, and develop a 
     prioritized research agenda to reduce such uncertainties and 
     improve risk assessment for children's health and safety;
       --$500,000 for the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital 
     (TJUH) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to continue development 
     of its Center for Integrative Medicine, a program combining 
     conventional medical science with promising alternative 
     therapies;
       --$461,000 for the Glaucoma Caucus Foundation to provide 
     glaucoma screening and outreach activities;
       --$650,000 in the Office of Minority Health for the 
     University of Pennsylvania School of Dentistry to develop a 
     Minority Oral Health Outreach program;
       --$638,000 for ARCH National Resource Center on Respite and 
     Crisis Services in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, to expand 
     training, technical assistance, evaluation and networking 
     expertise in respite care;
       --$750,000 for the Community Transportation Association of 
     America to provide technical assistance;
       --$680,000 in the Office of Minority Health for the Donald 
     R. Watkins Memorial Foundation in Houston, Texas, to enhance 
     care for African Americans and low income individuals with 
     HIV/AIDS by coordinating services and expanding outreach 
     efforts;
       --$765,000 in the Office of Minority Health for the Alameda 
     County Medical Center in California for an initiative to 
     reduce health disparities among uninsured, minority 
     populations;
       --$850,000 in the Office of Minority Health for the Henry 
     Ford Health System in Detroit, Michigan, to address the 
     burden of chronic disease among African Americans through a 
     network of partnerships with community organizations;
       --$850,000 in the Office of Minority Health for the CORE 
     Center at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, Illinois, for a 
     Community and Minority Education and Training Initiative for 
     HIV/AIDS;
       --$935,000 in the Office of Minority Health for the Sumter 
     Family Health Care Center, Sumter, South Carolina to support 
     an innovative service delivery effort to provide health care 
     to individuals with disadvantaged backgrounds, including 
     minority populations;
       --$1,105,000 in the Office of Minority Health for the San 
     Francisco Department of Public Health to provide HIV care and 
     related services with an emphasis on providing care for women 
     and minorities;
       --$1,165,000 in the Office of Minority Health for the 
     Fresno Community Hospital and Medical Center in California 
     for diabetes care and outreach for Hispanic Americans and 
     low-income individuals; and
       --$1,700,000 in the Office of Minority Health for the 
     National Council of La Raza for minority health research and 
     outreach.
       --$150,000 for the Briarpatch Transitional Living Program 
     in Madison, Wisconsin, to provide housing and support 
     services to homeless teens.
       It is understood that the screening of blood and blood 
     products could be improved through the use of nucleic acid 
     testing (NAT) to better detect known infectious diseases such 
     as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C virus 
     (HCV). The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute in the 
     National Institutes of Health has contracted with private 
     companies to develop fully automated NAT tests for HIV-1 and 
     HCV. In view of the NIH's financial commitment to NAT and the 
     approval of NAT in other countries, the Public Health Service 
     Blood Safety Committee, chaired by the Surgeon General/
     Assistant Secretary of Health, is urged to encourage the 
     adoption of these screening tools for individual donor 
     testing of blood and plasma.
       The conferees request that the Chief Financial Officer 
     report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
     on the status of the HHS financial audit. The conferees also 
     request that the Chief Information Officer report to the 
     House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on the status 
     of the HHS computer security and related infrastructure 
     protection. Both reports are to be presented to the 
     Committees no later than March 1, 2001.
       The conferees are concerned about the global AIDS pandemic 
     and are supportive of the Department's international AIDS and 
     infectious diseases efforts, especially those of CDC and NIH. 
     The Department should continue to identify opportunities for 
     strengthened international collaboration with those countries 
     heavily impacted by HIV/AIDS and other new and emerging 
     infectious diseases, as well as those nations that are 
     vulnerable to a rapid acceleration of new cases. The 
     Department should also coordinate its efforts with those of 
     the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to 
     ensure

[[Page H12144]]

     that HHS activities are consistent with the USAID country 
     strategic plan, and with those of multilateral organizations 
     such as the World Health Organization and the Joint United 
     Nations Programme on AIDS.
       The conferees urge the Secretary to establish a program to 
     provide information and education on autism to health 
     professionals and the general public as authorized in the 
     Children's Health Act of 2000.
       The conferees direct the Secretary of Health and Human 
     Services, in consultation with the Director of NIH, to 
     conduct a review of the eligibility of the Bermuda Biological 
     Station for Research (BBSR) to receive F&A recovery on NIH-
     supported research. The conferees are aware that the National 
     Science Foundation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
     Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space 
     Administration, and the Office of Naval Research provide BBSR 
     with direct and indirect costs of research in peer-reviewed, 
     competitive awards. The conferees request that the Secretary 
     report to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees on 
     the status of this review.
       The conferees expect the Office of Population Statistics to 
     better coordinate with the Health Resources and Services 
     Administration regarding family planning activities.
       The conferees support the HHS agreement to provide the 
     Interdepartmental Task Force on AIDS with administrative 
     support funding totalling $250,000 from within funds 
     available to the Department.
       The conferees request the Secretary to provide a report to 
     the House and Senate Appropriations Committees by May 1, 2001 
     on the Department's review and action steps taken in response 
     to the Institute of Medicine's report, ``No Time to Lose: 
     Getting More from HIV Prevention.'' This should include a 
     review of current investments in HIV prevention as they 
     relate to the issues raised by the Institute of Medicine.
       The conferees are aware that the Secretary is working to 
     establish the Advisory Committee on Minority Health to assist 
     the Secretary in improving the health of racial and ethnic 
     minority groups, and encourage the Secretary to proceed 
     expeditiously so that the Department's goals and program 
     activities better reflect the health care needs of Hispanic 
     Americans and other racial and ethnic minorities.
       The conferees are concerned about the current situation 
     regarding the availability and uneven distribution of 
     influenza vaccine for the nation at a critical time for our 
     most vulnerable populations, especially the elderly, sick and 
     very young. The conferees understand the Department's role in 
     developing influenza vaccine each year for distribution by 
     private industry and commend the Department for its efforts 
     to communicate with the American public as this unfortunate 
     situation developed. The Secretary, through the National 
     Vaccine Program Office, is directed to prepare a report to 
     the Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate by 
     June 30, 2001 regarding its assessment of this year's 
     distribution problems along with any recommendations for 
     changes in the vaccine development and distribution process.
       The conferees understand that the incidence of unreimbursed 
     health care provided to foreign nationals in U.S. hospital 
     emergency rooms is a problem costing taxpayers millions of 
     dollars per year. The conferees direct the Secretary to 
     conduct a study regarding the extent of the problem, 
     including U.S. hospitals' experiences in obtaining 
     reimbursement from foreign insurers, the identity of foreign 
     insurance companies who do not cooperate with or reimburse 
     U.S. health care providers, the amount of unreimbursed 
     services provided to foreign nationals, along with 
     recommended solutions. This study shall be submitted to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate no later 
     than December 31, 2001.

                      Office of Inspector General

       The conference agreement includes $33,849,000 for the 
     Office of Inspector General as proposed by the Senate instead 
     of $31,394,000 as proposed by the House. The conferees do not 
     include language proposed by the House to limit the amount of 
     funds available to the Inspector General in fiscal year 2001 
     under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act 
     of 1996 (HIPAA) to not more than $130,000,000. The Senate 
     bill contained no similar provision.
       The agreement includes language not proposed by the House 
     or the Senate to allow funds to be used to provide protective 
     services to the Secretary and investigate non-payment of 
     child support cases for which non-payment is a Federal 
     offense under 18 U.S.C. 228.

                        Office for Civil Rights

       The conference agreement includes $24,742,000 for the 
     Office for Civil Rights instead of $18,774,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $23,242,000 as proposed by the Senate.


