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< Back to current issue of Immigration Daily                        < Back to current issue of Immigrant's Weekly 

[Congressional Record: December 15, 2000 (House)]
[Page H12442-H12502]
From the Congressional Record Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:cr15de00pt2-83]                         


CONFERENCE REPORT ON H.R. 4577, DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN 
 SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2001

  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to the previous order of 
the House, I call up the conference report on the bill (H.R. 4577) 
making appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
Services, and Education, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2001, and for other purposes.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the order of the House of today, 
the conference report is considered as having been read.
  (For conference report and statement, see prior proceedings of the 
House of today.)
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young) and 
the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Obey) each will control 45 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young).
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  I would just briefly like to mention the fact that we have produced a 
four-page legal-sized document that identifies the highlights of this 
bill. This has been available now for more than 2 days for Members to 
look at to get a really good understanding of what is in the bill. I 
would suggest that anyone who wants to find some reason to oppose this 
bill, they can find it. It is a huge bill. It required hours and days 
and weeks of negotiation to get us to the point that we are.
  Mr. Speaker, this bill should be passed today, and the House should 
conclude its business. I am going to ask shortly that the gentleman 
from Illinois (Mr. Porter), who is the chairman of the subcommittee, 
manage the balance of the debate, inasmuch as he is the chairman of the 
Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Resources, and Education, and 
Related Agencies; but before I do, Mr. Speaker, I want to ask Members 
to adopt this legislation and to get quickly to a vote.
  I have a brief statement I would like to read before I turn this time 
over but before that I want to talk with the gentleman from Wisconsin 
(Mr. Obey).
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I yield to the gentleman from Wisconsin.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, I would like to at this point engage the 
chairman of the committee in a colloquy on the Low Income Energy 
Assistance Program, which I hope will address the concerns many Members 
have regarding the lack of an advanced appropriation for fiscal year 
2000 in this bill.
  We are all aware of the drastic spike in price fuels that has 
occurred in the past year. Home heating fuels have

[[Page H12443]]

doubled in the past year in many regions. In some areas it has 
increased fivefold. For many seniors and families who are struggling, 
that spike in energy costs have dealt a crushing blow to their family 
budgets just to provide the basic essentials of heating their homes.
  The LIHEAP program helps over 4 million low-income households by 
paying on average about half their home heating bills. But due to a 
lack of funds, this program has been serving only about 15 percent of 
federally income-eligible households. The recent jump in fuel costs 
will mean the relative value of that assistance will be cut in half 
this winter.
  Earlier this year, Congress provided an extra $600 million in the 
LIHEAP emergency fund that was required by the President in the 2000 
supplemental appropriation bill. About $450 million of those extra 
dollars were released by September for this winter, and I hope that the 
administration will release the balance soon.
  The conference agreement for fiscal year 2001 contains $1.4 billion 
for LIHEAP, an increase of 27 percent, plus an additional $300 million 
for the LIHEAP emergency fund. Now, normally this appropriation bill 
would also provide an advance appropriation for LIHEAP for the next 
fiscal year so that States have time to plan their programs prior to 
the time that funds become available. However, as the gentleman knows, 
due to a provision in the budget resolution which places a cap on the 
total for advance appropriations, we were not able to include LIHEAP 
funding for the next fiscal year as an advance appropriation.

                              {time}  1700

  It is my hope and understanding that next year we will finish our 
work on the Committee on Appropriations before the fiscal year starts 
on October 1. But in the event that we do not, I think we need to 
signal our intentions to the States now so that they can be assured 
that LIHEAP funds will be there when they need them despite the lack of 
an advanced appropriation in this bill.
  So I would, therefore, ask the chairman of the committee, is it your 
intention that we provide at least the same level of support for LIHEAP 
next year as is included in this bill?
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Speaker, reclaiming my time, I thank the 
gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Obey) for raising this issue because it 
has been a big concern for many Members on my side of the aisle as 
well.
  I want to assure Members that LIHEAP is a very high priority for the 
Committee on Appropriations and we will do everything we can to 
maintain, at a minimum, the current level of support for this program 
next year.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, I thank the chairman for that response.
  Mr. Speaker, if the gentleman will continue to yield, let me ask 
further, in the event that we do not complete the Labor-H bill next 
year by October 1 and have to pass a continuing resolution after that 
date, is it your intention to include adequate funding in the first CR 
for LIHEAP so that States can adequately run their systems programs 
through the next winter heating season?
  If the committee can offer that commitment, I think Members on this 
side of the aisle will feel much more comfortable in supporting this 
conference agreement knowing that the normal operations of this program 
will not be interrupted.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Speaker, let me respond to the gentleman 
that while I hope a continuing resolution would not be necessary next 
October, I would certainly support including funding for the full 
winter heating season in the first CR should we find ourselves in that 
position.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, I thank the chairman of the committee for his 
strong support for the program and for his commitment to ensure that 
this lack of an advance appropriation in this bill will not result in 
the interruption of this critical assistance.
  I also want to take this opportunity to thank him for the patience 
that he has shown as we worked our way through some very troubling 
difficulties. Thank goodness that they now appear to be behind us, at 
least for a month.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from 
Wisconsin (Mr. Obey) for his comments. We have had differences 
throughout the appropriations process, but we were able to come 
together. This is a good bipartisan bill. The gentleman from Wisconsin 
(Mr. Obey) and I spent a lot of time in the wee hours of this morning 
trying to bring this bill to the floor today.
  Before I turn my time over to the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. 
Porter) who is the chairman of the subcommittee, I wanted to say, Mr. 
Speaker, that we are at that time of the year when holiday thoughts 
enter our mind; and I recall one of my predecessors who one time made a 
very, very aggressive wish to the Members for a Merry Christmas after a 
rather heated discussion. I also want to leave a message about the 
holiday season if the Members would indulge me for about another 
minute. It goes like this:

     Twas the week before Christmas and all through the House, 
           appropriators were working but beginning to grouse.
     The big day was coming but no end in sight.
     If only we had a number, we could finish tonight.
     When back from the White House there came such a clatter, I 
           sprang from my office to see what was the matter.
     When what to my pleasant surprise did I see?
     Speaker Hastert with a number and a look of sheer glee.
     Here is what you told me you needed, he said,
     And quickly he turned with a nod of his head:
     I think Obey and Clinton and Daschle and Lott
     Will all be pleased with the number we got.
     As I turned I was amazed at what did transpire,
     13 Cardinals all ready to file . . .
     Now Packard! Now Porter! Now Hobson and Taylor!
     On Lewis! On Rogers! On Jim Walsh and Kolbe!
     From H-218 to the Committee on Rules
     It is time to wrap up and not a moment too soon . . .
     Our job here is done; now let us clear the hall
     Let us vote and then dash away, dash away all.

  And I wish everyone a very happy, safe holiday season.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. I yield to the gentleman from Wisconsin.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, I would also like to take this opportunity, 
and I know he has to leave to take a plane for a very important event 
which his wife has set up involving a number of Florida children, but 
in addition to thanking the gentleman for his good cheer and courtesy 
throughout a tough year, I also want to take this opportunity to wish 
him in advance a happy birthday, which I understand is tomorrow.
  Mr. YOUNG of Florida. Mr. Speaker, reclaiming my time, I thank the 
gentleman very much.
  I recall late one night we were here and the gentleman from Wisconsin 
(Mr. Obey) missed his wedding anniversary because of a late night 
session. And if we do not soon get out of here tonight, he is going to 
miss being awarded a very, very prestigious and impressive honorary 
degree at an institution of education that he founded back in 
Wisconsin.
  So I wish him the best of luck and congratulations.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 15 minutes.
  Mr. Speaker, before I get into my explanation of this bill, I want to 
take a moment to do something I think is very important. This 
institution takes a lot of abuse but there are some people in this 
institution who do a tremendous job on behalf of the taxpayers and they 
deserve, no matter how rushed the Members are, they deserve to be 
recognized.
  I want to start by thanking the committee staff on our side of the 
aisle, Mark Mioduski and Cheryl Smith, who have worked so incredibly 
hard all year on the Labor-Health bill. Cheryl not only handles 
education programs for the minority, but she does the transportation 
bill, as well. And I know that there were occasions when they went 2\1/
2\ days or more without a single hour's sleep in order to serve this 
House, this committee, and its members; and I am very grateful.
  I want to thank Mark Murray, who does a terrific job handling both 
the

[[Page H12444]]

Foreign Operations bill and the Legislative Branch appropriations bill; 
Dave Kilian, who has virtually single handedly handled the Defense bill 
on our side of the aisle; Tom Forhan, who handles both the Military 
Construction bill and the District of Columbia bill; Dave Reich and 
Mike Stephens, who worked together on VA-HUD. And, in addition, Dave 
handles the Agriculture bill and Mike handles the Interior bill. Sally 
Chadbourne and Pat Schlueter worked together on the Commerce-Justice-
State bill. Sally also does the Energy and Water bill, and Pat does the 
Treasury-Postal bill.
  None of these people would be nearly as effective if it were not for 
the tireless efforts of Mr. Bonner, who undoubtedly works as hard as 
any human being on Capitol Hill, and Jade Brennan, who was been here 
early in the morning until early the next morning day after day and 
night after night. And I would also like to thank Kori Bernards, who 
has coordinated our communications efforts too and Norris Cochran and 
Christina Hamilton, who have helped out in numerous ways.
  This small group of people had to deal literally with every funding 
issue in every department and agency and program of the entire Federal 
Government. They have had to help Members with their particular 
problems with government programs and very often have had to deal with 
the wrath of authorizing issues that have nothing to do with the 
appropriations but nonetheless get dumped into our bills as a means of 
clearing them through both Houses. I think that the effort they put 
forth on behalf of this institution and particularly Members on my side 
of the aisle is remarkable, and I want to thank them from the bottom of 
my heart for their long hours, their tremendous knowledge of our 
Government and legislative process and the enormous commitment that 
they have made to making this Government and this country a better 
place.
  I also want to pay special thanks to the clerk of the committee, Jim 
Dyer. I do not think there is a single person on Capitol Hill who is 
more patient, more fair or more pleasant to deal with on a daily basis 
in and out. I can say without reservation that, had it not been for his 
commitment and personal skill, this agreement and many others would 
never have come together.
  Also helping the chairman and the entire committee in the front 
office are John Mikel, a first rate professional, who for more than a 
decade has pulled the committee and the House through the thorny 
thickets of process and budget rules. And Chuck Parkinson has helped 
schedule our bills and coordinate with the Committee on Rules; and the 
leadership minority, Dale Oak, who manage the massive job of tracking 
the hundreds of extraneous items that various Members and other 
committees attempted to attach to this legislation; and Elizabeth Morra 
and John Schofield who have handled press for the majority.
  Dianne Kane, Sandy Farrow, Brian Mabry, and Theo Powell really make 
the committee work; and they are a big help not only to the majority 
but to all of us on the committee. And I want to especially recognize 
Tony McCann, the Subcommittee on Labor-Health clerk; Carol Murphy; 
Susan Firth; Geoff Kenyon; Francine Mack-Salvador; and Tom Kelly of the 
Subcommittee on Labor-HHS staff and all of the associate staff of the 
members of the Labor-HHS subcommittee on both sides of the aisle. And I 
also thank Steve Cartesi, the majority clerk on the Senate side, and 
Jim English on the minority side and all of the other clerks and 
ranking members' assistants as well on all of the other subcommittees 
who deal so well and with so much dedication.
  I know that there are few people in this country who appreciate how 
hard all of these people work and how much of a contribution they make 
to their country and this institution, but I want to say ``thank you'' 
to all of them. And I am sure that that feeling is shared on both sides 
of the aisle.
  Now I would simply like to say this, and I will say one more thing 
about one person before I move to substance: The gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Porter) is leaving this institution after a distinguished 
career which would make any American proud; and I have to say that, 
whether I have served with him on the Subcommittee on Foreign 
Operations or on the Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Education, he 
has invariably brought a high degree of thoughtfulness, a high degree 
of fairness, uncommon good judgment and good sense, and immense 
dedication to the public good.
  I can think of no better phrase than to repeat the phrase that we 
have heard so often, ``Well done, good and faithful servant.''
  John has truly been a credit to this institution, to his party, to 
his country and to his district. I want to lead us all in a round of 
applause for the wonderful work that he has done while he has been with 
us in this institution.
  And now, Mr. Speaker, on to the substance.
  On Wednesday night, the country heard two very good speeches on 
reconciliation from Mr. Gore and Mr. Bush. Both emphasized a need for 
bipartisanship.
  Unfortunately, we serve in the institution which has suffered the 
greatest erosion of bipartisanship in recent years. But this 
institution does, in my opinion, have a very good model for 
bipartisanship and that is the Committee on Appropriations.
  Even during the last 6 years, we have been able to produce a 
significant number of bills on a bipartisan basis. In all but one year, 
the Labor-HHS Education bill has not been one of those bills. That has 
not been the fault of the distinguished gentleman and my good friend 
the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Porter), the subcommittee chairman. 
Nor has it been the fault of the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young) or 
his predecessor as full committee chair, Bob Livingston. They have 
struggled in the best traditions of this committee to reach across the 
aisle and to build the broadest possible consensus for each bill. But 
because of the restrictions placed on them by the Committee on the 
Budget and their leadership, their efforts have not often succeeded in 
my judgment.
  This bill has been a poster child on how not to run a legislative 
body. And, in fact, in this process, a Member of the majority side of 
the aisle earlier correctly noted that there are dozens of items in 
this bill that have nothing whatsoever to do with the appropriations 
bill.
  In fact, there are well over a hundred different authorizations that 
are being added to this bill by reference. We did not negotiate those 
items. We are not responsible for them. All we can try to do with our 
limited staff is to try to make certain that they were not supremely 
objectionable to this or that faction in the House. And I have to say 
that this is a spectacular example of how not to run a railroad.
  This year has been especially frustrating to those of us who would 
like to see some of the most critical functions of Government funded on 
a bipartisan consensus. And the fact is that for 9 months of this year 
the deliberations of this committee were wasted on phoney budget 
resolutions that held funding for education, held research, worker 
protection and other critical programs in this bill at virtually last 
year's funding level with no adjustment for inflation, with no 
recognition of the new challenges facing this country and yet the 
majority passed the bill.

                              {time}  1715

  The Senate recognized that was an unrealistic package when they 
passed a bill somewhat more in line with the Nation's needs. In 
October, we reached a bipartisan agreement that in my view met the 
needs of a changing and growing country, but then that bill was blocked 
from coming to the floor by the majority party leadership. Both parties 
then went out and campaigned for the education and the health and 
worker protection programs that were in this bill. But after the 
election, the majority party leaders then demanded that this bill be 
cut by more than $3.7 billion before it could be brought back to the 
floor. That is a demand they did not make of the interior bill that was 
almost 15 percent above last year, or the transportation bill that was 
similarly way above last year, and also a bill such as the energy and 
water bill which was substantially above last year.
  To get an agreement in the last week, we had to cut $3.7 billion from 
the earlier agreement, we had to take $1.4 billion from advance funding 
for LIHEAP, we had to take $257 million

[[Page H12445]]

out of handicapped education, $127 million out of efforts to reduce 
class size, $180 million out of after-school programs and $200 million 
out of biomedical research. I dislike all of those cuts and would point 
out that they were unnecessary both in terms of meeting the budget 
limits that Congress imposed on itself in October and they were 
unnecessary in terms of passing this bill.
  But nonetheless, even with these changes, I will support this bill 
for two reasons: one, because I have in essence a ministerial duty to 
do so. Sooner or later we have to resolve our differences and this is 
the day; and, secondly, I think there are other good reasons to vote 
for this bill. It now provides funding on a program basis that is 
nearly 15 percent higher than last year for critical education and 
health programs. Some people are alarmed by that. I am delighted by it. 
The overall increase in education in this bill is 18 percent. It is a 
major step forward in providing local schools with the kind of 
resources that will facilitate the kind of change and improvement in 
our schools that the American people are anxious to see.
  Class size reduction efforts are increased 25 percent. Teacher 
quality efforts are increased 50 percent. School renovation is funded 
at a $1.2 billion level. For Pell grants, and I think this is perhaps 
the most important issue in the area of higher education in this bill, 
we have the biggest increase in 25 years, the Pell grant going from a 
maximum grant of $3,300 to $3,750. To the very deep regret of our 
friend, the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Porter), we did not provide 
the 15 percent increase for NIH that we had hoped to see. We provided 
almost that much, about 14 percent; and I am hopeful we will ultimately 
see our efforts against disease doubled within the 5-year time frame 
that will end in fiscal 2003.
  The most troubling cut in this bill for many Members on this side of 
the aisle is the advance funding for the low-income fuel assistance 
program which I just mentioned. Members need to recognize, however, 
that fuel assistance is funded for the current year not only at the 
full level provided last year, not only at the request, but at $300 
million above the request. I am convinced that will not be enough, 
given current energy price increases and long-term weather forecasts; 
but it is 25 percent more than would be available if we had to go to a 
continuing resolution. The deletion of that advance funding is 
unfortunate. It carries with it certain risks that I am uncomfortable 
about. It does not give State and local governments as much assurance 
about program levels for next year as would be desirable for planning 
purposes. It does not assure that all of the money will be allocated 
next fall before cold weather hits. But we have in the statement of the 
managers very firm commitments to work to overcome those problems, and 
I intend to see that the leadership in Congress and the new President 
will keep those commitments.
  I would also note that there were over 400 authorizations which one 
party or another attempted to add to this bill. We rejected almost 300 
of them. And of those that are in the bill, you will have to talk to 
the authorizing committees to get a balanced evaluation, because they 
largely negotiated them. I have just one additional statement to make. 
I love this institution. I respect every Member in it. I love what it 
can do when it is at its best in doing things that are needed to help 
the people we represent, but I honestly do believe that the way this 
bill was produced is a model of how not to proceed in the future. But 
in the end finally it has produced an honest product with honest 
numbers. I think it makes a significant advance forward in meeting the 
needs that it is supposed to meet.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Pease). Without objection, the time 
allocated to the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young) will be controlled 
by the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Porter).
  There was no objection.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I am sorry that the gentleman from Pennsylvania, who 
earlier had reserved the right to object and then criticized the bill, 
might have stayed on the floor because I am directing this portion of 
my remarks to him. In early 1988, Ronald Reagan came to the floor of 
this House to give his State of the Union address and slammed down on 
the Clerk's desk a bill that was probably twice the size of the one 
that is sitting there right now. It was an omnibus bill that had been 
passed about this time of year in 1987. President Reagan said, ``Never 
again.'' In his remarks to the Congress at that time, he lifted words 
out of a letter that I had written with 147 Members of the House of 
Representatives saying that this is not the way we ought to do the 
House's business.
  Very frankly, the gentleman from Pennsylvania is correct. Omnibus 
bills are never a proper way to legislate. But let me say to the 
gentleman that the Labor, Health and Human Services and Education 
appropriation bill was conferenced. We completed the conference on July 
27. Appropriators would have brought that measure to the floor right 
away. Yes, it might have been vetoed by the President, it probably 
would have been, but we would have started those negotiations with the 
White House long ago and would have completed them presumably before 
the end of the fiscal year. We do not support delay in the 
consideration of this conference report. This is an idea that comes 
from outside the appropriations process.
  I would say to the gentleman, if he were here, one other thing. It 
echoes the words that my colleague from Wisconsin mentioned a moment 
ago. We must have, early in the legislative process, a budget 
resolution adopted on a bipartisan basis. The White House needs to be 
on board. The Republicans in the Congress of both Houses need to be on 
board. The Democrats need to be on board, we must have an agreed 
number. We need not have all the detail. All we need is two lines: one 
that defines total spending for the government and one that defines 
total discretionary spending. That is all we need. Appropriators can 
then get started.
  If you do not have an agreed bipartisan budget resolution early in 
the process, you have no fiscal discipline. That is exactly what we had 
this year and in several past fiscal years--no fiscal discipline. We 
need to get such direction early. We need to get an agreement. We need 
to make the allocations between the Senate and the House appropriations 
subcommittees early in the process. Once that is accomplished we can 
achieve fiscal discipline. You do not end up with these kind of bills 
done where, he is right, nobody knows quite everything that is in it.
  I would add one other thing. Many things that are in this measure 
were well known on July 27. There are some changes in the appropriation 
numbers since that time, but they have been available to all Members. 
Most of the changes that are in the document sitting on the desk have 
occurred because authorizing measures have been added to the bill. Most 
of the delay all day yesterday and all day today have come not from 
appropriation matters but from authorizing matters that should have 
been dealt with long ago.
  I would say to the gentleman, he is on the right track. I commend to 
him Ronald Reagan's statement. I commend to all Members that statement. 
We need to do these things on a bipartisan basis, and let appropriators 
get their work done with some fiscal discipline involved.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
California (Mrs. Capps).
  Mrs. CAPPS. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this legislation. 
Included in this bill is a waiver of Medicare's 24-month waiting period 
for persons disabled by ALS, Lou Gehrig's Disease. This terrible 
disease leaves its victims totally unable to care for themselves. 
Tragically, their life expectancy is often less than the waiting period 
itself. Medicare coverage will ease their suffering and provide support 
for their families and friends. This provision comes from a bill 
authored by my husband, Walter Capps, which I reintroduced and which 
now has 282 House cosponsors. I want to thank these cosponsors.
  While recovering from a car accident, Walter received his physical 
rehab with a friend suffering from ALS, Tom Rogers. Towards the end of 
the rehab, Tom arrived one day with a pair of tennis

[[Page H12446]]

shoes. He gave them to Walter saying he had no further use for them, he 
was now confined to a wheelchair. Walter wore these shoes throughout 
his campaign for this House. He never forgot the struggle that is Tom's 
and thousands of other ALS victims.
  This victory today is for ALS patients and their families who built 
support for our bill.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Kentucky (Mr. Rogers), the chairman of the Subcommittee 
on Commerce, Justice, State and Judiciary.
  (Mr. ROGERS asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks, and include extraneous material.)
  Mr. ROGERS. Mr. Speaker, I submit the following material that updates 
the statement of the managers to accompany the Commerce, Justice, State 
Appropriations Act for fiscal year 2001 to reflect changes made by the 
pending bill and other minor technical corrections. It has the support 
of my good friend, our ranking member, the gentleman from New York (Mr. 
Serrano). This matter should be used to determine questions of intent 
with respect to our bill.

DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE JUDICIARY, AND RELATED 
                        AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS

       Following is explanatory language on H.R. 5548, as 
     introduced on October 25, 2000, and subsequent amendments.
       The conferees on H.R. 4942 agree with the matter included 
     in H.R. 5548 and enacted in this conference report by 
     reference and the following description of it. The bill was 
     developed through negotiations by subcommittee members of the 
     Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, 
     and Related Agencies Subcommittees of the House and Senate on 
     the differences in the House passed and Senate reported 
     versions of H.R. 4690. References in the following 
     description to the ``conference agreement'' mean the matter 
     included in the introduced bill enacted by this conference 
     report, and subsequent amendments. References to the House 
     bill mean the House passed version of H.R. 4690. References 
     to the Senate reported amendment mean the Senate reported 
     version of H.R. 4690.
       The House passed H.R. 4690 on June 26, 2000. The Senate 
     reported from Committee a Senate amendment to H.R. 4690 on 
     July 21, 2000. References in the following statement to 
     appropriations amounts or other items proposed by the House 
     bill or the Senate-reported amendment refer only to those 
     amounts and items recommended in the House-passed and Senate-
     reported versions of H.R. 4690. Any reference to 
     appropriations amounts or other items included in the 
     conference agreement reflects the final agreement on H.R. 
     4690. This statement reflects how the funds provided in the 
     conference agreement are to be spent.
       Senate-reported amendment: The Senate Appropriations 
     Committee considered H.R. 4690 as passed by the House, struck 
     all after the enacting clause, and inserted the text of the 
     Senate-reported amendment. The conference agreement includes 
     a revised bill.

                     TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

                         General Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $88,713,000 for General 
     Administration, instead of $83,713,000 as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment and $84,177,000 as proposed in the 
     House bill.
       The conference agreement adopts by reference the House 
     report language regarding budget ``shortfalls'' and racial 
     disparities in Federal capital prosecutions.
       The conference agreement includes a $5,000,000 transfer 
     from the Immigration and Naturalization Service Salaries and 
     Expenses account to continue the planned integration of the 
     Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) IDENT system and 
     the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) IAFIS system.
       The conference agreement includes a $5,000,000 increase for 
     the Office of Intelligence Policy and Review for Foreign 
     Intelligence Surveillance Act applications.
       The conference agreement includes bill language contained 
     in the House bill specifying the amount of funding provided 
     for the Department Leadership Program and the Offices of 
     Legislative and Public Affairs.


                     JOINT AUTOMATED BOOKING SYSTEM

       The conference agreement includes $15,915,000 for the Joint 
     Automated Booking System (JABS) program as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment, instead of $1,800,000 as proposed 
     in the House bill.


                       NARROWBAND COMMUNICATIONS

       The conference agreement includes $205,000,000 for 
     narrowband communications conversion activities as proposed 
     in the Senate-reported amendment, instead of $95,445,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill. The conference agreement provides 
     funding necessary to continue implementation of the 
     Department of Justice Wireless Network (JWN), and for 
     operations and maintenance of legacy systems. The Wireless 
     Management Office (WMO) is directed to submit quarterly 
     status reports on implementation of the JWN, with the first 
     such report due no later than February 15, 2001.
       The conference agreement deletes a citation included in the 
     House bill but not included in the Senate-reported amendment.