                            policy research

       The conference agreement includes $16,738,000 for policy 
     research as proposed by both the House and the Senate.
       The conferees include $7,125,000 to continue the study of 
     the outcomes of welfare reform and to assess the impacts of 
     policy changes on the low-income population. The conferees 
     recommend that this effort include the collection and use of 
     state-specific surveys and state and federal administration 
     data, including data which are newly becoming available from 
     state surveys. These studies should focus on assessing the 
     well-being of the low-income population, developing and 
     reporting reliable state-by-state measures of family hardship 
     and well-being and of the utilization of other support 
     programs, and improving the capabilities and comparability of 
     data collection efforts. These studies should continue to 
     measure outcomes for a broad population of welfare 
     recipients, former recipients, potential recipients, and 
     other special populations affected by state TANF policies. 
     The conferees further expect a report on these topics to be 
     submitted to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees 
     by May 1, 2001.

            Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund

       The conference agreement includes $241,231,000 for the 
     Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund instead of 
     $254,640,000 as proposed by the House and $214,600,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate.
       The amount provided includes $181,131,000 for the Centers 
     for Disease Control and Prevention for the following 
     bioterrorism and related activities:
       --$2,000,000 to continue to discover, develop, and 
     transition anti-infective agents to combat emerging diseases;
       --$18,040,000 for the second year of a collaborative 
     research program on the anthrax vaccine;
       --$32,000,000 for a national health alert network; and
       --$129,950,000 for all other activities, except tobacco 
     litigation. The conferees do not provide funding for this 
     activity.
       Regarding the anthrax study, the conferees understand that 
     clinical studies will be greatly facilitated by the 
     establishment of the Vaccine Healthcare Center Network, with 
     the first site at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. This 
     Network will facilitate data collection, standardization of 
     the anthrax immunization, training and general data 
     collection for this project.
       The conferees recommend that CDC continue and expand the 
     public health preparedness center program.
       The remaining $60,100,000 is for the Office of Emergency 
     Preparedness for bioterrorism-related activities.
       Within the total provided for CDC, the conferees include 
     the following amounts for the following projects and 
     activities in fiscal year 2001:
       --$500,000 for the National Bioterrorism Civilian Medical 
     Response Center at Drexel University;
       --$750,000 for the National Rapid Response Bioterrorism 
     Defense Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch, 
     Galveston;
       --$941,000 for the University of Findlay National Center 
     for Terrorism Preparedness to train and prepare underserved 
     populations and facilities to react to bioterrorism and 
     related incidents;
       --$900,000 for the St. Louis University Center for Research 
     and Education on Bioterrorism;
       --$1,000,000 for the West Virginia University Virtual 
     Medical Campus, to conduct an assessment for Disaster Medical 
     Assistance Teams, National Guard Civilian Support Teams and 
     hospital emergency and administrative personnel for medical 
     preparedness and readiness for Weapons of Mass Destruction or 
     similar events. These funds can only be used for this 
     purpose. A report is due to the Congress by June 30, 2001 on 
     this initiative;
       --$900,000 for the Rhode Island Hospital disaster 
     preparedness initiative;
       --$1,400,000 for the Charlotte Mecklenburg Advanced Local 
     Emergency Response Team (ALERT) project in Charlotte, North 
     Carolina;
       --$1,900,000 for the Public Health Service Moble Training 
     Center at Fort McClellan, Alabama for bioterrorism training; 
     and
       --$2,200,000 for the Washington Hospital Center, the 
     University of Pennsylvania Department of Emergency Medicine, 
     and the University of Tennessee ER One initiative.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS


                       nih and samhsa salary cap

       The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
     the House limiting the use of the National Institutes of 
     Health and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
     Administration funds to pay the salary of an individual, 
     through a grant or other extramural mechanism, at a rate in 
     excess of Level I of the Executive Schedule instead of Level 
     II as proposed by the Senate.


                       one-percent evaluation tap

       The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
     the House to allow for a one percent evaluation tap pursuant 
     to section 241 of the Public Health Service Act. The Senate 
     bill contained a provision to allow for an evaluation tap of 
     not more than 1.6 percent.


                           transfer authority

       The conference agreement includes language to provide 
     general transfer authority for the Department of Health and 
     Human Services. This authority was first provided in fiscal 
     year 1996 with the understanding that the flexibility it 
     provides can only be carried out when proper financial 
     management controls and systems are in place. However, CDC 
     has provided Congress with inaccurate spending data on a 
     number of programs. While it is recognized that CDC is 
     working to rectify problems that have been identified, for 
     fiscal year 2001 the conferees are requiring a letter of 
     reprogramming to the House and Senate Appropriations 
     Committees and a written response from the Committees before 
     any transfer of funds can be made to CDC.

[[Page H12145]]

       The conferees reiterate that it is not the purpose of the 
     transfer authority to provide funding for new policy 
     proposals that can, and should, be included in subsequent 
     budget proposals. Absent the need to respond to emergencies 
     or unforeseen circumstances, this authority cannot be used 
     simply to increase funding for programs, projects or 
     activities because of disagreements over the funding level or 
     the difficulty or inconvenience with operating levels set by 
     the Congress.


       substance abuse and mental block grant formula allocation

       The conference agreement does not include a provision 
     proposed by either the House or the Senate regarding the 
     distribution of substance abuse and mental health block grant 
     funding.


                            nih obligations

       The conference agreement does not include a provision 
     proposed by the House to limit NIH obligations to the 
     President's budget request. The Senate bill contained no 
     similar provision.


              extension of certain adjudication provisions

       The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
     the Senate to extend the refugee status for persecuted 
     religious groups. The House bill contained no similar 
     provision.


           medicare competitive pricing demonstration project

       The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
     the Senate to prohibit funding to implement or administer the 
     Medicare Prepaid Competitive Pricing Demonstration Project in 
     Arizona or in Kansas City, Missouri or in the Kansas City, 
     Kansas area. The House bill contained no similar provision.


                  withholding of substance abuse funds

       The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
     the Senate to prohibit the Secretary from withholding a 
     State's substance abuse block grant funds if that State is 
     not in compliance with the requirements of the Synar 
     Amendment. The provision also prohibits the Secretary from 
     withholding substance abuse funding from a territory that 
     receives less than $1,000,000. The House bill contained no 
     similar provisions.


           state children's health insurance program (schip)

       The conference agreement does not include a provision 
     proposed by the Senate to shift unspent fiscal year 1998 
     SCHIP funds to fiscal year 2003. The House bill contained no 
     similar provision.


      sense of the senate regarding needlestick injury prevention

       The conferees delete without prejudice a Sense of the 
     Senate provision regarding needlestick injury prevention. The 
     House bill contained no similar provision.


                clearinghouse on safe needle technology

       The conference agreement does not include a provision 
     proposed by the Senate to provide additional funds to the 
     Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to establish a 
     clearinghouse on safe needle technology offset by an across-
     the-board reduction to travel, consulting, and printing 
     services of the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
     Services, and Education. The House bill contained no similar 
     provision.


  reasonable rate of return on both intramural and extramural research

       The conference agreement does not include a provision 
     proposed by the Senate to withhold funding if the Director of 
     NIH did not provide a proposal to require a reasonable rate 
     of return on both intramural and extramural research by March 
     31, 2001. The House bill contained no similar provision.


    study on unreimbursed health care provided to foreign nationals

       The conference agreement does not include a provision 
     proposed by the Senate to require the Secretary to conduct a 
     study on the unreimbursed health care provided to foreign 
     nationals. The House bill contained no similar provision.


        national institute of child health and human development

       The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
     the Senate to amend the Public Health Service Act to revise 
     the purpose of the Institute relating to gynecologic health. 
     The House bill contained no similar provision.


         immunization infrastructure and operations activities

       The conference agreement does not include a provision 
     proposed by the Senate to provide additional funds to the 
     Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for State and 
     local immunization infrastructure and operations activities 
     offset by an across-the-board reduction to administrative and 
     related expenses of the Departments of Labor, Health and 
     Human Services, and Education. The House bill contained no 
     similar provision.


                   animal care contract requirements

       The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
     the Senate to require that the contractor hired for the care 
     of the 288 chimpanzees acquired by NIH from the Coulston 
     Foundation be accredited by the Association for the 
     Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care 
     International or has PHS assurance. The House bill contained 
     no similar provision.


                 Poison Prevention and Control Centers

       The conference agreement does not include a provision 
     proposed by the Senate to provide additional funds to the 
     Health Resources and Services Administration to provide 
     assistance for poison prevention and control activities 
     offset by an across-the-board reduction to administrative and 
     related expenses of the Departments of Labor, Health and 
     Human Services, and Education. The House bill contained no 
     similar provision.


    Sense of the Senate Regarding the Delivery of Emergency Medical 
                                Services

       The conferees delete without prejudice a Sense of the 
     Senate provision regarding the delivery of emergency medical 
     services. The House bill contained no similar provision.


  Sense of the Senate Regarding Impacts of the Balanced Budget Act of 
                                  1997

       The conferees delete without prejudice a Sense of the 
     Senate provision regarding impacts of The Balanced Budget Act 
     of 1997. The House bill contained no similar provision.


                                 ARKids

       The conference agreement does not include a provision 
     proposed by the House to prohibit the Health Care Financing 
     Administration from revoking a waiver to the State of 
     Arkansas that implements its own children's health insurance 
     plan. The Senate bill contained no similar provision.


                          Abstinence Education

       The conference agreement includes language to prohibit the 
     awarding of abstinence education grants authorized in the 
     Emergency Supplemental Act, 2000 until March 1, 2001. The 
     House and Senate bills contained no similar provision.


                  Physicians Comparability Allowances

       The conference agreement includes a provision not proposed 
     by either the House or the Senate to extend the authority of 
     physicians comparability allowances for five years.


                    Organ Procurement Organizations

       The conference agreement includes language to prohibit the 
     termination of the Lifelink of Puerto Rico Organ Procurement 
     Organization, the Northeast Organ Procurement Organization 
     and Tissue Bank, and the Arkansas Regional Organ Recovery 
     Agency from participation in the Medicare and Medicaid 
     programs for one year from the date of enactment of this Act. 
     The agreement further requires that future certification be 
     determined based upon performance information from these 
     individual Organ Procurement Organizations beginning on 
     January 1, 2000. The House and Senate bills contained no 
     similar provision.


                      CDC International Authority

       The conference agreement includes a provision not proposed 
     by either the House or the Senate to provide authority to 
     support CDC carrying out international HIV/AIDS and other 
     infectious and chronic disease activities abroad.
       Subsection (a)(1) is intended to allow CDC to meet 
     relatively short-term requirements for technical, management, 
     and administrative personnel needs abroad through the award 
     of personal services contracts in situations where other 
     options, such as use of existing staff or hiring of new 
     staff, or award of a service contract, other than one for 
     personal services, are ineffective and impractical. During FY 
     2001, the conferees expect HHS to work with the Office of 
     Management and Budget and other relevant agencies and 
     Congressional committees as appropriate to consider effective 
     longer-term solutions for addressing these types of needs.
       Section (a)(2) is intended to ensure that the Department of 
     State can provide necessary support services (including 
     Administrative Support services agreements) to support CDC's 
     international health programs, including the purchase of 
     necessary laboratory equipment and the lease, repair and 
     renovation of laboratory and other facilities.


                                Bayview

       The conference agreement includes language to allow the 
     Director of the National Institutes of Health to enter into 
     and administer a long-term lease agreement for facilities at 
     the Bayview Campus in Baltimore, Maryland.


             Office for Human Research Protections Transfer

       The conference agreement includes a provision to transfer 
     $5,800,000 from the National Institutes of Health to the 
     Office of the Secretary, General Departmental Management to 
     support the newly established Office for Human Research 
     Protections. This transfer of funds implements the 
     Secretary's decision to move the Office to the Department 
     from NIH and that in the future the Department will request 
     funding for the Office within the Office of the Secretary. 
     The House and Senate bills contained no similar provision.


                    Clinical Research Loan Repayment

       The conference agreement includes a provision to allow 
     extramural clinical researchers to be included in the 
     clinical research loan repayment program for individuals from 
     disadvantaged backgrounds. The House and Senate bills 
     contained no similar provision.


                         Acting Director of NIH

       The conference agreement includes a provision to allow the 
     current Acting Director of NIH to remain in that position 
     until a new Director is confirmed by the Senate. The House 
     and Senate bills contained no similar provision.

[[Page H12146]]

                 national neuroscience research center

       The conference agreement includes a provision to name the 
     National Neuroscience Research Center at the National 
     Institutes of Health the John Edward Porter Neuroscience 
     Research Center.


                           Title II Citation

       The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
     the House to cite title II as the ``Department of Health and 
     Human Services Appropriations Act, 2001''. The Senate bill 
     contained no similar provision.