                         COUNTERTERRORISM FUND

       The conference agreement includes $5,000,000 for the 
     Counterterrorism Fund as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment, instead of $10,000,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill. When combined with $32,844,150 in prior year carryover, 
     a total of $37,844,150 will be available in the Fund in 
     fiscal year 2001 to cover unanticipated, extraordinary 
     expenses incurred as a result of a terrorist threat or 
     incident.
       The conference agreement retains language, included in the 
     House bill and carried in previous Acts, authorizing the 
     Attorney General to make expenditures from the fund, subject 
     to section 605 of this Act. The Senate-reported amendment 
     proposed to give this authority to a new Deputy Attorney 
     General.


               TELECOMMUNICATIONS CARRIER COMPLIANCE FUND

       The conference agreement includes $201,420,000 for the 
     Telecommunications Carrier Compliance program for 
     implementation of the Communications Assistance for Law 
     Enforcement Act of 1994 (CALEA), instead of $278,021,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill. The Senate-reported amendment did 
     not include funding for this activity. This amount, when 
     combined with funds previously made available, will provide 
     the full $500,000,000 authorized and required to implement 
     CALEA.
       The conference agreement concurs with the direction in the 
     House report that the Department and the Federal Bureau of 
     Investigation (FBI) are to remain focused on the timely 
     implementation of CALEA, and have therefore included 
     $17,300,000 within the FBI Salaries and Expenses account for 
     CALEA implementation. The Department of Justice is directed 
     to submit a reorganization proposal no later than November 
     15, 2000, to ensure coordination of CALEA implementation and 
     other related electronic surveillance issues.


                   ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW AND APPEALS

       The conference agreement includes $161,062,000 for 
     Administrative Review and Appeals, instead of $159,570,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill and $112,814,000 as proposed in 
     the Senate-reported amendment. Of the total amount provided, 
     $159,335,000 is for the Executive Office for Immigration 
     Review (EOIR) and $1,727,000 is for the Office of the Pardon 
     Attorney.
       The conference agreement includes $9,566,000 for 
     adjustments to base, and $3,000,000, 37 positions and 19 
     full-time equivalent workyears (FTE) to address the increased 
     Immigration Judge and appellate caseload. In addition, EOIR 
     is directed to provide such sums as necessary for point-to-
     point installation of video-conferencing equipment in 
     accordance with EOIR's plan and the Senate report. The 
     conference agreement also includes direction under the INS 
     Examinations Fees account regarding continued support for 
     contract court interpreter services.


                           DETENTION TRUSTEE

       The conference agreement includes $1,000,000 to establish a 
     new Federal Detention Trustee within the Department of 
     Justice as proposed in the House bill. The Senate-reported 
     amendment did not address this matter. The conference 
     agreement reflects the concerns expressed in the House report 
     regarding the planning and management of detention space in 
     the Department of Justice. Therefore, the direction included 
     in the House report regarding the authorities and duties of 
     this new Trustee, and the establishment of regional pilot 
     projects to test better mechanisms for addressing detention 
     needs, is adopted by reference. Further, the Department of 
     Justice is expected to consolidate all detention resources 
     under the Trustee as part of the fiscal year 2002 budget 
     submission.


                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

       The conference agreement includes $41,575,000 for the 
     Office of Inspector General (OIG) instead of $41,825,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill and $42,192,000 as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment. The conference agreement also 
     assumes that $1,500,000 in INS fees will be available to the 
     OIG.
       The conference agreement directs the Department of Justice 
     to review its procedures for releasing OIG investigatory 
     material and findings and inform the Committees on 
     Appropriations by June 1, 2001, if any procedures should be 
     modified.
       The OIG is directed to submit future budget requests 
     separating OIG Leadership Offices and OIG Operational 
     Offices. The OIG Leadership Offices decision unit should 
     include the following: the Inspector General, the Deputy 
     Inspector General, the Counselor to the Inspector General, 
     the Special Counsel, and the Special Investigations and 
     Review Unit. The Operational Offices decision unit should 
     include the following offices: the Audit Division, the 
     Investigations Division, the Inspections Division, and the 
     Management and Planning Division.
       The conference agreement directs that the OIG submit a 
     detailed financial plan to the Committees on Appropriations 
     by December 1, 2000.

                    United States Parole Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $8,855,000 for the U.S. 
     Parole Commission, as

[[Page H12447]]

     proposed in the House bill, instead of the $7,380,000 as 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. The conference 
     agreement adopts by reference the recommendation in the 
     Senate report on detailing attorneys.

                            Legal Activities


            SALARIES AND EXPENSES, GENERAL LEGAL ACTIVITIES

       The conference agreement includes $535,771,000 for General 
     Legal Activities, instead of $523,228,000 as proposed in the 
     House bill, and $494,310,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment.
       The recommendation includes base adjustments for all 
     divisions, but does not include an undefined base 
     restoration. The distribution of funding provided is as 
     follows:

Office of the Solicitor General..............................$7,118,000
Tax Division.................................................70,991,000
Criminal Division...........................................110,851,000
Civil Division..............................................154,092,000
Environment and Natural Resources............................68,703,000
Office of Legal Counsel.......................................4,967,000
Civil Rights Division........................................92,166,000
Interpol--USNCB...............................................7,686,000
Legal Activities Office Automation...........................18,877,000
Office of Dispute Resolution....................................320,000
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Total...................................................535,771,000

       The conference agreement includes a $3,000,000 increase for 
     the Civil Rights Division, including funding for civil 
     enforcement for police misconduct, and other highest priority 
     initiatives.
       The conference agreement provides $18,877,000 to remain 
     available until expended for office automation costs as 
     proposed in the House bill, instead of $18,571,000 as 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. The conference 
     agreement adopts language included in the Senate-reported 
     amendment which limits the use of these funds to automation 
     costs and allows such funds to be used for the United States 
     Trustees Program. The conference agreement adopts by 
     reference the Senate report language regarding the Office of 
     Special Investigations, and the House report language 
     regarding extradition reporting and extradition treaties.


               THE NATIONAL CHILDHOOD VACCINE INJURY ACT

       The conference agreement includes a reimbursement of 
     $4,028,000 for fiscal year 2001 from the Vaccine Injury 
     Compensation Trust Fund to the Department of Justice, as 
     proposed in the House bill and the Senate-reported amendment.


               SALARIES AND EXPENSES, ANTITRUST DIVISION

       The conference agreement provides $120,838,000 for the 
     Antitrust Division as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment, instead of $113,269,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill. The conference agreement assumes that of the amount 
     provided, $95,838,000 will be derived from current year fee 
     collections and $25,000,000 from estimated unobligated fee 
     collections available from prior years, resulting in a net 
     direct appropriation of $0. The use of any remaining 
     unobligated fees balances from prior years is subject to the 
     reprogramming requirements outlined in section 605 of this 
     Act.
       Appropriations for both the Division and the Federal Trade 
     Commission are financed with Hart-Scott-Rodino Act pre-merger 
     filing fees. Section 630 of this Act modifies the Hart-Scott-
     Rodino Act to include a three-tiered fee structure that 
     increases the filing threshold for a merger transaction from 
     $15,000,000 to $50,000,000. It is anticipated that the 
     increase in the filing threshold will reduce the number of 
     mergers requiring review by approximately 50 percent.


             SALARIES AND EXPENSES, UNITED STATES ATTORNEYS

       The conference agreement includes $1,250,382,000 for the 
     U.S. Attorneys, instead of $1,247,416,000 as proposed in the 
     House bill, and $1,159,014,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. The following narrative reflects how the 
     funds provided in the conference agreement are to be spent.
       The conference agreement provides a net increase of 
     $59,896,000 for pay and inflationary adjustments to enable 
     the U.S. Attorneys to maintain the current operating level. 
     The conference agreement does not include $7,425,000 
     requested as base adjustments to substitute direct 
     appropriations for activities previously supported from the 
     Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control (HCFAC) account. The 
     Department of Justice is directed to continue to provide 
     funding for not less than 177 positions and 177 FTE to the 
     U.S. Attorneys from the HCFAC account to support health care 
     fraud activities.
       The conference agreement also includes the following 
     program increases:
       Firearms Prosecutions.--$15,259,000, 163 positions and 82 
     FTE, including 113 attorneys, to augment prosecutions under 
     existing firearms statutes. This amount, when combined with 
     base resources of $7,125,000, will provide a total of 
     $22,384,000 for intensive firearms prosecution projects. The 
     direction included in the House report regarding the criteria 
     and process for allocation of these funds is adopted by 
     reference. Further, the Executive Office of U.S. Attorneys is 
     directed not to set aside any portion of these funds for 
     headquarters priorities, but rather is to allocate these 
     funds in accordance with the priorities identified by the 
     local districts which will result in a direct increase in 
     prosecutions under existing gun laws. In addition, the 
     conference agreement adopts the Senate direction requiring 
     the annualization of funds provided in fiscal year 2000 for 
     firearms prosecutions, and the reporting requirement 
     regarding panel attorney costs.
       Cyber Crime and Intellectual Property.--$3,974,000, 50 
     positions and 25 FTE, including 28 attorneys, to augment the 
     investigation and prosecution of computer and intellectual 
     property crimes, including crimes identified in the No 
     Electronic Theft (NET) Act, the National Information 
     Infrastructure Assurance Act, and the Economic Espionage Act. 
     The direction included in the Senate report regarding 
     submission of a report on copyright enforcement is adopted by 
     reference.
       Immigration.--$1,974,000, 24 positions and 12 FTE, 
     including 13 attorneys, to address the growing criminal 
     immigration caseload along the Southwest Border, with 
     particular emphasis to be placed on prosecutions of 
     individuals involved in alien smuggling, document fraud, and 
     illegal aliens with multiple deportations. The conference 
     agreement adopts by reference the direction included in the 
     House report regarding submission of a spending plan for 
     these resources.
       Indian Country.--$5,000,000, 60 positions and 30 FTE, 
     including 33 attorneys, to enhance Federal investigation and 
     prosecution activities in Indian Country to meet Federal 
     statutory responsibilities related to Indian Country.
       Legal Education.--$2,300,000 to continue establishment of a 
     distance learning facility at the National Advocacy Center 
     (NAC). This amount, when combined with $15,316,000 in base 
     resources, provides a total of $17,616,000 under this account 
     for legal education at the National Advocacy Center (NAC). 
     These funds are to be spent in accordance with the direction 
     included in the Senate report.
       Within the total amount available to the U.S. Attorneys, 
     the conference agreement includes $2,612,000 for technology 
     demonstration projects, and adopts by reference the direction 
     included in the Senate report regarding distribution of these 
     resources. In addition, $1,000,000 is included from within 
     base resources to continue a violent crime task force 
     demonstration project, as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment. The conference agreement also adopts by reference 
     the direction included in the House and Senate reports 
     regarding the unstaffed offices report, as well as the 
     direction included in the Senate report regarding an office 
     in Western Kentucky. In addition, the Senate report language 
     regarding property flipping, computer network privatization, 
     and a fiscal year 1995 quarterly reporting requirement are 
     adopted by reference.
       The conference agreement does not adopt the recommendations 
     included in the Senate report regarding the reallocation of 
     existing staffing to the Southwest border and within the 
     Missouri River Valley, spending freezes among object 
     classifications, elimination of base funds for office 
     relocations, limitations on expansion of gun prosecution 
     initiatives, or pre-trial sentencing guidelines.
       In addition to identical provisions that were included in 
     both the House bill and Senate-reported amendment, the 
     conference agreement includes the following provisions: (1) 
     providing for 9,439 positions and 9,557 workyears for the 
     U.S. Attorneys, instead of 9,381 positions and 9,529 
     workyears as proposed in the House bill, and 9,120 positions 
     and 9,398 workyears as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment; (2) allowing not to exceed $2,500,000 for the 
     National Advocacy Center as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment; and (3) providing $1,000,000 for violent crime 
     task forces to remain available until expended as proposed in 
     the Senate-reported amendment. The conference agreement does 
     not include language proposed in the Senate bill withholding 
     50 percent of funds available to U.S. Attorneys until the 
     Attorney General establishes certain rules and penalties in 
     accordance with the Senate version of the fiscal year 2000 
     appropriations bill.


                   UNITED STATES TRUSTEE SYSTEM FUND

       The conference agreement provides $125,997,000 for the U.S. 
     Trustees for fiscal year 2001, to be entirely funded from 
     offsetting collections, instead of $126,242,000 proposed in 
     the House bill and $127,212,000 proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. The conference agreement does not provide 
     amounts the budget request assumed would carry forward to 
     fiscal year 2002. The conference agreement adopts by 
     reference the Senate report language on the National Advocacy 
     Center (NAC). The conference agreement also adopts House 
     report language on the reprogramming of offsetting 
     collections.


      SALARIES AND EXPENSES, FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION

       The conference agreement provides $1,107,000 for the 
     Foreign Claims Settlement Commission, instead of $1,000,000 
     as proposed in the House bill and $1,214,000 as proposed in 
     the Senate-reported amendment.


         SALARIES AND EXPENSES, UNITED STATES MARSHALS SERVICE

       The conference agreement includes $572,695,000 for the U.S. 
     Marshals Service Salaries and Expenses account, instead of 
     $560,438,000 as proposed in the House bill and $550,472,000 
     as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. The following 
     narrative reflects how the funds provided in the conference 
     agreement are to be spent.
       The amount included in the conference agreement includes a 
     $4,713,000 net increase in base adjustments, as follows: 
     $19,774,000 for pay and inflationary increases, offset by

[[Page H12448]]

     decreases of $4,852,000 for one-time equipment purchases and 
     $10,209,000 from the transfer of the Seized Assets Management 
     Program to the Assets Forfeiture Fund. Within the amount 
     provided, a total of $1,735,000 is included for the Warrant 
     Information Network and other networks and on-line services, 
     and $725,000 is for recurring costs of the Electronic 
     Surveillance Unit as directed in the Senate report. The 
     conference agreement does not adopt the recommendation 
     included in the Senate-reported amendment to transfer funding 
     from this account for U.S. Marshals Service costs associated 
     with the Justice Prisoner Alien Transportation System 
     (JPATS), but instead provides $25,503,000 for U.S. Marshals 
     Service requirements under this account.
       In addition, the conference agreement includes $27,389,000 
     in program increases for the following:
       Courthouse Security Staffing and Equipment.--$21,211,000, 
     for courthouse security personnel and equipment. Of this 
     amount, $6,711,000, 89 positions and 45 FTE are provided for 
     courthouse security personnel at new and expanded courthouses 
     expected to open in fiscal year 2001. Language included in 
     the House report regarding the submission of a spending plan 
     and allocation of resources in excess of requirements is 
     adopted by reference.
       In addition, $14,500,000 is provided for courthouse 
     security equipment, as follows:


                   USMS Courthouse Security Equipment

                       [In thousands of dollars]

New Courthouses.................................................$8,173 
  Las Vegas, NV.................................................(1,023)
  Cleveland, OH.................................................(1,012)
  Columbia, SC..................................................(1,122)
  Greenville, TN..................................................(353)
  Corpus Christi, TX............................................(1,078)
  Laredo, TX......................................................(989)
  Providence, RI..................................................(920)
  Helena, MT......................................................(658)
  Wheeling, WV....................................................(245)
  Denver, CO......................................................(773)
Other Security Requirements......................................5,684 
Nationwide Equipment Maintenance Requirement.......................643 
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Total, USMS Security Equipment..............................14,500 

       The Marshals Service is directed to use the $5,684,000 
     provided for Other Security Requirements to address the 
     highest priority security equipment needs for existing 
     courthouses and new courthouses with the greatest 
     deficiencies, and to submit a spending plan for these funds 
     no later than December 1, 2000.
       Electronic Surveillance Unit.--$3,150,000, and up to 6 
     positions and 3 FTE, for personnel and equipment for the 
     Electronic Surveillance Unit.
       Special Assignments.--$2,500,000 for security at high 
     threat and/or high profile trials and for protective details 
     for judicial personnel involved in these trials, including 
     the World Trade Center bombing trial. The Marshals Service is 
     directed to annualize this increase in fiscal year 2002. 
     Concerns have been expressed regarding the exclusion of the 
     Marshals Service from the threat assessment and decision-
     making process regarding certain special and other protective 
     assignments. In addition, the level of protection at Federal 
     facilities by the General Services Administration (GSA) is 
     inadequate relative to the amount the Marshals Service and 
     other agencies are charged by GSA for these services. The 
     Department is directed to report to the Committees on 
     Appropriations no later than December 15, 2000, on the role 
     afforded to the Marshals Service in the threat assessment and 
     decision-making process for special and other protective 
     assignments, and to provide recommendations to augment the 
     Marshals Service's role in this activity. Further, the 
     Department is directed to provide a report on the adequacy of 
     support provided by GSA for facility protection, relative to 
     the amount GSA is charging for these services.
       Financial Management.--$378,000, 8 positions and 4 FTE to 
     improve financial management.
       Cost Saving Initiatives.--$150,000 for implementation and 
     support of a variety of cost saving initiatives as directed 
     in the Senate report. Should additional funds become 
     available through savings achieved, the Marshals Service may 
     use those funds for additional staff only in accordance with 
     Section 605 of this Act.
       The conference agreement adopts by reference the concerns 
     expressed in the Senate report regarding the Special 
     Operations Group (SOG) and directs the Marshals Service to 
     provide a report to the Committees on Appropriations no later 
     than January 15, 2001, on the utilization of the SOG, as well 
     as the resource requirements necessary to ensure that the SOG 
     can fulfill its intended mission.
       The conference agreement includes language providing not to 
     exceed 4,034 positions and 3,895 FTE for the Marshals 
     Service, instead of 4,168 positions and 3,892 FTE as proposed 
     in the House bill. The Senate-reported amendment did not 
     include a similar provision. The conference agreement does 
     not include a provision proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment prohibiting the Marshals Service from providing a 
     protective vehicle for the Director of the Office of National 
     Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) unless certain conditions are 
     met. A similar provision was not included in the House bill. 
     However, the Marshals Service is directed to provide a report 
     to the Committees on Appropriations no later than January 15, 
     2001, on the usage of a protective vehicle by the Director of 
     ONDCP.


                              CONSTRUCTION

       The conference agreement includes $18,128,000 in direct 
     appropriations for the U.S. Marshals Service Construction 
     account, instead of $6,000,000 as proposed in the House bill, 
     and $25,100,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. 
     The conference agreement includes the following distribution 
     of funds:

                           USMS Construction

                       [In thousands of dollars]

Birmingham, AL.....................................................$472
Fort Smith, AR......................................................400
Hartford, CT........................................................200
Wilmington, DE......................................................100
Bowling Green, KY...................................................300
Boston, MA..........................................................650
Ann Arbor, MI.......................................................200
Detroit, MI.........................................................650
Wilmington, NC......................................................775
Buffalo, NY.........................................................150
Tulsa, OK...........................................................300
Philadelphia, PA....................................................400
Hato Rey, PR........................................................793
Spartanburg, SC...................................................1,441
Greenville, MS....................................................1,187
Other Renovation Projects.........................................9,500
Security Specialists/Construction Engineers.........................610
                                                               ________
                                                               
    Total, Construction..........................................18,128

       The Marshals Service is directed to use the $9,500,000 
     provided for Other Renovation Projects for the highest 
     priority security construction needs in locations with a 
     security score of 50 or less, and to submit a spending plan 
     for these funds no later than December 1, 2000.


         JUSTICE PRISONER AND ALIEN TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM FUND

       The conference agreement includes language, as proposed in 
     the House bill, to continue the operations of JPATS on a 
     revolving fund basis through reimbursements from 
     participating agencies, instead of through a direct 
     appropriation under this account as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. The conference agreement does include a 
     direct appropriation of $13,500,000 for a one-time 
     capitalization of the Fund to procure two Sabreliner-class 
     aircraft as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment.


                       FEDERAL PRISONER DETENTION

       The conference agreement provides $597,402,000 for Federal 
     Prisoner Detention as proposed in both the House bill and the 
     budget request, instead of $539,022,000 as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment, an increase of $72,402,000 over 
     the fiscal year 2000 direct appropriation. The increase has 
     been provided as follows: (1) $63,180,000 is for increased 
     jail days; (2) $675,000 is for increased medical costs; and 
     (3) $500,000 is for prisoner medical guard services.
       The conference agreement does not include language in this 
     section proposed in both the House bill and Senate-reported 
     amendment regarding contracts with private entities for the 
     confinement of Federal detainees, but instead addresses this 
     matter as a new general provision under Title I of this Act. 
     Language is included, as proposed in the House bill, 
     permanently making available amounts appropriated under this 
     account to be used to reimburse the Federal Bureau of Prisons 
     for certain costs associated with providing medical care to 
     certain pre-trial and pre-sentenced detainees. The Senate-
     reported amendment addressed this matter elsewhere under 
     Title I of this Act.


                     FEES AND EXPENSES OF WITNESSES

       The conference agreement includes $125,573,000 for Fees and 
     Expenses of Witnesses, instead of $95,000,000 as proposed in 
     the House bill, and $156,145,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment.
       Language is included allowing not to exceed $5,000,000 to 
     be made available for secure telecommunications equipment and 
     networks related to protected witnesses, as proposed in the 
     House bill. The conference agreement does not include a 
     provision allowing up to $77,067,000 to be transferred from 
     this account to the Federal Prisoner Detention account as 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment.


                      COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE

       The conference agreement includes $8,475,000 for the 
     Community Relations Service as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment, instead of $7,479,000 as proposed in the 
     House bill. The conference agreement adopts the funding 
     increases provided in the Senate report. In addition, the 
     conference agreement includes a provision allowing the 
     Attorney General to transfer up to $1,000,000 of funds 
     available to the Department of Justice to this program, as 
     proposed in the House bill. The Attorney General is expected 
     to report to the Committees on Appropriations of the House 
     and Senate if this transfer authority is exercised. In 
     addition, a provision is included allowing the Attorney 
     General to transfer additional resources, subject to 
     reprogramming procedures, upon a determination that emergent 
     circumstances warrant additional funding, as proposed in both 
     the House bill and the Senate-reported amendment.


                         ASSETS FORFEITURE FUND

       The conference agreement provides $23,000,000 for the 
     Assets Forfeiture Fund as proposed in Senate-reported 
     amendment, instead of no funding as proposed in the House 
     bill.

[[Page H12449]]

                    Radiation Exposure Compensation


                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $2,000,000 for 
     administrative expenses for fiscal year 2001, the full amount 
     requested and the same amount proposed in both the House bill 
     and the Senate-reported amendment. The conference agreement 
     adopts the bill language in the House bill.


         PAYMENT TO RADIATION COMPENSATION EXPOSURE TRUST FUND

       The conference agreement provides $10,800,000 for the 
     compensation trust fund, instead of $3,200,000 provided in 
     the House bill and $14,400,000 in the Senate-reported 
     amendment. The conference agreement includes bill language 
     from the Senate-reported amendment allowing claimants who 
     qualify under the original statute to be paid and does not 
     provide funding for the expansion of the program authorized 
     under Public Law 106-245.

                      Interagency Law Enforcement


                 INTERAGENCY CRIME AND DRUG ENFORCEMENT

       The conference agreement provides a total of $328,898,000 
     for Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement as proposed in the 
     House bill, of which $325,898,000 is derived from direct 
     appropriations, and $3,000,000 is from prior year carryover. 
     The House bill included $328,898,000 in direct 
     appropriations, while the Senate-reported amendment proposed 
     $316,792,000. The distribution of the total available funding 
     is as follows:

                        Reimbursements by Agency

                       [In thousands of dollars]

Drug Enforcement Administration................................$108,190
Federal Bureau of Investigation.................................112,468
Immigration and Naturalization Service...........................15,808
Marshals Service..................................................1,984
U.S. Attorneys...................................................86,582
Criminal Division...................................................814
Tax Division......................................................1,380
Administrative Office.............................................1,672
                                                             __________
                                                             
    Total.......................................................328,898

       The conferees note that the report requested in fiscal year 
     2000 has not yet been delivered to the Committees on 
     Appropriations.