                   TITLE III--DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

                            Education Reform

       The conference agreement includes $1,880,710,000 for 
     Education Reform instead of $1,505,000,000 as proposed by the 
     House and $1,434,500,000 as proposed by the Senate.
     Parental Assistance
       The conference agreement includes $38,000,000 for parental 
     assistance instead of $40,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
     The House did not propose funding for this program.
     Education Technology
       For education technology, the conference agreement includes 
     $872,096,000 instead of $905,000,000 as proposed by the House 
     and $794,500,000 as proposed by the Senate.
     Technology Literacy Challenge Fund
       For the Technology Literacy Challenge Fund, the conference 
     agreement includes $450,000,000 instead of $425,000,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate and $517,000,000 as proposed by the 
     House.
     Technology Innovation Challenge Grants
       For the Technology Innovation Challenge Grants, the 
     conference agreement includes $136,328,000 instead of 
     $197,500,000 as proposed by the House and $100,000,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate. Within the amounts provided for 
     Technology Innovation Challenge Grants, the conference 
     agreement includes $46,328,000 for the following:
       $921,000 to be divided equally among the Blount, Cherokee, 
     Cullman, DeKalb, Etowah, Fayette, Franklin, Lamar, Lawrence, 
     Marion, Marshall, Pickens, Walker and Winston County Boards 
     of Education in Alabama for technology enhancements for 
     schools;
       $369,000 Harford County Magnet School, Aberdeen, MD for 
     technology enhancements;
       $92,000 Community School District 31, Staten Island, NY for 
     school computer lab enhancements;
       $147,000 Community School District 20, Brooklyn, NY for 
     school computer lab enhancements;
       $921,000 Rockford Public Schools- District 205, Rockford, 
     IL for Digital Community Classroom project;
       $207,000 Grant Joint Union High School District, 
     Sacramento, CA for technology enhancements;
       $44,000 Bibb County Board of Education, AL for technology 
     enhancements;
       $44,000 Calhoun County Board of Education, AL for 
     technology enhancements;
       $44,000 Chambers County Board of Education, AL for 
     technology enhancements;
       $44,000 Chilton County Board of Education, AL for 
     technology enhancements;
       $44,000 Clay County Board of Education, AL for technology 
     enhancements;
       $44,000 Cleburne County Board of Education, AL for 
     technology enhancements;
       $44,000 Coosa County Board of Education, AL for technology 
     enhancements;
       $44,000 Lee County Board of Education, AL for technology 
     enhancements;
       $44,000 Macon County Board of Education, AL for technology 
     enhancements;
       $44,000 St. Clair County Board of Education, AL for 
     technology enhancements;
       $44,000 Talladega County Board of Education, AL for 
     technology enhancements;
       $44,000 Tallapoosa County Board of Education, AL for 
     technology enhancements;
       $44,000 Randolph County Board of Education, AL for 
     technology enhancements;
       $44,000 Russell County Board of Education, AL for 
     technology enhancements;
       $44,000 Jacksonville City Board of Education, AL for 
     technology enhancements;
       $44,000 Oxford City Board of Education, AL for technology 
     enhancements;
       $44,000 Sylacauga City Board of Education, AL for 
     technology enhancements;
       $44,000 Phenix City Board of Education, AL for technology 
     enhancements;
       $44,000 Auburn City Board of Education, AL for technology 
     enhancements;
       $44,000 Opelika City Board of Education, AL for technology 
     enhancements;
       $44,000 Piedmont City Board of Education, AL for technology 
     enhancements;
       $921,000 Corbin Technology and Training Center, Corbin KY;
       $921,000 Regional Technology and Training Center in West 
     Liberty, KY;
       $415,000 Cherokee County, Murphy NC for computers;
       $46,000 Meredith-Dunn School, Louisville, KY for technology 
     enhancements;
       $184,000 Crawford County Public Schools in Roberta GA for 
     technology development and equipment;
       $35,000 Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and 
     Technology, Alexandria, VA for technology enhancements;
       $921,000 California Institute of the Arts, Community Arts 
     Partnership, Santa Clarita, CA for the Digital Arts Network 
     Project;
       $184,000 Travis Unified School District, Fairfield, CA for 
     a technology plan;
       $9,000,000 I CAN LEARN;
       $1,800,000 Beaufort County School District in South 
     Carolina to continue implementing the Learning with Laptops 
     initiative;
       $900,000 Metropolitan Regional and Technical Center in 
     Providence, Rhode Island to provide training and support in 
     computer technology through Project Family Net;
       $1,500,000 Tupelo Public School District in Tupelo, 
     Mississippi to Model successful, replicable technology 
     application and utilization;
       $2,000,000 South Carolina Educational TV in Columbia, South 
     Carolina for its public-private partnership established to 
     develop model communication tools that support the use of 
     technology in improving students' reading and writing;
       $1,275,000 Washington State Educational Agency in Olympia, 
     Washington for the Linking Educational Technology and 
     Educational Reform (LINKS) project to provide electronic 
     student learning and teacher training;
       $500,000 Discovery Center in Springfield, Missouri, in 
     partnership with area schools, to enhance student access to 
     and use of technology-based learning;
       $100,000 Montgomery Public School system in Montgomery, 
     Alabama for technology upgrades at the Brewbaker Technology 
     Magnet High School;
       $850,000 New Mexico State Department of Education for an 
     online advanced placement course demonstration program;
       $450,000 Western Kentucky University to improve teacher 
     preparation programs that help incorporate technology into 
     the school curriculum;
       $680,000 Houston Independent School District in Houston, 
     Texas to provide advanced telecommunications systems for 
     schools in the district;
       $500,000 McDermitt Combined School in Nevada to improve 
     student access to and understanding of computers;
       $55,000 Northwood School District in Minong, Wisconsin for 
     distance education programs;
       $100,000 New Mexico State Department of Education for a 
     virtual school designed to increase educational access for 
     students;
       $850,000 Washington State Office of Public Instruction for 
     online advanced placement course development and delivery;
       $1,800,000 Iowa Department of Education for online advance 
     placement course development and delivery;
       $2,500,000 Wheeling Jesuit University NASA Center for 
     Educational Technologies in West Virginia for technology 
     training of math and science teachers;
       $65,000 Reid Elementary School District in Searchlight, 
     Nevada for educational technology enhancements;
       $100,000 City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for technology 
     training and access to the internet and other high-technology 
     tools;
       $925,000 Marymount University in Virginia for an 
     instructional technology program for teachers;
       $3,100,000 Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, for 
     the RUNet 2000 project;
       $2,200,000 South Dakota Board of Regents to support 
     distance learning technology;
       $1,421,000 Future of the Piedmont Foundation, Regional 
     Education Center, Danville, VA for technology enhancements;
       $170,000 Santa Barbara Industry Education Council and Santa 
     Barbara County Education Office, California for a computers 
     for families program;
       $250,000 Nicolet Distance Education Network in Rhinelander, 
     Wisconsin, for a distance learning initiative;
       $417,000 Gadsden School District in Quincy, Florida for 
     technology upgrades and equipment for a distance education 
     initiative;
       $451,000 Woodburn School District, Woodburn, Oregon for 
     technology equipment for a distance learning center;
       $489,000 Southwest Virginia Education and Training Network, 
     Abington, Virginia, for technology upgrades;
       $561,000 Adelphi University, New York, for the Information 
     Commons distance education initiative;
       $638,000 Liberty Science Center, Jersey City, New Jersey, 
     for technology upgrades for its partnership program with 28 
     school districts in New Jersey;
       $723,000 Maine School Administrative District Number 64, 
     East Corinth, Maine, for the STAR technology teacher training 
     project;
       $723,000 The Appalachian Center for Economic Networks, 
     Athens, Ohio, to expand a computer entrepreneurship project;
       $808,000 Detroit Educational Television Foundation, 
     Detroit, Michigan, to deliver expanded arts educational 
     programs to schools through the Enrichment Channel;
       $1,169,000 Puget Sound Center for Teaching, Learning, and 
     Technology, Seattle, Washington, for technology training, 
     equipment and support; and
       $100,000 Rose Tree Media School District in Pennsylvania 
     for integrating distance learning in the classroom through 
     the HUBS project.
     National Activities
       The conference agreement includes $191,950,000 for 
     education technology initiatives funded under National 
     Activities. This includes $125,000,000 for teacher training 
     in technology, the same amount as proposed by the Senate 
     instead of $85,000,000 as proposed by the House. It also 
     includes $64,950,000 to establish computer learning centers 
     in low-income communities instead of $32,500,000 as proposed 
     by the House and $65,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.

[[Page H12147]]

     Star Schools
       For Star Schools, the conference agreement includes 
     $59,318,000 instead of $45,000,000 as proposed by the House 
     and $43,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within the amounts 
     provided for Star Schools, the conference agreement includes 
     $8,768,000 for the following:
       $478,000 Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, Winston-
     Salem, NC for Winston-Net program;
       $1,290,000 Galena School District, Galena Alaska for a 
     distance education program;
       $4,000,000 Iowa Communications Network statewide fiber 
     optic demonstration program; and
       $3,000,000 South Dakota Department of Education and 
     Cultural Affairs to continue and expand the Digital Dakota 
     Network which provides high speed Internet and local and wide 
     area networking to all public K-12 schools in South Dakota.
     Telecommunications demonstration project for mathematics
       The conference agreement includes $8,500,000 for 
     telecommunications demonstration project for mathematics as 
     proposed by the Senate. The House proposed no funds. The 
     conferees recognize the positive work that the Public 
     Broadcasting Service (PBS) has done in demonstrating and 
     evaluating the use of different technologies to provide 
     professional development opportunities in mathematics to 
     elementary and secondary school teachers. While the Mathline 
     program clearly has reached many teachers through various 
     media, the conferees want to ensure that the greatest number 
     of educators and students will benefit from this program. The 
     conferees encourage PBS to continue to explore cost effective 
     options for providing high quality professional development 
     opportunities in core curricula to current and future 
     teachers. In addition, the conferees encourage PBS to 
     continue evaluating this program to measure the change in 
     student academic achievement that results from teaching 
     techniques learned through this program.
     21st Century Learning Centers
       The conference agreement includes $845,614,000 for the 21st 
     Century Learning Centers instead of $600,000,000 as proposed 
     by both the House and the Senate. Within the amounts provided 
     for 21st Century Learning Centers, the conference agreement 
     includes $20,614,000 for the following:
       $9,000 Thirteenth Place Youth and Family Services in Gadsen 
     Alabama for ``The After School Program'';
       $921,000 The Community House Inc. in Hinsdale, IL for youth 
     programs and services;
       $230,000 Boys and Girls Club of Coachella Valley in Palm 
     Desert, CA for after school programs;
       $553,000 Boys and Girls Club of Danville, Danville IL for 
     youth programs;
       $461,000 Fayette and Clark Counties, Kentucky for after 
     school programs;
       $69,000 Chrysalis House Inc. in Lexington, KY for equipment 
     related to afterschool programs;
       $18,000 Goodhue Center, Staten Island, NY for an 
     educational and technology enrichment project;
       $18,000 Central Family Life Center Inc. in Staten Island NY 
     for after school family preservation program for tutoring and 
     after school;
       $23,000 Jewish Community Center of Staten Island, NY for an 
     after school program;
       $41,000 Catholic Youth Organization Inc., Staten Island NY 
     for an after school program;
       $92,000 Boys and Girls Club of Rochester, MN for Project 
     Learn;
       $23,000 Children's Museum of Elizabethtown, KY for after 
     school programming;
       $921,000 Boys and Girls Clubs of Santa Clarita Valley, 
     Santa Clarita, CA for youth development programs;
       $9,000 First Gethsemane Center for Family Development, 
     Louisville, KY for tutoring program;
       $18,000 Summerbridge, Louisville, KY for tutoring program;
       $14,000 New Creations Development Programs, Inc., 
     Louisville, KY for tutoring/mentoring program;
       $18,000 New Zion Community Development Foundation, 
     Louisville, KY for after school mentoring program;
       $18,000 Robbie Valentine Stars Club Education Program, 
     Louisville, KY for mentoring programs;
       $14,000 Shiloh Community Renewal Center in Louisville, KY 
     for after school and summer tutoring;
       $276,000 Tulare County Office of Education, Visalia, CA for 
     a Summer Youth program;
       $691,000 West-End YMCA Association, Ontario, CA for after 
     school programming;
       $250,000 Big Brothers/Big Sisters of America to expand its 
     school-based mentoring program to the State of New Hampshire;
       $250,000 City of Portland, Oregon to increase student 
     achievement and family involvement with children through its 
     Schools Uniting Neighborhoods program;
       $350,000 Cranston Public School District in Cranston, Rhode 
     Island, in collaboration with community partners, to improve 
     parental participation in student learning and enhance the 
     use of technology in after school programs;
       $200,000 Discovery Center in Springfield, Missouri for 
     expansion of science education programs available to at risk 
     youth;
       $375,000 Bibb County Board of Education in Macon, Georgia 
     for after school programming;
       $200,000 John A. Logan College to develop a community 
     learning center in rural Southern Illinois;
       $100,000 Project 2000 for mentoring and other support 
     services for low-income and inner-city students in the 
     District of Columbia;
       $250,000 Holy Redeemer Health System in Philadelphia, 
     Pennsylvania for after school programs for at risk children;
       $1,100,000 State of Alaska for extended learning 
     opportunities for school children provided through the Right 
     Start program;
       $400,000 National Ten-Point Leadership Foundation in 
     Boston, MA to address the mentoring needs of at-risk inner-
     city youth;
       $425,000 Clark County School District, Las Vegas, Nevada 
     for an after school community learning center;
       $293,000 Centennial School District, Circle Pines, 
     Minnesota, for an after school program;
       $213,000 City School District of New Rochelle, New York, 
     for an after school program;
       $370,000 Abbotsford School District, Abbotsford, Wisconsin, 
     for an after school program;
       $213,000 Community School District 24, Glendale, New York 
     for before- and after-school programs;
       $213,000 Community School District 28, Forest Hills, New 
     York for an after school program;
       $213,000 Community School District 30, Jackson Heights, New 
     York for an after school program;
       $60,000 Crosby Independent School District in Barrett 
     Station, Texas, for an after school program;
       $85,000 Eastchester Union Free School District, 
     Eastchester, New York for an after school program;
       $128,000 Fontana Unified School District, Fontana, 
     California, for the educational component of a teen center 
     for at-risk youth;
       $234,000 Sauk Prairie Schools, Sauk City, Wisconsin for an 
     after school program;
       $468,000 Hastings Public Schools, Hastings, Minnesota, for 
     an after school program;
       $750,000 Hayward Community School District, Hayward, 
     Wisconsin for an after school;
       $191,000 Independence School District, Independence, 
     Missouri, to expand before and after school programs;
       $510,000 Macomb County Intermediate School District, 
     Michigan for the ``Kids Klub'' after school program;
       $1,275,000 Milwaukee Public Schools, Wisconsin, for after 
     school programs;
       $170,000 New London Public Schools, New London, 
     Connecticut, for an after school program;
       $298,000 New York Hall of Science in Queens, New York for 
     an after school program;
       $629,000 Pojoaque Valley Schools in Pojoaque, New Mexico 
     for the Para Los Ninos after school consortium;
       $213,000 Port Chester-Rye Union Free School District, Port 
     Chester, New York for an after school program;
       $850,000 Rock Island County Regional Office of Education, 
     Moline, Illinois for after school programs in the Moline-Coal 
     Valley School District and the Rock Island-Milan School 
     District;
       $361,000 South Washington County Schools, Cottage Grove, 
     Minnesota, for an after school program;
       $340,000 St. Clair County Intermediate School District, 
     Michigan for the ``Kids Klub'' after school program;
       $230,000 St. Francis School District, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
     for an after school program;
       $1,300,000 Wausau School District, Wausau, Wisconsin, for 
     an after school program;
       $170,000 Windham Public Schools, Willimantic, Connecticut, 
     for an after school program; and
       $2,500,000 Expansion of Gallery 37 after school programming 
     in Chicago, Illinois.
       The conference agreement includes bill language stating 
     that the Secretary shall strongly encourage applications for 
     21st Century Community Learning Center grants to be submitted 
     jointly by a local educational agency (or a consortium of 
     local educational agencies) and a community-based 
     organization, including public or private entities with 
     demonstrated effectiveness in providing educational or 
     related services to individuals in the community, such as 
     child care providers, youth development organizations (such 
     as YMCAs, the Boys and Girls Clubs, Big Brothers Big Sisters 
     of America, Camp Fire Boys and Girls, and the Girl Scouts), 
     museums, libraries, and Departments of Parks and Recreation. 
     In including this language, the conferees intend that the 
     Secretary shall strongly encourage joint applications in 
     order to promote local collaboration and coordination of 
     services. This is especially important where more than one 
     application is received proposing to serve the same 
     community. Additionally, the language requires all 
     applications submitted to the Secretary to contain evidence 
     that the project includes elements that are designed to 
     assist students to meet or exceed State and local standards 
     in core academic subjects, as appropriate to the needs of 
     participating children. The Senate bill included language 
     stating that a community-based organization that has 
     experience in providing before- and after-school services 
     shall be eligible to receive a grant on the same basis as a 
     school or consortium, and stating that the

[[Page H12148]]

     Secretary shall give priority to any applications jointly 
     submitted by a community-based organization and a school or 
     consortium. The House bill contained no similar language.
     Small Schools
       The conference agreement includes $125,000,000 for the 
     Small, Safe and Successful Schools initiative authorized 
     under section 10105 of part X of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act. The House bill included funding for this 
     initiative under the Fund for the Improvement of Education 
     and the Senate bill proposed no funding.
       The conferees agree that these funds shall be used only for 
     activities related to the redesign of large high schools 
     enrolling 1,000 or more students, and that this initiative 
     shall continue to be jointly managed by the Office of 
     Elementary and Secondary Education and the Office of 
     Vocational and Adult Education.