                    Federal Bureau of Investigation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes a total of $3,235,600,000 
     for the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Salaries and 
     Expenses account, instead of $3,229,505,000 as proposed in 
     the House bill, and $3,077,581,000 as recommended in the 
     Senate-reported amendment. Of this amount, the conference 
     agreement provides that not less than $437,650,000 shall be 
     used for counterterrorism investigations, foreign 
     counterintelligence, and other activities related to national 
     security, instead of $400,650,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment, and $159,223,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill. The following narrative reflects how the funds provided 
     in the conference agreement are to be spent.
       The conference agreement includes a net increase of 
     $136,080,000 for adjustments to base as follows: increases 
     totaling $137,219,000 for pay and inflationary increases, 
     including $27,711,000 for increased costs associated with the 
     transfer of Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) employees 
     to the Federal Employee Retirement System (FERS), increased 
     Federal health insurance premium costs, and continued direct 
     funding for the National Instant Check System; offset by 
     decreases totaling $1,139,000 for non-recurring equipment 
     purchases.
       The conference agreement adopts the concerns and direction 
     included in the House report regarding the FBI's inability to 
     execute its budget within the funding levels provided. The 
     conference agreement provides the full amount requested for 
     base adjustments to support the FBI's current staffing and 
     operating level as reflected in the budget request. The 
     conference agreement also includes a provision that 
     identifies the funded position and FTE levels provided in the 
     bill, which are consistent with the full base funding 
     requested and program increases provided in the conference 
     agreement. The FBI is directed to continue to provide 
     quarterly reports to the Committees on Appropriations which 
     delineate by direct and reimbursable the funded and actual 
     agent and non-agent staffing level for each decision unit, 
     with the first report to be provided no later than January 
     15, 2001.
       The following distribution represents the conference 
     agreement:

               FBI SALARIES AND EXPENSES, FISCAL YEAR 2001
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Activity                     Pos.     FTE      Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Criminal, Security and Other
 Investigations:
    Organized Criminal Enterprises........    3,984    3,993     450,678
    White Collar Crime....................    4,284    4,184     483,273
    Other Field Programs..................   10,551   10,304   1,307,024
                                           -----------------------------
      Subtotal............................   18,819   18,481   2,240,975
                                           =============================
Law Enforcement Support:
    Training, Recruitment, and Applicant..    1,003      984     120,454
    Forensic Services.....................      692      680     156,004
    Information, Management, Automation &       569      562     166,121
     Telecommunications...................
    Technical Field Support & Services....      232      229     141,642
    Criminal Justice Services.............    2,171    2,182     216,957
                                           -----------------------------
      Subtotal............................    4,667    4,637     801,178
Program Direction: Management and             2,083    2,024     193,447
 Administration...........................
                                           =============================
      Total, Direct Appropriations........   25,569   25,142   3,235,600
------------------------------------------------------------------------

       The FBI is reminded that changes in this distribution are 
     subject to the reprogramming requirements in section 605 of 
     this Act.
       In addition, the conference agreement includes a total of 
     $59,712,000 in program enhancements for the FBI, of which 
     $58,348,000 is for initiatives to enhance the FBI's ability 
     to investigate threats related to domestic terrorism and 
     cyber crime, as follows:
       $25,000,000 is for Digital Storm and digital collection for 
     foreigh counter-intelligence. The FBI is directed to provide 
     a spending plan to the Committees on Appropriations, no later 
     than December 15, 2000, for Digital Storm.
       $2,000,000 is for Joint Terrorism Task Forces. The FBI is 
     directed to provide a report and spending plan to the 
     Committees on Appropriations, no later than December 15, 
     2000, on this program.
       $10,000,000 is for intelligence gathering and analysis, of 
     which $1,305,000 (24 positions and 12 FTE) is for FISA 
     preparation; $5,606,000 is for contract translation services; 
     and $3,089,000 (55 positions and 28 FTE) is for intelligence 
     research specialists. The conference agreement does not adopt 
     the recommendation included in the Senate report to require 
     the conversion of special agents to 55 intelligence research 
     specialists. While the conference agreement does provide an 
     enhancement for this activity, the FBI is directed to use 
     attrition to convert support positions to intelligence 
     research specialist positions to meet additional requirements 
     in this area.
       $20,000,000 is for other activities, of which the FBI may 
     spend up to $1,364,000 for National Integrated Ballistics 
     Network (NIBIN) Connectivity; $3,700,000 (26 positions and 13 
     FTE) for a counterintelligence initiative; $3,936,000 for the 
     Automated Computer Examination System (ACES) and Computer 
     Analysis and Response Team equipment; $5,500,000 for the 
     Special Technologies and Applications Unit; and $5,500,000 
     for Digital Storm. Should the FBI require additional 
     resources to address personnel requirements, the Committees 
     would be willing to entertain a reprogramming under Section 
     605 from funding provided for these enhancements.
       $612,000 (8 positions and 4 workyears, including 2 agents) 
     is for the Intellectual Property Rights Center, as provided 
     for in the House report, to improve intelligence and analysis 
     related to intellectual property. The reporting requirement 
     included in Senate report regarding copyright enforcement is 
     adopted by reference.
       $2,100,000 is for implementation of the Communications 
     Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), for a total of 
     not less than $17,300,000 within the FBI to be used for this 
     purpose. The conference agreement adopts the direction in the 
     House report that the Department and the FBI remain focused 
     on the timely implementation of CALEA, and therefore the 
     Department of Justice is directed to submit a reorganization 
     proposal to address coordination of CALEA implementation and 
     other related electronic surveillance issues no later than 
     November 15, 2000. This reorganization is expected to ensure 
     continued coordination between the Department and the FBI on 
     all matters involving CALEA implementation, as well as to 
     ensure prioritization of financial and personnel resources 
     required for a continued and sustained implementation effort.
       National Instant Check System (NICS).--The conference 
     agreement includes $67,735,000 in direct appropriations to 
     continue operations of the NICS, as well as to provide system 
     enhancements, including funds for ``hot'' backup for the 
     Interstate Identification Index (III) and other system 
     availability improvements.
       The fiscal year 2001 budget request for the FBI included no 
     direct funding for the NICS, and instead proposed to finance 
     the costs of this system through a user fee. The conference 
     agreement includes a provision under Title VI of this Act 
     which prohibits the FBI from charging a fee for NICS checks, 
     and instead provides funding to the FBI for its costs to 
     operate the NICS.
       FBI Technology Upgrade Plan.--The conference agreement 
     includes total funding of $100,700,000, 14 positions and 7 
     FTE, for this initiative (previously referred to as the 
     Information Sharing Initiative/e-FBI). This amount is to be 
     derived from $80,000,000 made available in prior years, and 
     $20,700,000 in fiscal year 2001 base funding. The House bill 
     proposed a total of $139,344,000 for this initiative, to be 
     derived from $80,000,000 in prior year funds, $20,000,000 in 
     fiscal year 2001 base funds, and $39,344,000 in fiscal year 
     2001 program increases. The Senate-reported amendment 
     proposed a total of $40,000,000 for this initiative, to be 
     derived from prior year funds, and eliminated $20,000,000 in 
     fiscal year 2001 base funding for this activity. The 
     conference agreement does not include the rescission of 
     $40,000,000 in prior year funds for these activities as 
     proposed under Title VII of the Senate-reported amendment.
       The conference agreement approves the plan dated September 
     2000, entitled ``FBI Technology Upgrade Plan, Reprioritized 
     Three Year Implementation Plan.'' Therefore, the conference 
     agreement includes the full amount necessary for year one 
     costs as identified on page 47 of the September 2000 
     implementation plan. The FBI is directed to provide quarterly 
     status reports to the Committees on implementation of this 
     plan, including funding obligations, with the first such 
     report due no later than February 15, 2001.

[[Page H12450]]

       National Infrastructure Protection/Computer Analysis 
     Response Teams (CART).--The FBI is directed to convert 14 
     part-time positions for Computer Analysis Response Teams 
     (CART) examiners to full-time positions from personnel not 
     currently assigned to computer intrusion/infrastructure 
     protection squads, similar to direction included in the 
     Senate report. The conference agreement also adopts the 
     direction included in the Senate report regarding training, 
     promotion and retention of CART members and computer 
     intrusion/infrastructure protection squads. The Senate 
     direction regarding development of a cadre of computer 
     experts from other agencies and the private sector is adopted 
     by reference.
       Victim/Witness Specialists.--The conference agreement 
     includes a new general provision under Title I of this Act 
     authorizing funds to be provided to the FBI to improve 
     services for crime victims from the Crime Victims Fund. These 
     services are to be limited to victim assistance as described 
     in the Victims of Crime Act and shall not cover non-victim 
     witness activities such as witness protection or non-victim 
     witness management services, paralegal duties or community 
     outreach. The FBI is further directed to work with the Office 
     of Victims of Crime (OVC) in developing position 
     descriptions, grade level and hiring requirements, training 
     and annual reporting requests for these specialists. The 
     conference agreement assumes $7,400,000 will be needed to 
     support 112 victim/witness specialists to be distributed as 
     directed in the Senate report. The Committees on 
     Appropriations expect to be notified of the final 
     distribution of these specialists.
       Other.--The Senate report language regarding copyright 
     enforcement, continued collaboration with the Southwest 
     Surety Institute, the Northern New Mexico anti-drug 
     initiative, mitochondrial DNA, crimes against children, and 
     background checks for school bus drivers is adopted by 
     reference. The conference agreement also adopts by reference 
     the House report language regarding the Housing Fraud 
     Initiative, the Jewelry and Gem program, and submission of a 
     comprehensive information technology report.
       In addition, the FBI is directed to fully reimburse the 
     private ambulance providers for their costs in support of 
     Hostage Rescue Team operations in St. Martin Parish, 
     Louisiana, in December, 1999.
       In addition to identical provisions that were included in 
     both the House bill and the Senate-reported amendment, the 
     conference agreement includes a provision, modified from 
     language proposed in the House bill, providing not to exceed 
     25,569 positions and 25,142 FTE for the FBI from funds 
     appropriated in this Act. The Senate-reported amendment did 
     not include a similar provision.


                              construction

       The conference agreement includes $16,687,000 in direct 
     appropriations for construction for the Federal Bureau of 
     Investigation (FBI), instead of $1,287,000 as proposed in the 
     House bill, and $42,687,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. The agreement provides an increase of 
     $15,400,000 over the fiscal year 2000 level for the FBI 
     Academy firearms range modernization project, as follows: 
     $1,900,000 for relocation and consolidation of an ammunition 
     storage facility and for lead abatement at existing outdoor 
     ranges; and $13,500,000 for completion of Phase I and Phase 
     II of this project.

                    Drug Enforcement Administration


                         salaries and expenses

       The conference agreement includes $1,363,309,000 for the 
     Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Salaries and Expenses 
     account, instead of $1,362,309,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill, and $1,345,655,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment. In addition, $83,543,000 is derived from the 
     Diversion Control Fund for diversion control activities. The 
     following narrative reflects how the funds provided in the 
     conference agreement are to be spent.
       Budget and Financial Management.--The conference agreement 
     adopts by reference the concerns and direction included in 
     both the House and Senate reports regarding budget and 
     financial management. The conference agreement also includes 
     a provision that identifies the funded position and FTE 
     levels provided in the bill, which are consistent with the 
     full base funding requested and program increases provided in 
     the conference agreement.
       The following table represents funding provided under this 
     account:

                        DEA SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Activity                     Pos.     FTE      Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enforcement:
  Domestic Enforcement....................    2,252    2,183    $407,261
  Foreign Cooperative Investigation.......      732      699     206,644
  Drug and Chemical Diversion.............      142      143      16,156
  State and Local Task Forces.............    1,678    1,675     242,257
                                           -----------------------------
    Subtotal..............................    4,804    4,700     872,318
                                           =============================
Investigative Support:
  Intelligence............................      883      900     112,904
  Laboratory Services.....................      381      378      44,463
  Training................................       99       98      20,309
  RETO....................................      355      353      85,190
  ADP.....................................      133      130     140,479
                                           -----------------------------
    Subtotal..............................    1,851    1,859     403,345
  Management and Administration...........      865      853      87,646
                                           =============================
    Total, DEA............................    7,520    7,412   1,363,309
------------------------------------------------------------------------

       DEA is reminded that any deviation from the above 
     distribution is subject to the reprogramming requirements of 
     section 605 of this Act.
       The conference agreement provides a net increase of 
     $43,616,000 for base adjustments, as follows: increases 
     totaling $48,293,000 for pay and other inflationary costs to 
     maintain current operations, offset by decreases totaling 
     $4,677,000 for costs associated with one-time and non-
     recurring equipment purchases, GSA rent decreases, and the 
     transfer of funding for a demand reduction project to the 
     Office of Justice Programs.
       In addition, the conference agreement includes program 
     increases totaling $64,200,000, as follows:
       Investigative and Intelligence Requirements.--$48,100,000 
     is provided for the following investigative and intelligence 
     enhancements:
       $3,100,000, 19 positions (11 agents) and 9 FTE within 
     Domestic Enforcement for the Special Operations Division 
     (SOD) to expand support for the Southwest Border Initiative 
     and to address money laundering and financial investigations.
       $43,000,000, 2 positions and 1 FTE within Automated Data 
     Processing to continue deployment of Phase II of FIREBIRD. 
     When combined with $44,870,000 in existing base resources, a 
     total of $87,870,000 is available for this program in fiscal 
     year 2001 to enable FIREBIRD to be fully deployed to all 
     domestic offices and Western Hemisphere offices. Of this 
     amount, $28,000,000 is for deployment, $10,477,000 is for 
     technology renewal, and $49,393,000 is for operations and 
     maintenance and telecommunications costs. DEA is directed to 
     continue to provide quarterly FIREBIRD status and obligation 
     reports to the Committees on Appropriations.
       $2,000,000 within Intelligence, of which $1,800,000 is for 
     enhancements to the El Paso Intelligence Center (EPIC), and 
     $200,000 is to meet expanded participation in the National 
     Drug Pointer Index (NDPIX) information system. The House 
     direction regarding a comprehensive report on participation 
     and utilization of EPIC is adopted by reference.
       Domestic Enhancements.-- $14,600,000 is provided for the 
     following domestic counter-drug enhancements:
       $4,600,000, 25 positions (15 agents) and 13 FTE within 
     Domestic Enforcement to establish an additional Regional 
     Enforcement Team (RET). This amount, when combined with 
     existing base resources, provides a total of $24,195,000 for 
     RETS in fiscal year 2001.
       $1,500,000, 14 positions (9 agents) and 7 FTE within 
     Domestic Enforcement to enhance heroin enforcement, providing 
     a total of $30,291,000 in fiscal year 2001 for this effort, 
     as recommended in the Senate report. The Senate direction 
     regarding black tar heroin is adopted by reference.
       $1,500,000 within Domestic Enforcement to enhance 
     methamphetamine enforcement, providing a total of $27,459,000 
     in fiscal year 2001 for this effort, as recommended in the 
     Senate report.
       $1,000,000 within State and Local Task Forces to enhance 
     State and local methamphetamine training activities, as 
     recommended in the Senate report.
       $6,000,000 within Research, Engineering and Technical 
     Operations (RETO) to procure three additional single-engine 
     helicopters for drug enforcement activities along the 
     Southwest border.
       In addition, the conference agreement includes a total of 
     $20,000,000 under the Community Oriented Policing Services 
     Methamphetamine/Drug ``Hot Spots'' program to assist State 
     and local law enforcement agencies with the costs associated 
     with methamphetamine clean-up.
       Budget and Financial Management.--$1,500,000, 8 positions 
     and 4 FTE within Program Management and Administration to 
     improve DEA's financial and resource management oversight, 
     including funds to support DEA's Federal Financial System and 
     for additional staffing for Finance and Resource Management.
       Other.--The conference agreement includes a total of 
     $20,000,000 for the special investigative unit (SIU) program. 
     Within the amount available, DEA may establish a joint 
     Haitian/Dominican Republic SIU on the island of Hispaniola. 
     DEA is reminded that the Committees on Appropriations are to 
     be notified in accordance with section 605 of this Act prior 
     to the expansion of this program to any additional countries. 
     There are continued concerns about endemic corruption within 
     the Mexico SIU program which has severely limited its 
     effectiveness. DEA is directed to report to the Committees on 
     Appropriations no later than February 1, 2001, on progress 
     made in resolving these problems and recommendations to make 
     the Mexico program effective.
       The conference agreement adopts by reference the direction 
     included in the House report regarding continued 
     participation in the HIDTA program, quarterly reports on 
     source and transit countries, quarterly reports on 
     implementation of the Caribbean initiative, and a report on 
     requirements in the region. The conference agreement does not 
     include funding under DEA for continuation of the demand 
     reduction initiative recommended in the House report, but has 
     instead transferred base funding for this program from DEA 
     Domestic Enforcement to the Office of Justice Programs. DEA 
     is also directed to better coordinate its operations with 
     other Federal agencies, including INS and the FBI, along the 
     Southwest Border, and to pursue co-location of offices 
     whenever practical. The direction included in the Senate 
     report regarding DEA's presence in Chile is adopted by 
     reference. Within the amounts

[[Page H12451]]

     provided under this account, DEA may use up to $500,000 for a 
     study on methods to eliminate the effectiveness of anhydrous 
     ammonia in methamphetamine production, as authorized.
       Drug Diversion Control Fee Account.--The conference 
     agreement provides $83,543,000 for DEA's Drug Diversion 
     Control Program for fiscal year 2001, as provided in the 
     House bill and the Senate-reported amendment. This amount 
     includes an increase of $3,213,000 for adjustments to base, 
     including the annualization of 25 positions provided in 
     fiscal year 2000 for customer service improvements and drug 
     data analysis. The conference agreement assumes that the 
     level of balances in the Fee Account are sufficient to fully 
     support diversion control programs in fiscal year 2001. As 
     was the case in fiscal years 1999 and 2000, no funds are 
     provided in the DEA Salaries and Expenses appropriation for 
     this account in fiscal year 2001.
       The conference agreement includes bill language, modified 
     from language proposed in the House bill, providing not to 
     exceed 7,520 positions and 7,412 FTE for DEA from funds 
     provided in this Act. The Senate-reported amendment did not 
     include a similar provision.


                              construction

       The conference agreement includes no new funding for this 
     account as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment, instead 
     of $5,500,000 as proposed in the House bill. A total of 
     $19,500,000 in prior year carryover balances is available to 
     fund planned fiscal year 2001 expenditures.

                 Immigration and Naturalization Service


                         salaries and expenses

       The conference agreement includes $3,125,876,000 for the 
     salaries and expenses of the Immigration and Naturalization 
     Service (INS), instead of $3,121,213,000 as provided in the 
     House bill, and $2,895,397,000 as provided in the Senate-
     reported amendment. In addition to the amounts appropriated, 
     the conference agreement assumes that $1,549,480,000 will be 
     available from offsetting fee collections instead of 
     $1,438,812,000 as proposed by the House and $1,524,771,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate. Thus, including resources provided 
     under the Construction account, the conference agreement 
     provides a total operating level of $4,808,658,000 for INS, 
     instead of $4,670,689,000 as proposed by the House and 
     $4,553,470,000 as proposed by the Senate, representing a 
     $548,242,000 (13%) increase over fiscal year 2000. The 
     following narrative reflects how funds provided in the 
     conference agreement are to be spent.
       INS Organization and Management.--The conference agreement 
     incorporates concerns expressed in the House report that a 
     lack of resources is no longer an acceptable response to 
     INS's inability to adequately address its mission 
     responsibilities. The conference agreement includes the 
     establishment of clearer chains of command--one for 
     enforcement activities and one for services to non-citizens--
     as one step towards making the INS a more efficient, 
     accountable, and effective agency. Consistent with the 
     concept of separating immigration enforcement from services, 
     the conference agreement continues to provide for a 
     separation of funds, as in the fiscal year 1999 and 2000 
     Appropriations Acts. The conference agreement separates funds 
     into two accounts, as requested in the budget and proposed in 
     the House bill: Enforcement and Border Affairs, and 
     Citizenship and Benefits, Immigration Support and Program 
     Direction. INS enforcement funds are provided in the 
     Enforcement and Border Affairs account. All immigration-
     related benefits and naturalization, support and program 
     resources are provided in the Citizenship and Benefits, 
     Immigration Support and Program Direction account. Neither 
     account includes revenues generated in various fee accounts 
     to fund program activities for both enforcement and services 
     functions, which are in addition to the appropriated funds 
     and are discussed below. Funds for INS construction projects 
     continue to be provided in the INS Construction account.
       The conference agreement includes bill language which 
     provides authority for the Attorney General to transfer funds 
     from one account to another in order to ensure that funds are 
     properly aligned. Such transfers may occur notwithstanding 
     any transfer limitations imposed under this Act but such 
     transfers are still subject to the reprogramming requirements 
     under Section 605 of this Act. It is expected that any 
     request for transfer of funds will remain within the 
     activities under those headings.
       The conference agreement includes $2,547,057,000 for 
     Enforcement and Border Affairs, and $578,819,000 for 
     Citizenship and Benefits, Immigration Support and Program 
     Direction.
       Base adjustments.--The conference agreement provides a 
     total increase of $101,008,000 and 641 FTE for adjustments to 
     base for INS salaries and expenses, offset by a $89,000,000 
     and 404 FTE transfer to the INS Exams Fees account for the 
     naturalization and backlog reduction initiatives, as proposed 
     in the budget request. The conference agreement does not 
     include transfers to the Exams Fees account, the Breached/
     Bond Detention account, and the Justice Prisoner Alien 
     Transportation System (JPATS) Fund, as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment.
       For the Enforcement and Border Affairs account, the 
     conference agreement provides an increase of $86,255,000 and 
     889 FTE for pay and inflationary adjustments for Border 
     Patrol, Investigations, Detention and Deportation, and 
     Intelligence. This represents the full amount requested less 
     $11,770,000 for the annualization of border patrol agents not 
     yet hired, and $3,343,000 for the portion of the fiscal year 
     2000 annualized pay raise which has already been paid in the 
     current fiscal year. Funds have not been included for the 
     proposed increase in the journeyman level for border patrol 
     agents and immigration inspectors.
       For the Citizenship and Benefits, Immigration Support and 
     Program Direction account, the conference agreement includes 
     an increase of $14,752,000 for pay and inflationary 
     adjustments for the existing activities of Citizenship and 
     Benefits, Immigration Support, and Management and 
     Administration; offset by a transfer of $89,000,000 in 
     naturalization and backlog reduction activities to the Exams 
     Fees account, as proposed in the budget. The amount provided 
     for base adjustments represents the full amount requested 
     less $690,000 for the portion of the fiscal year 2000 
     annualized pay raise which has already been paid in the 
     current fiscal year. In addition, $35,000,000 is continued 
     within the base to support naturalization and other benefits 
     processing backlog reduction activities.
       None of these amounts include offsetting fees, which are 
     used to fund both enforcement and services functions.
       In addition, program increases totaling $222,768,000 are 
     provided, as follows:
       Border Control and Management.--$100,612,000 is provided 
     for additional border patrol staffing, technology, land 
     border inspections, and Joint Terrorism Task Forces, as 
     follows:
       $52,000,000, 430 positions and 215 FTE, are for new border 
     patrol agents. It is noted that again in fiscal years 1999 
     and 2000, the INS has failed to hire the 1,000 new border 
     patrol agents provided in each of those years. Should the INS 
     be unable to recruit the required agents again in fiscal year 
     2001, the INS is to submit a reprogramming in accordance with 
     section 605 of this Act, prior to expenditure of the funds 
     provided for the hiring of border patrol agents for any other 
     purpose.
       While some level of border control is being witnessed on 
     parts of the Southwest border, particularly in San Diego, as 
     a result of increased border patrol agents and technology, in 
     other areas of the country border control remains a growing 
     problem, particularly in the Northwest, Southeast, and other 
     areas of the Southwest border. The House report language 
     regarding consultation and submission of a deployment plan 
     for new border patrol agents and direction in the House 
     report regarding quarterly hiring status reports are adopted 
     by reference. Senate report language prohibiting the transfer 
     of any border patrol agents or technology from the Northwest 
     border to the Southwest border is also adopted by reference.
       $33,835,000 is for additional border patrol equipment and 
     technology, for the following activities:
        $598,000 is for replacement patrol boats to combat 
     alien smuggling on the Great Lakes, the Detroit River, Lake 
     St. Clair, and the St. Lawrence Seaway.
        $17,500,000 is for the deployment of additional 
     Integrated Surveillance Intelligence Systems (ISIS) along the 
     Northern and Southern borders. When combined with existing 
     base funds, a total of $35,500,000 is available for ISIS. INS 
     is directed to consult with the Committees on Appropriations 
     and provide a deployment plan for these systems no later than 
     December 15, 2000, which reflects the highest priority 
     locations on both the Northern and Southern borders.
        $15,737,000 is for additional border patrol 
     equipment and technology. The conference agreement includes a 
     total of $30,737,000 for additional border patrol equipment 
     and technology, of which $15,737,000 is provided as a program 
     increase and $15,000,000 is to be derived from within 
     existing base resources. Funding provided is to be used for 
     high priority equipment, including fiber optic scopes, hand-
     held search lights, vehicle infrared cameras, Global 
     Positioning Systems, infrared scopes, night vision goggles, 
     hand-held range-finder night vision binoculars, and pocket 
     scopes. INS is directed to provide a spending plan for these 
     funds to the Committees on Appropriations no later than 
     December 15, 2000.
       $6,277,000, 72 positions and 36 FTE are for additional 
     inspectors at land border Ports of Entry (POE). INS is 
     directed to consult with the Committees on Appropriations and 
     provide a deployment plan no later than December 15, 2000 
     which reflects the highest priority locations for 
     distribution of these resources.
       $7,000,000, 58 positions and 29 FTE are for additional 
     investigators and operational costs associated with INS 
     participation in Joint Terrorism Task Forces to address 
     immigration-related issues in terrorism cases.
       Additionally, the conference agreement includes a 
     $1,500,000 increase for the Law Enforcement Support Center 
     (LESC), providing a total of $12,500,000 for the LESC in 
     fiscal year 2001.
       The conference agreement adopts by reference the House 
     report language regarding the relocation of Tucson Sector 
     helicopter operations and related housing costs, a joint plan 
     on combating illegal immigration through Federal lands and 
     parks, and establishment of a joint task force to study 
     emergency medical services for illegal aliens.
       Interior Enforcement/Removal of Deportable Aliens.--
     $120,856,000 is provided for interior enforcement, including 
     the tracking, detention, and removal of aliens, as follows:

[[Page H12452]]