                    EDUCATION FOR THE DISADVANTAGED

       The conference agreement includes $9,532,621,000 for 
     Education for the Disadvantaged instead of $8,986,800,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate and $8,816,986,000 as proposed by the 
     House. The agreement includes advance funding for this 
     account of $6,758,300,000 instead of $6,204,763,000 as 
     proposed by the House and $6,223,342,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate.
       For Grants to Local Educational Agencies (LEAs) the 
     agreement provides $8,601,721,000 instead of $8,335,800,000 
     as provided by the Senate and $7,941,397,000 as provided by 
     the House. Of the funds made available for basic grants, 
     $5,394,300,000 becomes available on October 1, 2001 for the 
     academic year 2001-2002.
       The conference agreement includes $7,237,721,000 for basic 
     grants and $1,364,000,000 for concentration grants. For 
     fiscal year 2001, $1,158,397,000 was advance funded in the 
     fiscal year 2000 Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
     Services and Education and Related Agencies Act (P.L. 105-
     227). The funding of $1,364,000,000 for concentration grants 
     is advanced for fiscal year 2002.
       The conferees have included $225,000,000 for school 
     improvement activities under section 1116(c) of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965 to 
     assist low performing schools under Title I of ESEA. School 
     improvement activities are those measures designed to help 
     turn around low performing schools. One hundred percent of 
     the funds provided for these activities are to be allocated 
     by states to school districts.
       The conferees have also included a requirement that all 
     school districts receiving funds under Part A of Title I 
     shall provide students in low performing Title I schools with 
     the option to transfer to another public school or public 
     charter school in the school district, unless prohibited by 
     state or local law or policy. Local educational agencies 
     located within States that qualify for the small state 
     minimum under Title I Part A are not required to comply with 
     this requirement, but may comply if they so choose.
       The conference agreement includes $6,000,000 for capital 
     expenses for private school children as proposed by the 
     Senate. The House bill contained no funding for this program.
       The conference agreement includes $250,000,000 for the Even 
     Start program as proposed by the House instead of 
     $185,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
       The conference agreement includes $380,000,000 for the 
     migrant education program as proposed by the Senate instead 
     of $354,689,000 as proposed by the House. The agreement also 
     includes $46,000,000 for neglected and delinquent youth 
     instead of $50,000,000 as proposed by the Senate and 
     $42,000,000 as proposed by the House.
       The conference agreement includes $8,900,000 for evaluation 
     of title I programs as proposed by the House. The Senate bill 
     did not propose funding for this activity.
       The conference agreement includes $210,000,000 for the 
     comprehensive school reform demonstration program instead of 
     $190,000,000 as proposed by the House. The Senate bill did 
     not propose funding for this activity. The conferees direct 
     the Department to follow the directives in the report 
     accompanying the fiscal year 1998 bill (House Report 105-390) 
     and in the conference report accompanying the fiscal year 
     1999 bill (House Report 105-825) in administering this 
     program.
       For the education for the disadvantaged program, the 
     agreement includes a provision not contained in either House 
     or Senate bills which allows each state and local educational 
     agency (LEA) to receive the greater of either the amount it 
     would receive at specified levels under the 100% hold 
     harmless contained in the Senate bill or what it would 
     receive using the statutory formulas. This comparison is 
     intended to be used for allocating funds in fiscal year 2001 
     for both basic and concentration grants. The conferees expect 
     the Department to use updated demographic and financial 
     expenditure data in determining allocations when such data 
     becomes available. The Senate bill included a 100% hold 
     harmless for States and LEAs for both basic and concentration 
     grants. The House bill contained no similar provision.
       The conferees adopt language included in the Senate bill 
     providing that the Department shall make 100% hold harmless 
     awards to LEAs that were eligible for concentration grants in 
     2000, but are not eligible to receive grants in fiscal year 
     2001.
       The conferees also adopt language included in the Senate 
     bill providing that the Secretary of Education shall not take 
     into account the 100% hold harmless provision in determining 
     State allocations under any other program. The House bill did 
     not contain these hold harmless provisions.


                               IMPACT AID

       The conference agreement includes $993,302,000 for the 
     Impact Aid programs instead of $985,000,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $1,075,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. For 
     basic grants the agreement includes $882,000,000; for 
     payments for children with disabilities the conferees include 
     $50,000,000. The agreement also includes $8,000,000 for 
     facilities maintenance, $12,802,000 for construction, and 
     $40,500,000 for payments for federal property. The conferees 
     note that funds for basic grants and payments for heavily 
     impacted districts are combined pursuant to the provisions of 
     the Impact Aid Reauthorization Act of 2000.
       Sufficient funding is provided within the account for 
     construction for the following: $1,981,000 for the North 
     Chicago Community Unit School District 187; $921,000 for the 
     Wheatland School District, Wheatland, California; $400,000 
     for Brockton Elementary Public School District in Montana; 
     $2,600,000 for Craig School District in Alaska; and $900,000 
     for Cannon Ball Elementary School on Standing Rock Sioux 
     Reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota.
       The conferees also include the following language 
     provisions: timely filing of an application by the Academy 
     School District 20 in Colorado; restoration of payments to 
     school districts affected by a section 8002 cap in 1998; and 
     deeming eligibility for Kadoka School District in South 
     Dakota. Neither the House nor Senate bills contained similar 
     provisions.


                      SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMS

       The conference agreement includes $4,872,084,000 for School 
     Improvement Programs instead of $3,165,334,000 as proposed by 
     the House and $4,672,534,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
     agreement provides $3,107,084,000 in fiscal year 2001 and 
     $1,765,000,000 in fiscal year 2002 funding for this account.
     Eisenhower professional development state and local 
         activities
       For Eisenhower professional development state and local 
     activities, the conferees provide $485,000,000. The House 
     bill provided $1,750,000,000 for the Teacher Empowerment Act, 
     subject to authorization, which included funds previously 
     dedicated to the Eisenhower professional development 
     programs. The Senate bill provided $435,000,000.
       The conference agreement includes bill language providing 
     that a local educational agency shall use funds received in 
     excess of the allocation received for the preceding fiscal 
     year to improve teacher quality by reducing the percentage of 
     teachers who are uncertified, teaching out of field, or who 
     lack sufficient content knowledge to teach effectively in the 
     areas they teach. These additional funds may be used for 
     mentoring programs for new teachers, to provide opportunities 
     for teachers to participate in multi-week institutes, such as 
     those offered in the summer months that provide intensive 
     professional development and to implement incentives to 
     retain quality teachers who have a record of success in 
     helping low-achieving students improve their academic 
     success. State educational agencies and State agencies for 
     higher education may also use additional funds provided in 
     excess of the allocation received for the preceding fiscal 
     year for multi-week institutes, such as those provided in 
     the summer months, that provide intensive professional 
     development in partnership with local educational 
     agencies, and to provide grants to recruit, prepare, 
     retain, and train school principals and superintendents, 
     especially individuals serving or intending to serve in 
     high-poverty, low-performing schools and districts.
       The conference agreement also includes $45,000,000 within 
     the amount for Eisenhower state grants to be available to 
     States to support efforts to meet the requirements under 
     section 1111 of title I of the Elementary and Secondary 
     Education Act of 1965 or the requirements for State 
     eligibility for the Ed-Flex Partnership Act of 1999.
     Eisenhower professional development national activities
       The conference agreement provides $44,000,000 for 
     Eisenhower professional development national activities under 
     this account.
       Early Childhood Educators.--Within the funds available for 
     Eisenhower professional development national activities, the 
     conference agreement includes $10,000,000 for training early 
     childhood educators and caregivers in high-poverty 
     communities to focus on professional development activities 
     to further children's language and literacy skills to help 
     prevent them from encountering reading difficulties once they 
     enter school.
       Teacher Recruitment Initiatives.--Within the funds 
     available for Eisenhower professional development activities, 
     the conference agreement also includes $34,000,000 for new 
     teacher recruitment initiatives. The conferees believe that 
     an expanded effort to get more talented individuals from non-
     traditional routes into classrooms is warranted and is an 
     efficient means to get highly skilled people into schools at 
     a time when the demand for these skills is the greatest. For 
     example, the conferees acknowledge that the Troops to 
     Teachers and Teach for America programs have been innovative 
     models

[[Page H12149]]