       $87,306,000, 120 positions and 60 FTE are for an additional 
     1,167 detention beds, including 1,000 beds in State and local 
     facilities, and 120 juvenile detention beds, as proposed in 
     the House report.
       $15,550,000 is for additional JPATS movements, as proposed 
     in the House report. The conference agreement does not 
     include the proposed transfer of funds from INS to the JPATS 
     Fund for this activity which was recommended in the Senate 
     report.
       $11,000,000, 100 positions and 50 FTE are for 23 additional 
     Quick Response Teams, as proposed in the House report. The 
     House report language regarding consultation and submission 
     of a deployment plan and direction regarding quarterly status 
     reports are adopted by reference.
       In addition, the conference agreement includes an 
     additional $3,000,000 under the Community Oriented Policing 
     Services program to expand the program to provide video-
     teleconferencing equipment and technology to allow State and 
     local law enforcement to confirm the status of an alien 
     suspected of criminal activity.
       $3,000,000, 28 positions and 14 FTE are for expansion of 
     the on-going Criminal Alien Apprehension Program (CAAP), 
     pursuant to Public Law 105-141. The Senate report language 
     regarding Salt Lake City is adopted by reference, and INS is 
     directed to report its intention regarding this matter to the 
     Committees on Appropriations no later than December 1, 2000. 
     The House report language regarding consultation and 
     submission of a deployment plan is adopted by reference.
       $4,000,000, 26 positions and 13 FTE are for INS to enter 
     INS criminal alien records into the National Criminal 
     Information Center (NCIC) in order to address the current 
     backlog and to ensure that INS does not lose its NCIC 
     privileges. The direction included in the House report 
     regarding development of a comprehensive plan to address this 
     problem is adopted by reference.
       Concerns have been expressed regarding the adequacy of the 
     current training course for Detention Enforcement Officers 
     (DEO) in light of the increasingly violent detainee 
     population and other factors. INS is directed to complete a 
     comprehensive assessment of its current DEO training course 
     and provide a report to the Committees on Appropriations no 
     later than July 1, 2001, with recommendations for 
     improvements.
       The conference agreement reflects concerns regarding INS' 
     failure to vigorously pursue an effective interior 
     enforcement strategy, and adopts by reference the direction 
     included in the House report regarding quarterly reporting on 
     detention and removal orders. The Senate report language 
     regarding tuberculosis monitoring is also adopted by 
     reference.
       Professionalism and Infrastructure.--The conference 
     agreement includes an increase of $1,300,000 for the Debt 
     Management Center, as proposed in the Senate report. INS is 
     expected to follow the direction included in the Senate 
     report regarding annualization of this increase in fiscal 
     year 2002.
       IAFIS/IDENT.--The conference agreement adopts the 
     recommendation included in the House report directing that 
     $5,000,000 from within existing INS base funds available for 
     IDENT be transferred to the Justice Management Division to 
     continue the planned IAFIS/IDENT integration project, 
     including systems design and development work and additional 
     operational testing. INS is directed to comply with the 
     direction in the House report regarding further deployment of 
     IDENT.
       Within the total amount available to INS, $2,103,000 is to 
     be used to establish the task force required by Public Law 
     106-215.
       Services/Benefits.--The Congress has provided significant 
     additional resources to the INS over the past three years to 
     address the naturalization backlog, improve the integrity of 
     the naturalization process, and improve services. The 
     conference agreement provides a total of $1,004,851,000 for 
     these activities, $70,134,000 (7%) over the amount requested 
     in the budget, and $135,222,000 (16%) over the fiscal year 
     2000 level. However, serious concerns remain about the INS' 
     failure to manage its resources, and the Committees continue 
     to receive complaints from Members of Congress and their 
     constituents about the problems of backlogs in application 
     processing and casework, and deficiencies in other services. 
     Again this year, the conference agreement includes 
     significant additional resources, over and above the 
     President's budget request, for benefits and services. 
     Therefore, INS is directed to conduct a complete review of 
     staffing and resource needs to improve benefits and services 
     in all current INS offices, as well as the need for 
     additional offices, particularly in rural areas. INS is 
     directed to complete this review and report its findings to 
     the Committees on Appropriations, including a proposal to 
     reallocate resources as warranted, no later than December 15, 
     2000. As part of this review, the INS is directed to pay 
     particular attention to the following areas: Fort Smith, 
     Arkansas; Adak, Alaska; San Francisco, California; Ventura, 
     California; Washington, D.C.; Des Moines, Iowa; Louisville, 
     Kentucky; the Bronx, New York; New York, New York; Omaha, 
     Nebraska; Northern New Jersey; Las Vegas, NV; Greer, South 
     Carolina; Nashville, Tennessee; Roanoke, Virginia; and 
     Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In addition, the conferees are 
     concerned with the diversion of resources from smaller rural 
     offices and direct INS to notify the Committees prior to the 
     reallocation of resources, including the temporary 
     reassignment of personnel, from the area identified in the 
     Senate report.
       The conference agreement adopts by reference the direction 
     included in the House report regarding monthly reports on the 
     status of processing immigration benefits applications, 
     continuation of the San Jose customer service pilot, and a 
     report on unreviewed Citizenship USA cases, which is to be 
     submitted no later than November 1, 2000.
       In addition to identical provisions included in both the 
     House bill and the Senate-reported amendment, the conference 
     agreement includes the following additional provisions, as 
     follows: (1) a limitation of $30,000 per individual employee 
     for overtime payments, as proposed in the House bill, instead 
     of $20,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment; (2) 
     a limitation on funding and staffing available to the Offices 
     of Legislative and Public Affairs, as proposed in the House 
     bill; (3) a prohibition on the use of funds to operate the 
     San Clemente and Temecula traffic checkpoints unless certain 
     conditions are met, as proposed in the House bill; and (4) 
     limitations on the number of positions and FTE provided to 
     INS in this Act, modified from language proposed in the House 
     bill.


                       OFFSETTING FEE COLLECTIONS

       The conference agreement assumes $1,549,480,000 will be 
     available from offsetting fee collections, instead of 
     $1,438,812,000 as proposed in the House bill and 
     $1,524,771,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment, 
     to support activities related to the legal admission of 
     persons into the United States. These activities are funded 
     entirely by fees paid by persons who are either traveling 
     internationally or are applying for immigration benefits. The 
     following levels are recommended:
       Immigration Inspections User Fees.--The conference 
     agreement includes $494,384,000 of spending from offsetting 
     collections in this account, the same amount proposed in 
     Senate report, and $15,505,000 above the amount included in 
     the House report. This amount represents a $38,999,000 
     increase over fiscal year 2000 spending, and does not assume 
     the addition of any new or increased fees on airline or 
     cruise ship passengers. The conference agreement includes 
     $18,489,000 for adjustments to base, the full amount 
     requested. In addition, program increases are provided as 
     follows: $12,186,000, 154 positions and 77 FTE to increase 
     primary inspectors at new airport terminals; and $8,324,000 
     to address additional staffing and other requirements. 
     Funding is not included for the proposed change in the 
     journeyman level for inspectors. INS is directed to consult 
     with Committees on Appropriations and to submit a spending 
     and deployment plan no later than December 1, 2000, which 
     allocates these additional resources to the highest priority 
     locations. Should additional fees become available, the INS 
     may submit a reprogramming in accordance with section 605 of 
     this Act.
       Immigration Examinations Fees.--The conference agreement 
     includes a total of $1,004,851,000 to support the 
     adjudication of applications for immigration benefits, 
     instead of $918,717,000 as proposed in the House bill, 
     $841,017,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment, 
     and $934,617,000 as requested in the budget. These funds are 
     derived from offsetting collections in the Examinations Fees 
     account from persons applying for immigration benefits, 
     including collections from a new voluntary premium processing 
     fee as proposed in the House bill and the budget request, and 
     $35,000,000 in continued direct appropriations under the 
     Citizenship and Benefits, Immigration Support, and Program 
     Direction account. The conference agreement reflects the INS' 
     revised revenue estimates for collections from existing fees 
     which is $107,534,000 higher than the amount assumed in the 
     budget request, and $144,534,000 above the amount available 
     in fiscal year 2000. When combined with additional revenues 
     estimated from the new voluntary premium processing fee, the 
     total amount of collections available in the Examinations 
     Fees account for adjudication of immigration benefits is 
     $224,534,000 over the amount available in fiscal year 2000. 
     When combined with direct appropriations, the total amount 
     included in the conference agreement for benefits processing, 
     adjudication, and backlog reduction is an increase of 
     $70,134,000 (7%) above the budget request and $135,222,000 
     (16%) above the amount provided in fiscal year 2000. 
     Therefore, the conference agreement does not include the 
     reinstatement of section 245(i) as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. In addition, the conference agreement 
     does not adopt the transfer of $49,741,000 from Examinations 
     Fees funding to the Executive Office of Immigration Review 
     (EOIR); and the transfer of $50,000,000 in non-adjudication 
     related activities from the Salaries and Expenses account to 
     the Examinations Fees account which were proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment.
       Within the Examinations Fees account, the conference 
     agreement provides the following: $25,676,000 for adjustments 
     to base; and program enhancements totaling $94,841,000, as 
     proposed in the House report, for the following activities: 
     (1) $16,000,000 for implementing premium business service 
     processing; (2) $7,500,000 for anti-fraud investigations 
     related to business-related visa applications and marriage 
     fraud; (3) $13,000,000 for the telephone customer service 
     center, for a total of $43,000,000, the full amount 
     requested; (4) $4,200,000 for the indexing and conversion of 
     INS microfilm images, for a

[[Page H12453]]

     total of $7,200,000; and (5) $53,641,000 for replacement of 
     the case tracking system and hardware in field offices and 
     continued development and installation of digital photography 
     and signature capabilities in the Application Support 
     Centers. Included within these amounts is $6,000,000 for 
     installation of the CLAIMS 4 system in the Los Angeles, 
     California district office which will complete nationwide 
     deployment of the system. INS is directed to submit a 
     spending plan in accordance with the reprogramming procedures 
     set forth in section 605 of this Act which allocates the 
     remaining $51,134,000 in additional resources made available 
     in the Exams Fees account, and the $35,000,000 in continued 
     direct appropriations provided for backlog reduction 
     initiatives.
       The INS is directed to make available to EOIR from the INS 
     Examinations Fees account not less than $1,000,000 to be 
     applied toward expenditures related to EOIR's acquisition of 
     contract court interpreter services for immigration court 
     proceedings.
       Land Border Inspections Fees.--The conference agreement 
     includes $1,670,000 in spending from the Land Border 
     Inspection Fund, as proposed in the Senate report, instead of 
     $1,641,000 as proposed in the House report. The current 
     revenues generated in this account are from Dedicated 
     Commuter Lanes in Blaine and Port Roberts, Washington, 
     Detroit Tunnel and Ambassador Bridge, Michigan, and Otay 
     Mesa, California, and from Automated Permit Ports that 
     provide pre-screened local border residents' border crossing 
     privileges by means of automated inspections.
       Immigration Breached Bond/Detention Fund.--The conference 
     agreement includes $80,600,000 in spending from the Breached 
     Bond/Detention Fund, as proposed in the House report, instead 
     of $130,634,000 as proposed in the Senate report, and 
     reflects the current estimate of revenues available in the 
     Fund in fiscal year 2001 based upon current law. The 
     conference agreement does not assume the reinstatement of 
     Section 245(i), which was proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment and the budget request. Instead, the conference 
     agreement provides a $37,480,000 increase in the INS Salaries 
     and Expenses account to fully fund the detention requirements 
     requested in the Fund, but for which revenues are 
     insufficient in fiscal year 2001. The agreement does not 
     include the base transfer to the Breached Bond/Detention Fund 
     account, as proposed in the Senate report.
       Immigration Enforcement Fines.--The conference agreement 
     includes $1,850,000 in spending from Immigration Enforcement 
     fines, the amount requested and proposed in the House report, 
     instead of $5,593,000 as proposed in the Senate report.
       H-1B Fees.--The conference agreement includes $1,125,000 in 
     spending from the H-1B Fee account, the amount requested and 
     the amount proposed in the House report, instead of 
     $1,473,000 as proposed in the Senate report.


                              CONSTRUCTION

       The conference agreement includes $133,302,000 for 
     construction for INS, as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment, instead of $110,664,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill. This amount fully funds the Administration's request, 
     funds $5,000,000 in habitability, life safety, and other 
     improvements at the Charleston Border Patrol Academy, and 
     provides increases over the requested amount of $7,353,000 
     for one-time build out and $9,814,000 for maintenance, 
     repair, and alteration to accelerate these programs.
       The conference agreement includes language, as proposed in 
     the House bill and carried in prior Appropriations Acts, 
     prohibiting funds from being used for site acquisition, 
     design, or construction of a checkpoint in the Tucson Sector. 
     The Senate-reported amendment did not include a similar 
     provision.

                         Federal Prison System


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $3,476,889,000 for the 
     salaries and expenses of the Federal Prison System, instead 
     of $3,430,596,000 as proposed in the House bill and 
     $3,573,729,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. 
     The agreement assumes that, in addition to the amounts 
     appropriated, $31,000,000 will be available for necessary 
     operations from unobligated carryover balances from the prior 
     year.
       The conference agreement includes funding to begin and or 
     complete the activation of the following facilities:

Victorville, CA..............................................$5,882,000
Houston, TX.....................................................637,000
Brooklyn, NY..................................................8,131,000
Philadelphia, PA..............................................5,718,000
Butner, NC...................................................11,808,000
Loretto, PA expansion...........................................613,000
Pollock, LA..................................................33,511,000
Atwater, CA..................................................22,316,000
Coleman, FL..................................................10,235,000
Honolulu, HI.................................................14,119,000
Ft. Dix, NJ expansion.........................................4,893,000
Yazoo City, MS expansion........................................674,000
Lompoc, CA expansion............................................907,000
El Paso, TX expansion.........................................2,357,000
Seagoville, TX expansion......................................1,208,000
Jesup, GA expansion.............................................200,000

       The conference agreement provides an additional $500,000 
     for the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) to study 
     whether the location of illegal alien holding facilities 
     along the Southern border of the United States contributes to 
     the illegal immigration problems in this country. The 
     conference agreement includes $4,000,000 for the NIC to 
     address issues related to children of prisoners, as described 
     in the Senate report. Of the amounts provided, up to 
     $1,000,000 shall be for the NIC to address the issue of staff 
     sexual misconduct involving female inmates as described in 
     the Senate report.
       The conference agreement provides $100,000 for 
     implementation of a pilot internship program at the Federal 
     Correctional Institution in Yazoo City, MS as described in 
     the Senate report. The conference agreement adopts the Senate 
     report language directing BOP to continue to assess the 
     feasibility of construction of a high security facility in 
     Yazoo City, MS as described in the Senate report.
       The conference agreement includes a $3,000,000 enhancement 
     for education programming instead of the $7,433,000 
     requested. If additional resources become available either 
     through prior year unobligated balances or as a result of 
     savings in fiscal year 2001, BOP is expected to fund these 
     additional costs.


                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

       The conference agreement includes $835,660,000 for 
     construction, modernization, maintenance and repair of prison 
     and detention facilities housing Federal prisoners, the same 
     level as provided in the House bill, instead of $724,389,000 
     as provided in the Senate-reported amendment. The conference 
     agreement provides $681,271,000 for construction of new 
     facilities as outlined below:

                       [In thousands of dollars]

        Facility                                                 Amount
Facilities with prior funding:
  FCI Forrest City, AR..........................................$95,814
  FCI Yazoo City, MS.............................................86,884
  USP Lompoc, CA................................................118,111
  FCI Butner, NC.................................................83,111
  FCI Victorville, CA...........................................116,838
  FCI Herlong/Sierra, CA........................................116,861
Facilities with no prior funding:
  USP Western....................................................11,930
  USP Southeastern...............................................11,931
  FCI Southeastern................................................5,430
  FCI Mid-Atlantic................................................5,430
  FCI Midwestern..................................................5,431
  FCI Western.....................................................6,000
  FCI South Central...............................................5,000
  FCI Northeast...................................................5,000
  FCI Mid-Atlantic................................................5,000
  Mid-Atlantic Female.............................................2,000
  Alaska Prison Study...............................................500
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Total.......................................................681,271

       After reviewing numerous sites in South Carolina, the 
     Bureau of Prisons (BOP) narrowed its focus on four potential 
     locations that would be suitable for the construction of 
     correctional facilities. Following a comprehensive 
     Environmental Impact Study completed in April, 2000, the BOP 
     identified two preferred sites in Williamsburg and Marlboro 
     Counties. A Record of Decision (ROD) for the Salters site, 
     Williamsburg County was signed by the Director, BOP on July 
     19, 2000. On the same date, the ROD was signed for the 
     Bennetsville site, Marlboro County. The BOP is in the process 
     of procuring a design/build contract for the Salters site and 
     is proceeding with the second preferred site, consistent with 
     the ROD and the fiscal year 2001 request.
       The Senate provided $7,954,000 to plan and design a prison 
     in Alaska while the House included no such funding. The 
     managers note that there is no Federal prison in Alaska and 
     State prisons are severely overcrowded and are operating 
     under a court order requiring some prisoners to be 
     transported to lower 48 State prisons. Likewise, Federal 
     prisoners in Alaska must be transported by commercial air to 
     Federal facilities thousands of miles away at a huge cost to 
     taxpayers.
       The Director of the Bureau of Prisons is directed to 
     prepare a feasibility study on the need for a new prison in 
     Alaska including the number of Federal prisoners who would be 
     housed, the types of detention, rehabilitation, vocational 
     and educational facilities that would be required, and the 
     potential to lease surplus beds to the State of Alaska to 
     reduce its prison overcrowding. The report should also 
     analyze the costs of construction, the cost savings that 
     would be realized from reduced prisoner transportation costs, 
     and potential financing options, including State 
     contributions and private financing and operation. The 
     managers have provided $500,000 for the study which should be 
     conducted in consultation with the U.S. Marshal for Alaska, 
     the Chief Judge of the United States District Court, the 
     Alaska Commissioner of Corrections and private parties or 
     non-profit corporations with an interest in prison issues. 
     The report should be submitted to the House and Senate 
     Committees on Appropriations by March 15, 2001.

                Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated


                (LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES)

       The conference agreement includes a limitation on 
     administrative expenses of $3,429,000, as requested and as 
     proposed in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment.

                       Office of Justice Programs


                           JUSTICE ASSISTANCE

       The conference agreement includes $418,219,000 for Justice 
     Assistance, instead of $307,611,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill and $426,403,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment. The conference agreement includes the following:


[[Page H12454]]


National Institute of Justice...............................$70,000,000
  Defense/Law Enforcement Technology Transfer..............(12,277,000)
Bureau of Justice Statistics.................................28,755,000
Missing Children.............................................23,048,000
Regional Information Sharing System..........................25,000,000
National White Collar Crime Center............................9,250,000
Management and Administration................................41,186,000
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Subtotal................................................197,239,000
                                                       ================

Counterterrorism Programs:
  Equipment.................................................109,400,000
  Nunn-Lugar-Domenici Program................................20,980,000
  Training...................................................45,500,000
  Exercises...................................................7,000,000
  Technical Assistance........................................2,000,000
  Counterterrorism Research and Development..................36,100,000
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Subtotal................................................220,980,000
                                                       ================

    Total, Bureau of Justice Assistance.....................418,219,000

       National Institute of Justice (NIJ).--The conference 
     agreement provides $70,000,000 for the National Institute of 
     Justice, instead of $41,448,000 as proposed in the House bill 
     and $46,000,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. 
     Additionally, $5,200,000 for NIJ research and evaluation on 
     the causes and impact of domestic violence is provided under 
     the Violence Against Women Grants program; $17,500,000 is 
     provided from within technology funding in the Community 
     Oriented Policing Services account to be available to NIJ to 
     develop new, more effective safety technologies for safe 
     schools; and $20,000,000 is provided to NIJ, as was provided 
     in previous fiscal years, within the Local Law Enforcement 
     Block Grant for assisting local units to identify, select, 
     develop, modernize and purchase new technologies for use by 
     law enforcement.
       The conference agreement adopts by reference the following 
     recommendations in the House report which are within the 
     overall amounts provided to NIJ. The Office of Justice 
     Programs is expected to review proposals, provide grants if 
     warranted, and report to the Committees on its intentions 
     regarding: a grant at the current year level for information 
     technology applications for High Intensity Drug Trafficking 
     Areas; a grant for the Snohomish County Medical Examiner's 
     Office to assist in the development of a new death 
     investigation module for the FBI's ViCAP system; and a 
     $1,800,000 grant for facial recognition.
       The conference agreement adopts the following 
     recommendations in the Senate report that provides that 
     within the overall amount provided to NIJ, the Office of 
     Justice Programs is expected to review proposals, provide 
     grants if warranted, and report to the Committees on 
     Appropriations on its intentions regarding: a $400,000 grant 
     for continued research into non-toxic drug detection and 
     identification aerosol technology; a $300,000 grant for 
     Washington State Breaking the Cycle; and a $100,000 grant for 
     perfluorocarbon tracer.
       Within the amount provided, the conference agreement 
     directs that increased amounts over fiscal year 2000 be made 
     available for computerized identification systems and the DNA 
     Research Technology and Development Program, as proposed in 
     the Senate report.
       The conference agreement provides $15,000,000 for an 
     education and development initiative to promote criminal 
     justice excellence at Eastern Kentucky University in 
     conjunction with the University of Kentucky.
       The conference agreement includes $600,000 for NIJ to 
     develop, test, and validate a prototype national 
     Vulnerability Assessment (VA) methodology for assessing the 
     security of chemical facilities against terrorist and 
     criminal attacks, consistent with the requirements of Public 
     Law 106-40. This report is expected to include 
     recommendations for the Attorney General on the appropriate 
     security classification and public release of information 
     likely to be generated by a national VA of chemical 
     facilities, including an analysis of expected risks and 
     benefits. One year after enactment of this Act, the Attorney 
     General shall provide to the Committees on Appropriations a 
     comprehensive report on the findings derived from the 
     development of the VA methodology. The information contained 
     in this report will be used only to describe and validate 
     conditions at chemical facilities in general and will contain 
     no identifications of specific chemical facilities.
       Defense/Law Enforcement Technology Transfer.--Within the 
     total amount provided to NIJ, the conference agreement 
     includes $12,277,000 to assist NIJ, in conjunction with the 
     Department of Defense, in converting non-lethal defense 
     technology to law enforcement use. Within the amount provided 
     is funding for the continuation of the law enforcement 
     technology center network, which provides States with 
     information on new equipment and technologies, as well as 
     assisting law enforcement agencies in locating high cost/low 
     use equipment for use on a temporary or emergency basis. The 
     current year level is provided for the technology 
     commercialization initiative at the National Technology 
     Transfer Center and other law enforcement technology centers. 
     The current year level is provided for the Center for Rural 
     Law Enforcement Technology and Training to evaluate and 
     assist in providing technology needs of rural State and local 
     law enforcement officers, as part of the National Law 
     Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center (NLECTC) 
     system. $1,500,000 is also provided to develop plans to 
     establish a National Law Enforcement and Corrections 
     Technology Center in Alaska as described in the Senate 
     report.
       The conference agreement includes an $8,000,000 increase 
     for smart gun technology research and development.
       Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS).--The conference 
     agreement provides $28,755,000 for the Bureau of Justice 
     Statistics, instead of $25,505,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill and $27,305,000 as proposed by the Senate-reported 
     amendment. The recommendation includes $500,000 for 
     inflationary cost increases, $725,000 to collect Computer 
     Crime and Cyber-Fraud Statistics as described in the Senate 
     report and $2,000,000 for tribal criminal justice statistics.
       Missing Children.--The conference agreement provides 
     $23,048,000 for the Missing Children Program instead of 
     $25,473,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment and 
     $19,952,000 as proposed in the House bill. Within the amounts 
     provided the conference agreement assumes the following:
       (1) $9,298,000 for the Missing Children Program within the 
     Office of Justice Programs, Justice Assistance, including the 
     following: $6,500,000 for State and local law enforcement to 
     continue specialized cyberunits and to form new units to 
     investigate and prevent child sexual exploitation which are 
     based on the protocols for conducting investigations 
     involving the Internet and online service providers that have 
     been established by the Department of Justice and the 
     National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.
       (2) $11,450,000 for the National Center for Missing and 
     Exploited Children, of which $100,000 is provided for a case 
     manager as described in the Senate report; $2,250,000 is for 
     CyberTipline, Cyperspace training and continuation of a study 
     regarding the victimization of children on the Internet as 
     described in the Senate report. Additional funding is also 
     provided for a legal and technical assistance section. OJP is 
     directed to work with the National Center for Missing and 
     Exploited Children to identify law enforcement agencies which 
     currently utilize computers in their patrol vehicles and 
     create a program to use computers to disseminate information 
     on missing children as described in the Senate report.
       (3) $2,300,000 for the Jimmy Ryce Law Enforcement Training 
     Center for training of State and local law enforcement 
     officials investigating missing and exploited children cases.
       Regional Information Sharing System (RISS).--The conference 
     agreement includes $25,000,000 for RISS, instead of 
     $20,000,000 and a $5,000,000 transfer from the COPS program 
     as proposed in the House bill and $30,000,000 as proposed in 
     the Senate-reported amendment.
       White Collar Crime Information Center.--The conference 
     agreement includes $9,250,000 for the National White Collar 
     Crime Center (NWCCC), as proposed in the House bill, instead 
     of no funding as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment.
       Counterterrorism Assistance.--The conference agreement 
     includes a total of $220,980,000 to continue the initiative 
     to prepare, equip, and train State and local entities to 
     respond to incidents of chemical, biological, radiological, 
     and other types of domestic terrorism, instead of 
     $152,000,000 as proposed in the House bill and $257,000,000 
     as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. Funding is 
     provided as follows:
       Equipment.--$109,400,000 is provided for grants to equip 
     State and local first responders, including, but not limited 
     to, firefighters and emergency services personnel, as 
     follows:

        $97,000,000 for Domestic Preparedness Equipment 
     Grants to be used to procure specialized equipment required 
     by State and local first responders to respond to terrorist 
     incidents involving chemical, biological, radiological, and 
     explosive weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The conference 
     agreement continues the direction included in the fiscal year 
     2000 Appropriations Act, allowing funds to be allocated only 
     in accordance with an approved State plan, and adopts the 
     direction included in the Senate report requiring 80 percent 
     of each State's funding to be provided to local communities 
     with the greatest need. Within the total amount provided for 
     these grants, up to $2,000,000 shall be made available for 
     continued support of the Domestic Preparedness Equipment 
     Technical Assistance program at the Pine Bluff Arsenal;
        $5,000,000 is for equipment grants for State and 
     local bomb technicians, instead of $10,000,000 as proposed in 
     the House report; and
        $7,400,000 is for pre-positioned equipment, as 
     proposed in the Senate report.
       Nunn-Lugar-Domenici Program (NLD).--$20,980,000 is for the 
     NLD Domestic Preparedness Program authorized under the 
     National Defense Authorization Act, 1997, and previously 
     funded by the Department of Defense, to provide training and 
     other assistance to the 120 largest U.S. cities. On April 6, 
     2000, the President proposed the transfer of responsibility 
     for completion of the NLD

[[Page H12455]]

     program to the Department of Justice. The conference 
     agreement provides the full amount necessary to complete the 
     NLD program, of which $8,100,000 is for training and 
     $6,880,000 is for exercises for the remainder of the 120 
     cities; $3,000,000 is for Improved Response Plans; and 
     $3,000,000 is for management and administrative costs 
     associated with this program. Within the amounts provided for 
     Domestic Preparedness Equipment grants, the Office of Justice 
     Programs may provide equipment to NLD cities if such 
     equipment is necessary to fulfill the requirements of the 
     program. The conference agreement includes a series of new 
     programs to address training and exercise requirements on a 
     national basis, and expects the Office of Justice Programs to 
     provide any future training and exercises assistance through 
     these programs. The Senate report language regarding 
     administration of this program is adopted by reference.
       Training.--$45,500,000 is for training programs for State 
     and local first responders, to be distributed as follows:
        $33,500,000 is for the National Domestic 
     Preparedness Consortium, of which $15,500,000 is for the 
     Center for Domestic Preparedness at Ft. McClellan, Alabama, 
     including $500,000 for management and administration of the 
     Center; $5,250,000 is for the Texas Engineering Extension 
     Service at Texas A&M; and $12,750,000 is to be equally 
     divided among the three other Consortium members;
        $8,000,000 is for additional training programs to 
     address emerging training needs not provided for by the 
     Consortium or elsewhere. In distributing these funds, OJP is 
     expected to consider the needs of firefighters and emergency 
     services personnel, and State and local law enforcement;
        $3,000,000 is for continuation of distance 
     learning training programs at the National Terrorism 
     Preparedness Institute at the Southeastern Public Safety 
     Institute to provide training through advanced distributive 
     learning technology and other mechanisms; and
        $1,000,000 is for continuation of the State and 
     Local Antiterrorism Training Program.
       Exercises.--$7,000,000 is for exercise programs, of which 
     $4,000,000 is for grants to assist State and local 
     jurisdictions in planning and conducting exercises to enhance 
     their response capabilities, and $3,000,000 is for planning, 
     execution, and analysis of TOPOFF II. The direction included 
     in the Senate report regarding distribution of exercises 
     grants in accordance with approved State plans is adopted by 
     reference.
       Technical Assistance.--$2,000,000 is for technical 
     assistance to States and localities, as proposed in the 
     Senate report.
       Counterterrorism Research and Development.--$36,100,000 is 
     for counterterrorism research and development, of which 
     $18,000,000 is for the Dartmouth Institute for Security 
     Technology Studies (ISTS), $18,000,000 is for the Oklahoma 
     City National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of 
     Terrorism (MIPT), and $100,000 is for a pilot project to 
     develop an RDT&E system similar to the Department of Defense 
     System, as proposed in the Senate report. Within the amount 
     provided for MIPT, up to $4,000,000 is to be used to support 
     the development of performance standards in a biological and 
     chemical environment for respirators and personal protective 
     garments. The MIPT and the ISTS are directed to work with the 
     Technical Support Working Group and the National Domestic 
     Preparedness Office to develop and implement a process 
     whereby WMD equipment is standardized.
       The conference agreement includes language modified from 
     language included in the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment providing funding for counterterrorism programs.
       Management and Administration.--The conference agreement 
     includes $41,186,000 for Management and Administration, 
     instead of $39,456,000 as proposed by the House, and 
     $40,125,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conference 
     agreement adopts the House report language concerning the 
     reorganization of the Office of Justice Programs and the 
     submission of a report on the implementation of the 
     reorganization by December 31, 2000.


               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE

       The conference agreement includes $2,848,929,000 for State 
     and Local Law Enforcement Assistance, instead of 
     $2,823,950,000 as proposed in the House bill, and 
     $1,475,254,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. 
     The conference agreement provides for the following programs:

Local Law Enforcement Block Grant.........................$523,000,000 
  Boys and Girls Clubs.....................................(60,000,000)
  Law Enforcement Technology...............................(20,000,000)
State Prison Grants........................................686,500,000 
  Cooperative Agreement Program............................(35,000,000)
  Indian Country Earmark...................................(34,000,000)
  Alien Incarceration.....................................(165,000,000)
  State Environmental Impact Statements.....................(2,000,000)
State Criminal Alien Assistance Program....................400,000,000 
Indian Tribal Courts Program.................................8,000,000 
Byrne Discretionary Grants..................................69,050,000 
Byrne Formula Grants.......................................500,000,000 
Drug Courts.................................................50,000,000 
Juvenile Crime Block Grant.................................250,000,000 
Violence Against Women Act Programs........................288,679,000 
State Prison Drug Treatment.................................63,000,000 
Indian Country Alcohol and Crime Prevention..................5,000,000 
Missing Alzheimer's Patient Program............................900,000 
Law Enforcement Family Support Programs......................1,500,000 
Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention...............................1,300,000 
Senior Citizens Against Marketing Scams......................2,000,000 
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Total................................................2,848,929,000 

       Local Law Enforcement Block Grant.--The conference 
     agreement includes $523,000,000 for the Local Law Enforcement 
     Block Grant program, as proposed in the House bill, instead 
     of $400,000,000, as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment, in order to continue the commitment to provide 
     local governments with the resources and flexibility to 
     address specific crime problems in their communities with 
     their own solutions. Within the amount provided, the 
     conference agreement includes language providing $60,000,000 
     to the Boys and Girls Clubs of America. In addition, the 
     conference agreement extends the set-aside for law 
     enforcement technology, as proposed in both the House bill 
     and the Senate-reported amendment.
       State Prison Grants.--The conference agreement includes 
     $686,500,000 for State Prison Grants as proposed in the House 
     bill, instead of $76,000,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. Of the amount provided, $450,500,000 is 
     available to States to build and expand prisons, $165,000,000 
     is available to States for the reimbursement of the costs of 
     incarceration of criminal aliens, $35,000,000 is available 
     for the Cooperative Agreement Program, $34,000,000 is 
     available for Indian tribes, and $2,000,000 is available for 
     review of State environmental impact statements to determine 
     compliance with Federal requirements and ensure that State 
     projects are not delayed.
       State Criminal Alien Assistance Program.--The conference 
     agreement provides a total of $565,000,000 for the State 
     Criminal Alien Assistance Program for payment to the States 
     for the costs of incarceration of criminal aliens, instead of 
     $50,000,000, as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment and 
     $585,000,000 as proposed in the House bill. Of the total 
     amount, the conference agreement includes $400,000,000 under 
     this account for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program 
     and $165,000,000 for this purpose under the State Prison 
     Grants program, as proposed by the House bill.
       Indian Tribal Courts.--The conference agreement includes 
     $8,000,000, instead of $5,000,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment, and no funding in the House bill, to 
     assist tribal governments in the development, enhancement, 
     and continuing operation of tribal judicial systems by 
     providing resources for the necessary tools to sustain safer 
     and more peaceful communities.
       Edward Byrne Grants to States.--The conference agreement 
     provides $569,050,000 for the Edward Byrne Memorial State and 
     Local Law Enforcement Assistance Program, of which 
     $69,050,000 is for discretionary grants and $500,000,000 is 
     provided for formula grants under this program.
       Byrne Discretionary Grants.--The conference agreement 
     provides $69,050,000 for discretionary grants under the 
     Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Assistance Program to 
     be administered by Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), 
     instead of $52,000,000 as proposed in the House bill and the 
     Senate-reported amendment. Within the amount provided for 
     discretionary grants, OJP is expected to review the following 
     proposals, provide grants if warranted, and report to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House and the Senate on 
     its intentions:
        $2,000,000 for the Drug Abuse Resistance Education 
     (DARE AMERICA) program;
        $1,600,000 for continued support for the expansion 
     of Search Group, Inc. and the national Technical Assistance 
     and Training Program to assist States, such as West Virginia, 
     to accelerate the automation of fingerprint identification 
     processes;
        $4,400,000 for the National Crime Prevention 
     Council to continue and expand the National Citizens Crime 
     Prevention Campaign, McGruff;
        $800,000 for the Haymarket Center;
        $5,000,000 for Project HomeSafe for safety packets 
     which include a gun locking device and information on how to 
     handle and store guns safely as described in the Senate 
     report;
        $150,000 for the Ottawa County, MI, Sheriff's 
     Department to support crime fighting technologies;
        $1,000,000 for the Tools for Tolerance Program;
        $500,000 for the Littleton Area Learning Center;
        $4,500,000 for the Executive Office of U.S. 
     Attorneys to support the National District Attorneys 
     Association's participation in legal education training at 
     the National Advocacy Center;
        $2,000,000 for the Youth Safe Haven program;
        $1,900,000 for the Families and Schools Together 
     (FAST) program;
        $1,500,000 for Project Return in New Orleans, LA;
        $2,000,000 for the Alaska Native Justice Center;
        $400,000 for the Ridge House in Reno, NV;
        $3,000,000 for a grant to the National Center for 
     Justice and the Rule of Law at the

[[Page H12456]]

     University of Mississippi School of Law to sponsor research 
     and produce judicial education seminars and training for 
     judges, court personnel, prosecutors, police agencies, and 
     attorneys;
        $350,000 for a grant to Turtle Mountain Community 
     College's Department of Justice for ``Project Peacemaker'';
        $300,000 for the Chattanooga Endeavors program;
        $750,000 for a grant to the University of Kentucky 
     College of Law for teleconferencing equipment for prosecutor 
     training;
        $1,000,000 for the Fels Center at the University 
     of Pennsylvania for a demonstration fellowship project;
        $1,400,000 for rural alcohol interdiction, 
     investigations, and prosecutions in the State of Alaska;
        $150,000 for the MUSC Innovative Alternatives for 
     Women program;
        $750,000 for the Nevada National Judicial College;
        $3,000,000 for a grant for the National Fatherhood 
     Initiative;
        $190,000 to the Hampshire County, MA, TRIAD 
     project;
        $450,000 for the Gospel Rescue Mission;
        $2,250,000 the Washington Metropolitan Area Drug 
     Enforcement Task Force and for expansion of the regional gang 
     tracking system;
        $2,000,000 for the Rural Crime Prevention and 
     Prosecution program;
        $1,000,000 for the Night Light program in San 
     Bernardino, CA to assign probation officers to patrol with 
     law enforcement during peak crime hours;
        $800,000 for the Illegal Firearms Reduction 
     Program in Illinois;
        $850,000 for the DuPage County Children's Sexual 
     Abuse Center;
        $1,000,000 for Operation NITRO (Narcotics 
     Interdiction To Reduce Open-Air Drug Markets) in Newark, NJ;
        $1,800,000 for the Center for Rural Law 
     Enforcement Technology and Training;
        $2,505,000 for Kentucky Child Advocacy Centers;
        $1,000,000 for a community court pilot project in 
     Los Angeles, CA;
        $1,000,000 for a Neighborhood Policing Initiative 
     for the Homeless in Clearwater, FL;
        $1,000,000 for the National Children's Advocacy 
     Center in Huntsville, Alabama for a Child Abuse Investigation 
     and Prosecution Enhancement Initiative;
        $1,100,000 for the National Training and 
     Information Center;
        $1,000,000 for the Doe Fund's Ready, Willing and 
     Able program;
        $30,000 for the Crimestoppers program in 
     Lexington, KY, to expand its efforts to involve citizens in 
     crime prevention;
        $1,000,000 for the Ben Clark Public Safety 
     Training program for law enforcement officers;
        $3,000,000 for the Regional Mobile Gang Task Force 
     Enforcement Team in Orange County, CA;
        $500,000 for the Local Initiative Support 
     Corporation;
        $300,000 for the National Association of Town 
     Watch's National Night Out crime prevention program;
        $2,000,000 for a Spokane County crime task force 
     for costs associated with State and local investigations;
        $750,000 for Operation Child Haven;
        $150,000 for the Samantha Reid Foundation;
        $500,000 for the Sunflower House in Shawnee, KS; 
     and
        $400,000 for the Domestic Violence Services for 
     Women in Substance Abuse Treatment and Substance Abuse 
     Treatment for Women in Domestic Violence Shelters project at 
     the University of Northern Iowa.
       The conference agreement adopts the Senate report language 
     supporting the national motor vehicle title information 
     system. Within available resources for Byrne discretionary 
     grants, OJP is urged to review proposals, and provide grants 
     if warranted, to the Alaska Federation of Natives and the 
     Alaska court system for an alcohol law offenders program 
     using Naltrexone and other drug therapies.
       Byrne Formula Grants.--The conference agreement provides 
     $500,000,000 for the Byrne Formula Grant program as proposed 
     in the House bill, instead of $400,000,000 as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment.
       Drug Courts.--The conference agreement includes $50,000,000 
     for drug courts, instead of $40,000,000 as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment and the House bill. Localities may 
     also obtain funding for drug courts under the Local Law 
     Enforcement Block Grant program and the Juvenile 
     Accountability Incentive Block Grant program.
       The conference agreement recognizes that there are 
     currently over 480 drug courts in the United States. These 
     drug courts play an important role in controlling the 
     behavior and drug addiction of drug-using offenders across 
     the Nation. Among these courts, there are only three 
     comprehensive drug court systems in the country, one of which 
     is in Denver, Colorado. Denver's adult drug court was 
     established in 1994 and recently a juvenile drug court was 
     established. The conference agreement recognizes the Denver 
     concept has demonstrated its efficacy and, with sufficient 
     resources, could serve as a model for other drug courts.
       Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grant.--The 
     conference agreement provides $250,000,000 for the Juvenile 
     Accountability Incentive Block Grant program to address the 
     problem of juvenile crime as proposed in the House bill 
     instead of $100,000,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment.
       Violence Against Women Act Grants.--The conference 
     agreement includes $288,679,000 for grants to support the 
     Violence Against Women Act, instead of $283,750,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill, and $284,854,000 as proposed in 
     the Senate-reported amendment. The conference agreement 
     provides funding under this account as follows:

General Grants............................................$210,179,000 
  Civil Legal Assistance...................................(31,625,000)
  National Institute of Justice.............................(5,200,000)
  OJJDP-Safe Start Program.................................(10,000,000)
  Violence on College Campuses.............................(11,000,000)
Victims of Child Abuse Programs:
  Court-Appointed Special Advocates.........................11,500,000 
  Training for Judicial Personnel............................2,000,000 
  Grants for Televised Testimony.............................1,000,000 
Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies.........................34,000,000 
Rural Domestic Violence.....................................25,000,000 
Training Programs............................................5,000,000 
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Total..................................................288,679,000 

       State Prison Drug Treatment.--The conference agreement 
     includes $63,000,000 for substance abuse treatment programs 
     within State and local correctional facilities, as proposed 
     in the House bill and the Senate-reported amendment. The 
     conference agreement prohibits funding in this program from 
     being used for aftercare programs.
       Indian Country Alcohol and Crime Prevention.--The 
     conference agreement includes $5,000,000 for demonstration 
     grants on alcohol abuse and crime in Indian country. No 
     funding was proposed for this program in either the House 
     bill or the Senate-reported amendment. These funds are only 
     available for law enforcement activities.
       Safe Return Program.--The conference agreement includes 
     $900,000 as proposed in both the House bill and the Senate-
     reported amendment.
       Law Enforcement Family Support.--The conference agreement 
     includes $1,500,000 for law enforcement family support 
     programs, as proposed in both the Senate-reported amendment 
     and the House bill.
       Senior Citizens Against Marketing Scams.--The conference 
     agreement includes $2,000,000 for programs to assist law 
     enforcement in preventing and stopping marketing scams 
     against senior citizens, as proposed by both the House bill 
     and the Senate-reported amendment. The conference agreement 
     adopts by reference the Senate report language on the 
     National Advocacy Center and coordinating with the Federal 
     Trade Commission.
       Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention.--The conference agreement 
     includes $1,300,000 for grants to combat motor vehicle theft 
     as proposed in the House bill.
       The conference agreement adopts the House report language 
     by reference concerning false residential and commercial 
     alarms. The conference agreement also includes language 
     proposed in the House bill providing for Guam to be 
     considered a State under the Local Law Enforcement Block 
     Grant program and the Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block 
     Grant program.


                         WEED AND SEED PROGRAM

       The conference agreement includes a direct appropriation of 
     $34,000,000 for the Weed and Seed program, instead of 
     $33,500,000 proposed by the House bill and $40,000,000 as 
     proposed by the Senate-reported amendment. The conference 
     agreement includes the expectation that an additional 
     $6,500,000 will be made available from the Assets Forfeiture 
     Super Surplus Fund.

                  Community Oriented Policing Services

       The conference agreement includes $1,032,325,000 for the 
     Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) program, instead 
     of $812,025,000 in the Senate-reported amendment and 
     $595,000,000 in the House bill. This conference agreement 
     assumes that $5,000,000 will be available to the program in 
     unobligated balances, providing for a total program level of 
     $1,037,325,000.
       Police Hiring Initiatives.--The conference agreement 
     includes $470,000,000 for police hiring initiatives. Of this 
     amount $180,000,000 is provided specifically for school 
     resource officers and $35,000,000 is provided specifically 
     for hiring police officers for Indian Country, with an 
     additional $5,000,000 from unobligated
     carryover balances from fiscal year 2000 for Indian Country 
     grants. Since fiscal year 1998, the COPS program has 
     recovered over $100,000,000 per year in prior year funds. The 
     conference agreement includes a provision requiring the COPS 
     program office to submit a reprogramming request to the 
     Committees on Appropriations before spending any funds made 
     available through prior year deobligations, with an exception 
     for program management and administration funding.
       Safe Schools Initiative (SSI).--To address the issue of 
     violence in our schools, the conference agreement includes 
     $227,500,000 for the Safe Schools Initiative (SSI), including 
     funds for technology development, prevention, community 
     planning and school safety officers. Within this total, 
     $180,000,000 is from the COPS hiring program to provide 
     school resource officers who will work in partnership with 
     schools and other community-based entities to develop 
     programs to improve the safety of elementary and secondary 
     school children and educators in and

[[Page H12457]]

     around schools; $15,000,000 is from the Juvenile Justice At-
     Risk Children's Program and $15,000,000 is from the COPS 
     program ($30,000,000 total) for programs aimed at preventing 
     violence in schools through partnerships with schools and 
     community-based organizations; and $17,500,000 is provided 
     from the Crime Identification Technology Program to NIJ to 
     develop technologies to improve school safety.
       Indian Country.--The conference agreement includes a total 
     of $40,000,000 to improve law enforcement capabilities on 
     Indian lands, both for hiring uniformed officers and for the 
     purchase of equipment and training for new and existing 
     officers, as proposed by the Senate. Of the $40,000,000 for 
     this program, $35,000,000 is from direct appropriations and 
     $5,000,000 is from unobligated balances.
       Management and Administration.--The conference agreement 
     includes language that provides that not to exceed 
     $31,825,000 shall be expended for management and 
     administration of the program.
       Non-Hiring Initiatives.--The COPS program reached its 
     original goal of funding 100,000 officers in May of 1999. 
     Accordingly, the conference agreement funds initiatives to 
     ensure there is adequate infrastructure for the new police 
     officers, similar to the focus that has been provided Federal 
     law enforcement. This will enable police officers to work 
     more efficiently, equipped with the protection, tools, and 
     technology they need; to address crime in and around schools; 
     to provide law enforcement technology for local law 
     enforcement; to combat the emergence of methamphetamine in 
     new areas and police ``hot spots'' of drug market activity; 
     and to make more bullet proof vests available for local law 
     enforcement officers and correctional officers. In addition, 
     the conference agreement provides funding for Community and 
     Gun Violence Prosecutors, law enforcement costs associated 
     with Offender Reentry programs and Police Integrity training. 
     The conference agreement includes funding for the following 
     non-hiring grant programs:
       1. COPS Technology Program.--The conference agreement 
     includes $140,000,000 to be used for continued development of 
     technologies and automated systems to assist State and local 
     law enforcement agencies in investigating, responding to and 
     preventing crime. In particular, it supports the sharing of 
     criminal information and intelligence between State and local 
     law enforcement to address multi-jurisdictional crimes.
       Within the amounts made available under this program, the 
     conference agreement includes the expectation that the COPS 
     office will award grants for the following technology 
     proposals:
       $3,000,000 for a grant for the Law Enforcement On-Line 
     Program (LEO). The conference agreement directs the 
     Department of Justice to submit a report to the Committees on 
     Appropriations by February 1, 2001, on the future of the LEO 
     system. The report shall present the Department's vision for 
     LEO, interoperability of LEO with other FBI and Departmental 
     systems, and the relationship of LEO to the Global Justice 
     Information Network. The report should also include funding 
     requirements and a project time line for achieving the 
     Department's vision and address whether management of LEO 
     should remain with the FBI, or be transferred to JMD;
       $500,000 for a grant to Delaware County, IN, for mobile 
     data terminals for law enforcement vehicles;
       $250,000 for a grant to Clackamas County, OR, for police 
     communications equipment;
       $1,000,000 for a grant to Jackson, MS, for law enforcement 
     technologies and equipment;
       $5,000,000 for a grant to the National Center for Missing 
     and Exploited Children to continue the program created in 
     fiscal year 2000 that provides targeted technology to police 
     departments for the specific purpose of child victimization 
     prevention and response. The technology available to help law 
     enforcement find missing children is not at the level it 
     needs to be. Most police departments across the United States 
     do not have personal computers, modems, and scanners. The 
     departments that do rarely have them in areas focusing on 
     crimes against children;
       Up to $3,000,000 for the acquisition or lease and 
     installation of dashboard mounted cameras for State and local 
     law enforcement on patrol. One camera may be used in each 
     vehicle which is used primarily for patrols. These cameras 
     are only to be used by State and local law enforcement on 
     patrol;
       $800,000 for a grant to the National Center for Victims of 
     Crime--INFOLINK;
       $3,000,000 for a grant to allow the Utah Olympic Public 
     Safety Command to implement the public safety master plan for 
     the 2002 Winter Olympic Games;
       $300,000 for a grant to the Kansas City Community Security 
     Initiative to continue developing community policing models 
     in Kansas City neighborhoods;
       $150,000 for a grant to establish a Computer Crime Unit 
     within the Montana Board of Crime Control;
       $1,500,000 for a grant to the New Hampshire Department of 
     Safety to support Operation Streetsweeper;
       $400,000 for a grant to the Western Missouri Public Safety 
     Training Institute for classroom and training equipment to 
     facilitate the training of public safety officers;
       $3,500,000 for a grant to continue the Consolidated 
     Advanced Technologies for Law Enforcement Program at the 
     University of New Hampshire and the New Hampshire Department 
     of Safety, in cooperation with the National Resource Center 
     and the National Institute of Justice;
       $400,000 for a grant to Mountain Village, CO, for public 
     safety information management systems related to law 
     enforcement;
       $500,000 for a grant to Washington State for an electronic 
     jail booking and reporting system;
       $850,000 for a grant to the South Carolina Law Enforcement 
     Division for a high technology crime investigative unit;
       $500,000 for a grant to the National Center for Rural Law 
     Enforcement in Little Rock, AR, to continue providing 
     management education, research, forensics, computer, and 
     technical assistance and training to rural law enforcement 
     agencies, tribal police, and railroad police throughout the 
     Nation;
       $130,000 for a grant to Jackson County, MS, for public 
     safety and automated system technologies related to law 
     enforcement;
       $750,000 for grants to the Bennington, Brattleboro, 
     Newport, Montpelier, and Winooski, VT, for police technology 
     systems and equipment;
       $900,000 for a grant to Billings, MT, for patrol car mobile 
     data terminals;
       $100,000 for a grant to the Inglewood, CA, police 
     department for technology systems;
       $600,000 for a grant for telecommunications upgrades in 
     rural areas of Montana to improve law enforcement response 
     times;
       $750,000 for a grant to the Macon, GA, Police Department 
     for technology equipment and software;
       $700,000 for a grant for a voice trunking system to assist 
     law enforcement in eastern North Carolina;
       $1,000,000 for a grant to the North Star Borough for 
     centralized and computer aided dispatch equipment and a study 
     of needs;
       $60,000 for a grant to Monroe County, MI, for a data 
     transmission mechanism for squad cars;
       $600,000 for a grant to the State Police of Virginia for 
     computers and related equipment;
       $5,000,000 for a grant for the Utah Communications Agency 
     Network (UCAN) for enhancements and upgrades of security and 
     communications infrastructure to assist with the law 
     enforcement needs arising from the 2002 Winter Olympics;
       $250,000 for a grant to Lane County, OR, for an area 
     information records system;
       $550,000 for a grant to the Clearwater Economic Development 
     Association to provide funding to sheriffs' offices in 
     Clearwater, Idaho, Lemhi, Lewis and Nez Perce counties, ID, 
     to buy radio communications equipment;
       $200,000 for a grant to the Pawtucket, RI, Police 
     Department for patrol car mobile data terminals;
       $150,000 for a grant to Bolivar County, MS, for public 
     safety equipment and automated system technologies to improve 
     county law enforcement;
       $500,000 for a grant to the Maine State Police to upgrade 
     their police radio system;
       $350,000 for a grant to Huntingdon County, PA, for rural 
     law enforcement technology needs;
       $2,200,000 for a grant to the Alaska Department of Public 
     Safety for technology, policing, and enforcement initiatives;
       $2,500,000 for a grant to the Virginia Department of State 
     Police for law enforcement technologies;
       $200,000 for a grant to the Easley, SC, Police Department 
     for policing equipment upgrades and computer enhancements;
       $110,000 for a grant to the Scotts Bluff County, NE, 
     consolidated communications center to improve law enforcement 
     response times;
       $250,000 for a grant to the Vermont State Police for 
     computer and radio system upgrades and integration;
       $3,000,000 for a grant for the Southeastern Law Enforcement 
     Technology Center's Coastal Plain Police Communications 
     initiative for regional law enforcement communications 
     equipment;
       $1,300,000 for a grant to the Alaska Department of Public 
     Safety for the law enforcement photo network to provide 
     statewide access to the Alaska booking, driver, and ID 
     photographic information throughout the State;
       $100,000 for a grant to the Lawrence, MA, Police Department 
     for a police identification management system;
       $300,000 for a grant to Grand Rapids, MI, for computer 
     equipment for police officer vehicles;
       $3,000,000 for a grant to the Milwaukee, WI, police 
     department for communications infrastructure equipment;
       $500,000 for a grant to Nye County, NV, for computer 
     upgrades and other technologies;
       $750,000 for a grant to the Vermont Department of Public 
     Safety for mobile communications technology upgrades for law 
     enforcement;
       $1,650,000 for a grant to the South Carolina Law 
     Enforcement Division for emergency response technology 
     equipment, including datamasters;
       $100,000 for a grant to Deschutes County, OR, for mobile 
     data and radio communications upgrades;
       $750,000 for a grant to the City of Paducah and McCracken 
     County, KY, for a Public Safety Mobile Data System to assist 
     law enforcement;
       $400,000 for a grant to the Arkansas Crime Information 
     Center to address software and hardware requirements;
       $500,000 for a grant to the City of Seattle and King 
     County, WA, for technology upgrades and to assist with inter-
     jurisdictional investigations;

[[Page H12458]]

       $1,800,000 for a grant to the State of Alaska for the 
     training of Village Public Safety Officers and the purchase 
     of emergency response equipment;
       $500,000 for a grant to Madison, WI, for communications 
     upgrades needed to address police radio transmitting capacity 
     and inter-agency communications;
       $150,000 for a grant to the Yellowstone County, MT, 
     Sheriff's office for training technologies upgrades;
       $1,500,000 for a grant to Baltimore, MD, for police 
     training programs and equipment;
       $2,000,000 for a grant to Clark County, NV, to upgrade 
     mobile and in-vehicle computers;
       $1,400,000 for a grant to the Virginia State Police's 
     Bureau of Criminal Intelligence Division for technical 
     equipment;
       $500,000 for a grant to the Johnson County, KS, Sheriff's 
     Department for a countywide public safety radio network;
       $400,000 for a grant to the Montgomery, AL, Police 
     Department for an integrated communications system;
       $150,000 for a grant to the Bozeman, MT, police department 
     for high risk activity training equipment;
       $100,000 for a grant to St. Clair County, MI, to assist 
     with law enforcement data needs;
       $600,000 for a grant to the Alabama Department of Public 
     Safety for technology and automated systems to assist law 
     enforcement;
       $3,000,000 for a grant for the continuation of the 
     Southwest Border States Anti-Drug Information System, which 
     will provide for the purchase and deployment of the 
     technology network between all State and local law 
     enforcement agencies in the four Southwest Border States;
       $200,000 for a grant to Hall County, NE, for mobile data 
     computers for law enforcement;
       $100,000 for a grant to Burrillville, RI, for a 
     communications system to assist law enforcement;
       $200,000 for a grant to Irvington, NJ, for police 
     technology needs;
       $3,000,000 for a grant for videoteleconferencing equipment 
     necessary to assist State and local law enforcement in 
     contacting the Immigration and Naturalization Service to 
     allow them to confirm the identification and status of 
     illegal and criminal aliens in their custody;
       $2,000,000 for a grant to Ventura County, CA, for an 
     integrated justice information system;
       $3,000,000 for a grant for the Southwest Alabama Justice 
     Integration Project;
       $5,000,000 for a grant for the Ohio WEBCHECK system;
       $1,750,000 for a grant to the Missouri State Highway Patrol 
     for an integration technology program;
       $1,750,000 for a grant to the California Highway Patrol for 
     a communications system;
       $3,000,000 for a grant for SmartCOP in Alabama;
       $3,000,000 for a grant for Project Hoosier SAFE-T;
       $2,920,000 for a grant for the Access to Court Electronic 
     Data for Criminal Justice Agencies project;
       $600,000 for a grant to modernize and update law 
     enforcement technologies and equipment in East Baton Rouge 
     Parish, Livingston Parish and Ascension Parish, LA;
       $1,000,000 for a grant to the Riverside, CA, police 
     department for mobile data terminals;
       $1,000,000 for a grant to Orange County, CA, for a 
     seamless, integrated communications technology system;
       $260,000 for a grant to Shively, KY, for police department 
     communications improvements;
       $1,500,000 for a grant for the Citrus Heights, CA, police 
     force for computer networking and radios;
       $250,000 for a grant for the Suffolk County, NY, Police 
     Department Technology Crimes Initiative;
       $750,000 for a grant for Riviera Beach, FL, for a police 
     mobile radio system;
       $750,000 for a grant for Clearwater, FL, for laptop 
     computers and printers for police vehicles and network 
     operations;
       $750,000 for a grant for the cities of Arcadia, and Sierra 
     Madre, CA, to improve crime technology and communications 
     between the cities;
       $600,000 for a grant for a computer-aided dispatch and 
     records management system for the Bells Garden, CA, police 
     department;
       $3,000,000 for a grant for the Chattanooga, TN, Police 
     Department to improve information sharing;
       $3,000,000 for a grant for the purchase and installation of 
     mobile data computers for the Huntsville, AL, police 
     department;
       $83,000 for a grant for the Long County, GA, police 
     department for a communications system;
       $3,500,000 for a grant for Pinellas County, FL, law 
     enforcement agencies to demonstrate with the Florida 
     Department of Motor Vehicles how facial recognition 
     technology may be used by police;
       $1,300,000 for a grant for vehicle-mounted cameras and 
     equipment for the Jefferson County, KY, police department;
       $3,000,000 for a grant for the Lexington, KY, police 
     department for communications equipment to improve officer 
     safety and effectiveness;
       $350,000 for a grant for the Daviess County, KY, sheriff's 
     department for a wireless mobile information system;
       $250,000 for a grant for the City of Falls Church, VA, 
     police department for a computer-aided dispatch and records 
     management system;
       $3,000,000 for a grant for Yuma, AZ, for telecommunications 
     and technology infrastructure for law enforcement officers;
       $152,000 for a grant for Mexico Beach, FL, to upgrade its 
     dispatch communications service;
       $1,500,000 for a grant for an integrated public safety 
     records management and document imaging system for the 
     Wichita Police Department (KS);
       $500,000 for a grant for the East Valley Regional Community 
     Analysis Center for a data warehousing project;
       $7,500,000 for a grant for a regional law enforcement 
     technology program in Kentucky;
       $1,235,000 for a grant for the Virgin Islands for 
     technology equipment and upgrades;
       $1,500,000 for a grant for a justice tracking information 
     system (JUSTIS) for San Francisco, CA;
       $230,000 for a grant for Glendale, CA, for police training 
     equipment and technologies;
       $1,190,000 for a grant for Pasadena, CA, for a computerized 
     geographic information system;
       $152,000 for a grant for the New Jersey State Police's 
     High-tech Crime Unit for technology equipment;
       $50,000 for a grant for the Tuckahoe, NY, police department 
     for technology upgrades;
       $1,000,000 for a grant for the Greater Atlanta Data Center;
       $300,000 for a grant for the Berkshire County Regional 
     Strategic Response Team in Pittsfield, MA;
       $500,000 for a grant for mobile data terminals for 
     Louisville, KY, to improve information retrieval on-scene and 
     greatly reduce time used to complete paperwork off-scene;
       $750,000 for a grant for the Louisiana State Police for 
     communications and computer system upgrades for the Public 
     Safety Emergency Services Training Center;
       $50,000 for a grant for the Bound Brook, NJ, police 
     department for law enforcement technologies;
       $500,000 for a grant for the Tampa, FL, police department 
     for in-vehicle video cameras;
       $750,000 for a grant for the North Carolina State Highway 
     Patrol for mobile data terminals;
       $1,000,000 for the Center for Criminal Justice Technology;
       $500,000 for a grant for the San Joaquin County, CA, 
     sheriff's office for technology enhancements; and
       $1,000,000 for a grant for Minnesota for a radio system to 
     improve law enforcement communications in rural Minnesota.
       2. COPS Methamphetamine/Drug ``Hot Spots'' Program.--The 
     conference Agreement provides $48,500,000 for State and local 
     law enforcement programs to combat methamphetamine 
     production, distribution, and use, and to reimburse the Drug 
     Enforcement Administration for assistance to State and local 
     law enforcement for proper removal and disposal of hazardous 
     materials at clandestine methamphetamine labs. The monies may 
     also be used for policing initiatives in ``hot spots'' of 
     drug market activity. The House bill proposed $45,675,000 and 
     the Senate-reported amendment proposed $41,700,000 for this 
     purpose.
       Within the amount provided, the conference agreement 
     includes $20,000,000 to be reimbursed to the Drug Enforcement 
     Administration as described above. The conference agreement 
     expects the COPS office to award grants for the following 
     programs:
       $2,000,000 to the Washington State Methamphetamine 
     Initiative for a comprehensive program to address 
     methamphetamine enforcement, treatment, and cleanup efforts;
       $2,500,000 to the Midwest (Missouri) Methamphetamine 
     Initiative to train and provide related equipment to State 
     and local law enforcement officers on the proper recognition, 
     collection, removal, and destruction of methamphetamine;
       $2,000,000 to the Kansas Bureau of Investigation to combat 
     methamphetamine and to train officers in those types of 
     investigations;
       $750,000 to the Indiana State Police for a methamphetamine 
     program to address training, equipment, and removal 
     requirements;
       $250,000 to the State Police of Virginia for an intensified 
     methamphetamine enforcement program;
       $800,000 to Southern Utah law enforcement agencies to be 
     used to purchase remote methamphetamine detection 
     laboratories to identify infrastructure decay caused by the 
     disposal of hazardous and toxic chemicals;
       $1,000,000 for the Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics to 
     combat methamphetamine and to train officers on the proper 
     recognition, collection, removal, and destruction of 
     methamphetamine;
       $600,000 for the South Dakota Division of Alcohol and Drug 
     Abuse to expand its Community Mobilization Project to include 
     a methamphetamine prevention project;
       $500,000 to the State of Illinois to combat methamphetamine 
     and to train officers in those type of investigations;
       $800,000 to the State of Idaho to train State and local law 
     enforcement officers in the proper recognition, collection, 
     removal, and destruction of methamphetamine;
       $1,000,000 for the Iowa Methamphetamine Clandestine Lab 
     Task Force;
       $1,500,000 for the Arkansas Methamphetamine Law Enforcement 
     Initiative, of which, $150,000 is for the Arkansas State 
     Crime Lab to hire three additional chemists and $1,350,000 is 
     for the Arkansas State Police for training, enforcement, and 
     cleanup efforts;
       $350,000 to the Nebraska Clan Lab Team for the Nebraska 
     Methamphetamine Fighting Initiative;
       $1,000,000 for the Western Wisconsin Methamphetamine Law 
     Enforcement Initiative;

[[Page H12459]]

       $1,000,000 for personnel, equipment, and training for 
     Arizona law enforcement to combat methamphetamine;
       $250,000 for the Nye County, NV, Methamphetamine 
     Initiative;
       $750,000 to the Alabama Department of Public Safety to 
     combat methamphetamine production and distribution;
       $250,000 for the Hawaii Department of Public Safety, 
     Narcotics Enforcement Division to address methamphetamine 
     diversion, production, distribution, and enforcement efforts;
       $400,000 for the Vermont State Multi-Jurisdictional Drug 
     Task Force;
       $2,200,000 for the Tri-State Methamphetamine Training 
     Program (IA/SD/NE) to train officers from rural areas on 
     methamphetamine interdiction, covert operations, intelligence 
     gathering, locating clandestine laboratories, case 
     development, and prosecution;
       $1,000,000 to form a Western Kentucky Methamphetamine 
     training program and provide equipment and personnel;
       $1,000,000 for the Eastern Appalachian Taskforce on 
     Methamphetamine Eradication in Tennessee, including $100,000 
     to establish videoconferencing with the Hamilton County 
     District Attorney's Office;
       $250,000 for the Polk County, FL, sheriff's office to 
     support additional law enforcement officers, intelligence 
     gathering and forensic capabilities, training and community 
     outreach programs for an expanded methamphetamine program;
       $750,000 for Central Kentucky to assist local police and 
     sheriffs' departments with costs associated with combating 
     the production and distribution of methamphetamine;
       $1,500,000 for the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation 
     for costs associated with combating the production and 
     distribution of methamphetamine; and
       $300,000 for the Ascension Parish, LA, sheriff's office to 
     support officer training and outreach programs.
       The conference agreement expects the COPS office to review 
     requests from the California Bureau of Narcotics 
     Enforcement's Methamphetamine Strategy and Merced County, CA, 
     and provide grants, if warranted.
       3. COPS Safe Schools Initiative (SSI)/School Prevention 
     Initiatives.--The conference agreement includes $15,000,000 
     to provide resources for programs aimed at preventing 
     violence in public schools, and to support the assignment of 
     officers to work in collaboration with schools and community-
     based organizations to address crime and disorder problems, 
     gangs, and drug activities, as proposed in the House bill and 
     the Senate-reported amendment. Within the overall amounts 
     recommended for this program, the conference agreement 
     includes the expectation that the COPS office will examine 
     each of the following proposals, provide grants if warranted, 
     and submit a report to the Committees on its intentions for 
     each proposal:
       $3,000,000 for training by the National Center for Missing 
     and Exploited Children for law enforcement officers selected 
     to be part of the Safe Schools Initiative;
       $541,000 for the Milwaukee schools' Summer Stars program;
       $250,000 for the Sioux Falls, SD, school district to expand 
     an alternative educational support program for at-risk youth;
       $250,000 for the Safe Schools program at the University of 
     Montana;
       $500,000 for the School Security and Technology Center in 
     New Mexico;
       $375,000 for the Kenosha County, WI, Sheriff's Department 
     to address school resource officer needs;
       $350,000 for Berkeley, CA, for an intercom and surveillance 
     safety system;
       $250,000 for the King County, WA, school resource officer 
     program;
       $750,000 to the University of Louisville Center for the 
     Study and Prevention of Violence in Urban Schools;
       $350,000 for Bennington, VT, for a teen delinquency 
     prevention project;
       $1,500,000 for the Youth Advocacy Program;
       $350,000 for the Alaska Community in Schools Mentoring 
     program;
       $750,000 for Compton, CA, for the Youth Center and After 
     School Initiative;
       $2,000,000 for the National Center for Rural Law 
     Enforcement for the school violence research center;
       $375,000 for the Waukesha, WI, Police Department to address 
     school resource officer requirements;
       $150,000 for the Nevada Foundation for Youth Development;
       $495,000 for the Home Run Program;
       $500,000 for the Safer School Initiative in Maricopa 
     County, AZ;
       $1,300,000 to setup the Aggressors, Victims and Bystanders 
     Demonstration Project for Palm Beach County, FL, middle 
     schools;
       $120,000 for the Copiague School District School Safety 
     Program; and
       $80,000 for the Lindenhurst School Violence Program.
       4. COPS Bullet-Proof Vests Initiative.--The conference 
     agreement includes $25,500,000 to provide State and local law 
     enforcement officers with bullet-proof vests. The House bill 
     provided $25,000,000 for this program and the Senate-reported 
     amendment provided $26,000,000.
       5. Police Corps.--The conference agreement includes 
     $29,500,000 for the Police Corps as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment instead of $15,000,000 as proposed in the 
     House bill.
       6. Crime Identification Technology Act Program [CITA].--As 
     included in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, the conference agreement provides $130,000,000 for 
     the CITA program, to be used and distributed pursuant to the 
     Crime Identification Technology Act of 1998, Public Law 105-
     251. Under that Act, eligible uses of the funds are (1) 
     upgrading criminal history and criminal justice record 
     systems; (2) improvement of criminal justice identification, 
     including fingerprint-based systems; (3) promoting 
     compatibility and integration of national, State, and local 
     systems for criminal justice purposes, firearms eligibility 
     determinations, identification of sexual offenders, 
     identification of domestic violence offenders, and background 
     checks for other authorized purposes; (4) capture of 
     information for statistical and research purposes; (5) 
     developing multi-jurisdictional, multi-agency communications 
     systems; and (6) improvement of capabilities in forensic 
     sciences, including DNA.
       Jennifer's Law (P.L. 106-177) authorizes funds for States 
     to apply for competitive grants to cover the costs associated 
     with entering complete files on unidentified victims into the 
     FBI's National Crime Information Center (NCIC). This law 
     provides incentives for States to report to the NCIC 
     information on unidentified, deceased persons and will give 
     law enforcement officials the opportunity to identify missing 
     children who are reported as ``unidentified''. The conference 
     agreement notes that funding provided under CITA is 
     authorized to fund these costs and encourages States to use 
     CITA funds for this purpose.
       Within the amounts provided, the Office of Justice Programs 
     is directed to provide grants to the following:
       $500,000 for Hamilton County, OH, for a juvenile case 
     management system and integrated automated fingerprint 
     information system;
       $150,000 for Kalamazoo County, MI, to integrate its 
     criminal justice system data on-line;
       $100,000 for Ogden, UT, for public safety and automated 
     system technologies;
       $2,500,000 for the Missouri State Court Administrator for 
     the Juvenile Justice Information System to enhance 
     communication and collaboration between juvenile courts, law 
     enforcement, schools, and other agencies;
       $1,250,000 for the Alaska Department of Public Safety for 
     an information network;
       $150,000 for Logan County, OH, to support a regional 
     planning criminal information infrastructure system;
       $4,000,000 for the State Police of NH, for a VHF trunked 
     digital radio system;
       $4,700,000 for the State of Minnesota for a criminal 
     justice integrated information system, of which $700,000 
     shall be allocated to Hennepin County;
       $2,000,000 to automate the criminal records management 
     system in San Diego, CA;
       $1,500,000 to upgrade the Indianapolis Automated 
     Fingerprint Identification System; and
       $1,500,000 for an information technology project in Wayne 
     County, MI, to improve communications and information sharing 
     between local, State and Federal law enforcement.
       Safe Schools Technology.--Within the amounts available for 
     crime identification technology, the conference agreement 
     includes $17,500,000 for Safe Schools technology to continue 
     funding NIJ's development of new, more effective safety 
     technologies such as less obtrusive weapons detection and 
     surveillance equipment and information systems that provide 
     communities quick access to information they need to identify 
     potentially violent youth. The conference agreement adopts by 
     reference the Senate report language regarding a competitive 
     grant to a university based technology center.
       Upgrade Criminal History Records (Brady Act).--Within the 
     amounts available for crime identification technology, the 
     conference agreement provides $35,000,000 for States to 
     upgrade criminal history records so that these records can 
     interface with other databases holding information on other 
     categories of individuals who are prohibited from purchasing 
     firearms under Federal or State statute. Additionally, the 
     national sexual offender registry (NSOR) component of the 
     Criminal History Records Upgrade Program has two principal 
     objectives. The registry assists States in developing 
     complete and accurate in-State registries. It will also 
     assist States in sharing their registry information with the 
     FBI system which identifies those offenders for whom special 
     law enforcement interest has been noted.
       DNA Backlog Grants/Crime Laboratory Improvement Program 
     (CLIP).--Within the amounts available for crime 
     identification technology, the conference agreement includes 
     $30,000,000 for grants to reduce DNA backlogs and for the 
     Crime Laboratory Improvement Program (CLIP). The CLIP/DNA 
     Program supports State and local government crime 
     laboratories to develop or improve the capability to analyze 
     DNA in a forensic laboratory, as well as other general 
     forensic science capabilities. Within the amounts provided 
     under CITA, it is expected that the Office of Justice 
     Programs will provide grants to the following programs: 
     $400,000 to the Southeast Missouri Crime Laboratory; $450,000 
     to the Rhode Island State Crime Laboratory; $650,000 to the 
     Georgia State Crime Laboratory; $950,000 to the Iowa Forensic 
     Science Improvement Initiative; $2,500,000 to the South 
     Carolina Law Enforcement Division's forensic laboratory; 
     $2,000,000 to the Marshall University Forensic Science 
     program; $4,000,000 to the West

[[Page H12460]]

     Virginia University Forensic Identification Program; $500,000 
     to the Vermont Forensic Laboratory; $2,500,000 to the 
     National Center for Forensic Science at the University of 
     Central Florida; $500,000 to the National Academy for 
     Forensic Computing and Investigation in Charlotte, NC; 
     $500,000 to Ohio forensic science laboratory improvements; 
     $150,000 to the Kansas Bureau of Investigations for a new 
     latent fingerprint examination instrument; $650,000 to the 
     Bellevue, WA, Police Department's Forensic Services Unit; 
     $700,000 to the Arizona Department of Public Safety Southern 
     Regional Crime Laboratory for forensic equipment; and 
     $2,600,000 to the National Forensic Science Technology 
     Center.
       The conference agreement encourages the CLIP/DNA program to 
     support within existing funds the Mississippi Crime Lab in 
     improving its capacity to analyze and process forensic, DNA 
     and toxicology evidence and in upgrading its technology.
       The conference agreement adopts the Senate report language 
     directing OJP to conduct a study of the funding requirements 
     for the operation of forensic science laboratories given the 
     caseload growth and backlog.
       7. Community Prosecutors.--The conference agreement 
     includes $100,000,000 for the Community Prosecutors program. 
     The House bill and the Senate-reported amendment did not 
     include funding for this program. Of the funds provided, 
     $25,000,000 is for continuation of the current community 
     prosecutors program and $75,000,000 is for community 
     prosecutors in high gun violence areas. The $75,000,000 is to 
     be used exclusively for community prosecutors to prosecute 
     cases involving violent crimes committed with guns, and 
     violations of gun statutes in cases involving drug 
     trafficking and gang-related crime in high gun violence 
     areas. The Department of Justice is directed to submit a 
     report to the Committees on Appropriations by December 15, 
     2000, outlining how the $75,000,000 for community prosecutors 
     in high gun violence areas will be spent. The report shall 
     include but not be limited to the following information: (1) 
     a definition of a high gun violence area; (2) the amount of 
     funding per prosecutor that will be provided; and (3) an 
     explanation of how local communities will be able to continue 
     to employ the prosecutors that are hired after the grant has 
     expired.
       8. Offender Reentry.--In recognition of the public safety 
     issues generated by the increasing number of offenders who 
     have served their sentences and are returning from jails and 
     prisons to our communities, the conference agreement includes 
     $30,000,000 for the law enforcement costs related to 
     establishing offender reentry programs. The House bill did 
     not include funding for this program and the Senate-reported 
     amendment included $7,000,000 for this program within State 
     Prison Grants.
       Offender reentry programs establish partnerships among 
     institutional corrections, community corrections, social 
     services programs, community policing and community leaders 
     to prepare for more successful returns of inmates to their 
     home neighborhoods. The $30,000,000 provided is intended to 
     fund law enforcement participation and coordination of 
     offender reentry programs. These funds are not provided to 
     teach job training skills or provide alcohol or drug abuse 
     treatment. The Department of Justice is directed to submit an 
     implementation plan to the Committees on Appropriations by 
     December 15, 2000, outlining how the funds will be spent. The 
     report shall include the following: (1) a description of the 
     law enforcement costs that will be funded; (2) an explanation 
     of how the non-law enforcement costs such as job training, 
     education, and drug treatment will be funded; (3) an 
     explanation of how this program is being coordinated with the 
     Departments of Labor and Health and Human Services; and (4) 
     an explanation of how local communities will be able to fund 
     the operational costs of this program after their grants 
     expire.
       9. Police Integrity Program.--The conference agreement 
     provides $17,000,000 for police integrity training to provide 
     training and technical assistance grants to develop and 
     implement new policing methods and strategies. Neither the 
     House bill nor the Senate-reported amendment included funding 
     for this initiative.