     for recruiting qualified, nontraditional candidates into 
     teaching and offer viable solutions to our nation's need to 
     hire over 2.2 million teachers over the next ten years to 
     replace veteran retiring teachers and to accommodate 
     additional student enrollment.
       Of the amount made available for teacher recruitment 
     initiatives, $3,000,000 shall be available to the Secretary 
     for transfer to the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional 
     Education Support of the Department of Defense (Troops-to-
     Teachers). The remaining $31,000,000 available for teacher 
     recruitment initiatives shall be available for grants as 
     described in the prior paragraph for local educational 
     agencies, State educational agencies, educational service 
     agencies, or nonprofit agencies and organizations, including 
     organizations with expertise in teacher recruitment, or 
     partnerships comprised of these entities to recruit, prepare, 
     place and support mid-career professionals from diverse 
     fields who possess strong subject matter skills to become 
     teachers, particularly in high-need fields such as 
     mathematics, science, foreign languages, bilingual education, 
     reading, and special education; and to attract, recruit, 
     screen, select, train, place and provide financial incentives 
     to recent college graduates with outstanding academic records 
     and a baccalaureate in a field other than education to become 
     fully qualified teachers through nontraditional routes.
     Innovative education program strategies
       For innovative education program strategies, title VI of 
     the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, the 
     conference agreement includes $385,000,000 instead of 
     $3,100,000,000 as proposed by the Senate and $365,750,000 as 
     proposed by the House.
       The conferees support the use of funds appropriated under 
     section 6301(b) to provide single-sex school or classroom 
     programs provided that the recipient ``complies with 
     applicable law,'' a phrase intended to incorporate all 
     relevant Supreme Court opinions, including U.S. v. Virginia, 
     116 S. Ct. 2264 (1996), as proposed by the Senate. The House 
     bill contained no similar provision. The conferees intend 
     that this provision does not require local educational 
     agencies to use title VI funds only for gender equity 
     activities.
     Class size
       The conference agreement includes $1,623,000,000 to 
     continue the initiative to reduce class size that was begun 
     in fiscal year 1999. The House bill provided $1,750,000,000 
     for the Teacher Empowerment Act, subject to authorization. 
     The Senate bill provided $3,100,000,000 for activities to 
     improve teacher quality, reduce class size, and renovate 
     school facilities and to carry out activities under title VI 
     of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.
       The conference agreement provides that the allocation of 
     funds under section 306 to the States shall be based on the 
     proportional share that each State received from the fiscal 
     year 1999 appropriation for class size reduction. States will 
     continue to allocate their grant funds among local 
     educational agencies based on a formula that reflects both 
     their relative numbers of children in low-income families and 
     their school enrollments.
       Local educational agencies would use funds for recruiting, 
     hiring and training fully qualified regular and special 
     education teachers who are certified within the States, have 
     a baccalaureate degree and demonstrate subject matter 
     knowledge in their content areas. Twenty five percent of 
     these funds may be used by local educational agencies to test 
     new teachers for academic content knowledge, to meet State 
     certification requirements, or to provide professional 
     development for existing teachers. In addition, local 
     educational agencies may use these funds for carrying out 
     activities authorized under section 2210 of the Elementary 
     and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (the Eisenhower 
     Professional Development program); mentoring programs for new 
     teachers; providing opportunities for teachers to attend 
     multi-week institutes, such as those provided in the summer 
     months, that provide intensive professional development in 
     partnership with local educational agencies; and carrying out 
     initiatives to promote the retention of highly qualified 
     teachers who have a record of success in helping low-
     achieving students improve their academic success. Such 
     activities shall have the goal of ensuring that all 
     instructional staff are fully qualified.
       A local educational agency that has already reduced class 
     size in the early grades may use its funds to make further 
     reductions in grades kindergarten through 3 or other grades, 
     or carry out activities to improve teacher quality. A local 
     educational agency in which 10 percent or more of its 
     elementary teachers have not met applicable State and local 
     certification requirements (including certification through 
     State or local alternative routes), or if such requirements 
     have been waived, may use 100 percent of funds under this 
     program for the purpose of helping those teachers become 
     certified or to help teachers who lack sufficient content 
     knowledge to teach effectively in the areas they teach to 
     obtain that knowledge. A local educational agency must 
     notify the State educational agency of the percentage of 
     funds it will use for these purposes.
       A local educational agency that receives an award under 
     this section that is less than the starting salary for a new 
     teacher may use these funds to help pay the salary of a 
     teacher or pay for professional development activities to 
     ensure that all the instructional staff are fully qualified.
       To improve accountability, the conference agreement 
     maintains language included as part of last year's 
     appropriations law requiring that each State and local 
     educational agency receiving funds publicly report to parents 
     on their progress in reducing class size and in increasing 
     the percentage of classes in core academic areas taught by 
     fully qualified teachers, and on the impact that such 
     activities have had on increasing student academic 
     achievement. Parents, upon request, will also have the right 
     to know the professional qualifications of their children's 
     teachers.
       The conference agreement requires the Secretary of 
     Education to inform local educational agencies of the 
     additional flexibility provided to local educational agencies 
     in which more than 10 percent of their teachers are not fully 
     qualified to spend all of these funds on professional 
     development activities. The conferees also intend that the 
     Secretary notify local educational agencies of the 
     flexibility provisions already incorporated into the class 
     size reduction initiative, including the ability of local 
     educational agencies to use up to 25 percent of local 
     educational agency allocations on professional development 
     activities; to spend funds on professional development for 
     existing teachers if the local educational agency receives an 
     award that is less than the starting salary for a new fully 
     qualified teacher; and to spend funds to reduce class sizes 
     in other grades or to improve teacher quality if the local 
     educational agency has already reduced class sizes in the 
     early grades to 18 or fewer children.
     School renovation
       The conference agreement includes $1,200,000,000 for grants 
     to local educational agencies for emergency school renovation 
     and repair activities; activities under part B of the 
     Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA); and 
     technology activities. The House bill provided no funding for 
     this activity. The Senate bill provided $3,100,000,000 for 
     activities to improve teacher quality, reduce class size, 
     renovate school facilities and to carry out activities under 
     title VI of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
     1965.
       The conference agreement provides $75,000,000 of the 
     $1,200,000,000 for formula grants to local educational 
     agencies with at least 50 percent of their student population 
     living on Native American or Native Alaskan lands. These 
     funds may be used for school renovations and repairs, as well 
     as new construction activities, which may include 
     construction of new facilities for specialized programs such 
     as vocational-technical education and the installation of 
     plumbing, sewage and electrical systems. For some of the 
     schools in these local educational agencies, new construction 
     may represent a more prudent use of resources than the repair 
     or renovation of existing structures.
       The conference agreement provides $3,250,000 of the 
     $1,200,000,000 for grants to local educational agencies in 
     outlying areas for the renovation and repair of high-need 
     schools.
       The conference agreement provides $25,000,000 for a new 
     Charter Schools Facilities Financing Demonstration Program 
     authorized as subpart 2 of part C of title X of the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Charter 
     schools are break-the-mold public schools that are free of 
     bureaucratic red tape, and accountable for academic results. 
     Many of these innovative schools receive no assistance from 
     their states for capital financing expenses, or at best, only 
     a modest amount of assistance for capital expenses. 
     Furthermore, in most states, charter schools do not have 
     bonding authority or a tax base for capital financing.
       The Charter School Facilities Financing Demonstration 
     Program would establish a credit enhancement demonstration 
     program for the acquisition, renovation, or construction of 
     public charter schools. Non-profit private entities 
     (including those that benefit Native Alaskans), public 
     entities, or consortia of the two entities would compete for 
     one-time grants to be used to establish reserve funds to 
     leverage private capital. For example, the reserve funds 
     could be used for activities such as guaranteeing bonds, 
     notes, or leases; encouraging private lending; or 
     facilitating the issuance of bonds. The conferees intend that 
     the Secretary of Education widely disseminate information 
     gleaned from these demonstration efforts with a view toward 
     these demonstrations serving as models for replication in 
     states with charter schools.
       The conference agreement provides that the remaining funds 
     ($1,096,750,000) would be distributed to State educational 
     agencies based on the title I, part A allocations under the 
     Elementary and Secondary Education Act, with a small state 
     minimum of one half of one percent. After allowing for not 
     more than one percent set aside at the state level for 
     administrative expenses, the State educational agency or 
     other entity with jurisdiction over school facilities 
     financing, as the case may be, would distribute 75 percent of 
     the state's funds to local educational agencies through 
     competitive grants for emergency school repair and renovation 
     activities.
       The state educational agency or other responsible entity 
     would ensure, through a competitive grant process, that high 
     poverty local educational agencies receive, in the aggregate, 
     shares of the state allocation of Federal emergency repair 
     and renovation