                       JUVENILE JUSTICE PROGRAMS

       The conference agreement includes $298,597,000 for Juvenile 
     Justice programs, instead of $287,097,000 as proposed in the 
     House bill and $279,697,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. The conference agreement includes the 
     understanding that changes to Juvenile Justice and 
     Delinquency Prevention Programs are being considered in the 
     reauthorization of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Act 
     of 1974. However, absent completion of this reauthorization 
     process, the conference agreement provides funding consistent 
     with the current Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention 
     Act. The conference agreement includes language that provides 
     that funding for these programs shall be subject to the 
     provisions of any subsequent authorization legislation that 
     is enacted.
       Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.--Of the total 
     amount provided, $279,097,000 is for grants and 
     administrative expenses for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 
     Prevention programs including:
       1. $6,847,000 for the Office of Juvenile Justice and 
     Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) (Part A).
       2. $89,000,000 for Formula Grants for assistance to State 
     and local programs (Part B).
       3. $50,250,000 for Discretionary Grants for National 
     Programs and Special Emphasis Programs (Part C). Within the 
     amount provided for Part C discretionary grants, OJJDP is 
     directed to review the following proposals, provide a grant 
     if warranted, and submit a report to the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House and the Senate on its intentions 
     regarding:
       $3,000,000 for Parents Anonymous, Inc., to develop 
     partnerships with local communities to build and support 
     strong, safe families and to help break the cycle of abuse 
     and delinquency. The conference agreement directs Parents 
     Anonymous to open up an active dialog with those 
     organizations no longer associated with the program. With a 
     concerted effort by all parties, problematic issues can be 
     resolved which will ultimately benefit the cause of child 
     abuse prevention;
       $1,000,000 to continue the Achievable Dream after-school 
     program for at-risk youth;
       $3,000,000 to continue funding for the National Council of 
     Juvenile and Family Courts which provides continuing legal 
     education for family and juvenile law;
       $1,900,000 for continued support of law-related education;
       $1,500,000 for continuation of the Center for Research on 
     Crimes Against Children which focuses on improving the 
     handling of child crime victims by the justice system;
       $1,500,000 for equipment and programming costs at the Brown 
     County, SD, Juvenile Detention Center;
       $750,000 for juvenile drug treatment services in Cook 
     County, IL;
       $250,000 to the Low Country Children's Center;
       $1,500,000 to expand the Milwaukee Safe and Sound Program 
     to other Milwaukee neighborhoods;
       $150,000 to the Mel Blount Youth Home;
       $300,000 to the New Mexico PAL program;
       $250,000 to the juvenile assessment center in Billings, MT, 
     for child and family intervention programs;
       $150,000 to Sioux Falls, SD, Turning Point locations, 
     including the Bowden Youth Center;
       $300,000 to the New Mexico Cooperative Extension Service 4-
     H Youth Development Program;
       $1,000,000 for Project Escape;
       $400,000 to the Institute for Character Development, Civic 
     Responsibility, and Leadership at Neumann College;
       $750,000 to Utah State University's Youth and Families with 
     a Promise program;
       $120,000 to the South Dakota Unified Judicial System to 
     continue the Intensive Juvenile Probation program;
       $250,000 to the Hawaii Navigator Project;
       $500,000 to the North Eastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement 
     Council;
       $150,000 to the Vermont Coalition of Teen Centers;
       $250,000 to the Better Way program in Muncie, IN;
       $350,000 to drug prevention programs in Shelby County, KY;
       $150,000 to the South Dakota Network Against Family 
     Violence and Sexual Assault;
       $100,000 to the Alfred University Coordinating County 
     Services for Families and Youth program;
       $500,000 to the Kansas YouthFriends program;
       $500,000 to perform a national demonstration of the 
     Learning for Life Program which is then to be replicated by 
     the Gulf Ridge Council and others;
       $1,500,000 to the State of Alaska for a child abuse 
     investigation program;
       $1,250,000 to Aberdeen, SD, for a youth enrichment program;
       $438,000 to the National Association of State Fire Marshals 
     for implementing a national juvenile fire-setter intervention 
     mobilization plan that will facilitate and promote the 
     establishment of juvenile fire-setter intervention programs 
     based on existing model programs at the State and local 
     level;
       $3,000,000 for the ``Innovative Partnerships for High Risk 
     Youth'' demonstration;
       $7,500,000 for the Youth ChalleNGe Program;
       $300,000 to Prevent Child Abuse America for the programs of 
     the National Family Support Roundtable;
       $2,000,000 to continue the L.A.'s Best youth program;
       $500,000 to the Culver City Juvenile Crime Diversion 
     Initiative;
       $275,000 to the Sports Foundation to work with at-risk 
     youth;
       $300,000 to the No Workshops * * * No Jump Shots program to 
     provide case management, counseling and mandatory workshops 
     for at-risk youth;
       $1,000,000 to the Greater Heights program to provide at-
     risk youth with mentoring, positive activities, networking 
     and alternatives to incarceration;
       $500,000 to Our Next Generation;
       $1,000,000 to the Youth Crime Watch of America;
       $150,000 to Operation Quality Time;
       $1,300,000 to the Suffolk University Center for Juvenile 
     Justice;
       $1,000,000 for Drug Free America;
       $750,000 to New Mexico State University to establish an 
     After School Services Pilot Program for at-risk youth;
       $250,000 for the Culinary Education Training for At-Risk 
     Youth in Miami-Dade, FL;
       $1,000,000 to Mount Vernon, NY, to provide after-school 
     services to at-risk youth;
       $500,000 to the Lourdes Health Network in Pasco, WA, for 
     extension of the school year

[[Page H12461]]

     program for youth and adolescents at risk of delinquency;
       $250,000 to the Ella H. Baker House to support its juvenile 
     delinquency intervention and prevention programs;
       $365,000 to Project Bridge to continue to assist at-risk 
     youths in Riverside County, CA;
       $500,000 to Wichita State University for a juvenile justice 
     program;
       $500,000 to the Wayne County Department of Community 
     Justice for an at-risk youth program including prevention and 
     intervention services;
       $1,000,000 for the West Farms program to assist at-risk 
     youth; and
       $50,000 for the Maryhurst Youth Center.
       The conference agreement recognizes Project CRAFT 
     (Community Restitution and Apprenticeship-Focused Training) 
     as a successful model and proven intervention technique in 
     the rehabilitation and reduced recidivism of accused and 
     adjudicated juvenile offenders. The OJP is encouraged to work 
     in cooperation with the Department of Labor to replicate 
     Project CRAFT in order to offer at-risk and adjudicated youth 
     pre-apprenticeship training and job placement in the 
     residential construction trades.
       4. $12,000,000 to expand the Youth Gangs (Part D) program 
     which provides grants to public and private nonprofit 
     organizations to prevent and reduce the participation of at-
     risk youth in the activities of gangs that commit crimes.
       5. $10,000,000 for Discretionary Grants for State Challenge 
     Activities (Part E) to increase the amount of a State's 
     formula grant by up to 10 percent, if that State agrees to 
     undertake some or all of the ten challenge activities 
     designed to improve various aspects of a State's juvenile 
     justice and delinquency prevention program.
       6. $16,000,000 for the Juvenile Mentoring Program (Part G) 
     to reduce juvenile delinquency, improve academic performance, 
     and reduce the drop-out rate among at-risk youth by bringing 
     young people in high crime areas together with law 
     enforcement officers and other responsible adults who are 
     willing to serve as long-term mentors. OJJDP is directed to 
     provide a $3,000,000 grant for the Big Brothers/Big Sisters 
     of America program.
       7. $95,000,000 for the At Risk Children's Program (Title 
     V). Under Title V juvenile justice programs, the At Risk 
     Children's Program provides funding to support comprehensive 
     delinquency prevention plans formulated at the community 
     level. The program targets truancy and school violence; 
     gangs, guns, and drugs; and other influences that lead 
     juveniles to delinquency and criminality.
       Safe School Initiative (SSI).--The conference agreement 
     includes $15,000,000 within Title V grants for the Safe 
     School initiative as proposed in the Senate report. Within 
     the amount provided, OJJDP is directed to review the 
     following proposals, provide grants if warranted, and submit 
     a report to the Committees on Appropriations on its 
     intentions regarding:
       $3,600,000 to the Hamilton Fish National Institute on 
     School and Community Violence;
       $1,250,000 to the Teens, Crime, and Community Program;
       $200,000 to the Decatur Mentoring Project in Decatur, IL;
       $250,000 to an Allegheny County, PA, youth development 
     program;
       $1,000,000 to establish and enhance after-school programs 
     for at-risk youth in Baltimore, MD;
       $750,000 to the University of South Alabama for Youth 
     Violence Prevention Research;
       $900,000 to the Stop Truancy Outreach program;
       $58,000 to the Southern Kentucky Truancy Diversion program;
       $1,000,000 to the ``I Have a Dream'' foundation for at-risk 
     youth program;
       $500,000 to the Family, Career, and Community Leaders of 
     America (FCCLA), STOP the Violence--Students Taking On 
     Prevention Project; and
       $1,000,000 to the Little Rock School District to create a 
     safe, secure and healthy school environment.
       Tribal Youth Program.--The conference agreement includes 
     $12,500,000 within the Title V grants for programs to reduce, 
     control and prevent crime, as proposed in the Senate report.
       Enforcing the Underage Drinking Laws Program.--The 
     conference agreement includes $25,000,000 within the Title V 
     grants for programs to assist States in enforcing underage 
     drinking laws, as proposed in the Senate report. Within the 
     amounts provided for underage drinking, OJP shall make awards 
     of $700,000 to expand Oregon Partnership programs and 
     $500,000 to the Sam Houston State University and Mothers 
     Against Drunk Driving for the National Institute of Victims 
     Studies.
       Drug Prevention Program.--The conference agreement includes 
     $11,000,000 as proposed in the House bill to develop, 
     demonstrate and test programs to increase the perception 
     among children and youth that drug use is risky, harmful, or 
     unattractive.
       Victims of Child Abuse Act.--The conference agreement 
     includes $8,500,000 for the various programs authorized under 
     the Victims of Child Abuse Act (VOCA), as proposed in the 
     House bill. The following programs are included in the 
     agreement:
       $1,250,000 to Regional Children's Advocacy Centers, as 
     authorized by section 213 of VOCA;
       $5,000,000 to establish local Children's Advocacy Centers, 
     as authorized by section 214 of VOCA;
       $1,500,000 for a continuation grant to the National Center 
     for Prosecution of Child Abuse for specialized technical 
     assistance and training programs to improve the prosecution 
     of child abuse cases, as authorized by section 214a of VOCA; 
     and
       $750,000 for a continuation grant to the National Network 
     of Child Advocacy Centers for technical assistance and 
     training, as authorized by section 214a of VOCA.


                    PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS BENEFITS

       The conference agreement includes $35,624,000, instead of 
     $33,224,000 as proposed in the House bill and the Senate-
     reported amendment. This includes $33,224,000 for the death 
     benefits program and $2,400,000 for the disability benefits 
     program. In addition to the $2,400,000 appropriated for 
     disability benefits, it is estimated there will be $500,000 
     in available disability carryover balances for a total of 
     $2,900,000 for disability payments in fiscal year 2001.
       In addition, the conferees understand that there is an 
     estimated $2,300,000 unobligated balance available for the 
     Education Assistance to Dependents Program in fiscal year 
     2001. This amount is estimated to be sufficient to cover the 
     cost of this program, which has recently been expanded to 
     provide benefits to the children and spouses of Federal, 
     State and local public safety officers permanently disabled 
     in the line of duty as long ago as 1978.

               General Provisions--Department of Justice

       The conference agreement includes the following general 
     provisions for the Department of Justice:
       Section 101.--The conference agreement includes section 
     101, identical in the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, which makes up to $45,000 of the funds 
     appropriated to the Department of Justice available for 
     reception and representation expenses.
       Sec. 102.--The conference agreement includes section 102, 
     modified from language proposed in the House bill and the 
     Senate-reported amendment, which continues certain 
     authorities for the Department of Justice contained in the 
     Department of Justice Appropriation Authorization Act, fiscal 
     year 1980, until enactment of subsequent authorization 
     legislation.
       Sec. 103.--The conference agreement includes section 103, 
     as proposed in the House bill, which prohibits the use of 
     funds to perform abortions in the Federal Prison System. The 
     Senate-reported amendment did not include a similar 
     provision.
       Sec. 104.--The conference agreement includes section 104, 
     as proposed in the House bill, which prohibits the use of 
     funds to require any person to perform, or facilitate the 
     performance of, an abortion. The Senate-reported amendment 
     did not include a similar provision.
       Sec. 105.--The conference agreement includes section 105, 
     as proposed in the House bill, which states that nothing in 
     the previous section removes the obligation of the Director 
     of the Bureau of Prisons to provide escort services to female 
     inmates who seek to obtain abortions outside a Federal 
     facility. The Senate-reported amendment did not include a 
     similar provision.
       Sec. 106.--The conference agreement includes section 106, 
     identical in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, which allows the Department of Justice to spend up 
     to $10,000,000 for rewards for information regarding acts of 
     terrorism against a United States person or property at 
     levels not to exceed $2,000,000 per reward.
       Sec. 107.--The conference agreement includes section 107, 
     as proposed in the House bill, which continues the current 5 
     percent and 10 percent limitations on transfers among 
     Department of Justice accounts. The Senate-reported amendment 
     included a minor technical difference in the language.
       Sec. 108.--The conference agreement includes section 108, 
     as proposed in the House bill, which sets forth the grant 
     authority of the Assistant Attorney General for the Office of 
     Justice Programs and makes these authorities permanent. The 
     Senate-reported amendment included such authorities only for 
     fiscal year 2001.
       Sec. 109.--The conference agreement includes section 109, 
     as proposed in the House bill, which continues a provision in 
     the fiscal year 2000 Appropriations Act to allow assistance 
     and services to be provided to the families of the victims of 
     Pan Am 103. The Senate-reported amendment did not include a 
     similar provision.
       Sec. 110.--The conference agreement includes a new 
     provision, numbered as section 110, which modifies section 
     641 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant 
     Responsibility Act (IIRIRA) to reduce the fees charged to au 
     pairs, camp counselors, and participants in summer work 
     travel programs for collection of certain information. The 
     Senate-reported amendment included a provision to repeal 
     section 641 and section 110 of the IIRIRA, while the House 
     bill did not address this matter.
       Sec. 111.--The conference agreement includes section 111, 
     modified from language proposed in the House bill, which 
     relates to the payment of certain compensation from funds 
     appropriated to the Department of Justice. A similar 
     provision was included as section 113 of the Senate-reported 
     amendment.
       Sec. 112.--The conference agreement includes section 112, 
     as proposed in the House bill, which establishes fees for 
     genealogy

[[Page H12462]]

     services and voluntary premium processing for Immigration and 
     Naturalization Service activities. The Senate-reported 
     amendment did not include a similar provision.
       Sec. 113.--The conference agreement includes section 114, 
     proposed as section 110 in the Senate-reported amendment, 
     which allows funds to be provided to the FBI from the Crime 
     Victims Fund to improve services to crime victims. Additional 
     direction regarding implementation of this provision is 
     included under the FBI Salaries and Expenses account. In 
     addition, the conference agreement assumes that funding will 
     continue to be provided to the U.S. Attorneys to support the 
     current number of victim witness coordinators in fiscal year 
     2001, as was provided from the Fund in fiscal year 2000.
       Sec. 114.--The conference agreement includes section 115, 
     proposed as section 112 in the Senate-reported amendment, 
     which permanently allows funds appropriated to the Federal 
     Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to be used to place prisoners in 
     privately operated prisons provided that the Director of BOP 
     determines such placement is consistent with Federal 
     classification standards. The House bill did not include a 
     similar provision.
       Sec. 115.--The conference agreement includes section 116, 
     proposed as section 114 in the Senate-reported amendment, 
     which makes available up to $1,000,000 for technical 
     assistance from funds appropriated for part G of title II of 
     the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, 
     as amended. The House bill did not include a similar 
     provision.
       Sec. 116.--The conference agreement includes section 117, 
     proposed as section 115 in the Senate-reported amendment, 
     which makes available funds provided in fiscal year 2000 for 
     certain activities. The House bill did not include a similar 
     provision.
       Sec. 117.--The conference agreement includes section 118, 
     proposed as section 116 in the Senate-reported amendment, 
     which permanently prohibits funds from being provided to any 
     local jail that runs a ``pay to stay'' program. The House 
     bill did not include a similar provision.
       Sec. 118.--The conference agreement includes a new 
     provision which allows the Attorney General to enter into 
     contracts and other agreements for detention and 
     incarceration space and facilities on any reasonable basis. 
     The House bill and the Senate-reported amendment included 
     similar language elsewhere in Title I of this Act.

         TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND RELATED AGENCIES

         TRADE AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT RELATED AGENCIES

            Office of the United States Trade Representative


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $29,517,000 for the 
     salaries and expenses of the Office of the United States 
     Trade Representative (USTR) instead of $29,433,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill and $29,600,000 as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment. The USTR is directed to provide 
     the necessary space within its Geneva offices for use by 
     Department of Commerce Import Administration personnel 
     working with the USTR on issues related to antidumping and 
     countervailing duties.

                     International Trade Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $48,100,000 for the 
     salaries and expenses of the International Trade Commission 
     (ITC) instead of $46,995,000 as proposed in the House bill 
     and $49,100,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. 
     The conference agreement incorporates by reference report 
     language in both the Senate and House reports.

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

                   International Trade Administration


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

       The conference agreement includes $337,444,000 in new 
     budgetary resources for the operations and administration of 
     the International Trade Administration (ITA) for fiscal year 
     2001, of which $3,000,000 is derived from fee collections, 
     instead of $321,448,000 as proposed by the House bill, and 
     $318,686,000 as proposed by the Senate-reported amendment. 
     The conference agreement does not include Senate-reported 
     amendment language regarding Executive Direction and 
     Administration funding. ITA is, however, directed to adhere 
     to the reprogramming procedures set forth in section 605 of 
     this Act, and to submit a spending plan.
       The following table reflects the distribution of funds by 
     activity included in the conference agreement:

Trade Development..........................................$64,747,000 
Market Access and Compliance................................25,555,000 
Import Administration.......................................40,645,000 
U.S. & F.C.S...............................................194,638,000 
Executive Direction and Administration......................11,859,000 
Fee Collections.............................................(3,000,000)
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Total, ITA.............................................334,444,000 

       Trade Development (TD).--The conference agreement provides 
     $64,747,000 for this activity. Of the amounts provided, 
     $50,992,000 is for the TD base program, $9,750,000 is for the 
     National Textile Consortium, $3,000,000 is for the Textile/
     Clothing Technology Corporation, and $250,000 is for the 
     requested export database. Existing members of the National 
     Textile Consortium should receive funding at the fiscal year 
     2000 level and the remaining $750,000 is available for new 
     members on a competitive basis. Further, the conference 
     agreement includes $255,000 for the Access Mexico program and 
     $500,000 for continuation of the international global 
     competitiveness initiative as recommended in the House 
     report.
       Market Access and Compliance (MAC).--The conference 
     agreement includes a total of $25,555,000 for this activity. 
     Of the amounts provided, $18,755,000 is for the base program, 
     $500,000 is for the strike force teams initiative as provided 
     in the current year, and $6,300,000 is for the trade 
     enforcement and compliance initiative, the full amount 
     requested in the budget. Senate report language regarding the 
     Mid-American Regional Council is incorporated by reference.
       Import Administration.--The conference agreement provides 
     $40,645,000 for the Import Administration. Requested program 
     increases are included as follows: $1,250,000 for overseas 
     compliance; $2,225,000 for China and Japan compliance; and 
     $3,000,000 for import surge monitoring enforcement. Funding 
     for a trade-law technical assistance center and a World Trade 
     Organization initiative is not included. Senate report 
     language on ITA and USTR work is included by reference.
       U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service (US & FCS).--The 
     conference agreement includes $194,638,000 for the programs 
     of the US & FCS, the same amount provided in the House bill 
     and $23,923,000 above the Senate-reported amendment. House 
     report language regarding the Rural Export Initiative, the 
     Global Diversity Initiative, and base resources is adopted by 
     reference. Senate report language regarding the US & FCS's 
     work on the Appalachian-Turkish Trade Project is adopted by 
     reference.
       Executive Direction and Administration.--The conference 
     agreement includes $11,859,000 in direct appropriations and 
     $847,000 in prior year carryover, providing total 
     availability of $12,706,000 for the administrative and policy 
     functions of the ITA. The conference agreement does not 
     include Senate-reported amendment language regarding 
     Executive Direction and Administration funding.
       House report language regarding trade missions, buying 
     power maintenance, and trade show revenues is included by 
     reference.

                         Export Administration


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

       The conference agreement includes $64,854,000 for the 
     Bureau of Export Administration (BXA) instead of $53,833,000 
     as proposed in the House bill and $61,037,000 as proposed in 
     the Senate-reported amendment. The conference agreement 
     assumes $425,000 will be available from prior year carryover. 
     Of the amount provided, $31,328,000 is for Export 
     Administration base, including Chemical Weapons Convention 
     (CWC) implementation and $7,250,000 is for CWC inspections; 
     $25,033,000 is for Export Enforcement, including $500,000 for 
     computer export verification as in the current year and 
     $1,000,000 for the Chemical Weapons Convention Treaty; 
     $4,051,000 is for Management and Policy Coordination; and 
     $4,867,000 is for the Critical Infrastructure Assurance 
     Office (CIAO). The House report language regarding the final 
     year of operation for the CIAO is incorporated by reference.
       The conference agreement does not include under this 
     heading, a provision proposed in the House bill regarding the 
     processing of licenses for the export of satellites to the 
     People's Republic of China. The conference agreement includes 
     an identical provision under ``Department of State, 
     Diplomatic and Consular Programs'', as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment.

                  Economic Development Administration


                ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

       The conference agreement includes $411,879,000 for Economic 
     Development Administration (EDA) grant programs instead of 
     $361,879,000 as proposed in the House bill and $218,000,000 
     as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment.
       Of the amounts provided, $286,700,000 is for Public Works 
     and Economic Development, $49,629,000 is for Economic 
     Adjustment Assistance, $31,450,000 is for Defense Conversion, 
     $24,000,000 is for Planning, $9,100,000 is for Technical 
     Assistance, including University Centers, $10,500,000 is for 
     Trade Adjustment Assistance, and $500,000 is for Research. 
     EDA is expected to allocate the funding as directed in the 
     House report. The conference agreement does not include set-
     aside funding for specific sectors or populations that was 
     requested in the budget. The authorized, traditional programs 
     provide support for all communities facing economic hardship. 
     Within the funding for Economic Adjustment Assistance, EDA is 
     expected to increase funding for assistance to the timber and 
     coal industries above fiscal year 2000 levels. In addition, 
     EDA is expected to provide resources for communities affected 
     by economic downturns due to United States-Canadian trade-
     related issues, New England fisheries impacted by 
     regulations, and communities impacted by NAFTA, as directed 
     in the Senate report.
       The conference agreement makes funding under this account 
     available until expended, as proposed in both the House bill 
     and the Senate-reported amendment.


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $28,000,000 for salaries 
     and expenses of the EDA instead of $26,499,000 as proposed in 
     the House bill and $31,542,000 as proposed in the

[[Page H12463]]

     Senate-reported amendment. This funding will allow EDA to 
     increase its level of administrative operations to manage 
     increased program funding levels. The EDA is directed to 
     aggressively pursue all opportunities for reimbursement, 
     deobligations, and use of non-appropriated resources to 
     achieve efficient and effective control of EDA programs.

                  Minority Business Development Agency


                     MINORITY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

       The conference agreement includes $27,314,000 for the 
     programs of the Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA), 
     as proposed in the House bill, instead of $27,000,000 as 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. House report 
     language regarding the Entrepreneurial Technology 
     Apprenticeship Program is included by reference.

                ECONOMIC AND INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE

                   Economic and Statistical Analysis


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $53,745,000 for salaries 
     and expenses of the activities funded under the Economic and 
     Statistical Analysis account, instead of $49,499,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill and $53,992,000 as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment. Funding is included to begin the 
     necessary task of updating and improving statistical 
     measurements of the U.S. economy, international transactions, 
     and the effects of e-business, as referenced in the Senate 
     report. House report language regarding the Integrated 
     Environmental-Economic Accounting initiative is included by 
     reference.

                          Bureau of the Census

       The conference agreement provides total spending of 
     $733,633,000 for the Bureau of the Census for fiscal year 
     2001, instead of a direct appropriation of $670,867,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill, and a direct appropriation of 
     $693,610,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment.