[[Page H12150]]

     funds that are proportionate to their share of the state 
     allocation of title I, part A funds. For the purposes of this 
     program high poverty school districts are considered to be 
     those with 30 percent or greater child poverty or 10,000 or 
     greater poor children. The state educational agency or entity 
     would also ensure that rural local educational agencies 
     receive, in the aggregate, shares of the state allocation of 
     Federal emergency repair and renovation funds that are 
     proportionate to their share of title I, part A funds. Each 
     state shall determine which local educational agencies within 
     the state qualify as rural for the purposes of this program.
       Those local educational agencies eligible to compete for an 
     emergency repair and renovation grant either because of their 
     high poverty status or their rural status, but who do not 
     actually receive a grant, may be considered for a grant from 
     the remaining funds for repair and renovation activities. 
     Additionally, local educational agencies not eligible to 
     receive a grant because of their lack of high poverty or 
     rural status may be considered for a grant from the remaining 
     repair and renovation funds.
       These funds may be used by local educational agencies to 
     meet the requirements of federal mandates such as the 
     Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504 of the 
     Rehabilitation Act, and asbestos abatement requirements. 
     Funds may also be used for the renovation, acquisition, and 
     repair of charter schools and for emergency renovations or 
     repairs to public school facilities to ensure the health 
     and safety of students and staff (repairing, replacing, or 
     installing roofs, electrical wiring, plumbing systems, or 
     sewage systems; repairing, replacing, or installing 
     heating, ventilation, or air conditioning systems, 
     including insulation; and bringing schools into compliance 
     with fire and safety codes).
       The conference agreement clarifies that public charter 
     schools that are considered to be a local educational agency 
     under state law are eligible to compete for renovation and 
     repair funds from the state in the same manner as local 
     educational agencies. In addition, public charter schools 
     that are not considered to be a local educational agency are 
     eligible to receive assistance, in the same manner as a 
     public school, from a local educational agency that is 
     awarded a grant under this section.
       The conference agreement provides for the equitable 
     participation of non-profit, private elementary and secondary 
     schools in repair and renovation activities. The eligible 
     non-profit, private elementary and secondary schools would be 
     limited to those schools with a child poverty rate of 40 
     percent or greater. Private school participation, in general, 
     would be controlled by section 6402 of the Elementary and 
     Secondary Education Act (ESEA), which provides for the 
     equitable participation of children enrolled in non-profit 
     private elementary and secondary schools in the title VI 
     block grant program of ESEA. This provision would allow these 
     schools to receive the following services: (1) modifications 
     of private school facilities in order to meet the standards 
     under the Americans with Disabilities Act; (2) modifications 
     of private school facilities to meet the standards under 
     Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act; and (3) asbestos 
     abatement or removal from such school facilities.
       The conference agreement includes a prohibition on using 
     federal emergency repair and renovation funds to supplant 
     state and local funds available for repair and renovation. 
     However, federal funds used for compliance with the Americans 
     with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation 
     Act would not be subject to a supplement, not supplant 
     requirement. While schools are required to make facilities 
     modifications to ensure accessibility and should have already 
     made these modifications, it is most important that these 
     modifications be made. Minimizing the restrictions placed 
     upon federal funds for these purposes can help ensure that 
     school buildings become accessible to disabled individuals.
       The conference agreement also provides for flexibility in 
     the use of funds by local educational agencies. State 
     educational agencies would distribute 25 percent of the funds 
     they receive to local educational agencies through a 
     competitive grant process for activities under part B of 
     IDEA, technology activities, or both IDEA and technology 
     activities. State educational agencies would base the grant 
     awards for IDEA activities upon the need of a local 
     educational agency for additional funds due to substantially 
     high costs associated with serving a child with a disability; 
     the costs of special education and related services, 
     including transportation as needed to assist a child with a 
     disability to benefit from special education; the costs of 
     assistive technology devices and services, and the costs 
     associated with helping children with disabilities progress 
     toward state performance goals and indicators. State 
     educational agencies would base the technology grant awards 
     upon the need of a local educational agency for additional 
     funds for technology activities carried out in connection 
     with school repair and renovation, including wiring; 
     acquiring hardware and software; acquiring connectivity 
     linkages and resources; and acquiring microwave, fiber 
     optics, cable, and satellite transmission equipment.
       Under the conference agreement, local educational agencies 
     choose whether to apply for an IDEA grant, a technology 
     grant, or both categories of grants. Local educational 
     agencies that receive competitive grants for activities 
     authorized under part B of IDEA would be required to use the 
     grant funds in compliance with the provisions of that part. 
     This requirement includes providing for the participation of 
     private school children eligible for IDEA services. 
     Technology activities would be for technology activities 
     carried out in connection with school repair and renovation 
     and include wiring; acquiring hardware and software; 
     acquiring connectivity linkages and resources; and acquiring 
     microwave, fiber optics, cable, and satellite transmission 
     equipment.
     Safe and drug free schools
       The conference agreement includes $644,250,000 for the Safe 
     and Drug Free Schools and Communities Act instead of the 
     $599,250,000 as proposed by the House and $642,000,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate.
       Included within this amount is $439,250,000 for state 
     grants as proposed by the House and $447,000,000 as proposed 
     by the Senate.
       The agreement also includes $155,000,000 for national 
     programs instead of $145,000,000 as proposed by the Senate 
     and $110,000,000 as proposed by the House. Within this 
     amount, the conferees include $117,000,000 to support the 
     Safe Schools/Healthy Students initiative. Within the funds 
     for national programs, the agreement also provides 
     $10,000,000 to remain available until expended for Project 
     School Emergency Response to Violence to provide services to 
     local educational agencies in which the learning environment 
     has been disrupted due to a violent or traumatic crisis.
     Reading is fundamental
       For the Reading is Fundamental program, the conference 
     agreement provides $23,000,000 as proposed by the Senate 
     instead of $21,000,000 as proposed by the House.
     Arts in education
       For Arts in Education, the conference agreement includes 
     $28,000,000 instead of $16,500,000 as proposed by the House 
     and $18,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conferees 
     provide that within this total, $6,500,000 is for VSA arts, 
     $5,500,000 is for the John F. Kennedy Center for the 
     Performing Arts, $2,000,000 is to be used to continue a youth 
     violence prevention initiative, and $10,000,000 is to be used 
     for the Secretary to make grants to school districts, state 
     educational agencies, institutions of higher education and/or 
     state and local non-profit arts organizations for activities 
     authorized under subpart 1 of the Arts in Education program, 
     particularly for supporting model projects and programs that 
     integrate arts education into the regular elementary and 
     secondary school curriculum and that provide for the 
     development of model preservice and inservice professional 
     development programs for arts educators and other 
     instructional staff. In addition, $2,000,000 is for model 
     professional development programs for music educators and 
     $2,000,000 is for activities authorized under subpart 2 of 
     the Arts in Education program.
     Education for homeless children and youth
       The conference agreement includes $35,000,000 for Education 
     for Homeless Children and Youth instead of $32,000,000 as 
     proposed by the House and $31,700,000 as proposed by the 
     Senate.
     Education of Native Hawaiians
       The conference agreement includes $28,000,000 for the 
     Education of Native Hawaiians as proposed by the Senate 
     instead of $23,000,000 as proposed by the House. When making 
     awards for this program, the Department should provide: 
     $6,500,000 for curricula development, teacher training, and 
     recruitment programs, including native language 
     revitalization (for which the conferees encourage priority to 
     be given to the University of Hawaii at Hilo Native Language 
     College), aquaculture, prisoner education initiatives, waste 
     management, computer literacy, big island astronomy, and 
     indigenous health programs; $1,600,000 for community-based 
     learning centers; $3,200,000 for the native Hawaiian higher 
     education program; $500,000 for the native Hawaiian education 
     councils; and $10,900,000 for family based education centers, 
     including early childhood education for native Hawaiian 
     children. If the Department proposes to provide 10% less than 
     the stated amounts for any activity within this program, it 
     must notify the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
     at least 90 days prior to the end of the fiscal year.
     Alaska Native educational equity
       The conference agreement includes $15,000,000 for the 
     Alaska Native Educational Equity program as proposed by the 
     Senate instead of $13,000,000 as proposed by the House. From 
     the increase in funds provided over the fiscal year 2000 
     level, $1,000,000 shall be for the Alaska Humanities Forum 
     for operation of the Rose student exchange program and 
     $1,000,000 shall be for the Alaska Native Heritage Center for 
     support of its cultural education programs.
     Charter schools
       The conference agreement includes $190,000,000 for Charter 
     Schools instead of $175,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $210,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.


                           READING EXCELLENCE

       The conference agreement includes $286,000,000 for 
     activities authorized under the Reading Excellence Act as 
     proposed by the Senate instead of $260,000,000 as proposed by 
     the House. The agreement provides $91,000,000 in fiscal year 
     2001 and $195,000,000 in fiscal year 2002 funding for this 
     account.


                            INDIAN EDUCATION

       The conference agreement includes $115,500,000 for Indian 
     Education as proposed


[[Continued on page H12151]]



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