                         salaries and expenses

       The conference agreement includes $157,227,000 for the 
     Salaries and Expenses of the Bureau of the Census for fiscal 
     year 2001, instead of $140,000,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill, and $158,386,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment. The agreement represents a $17,227,000 increase 
     over the fiscal year 2000 level. The distribution of funding 
     is as follows:

Current Economic Statistics................................$103,228,000
Current Demographic Statistics...............................50,100,000
Survey Development and Data Surveys...........................3,899,000
                                                             __________
                                                             
    Total...................................................157,227,000

       For current economic statistics programs, the conference 
     agreement provides a total of $103,228,000, of which 
     $11,295,000 is for adjustments to base, and $3,000,000 is for 
     program enhancements for the following initiatives: 
     $2,000,000 to begin the measurement of electronic businesses, 
     and $1,000,000 to support efforts to improve the timeliness, 
     quality and coverage of export trade statistics. The 
     conference agreement fully funds base requirements for these 
     programs to ensure that key reports on manufacturing, general 
     economic and foreign trade statistics are maintained and 
     issued on a timely basis. The conference agreement does not 
     include additional funding requested to begin funding a 
     specialized Survey of Minority Owned Business Enterprises 
     under this account, because such action is inconsistent with 
     the long-standing practice of requiring specialized surveys 
     to be funded by an affected agency or entity. The conference 
     agreement adopts the Senate report language requiring a 
     report on reimbursements to be submitted with the fiscal year 
     2002 budget request.
       The Bureau of the Census is directed to make the following 
     changes beginning with the data collection on or after 
     October 1, 2000, to the monthly report entitled 
     ``Preliminary: U.S. Imports for Consumption of Steel 
     Products'': (1) to delineate all products listed in such 
     report into the following categories: alloy steel products, 
     stainless steel products, and carbon steel products; (2) to 
     add the following specialty steel categories to the report: 
     alloy steel and silicon electrical steel; and (3) to divide 
     in the report all steel line pipe products into the following 
     categories: line pipe products 16 inches or less in diameter, 
     and line pipe products over 16 inches in diameter.
       Concerns have been expressed regarding recent actions taken 
     by the Bureau of the Census to change the manner in which 
     data are collected from the Shipper's Export Declaration, and 
     the burden this may impose on some shippers. The Bureau is 
     requested to provide a report on this matter to the 
     Committees on Appropriations no later than December 15, 2000.
       It is the Congress' understanding that the Office of 
     Management and Budget (OMB) will not be designating or 
     defining any changes to metropolitan areas during fiscal year 
     2001. In order to ensure public acceptance of revised 
     standards for defining metropolitan areas, OMB will continue 
     to work with the Congress to resolve outstanding issues 
     before adopting revised standards. With respect to the 
     titling of Combined Areas that may be defined in 2003, OMB is 
     urged to adopt a standard as follows: (1) the name of the 
     largest principal city of the largest Core Based Statistical 
     Area should appear first in the Combined Area title; and (2) 
     in accordance with local opinion, up to two additional names 
     could be included in the Combined Area title, provided that 
     the additional names are the names of principal cities in the 
     Combined Area or suitable regional names; and the resulting 
     title of the Combined Area would be distinct from the title 
     of any Metropolitan Area, Micropolitan Area, or Metropolitan 
     Division defined in 2003 or beyond. With respect to titling 
     of Metropolitan Areas, OMB is urged to continue to work with 
     the Congress to address local concerns.


                     periodic censuses and programs

       The conference agreement provides a total spending level of 
     $576,406,000 for periodic censuses and programs, of which 
     $276,406,000 is provided as a direct appropriation, and 
     $300,000,000 is from prior year unobligated balances, instead 
     of a direct appropriation of $530,867,000 as proposed in the 
     House bill, and a direct appropriation of $535,224,000 as 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment.
       Decennial Census Programs.--The conference agreement 
     includes a total of $390,898,000 for completion of the 2000 
     decennial census, of which $130,898,000 is provided as a 
     direct appropriation, and $260,000,000 is derived from prior 
     year carryover, instead of a direct appropriation of 
     $392,898,000 as proposed in the House bill, and a direct 
     appropriation of $389,716,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. The following represents the distribution 
     of total funds provided for the 2000 Census in fiscal year 
     2001:

Program Development and Management..........................$24,055,000
Data Content and Products....................................55,096,000
Field Data Collection and Support Systems...................122,000,000
Address List Development......................................1,500,000
Automated Data Process and Telecommunications Support.......115,038,000
Testing and Evaluation.......................................55,000,000
Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands and Pacific Areas.................5,512,000
Marketing, Communications and Partnerships....................9,197,000
Census Monitoring Board.......................................3,500,000
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Total, Decennial Census.................................390,898,000

       The Bureau is directed to continue to provide monthly 
     reports on the obligation of funds against each framework. 
     Reallocation of resources among the frameworks listed above 
     is subject to the requirements of section 605 of this Act, as 
     is allocation of any additional unobligated balances not 
     allocated in this conference agreement.
       The conference agreement includes language designating the 
     amounts provided for each decennial framework, modified from 
     language proposed in the House bill. Should the operational 
     needs of the decennial census necessitate the transfer of 
     funds between these frameworks, the Bureau may transfer such 
     funds as necessary subject to the standard transfer and 
     reprogramming procedures set forth in section 605 of this 
     Act. In addition, the conference agreement includes language 
     designating funding under this account for the expenses of 
     the Census Monitoring Board as proposed in the House bill. 
     The Senate bill did not include a similar provision.
       Other Periodic Programs.--The conference agreement includes 
     a total of $185,508,000 for other periodic censuses and 
     programs, of which $40,000,000 is derived from prior year 
     unobligated balances available from the decennial census, 
     instead of a direct appropriation of $137,969,000 as proposed 
     in the House bill, and $145,508,000 as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment. The following table represents the 
     distribution of funds provided for non-decennial periodic 
     censuses and related programs:

Economic Statistics Programs...............................$45,928,000 
  Economic Censuses........................................(42,846,000)
  Census of Governments.....................................(3,082,000)
Demographic Statistics Programs.............................96,380,000 
  Intercensal Demographic Estimates.........................(5,583,000)
  Continuous Measurement...................................(21,615,000)
  Demographic Survey Sample Redesign........................(4,769,000)
  Electronic Information Collection (CASIC).................(6,000,000)
  Geographic Support.......................................(35,108,000)
  Data Processing Systems..................................(23,305,000)
Suitland Federal Center.....................................43,200,000 
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Total..................................................185,508,000 

       The Secretary of Commerce is directed to submit to the 
     Congress, no later than September 30, 2001, a written report 
     on any methodological, logistical, and other issues 
     associated with the inclusion in future decennial censuses of 
     American citizens and their dependents living abroad, for 
     apportionment, redistricting, and other purposes for which 
     decennial census results are used. This report shall include 
     estimates of the number of Americans living abroad in the 
     following categories: Federal civilian employees, military 
     personnel, employees of business enterprises, employees of 
     non-profit entities, and individuals not otherwise described.
       Suitland Federal Center.--The conference agreement includes 
     a total of $43,200,000 for activities related to renovation 
     of Census Bureau facilities at the Suitland Federal Center, 
     of which $40,000,000 is provided from prior year unobligated 
     balances and $3,200,000 is provided from direct 
     appropriations. This amount represents the Census Bureau's 
     costs

[[Page H12464]]

     associated with renovation of this facility, as follows: 
     $3,200,000 for planning and design work, and $40,000,000 for 
     above-standard costs. The construction and tenant build-out 
     costs for this facility are to be funded by the General 
     Services Administration (GSA), not the Census Bureau, and the 
     conference agreement includes new language prohibiting Census 
     Bureau funds from being used for these purposes. Language is 
     also included, as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment, 
     requiring quarterly reports from the Census Bureau and GSA on 
     this project.

       National Telecommunications and Information Administration


                         salaries and expenses

       The conference agreement includes $11,437,000 for the 
     salaries and expenses of the National Telecommunications and 
     Information Administration (NTIA) as provided in the Senate-
     reported amendment, instead of $10,975,000 as proposed in the 
     House bill. The conference agreement includes, by reference, 
     Senate report language regarding funding for the critical 
     infrastructure program, and House report language regarding 
     reimbursements.


    public telecommunications facilities, planning and construction

       The conference agreement includes $43,500,000 for the 
     Public Telecommunications Facilities, Planning and 
     Construction (PTFP) program, instead of $31,000,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill and $50,000,000 as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment. NTIA is expected to use this 
     funding for the existing equipment and facilities replacement 
     program, and to maintain an appropriate balance between 
     traditional grants and those to stations converting to 
     digital broadcasting. NTIA is directed to place emphasis on 
     distance learning initiatives targeting rural areas, as 
     described in Senate report.


                   INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE GRANTS

         The conference agreement includes $45,500,000 for NTIA's 
     Information Infrastructure Grants program, instead of 
     $15,500,000 as proposed in both the House bill and the 
     Senate-reported amendment. Senate report language regarding 
     the overlap of funding under this heading with funding for 
     the Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, with 
     respect to law enforcement communication and information 
     networks is included by reference. The conference agreement 
     includes language proposed in the Senate-reported amendment 
     regarding uses of spectrum. The House bill did not include a 
     provision on this matter. Senate report language regarding 
     proposals for several grant programs is not included in the 
     conference agreement. House report language regarding 
     telecommunications research is included by reference.

                       Patent and Trademark Office


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement provides a total funding level of 
     $1,038,732,000 for the Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) as 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment and requested in 
     the budget, instead of $904,924,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill. Of the amount provided in the conference agreement, 
     $783,843,000 is to be derived from fiscal year 2001 
     offsetting fee collections, and $254,889,000 is to be derived 
     from carryover of prior year fee collections. This amount 
     represents an increase of $167,732,000, or 19 percent, above 
     the fiscal year 2000 operating level for the PTO. The PTO has 
     experienced significant growth in recent years due to 
     increased application filings for patents and trademarks, and 
     funding is provided to address these increased filings.
       The conference agreement includes bill language limiting 
     the amount of carryover that may be obligated in fiscal year 
     2001, as proposed in the House bill.
       The conference agreement includes House report language 
     concerning PTO's partnership with the National Inventor's 
     Hall of Fame and Inventure Place, and Senate report language 
     concerning the official insignias of Native American Tribes, 
     and agency budget forecasts.

                         SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

                       Technology Administration


       UNDER SECRETARY FOR TECHNOLOGY/OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY POLICY

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $8,080,000 for the 
     Technology Administration, instead of $7,945,000 as proposed 
     in the House bill, and $8,216,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. The conference agreement continues 
     direction as in fiscal years 1998, 1999, and 2000 regarding 
     the use of Technology Administration and Department of 
     Commerce resources to support foreign policy initiatives and 
     programs.

             National Institute of Standards and Technology


             SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL RESEARCH AND SERVICES

       The conference agreement includes $312,617,000 for the 
     internal (core) research account of the National Institute of 
     Standards and Technology (NIST), instead of $292,056,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill, and $305,003,000 as proposed in 
     the Senate-reported amendment.
       The conference agreement provides funds for the core 
     research programs of NIST as follows:

Electronics and Electrical Engineering.....................$40,127,000 
Manufacturing Engineering...................................19,821,000 
Chemical Science and Technology.............................33,360,000 
Physics.....................................................31,556,000 
Material Sciences and Engineering...........................54,658,000 
Building and Fire Research..................................17,124,000 
Computer Science and Applied Mathematics....................52,551,000 
Technology Assistance.......................................17,349,000 
Baldrige Quality Awards......................................5,205,000 
Research Support............................................36,599,000 
Infrastructure Protection Research Grants....................5,000,000 
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Subtotal...............................................313,350,000 
Deobligations.................................................(733,000)
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Total..................................................312,617,000 

       In addition, the conference agreement includes funding for 
     the Physics program as referenced in the Senate report. Of 
     the funding provided for Computer Science and Applied 
     Mathematics, $3,000,000 is for expert review teams, and 
     $4,000,000 is for internal critical infrastructure protection 
     activities. Funding is included for the Building and Fire 
     Program at $1,192,000 above the budget request, and 
     $2,000,000 is to continue the disaster research program on 
     effects of windstorms on protective structures and other 
     technologies begun in fiscal year 1998. A total of $282,000 
     is authorized to be transferred to the NIST working capital 
     fund, as referenced in the House bill instead of $6,200,000 
     as referenced in the Senate-reported amendment. Language 
     regarding the placement of NIST personnel overseas is 
     included as in the House report.
       Funding of $5,000,000 is provided for a new program to 
     award research grants for critical infrastructure protection. 
     NIST is required to submit an implementation plan for this 
     new, competitive grant program, prior to obligation of 
     funding.


                     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

       The conference agreement includes $250,837,000 for the NIST 
     external research account, instead of $104,836,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill, and $262,737,000 as proposed in 
     the Senate-reported amendment.
       Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program.--The 
     conference agreement includes $105,137,000 for the 
     Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program (MEP), instead of 
     $104,836,000 as proposed in the House bill, and $109,137,000 
     as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. The conference 
     agreement includes no funding for new initiatives. Additional 
     funding is provided for the centers. The conference agreement 
     incorporates direction in the Senate report that the Northern 
     Great Plains Initiative e-commerce project should assist 
     small manufacturers with marketing and business development 
     purposes in rural areas.
       Advanced Technology Program.--The conference agreement 
     includes $145,700,000 for the Advanced Technology Program 
     (ATP), instead of $153,600,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment, and no funding as proposed in the House 
     bill. The amount of carryover funding available in fiscal 
     year 2001 is $45,000,000, providing total available funding 
     of $190,700,000 for fiscal year 2001.
       The recommendation provides the following: (1) $84,800,000 
     for continued funding requirements for awards made in fiscal 
     years 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, and 2000; (2) $60,700,000 for 
     new awards in fiscal year 2001; and (3) $45,200,000 for 
     administration, internal NIST lab support and Small Business 
     Innovation Research requirements.
       The conference agreement includes bill language, modified 
     from the Senate language, designating $60,700,000 for new ATP 
     awards.


                  CONSTRUCTION OF RESEARCH FACILITIES

       The conference agreement provides $34,879,000 for 
     construction, renovation and maintenance of NIST facilities, 
     instead of $26,000,000 as proposed in the House bill, and 
     $28,879,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment.
       Of the amount provided, $14,000,000 is for grants and 
     cooperative agreements as referenced in Section 209 of this 
     Act; and $20,879,000 is for safety, capacity, maintenance, 
     and repair projects at NIST, including funding to address 
     electrical service issues at NIST's Boulder campus.

            National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

       The conference agreement provides a total funding level of 
     $2,627,500,000 for all programs of the National Oceanic and 
     Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), instead of $2,230,959,000 
     as proposed in the House bill, and $2,687,070,000 as proposed 
     in the Senate-reported amendment. Of these amounts, the 
     conference agreement includes $1,869,170,000 in the 
     Operations, Research, and Facilities (ORF) account, 
     $682,899,000 in the Procurement, Acquisition and Construction 
     (PAC) account, and $75,431,000 in other NOAA accounts.


  operations, research, and facilities (including transfers of funds)

       The conference agreement includes $1,869,170,000 for the 
     Operations, Research, and Facilities account of the National 
     Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration instead of 
     $1,608,125,000 as proposed in the House bill, and 
     $1,958,046,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment.
       In addition to the new budget authority provided, the 
     conference agreement allows a transfer of $68,000,000 from 
     balances in the

[[Page H12465]]

     account entitled ``Promote and Develop Fishery Products and 
     Research Related to American Fisheries'', as proposed in the 
     House bill, instead of $72,828,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. In addition, the conference agreement 
     assumes prior year deobligations totaling $16,650,000, 
     $4,000,000 in offsets from fee collections, and $3,200,000 to 
     be transferred from the Coastal Zone Management Fund to the 
     ORF account.
       The conference agreement does not include language proposed 
     in the House bill designating the amounts provided under this 
     account for the six NOAA lines offices. The Senate-reported 
     amendment contained no similar provision.
       The conference agreement includes language, similar to 
     language proposed in the House bill and carried since the 
     1999 Appropriations Act, designating the amount available for 
     Executive Direction and Administration and prohibiting 
     augmentation of specified offices through formal or informal 
     personnel details, transfers, or reimbursements above 42 
     personnel. The Senate-reported amendment contained no such 
     provision.
       The conference agreement includes language proposed in the 
     House bill making the use of deobligated balances subject to 
     standard reprogramming procedures. NOAA is directed that any 
     use of deobligations above $16,650,000 is subject to the 
     procedures set forth in section 605 of this Act. In addition, 
     the conference agreement includes House bill language 
     limiting administrative charges assessed on assigned 
     activities, as in the current year. The Senate-reported 
     amendment included no similar provisions.
       The conference agreement does not include language in the 
     Senate-reported amendment regarding lawsuits. The House bill 
     did not address this matter.
       The conference agreement does not include $34,000,000 in 
     controversial new fisheries and navigation safety fees that 
     were proposed in the budget request. House and Senate report 
     language regarding these fees is incorporated by reference.
       The conference agreement does not include a provision, as 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment, permitting the 
     Secretary to have NOAA occupy and operate research facilities 
     at Lafayette, Louisiana.
       The following table reflects the distribution of the funds 
     provided in this conference agreement.

                          NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION OPERATIONS, RESEARCH AND FACILITIES, FISCAL YEAR 2001
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                        Fiscal year--
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       2000 Enacted     2001 Request      2001 House      2001 Senate       2001 Conf.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE

  Navigation Services:
    Mapping and Charting...........................................          35,298           38,456           32,718           40,256           37,437
    Address Survey Backlog.........................................          18,900           18,000           18,900           22,000           20,450
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          54,198           56,456           51,618           62,256           57,887
    Geodesy........................................................          20,159           20,206           21,159           21,134           22,384
    Tide and Current Data..........................................          12,390           15,089           15,089           12,293           15,089
    Acquisition of Data............................................          15,546           17,246           14,546           18,246           18,246
    NOAA Corps strength increase...................................  ...............  ...............  ...............           1,000            1,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Navigation Services.................................         102,293          108,997          102,412          114,929          114,606
                                                                    ====================================================================================
  Ocean Resources Conservation and Assessment:
    Ocean Assessment Program.......................................          44,846           41,465           34,348           49,515           49,956
        GLERL......................................................  ...............           6,085   ...............           7,000   ...............
        Response and Restoration...................................          15,329           20,149           10,991           19,884           11,600
        Oceanic and Coastal Research...............................           8,470            8,500            5,410           10,500            9,500
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal--Estuarine & Coastal Assessment...............          68,645           76,199           50,749           86,899           71,056
    Coastal Ocean Program..........................................          17,200           18,232           17,087           19,432           18,287
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Total, Ocean Resources Conservation & Assessment.......          85,845           94,431           67,836          106,331           89,343
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Ocean and Coastal Management:
    CZM Grants.....................................................          54,700          147,400           54,700           60,000           52,000
    Program Administration.........................................           4,500            6,608            4,500            4,500            4,500
    Estuarine Research Reserve System..............................           6,000           12,000            6,000           12,000            9,750
    Nonpoint Pollution Control.....................................           2,500            4,500            2,500   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Coastal Management...............................          67,700          170,508           67,700           76,500           66,250
    Marine Sanctuary Program.......................................          23,000           32,000           22,500           23,500           20,500
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Ocean & Coastal Management..........................          90,700          202,508           90,200          100,000           86,750
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Total, NOS.................................................         278,838          405,936          260,448          321,260          290,699
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                 NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE

  Information Collection and Analysis:
    Resource Information...........................................         107,848          101,988          100,100          117,795          119,945
        Antarctic Research.........................................           1,234            1,200            1,200            2,000            1,500
        Chesapeake Bay Office......................................           2,390            1,500            2,390            3,000            2,500
        Right Whale Research.......................................  ...............             200   ...............  ...............  ...............
        MARFIN.....................................................           2,750            2,750            2,500            3,500            3,500
        SEAMAP.....................................................           1,200            1,200            1,200            1,200            1,400
        Alaskan Groundfish Surveys.................................             900              661              661              900              900
        Bering Sea Pollock Research................................             945              945              945              945              945
        West Coast groundfish......................................             820              780              820              780              820
        New England Stock Depletion................................           1,000            1,000            1,000            1,000            1,000
        Hawaii Stock Management Plan...............................             500   ...............             500              500              500
        Yukon River Chinook Salmon.................................           1,200              700   ...............           1,500            1,500
        Atlantic Salmon Research...................................             710              710              710              710              710
        Gulf of Maine Groundfish Survey............................             567              567              567              567              567
        Dolphin/Yellowfin Tuna Research............................             250              250              250              250              250
        Pacific Salmon Treaty Program..............................          17,431           10,587            5,587           10,587            7,456
        Red Snapper Monitoring and Research........................  ...............  ...............  ...............           7,500            4,500
        SE Cooperative Research....................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............           2,500
        Hawaiian Monk Seals........................................             750              500              500              800              800
        Steller Sea Lion Recovery Plan.............................           4,000            1,440            1,440           12,300           12,300
        Hawaiian Sea Turtles.......................................             285              248              248              300              300
        Bluefish/Striped Bass......................................           1,000   ...............           1,000   ...............           1,500
        Halibut/Sablefish..........................................           1,200            1,200            1,200            1,200            1,200
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal...............................................         146,980          128,426          122,818          167,334          166,593
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Fishery Industry Information:
    Fish Statistics................................................          13,000           18,871           13,000           21,871           17,680
    Alaska Groundfish Monitoring...................................           5,500            5,200            5,200            7,100            6,750
    PACFIN/Catch Effort Data.......................................           3,000            3,000            4,700            3,700            3,000
    AKFIN (Alaska Fishery Information Network).....................           2,500   ...............  ...............           3,400            3,000
    RECFIN.........................................................           3,700            3,100            3,100            3,700            3,700
    GULF FIN Data Collection Effort................................           3,500   ...............           3,000   ...............           3,500
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal...................................................          31,200           30,171           29,000           39,771           37,630
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Information Analyses and Dissemination.............................          20,900           21,403           20,400           21,403           21,150
    Computer Hardware and Software.................................           3,500            3,500              750            3,500            3,500
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal...................................................          24,400           24,903           21,150           24,903           24,650
Acquisition of Data................................................          25,943           25,944           25,943           26,944           26,900
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Total, Information, Collection, and Analyses...............         228,523          209,444          198,911          258,952          255,773
                                                                    ====================================================================================

[[Page H12466]]


Conservation and Management Operations:
    Fisheries Management Programs..................................          38,830           37,825           34,680           79,295           62,888
        Columbia River Hatcheries..................................          12,055           15,212           12,055           15,742           14,055
        Columbia River Endangered Species..........................             288              288              288              288              288
        Regional Councils..........................................          13,150           13,100           13,150           15,100           13,150
        International Fisheries Commissions........................             400              400              400              400              400
        Management of George's Bank................................             478              478              478              478              478
        Pacific Tuna Management/Pelagic Fisheries..................           2,300            1,250            1,250            3,000            2,650
        Fisheries Habitat Restoration..............................           2,000            4,000            2,000            2,000            2,000
        NE Fisheries Management....................................           6,000           11,980            6,000            3,980   ...............
        NE Consortium..............................................  ...............  ...............  ...............           5,000            5,000
        NE Cooperative.............................................  ...............          15,000           15,000           15,000           15,000
        Norton Sound Fisheries.....................................  ...............           5,000            5,000            5,000            5,000
        Coral Reefs................................................  ...............           5,000   ...............           3,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Fisheries Mgmt. Programs.....................          75,501          109,533           90,301          143,283          120,909
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Protected Species Management...............................           6,200            8,988            6,950           11,288            9,038
        Dolphin Encirclement.......................................           3,300            3,300            3,300            3,300            3,300
        Driftnet Act Implementation................................           3,439            3,278            3,278            5,250            3,775
        Marine Mammal Protection Act...............................           7,583            7,225            7,225            8,225            8,125
        Endangered Species Act Recovery Plan.......................          43,500           55,450           42,800           47,765           55,338
        Native Marine Mammals......................................             950              700              200            1,200              950
        Observers/Training.........................................           2,650            4,500            5,700            4,925            6,475
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal...............................................          67,622           83,441           69,453           81,953           87,001
                                                                    ====================================================================================
    Habitat Conservation...........................................           9,200           11,079            9,200           11,079           10,140
    Enforcement & Surveillance.....................................          17,950           22,354           17,950           22,354           22,354
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Total, Conservation, Management & Operations...............         170,273          226,407          186,904          258,669          240,404
                                                                    ====================================================================================
State and Industry Assistance Programs:
    Interjurisdictional Fisheries Grants...........................           2,600            2,590            2,590            2,590            2,590
    Anadromous Grants..............................................           2,100            2,100            2,100            2,100            2,100
    Interstate Fish Commissions....................................           7,750            4,000            7,750            8,750            8,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal...................................................          12,450            8,690           12,440           13,440           12,690
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Fisheries Development Program:
    Product Quality and Safety/Seafood Inspection..................           9,500            8,328            8,328            8,778            8,328
    Hawaiian Fisheries Development.................................             750   ...............  ...............             750              750
    Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation........................  ...............  ...............  ...............             300   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal...................................................          10,250            8,328            8,328            9,828            9,078
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Total, State and Industry Programs.........................          22,700           17,018           20,768           23,268           21,768
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Total, NMFS................................................         421,496          452,870          406,583          540,889          517,945
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH

Climate and Air Quality Research:
    Interannual & Seasonal.........................................          16,900           14,986           12,900           14,986           14,943
    Climate & Global Change Research...............................          67,000           67,095           63,000           68,895           68,500
    GLOBE..........................................................           3,000            5,000   ...............  ...............           3,000
    Climate Observations & Services................................  ...............          24,000   ...............          14,000           12,250
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal...................................................          86,900          111,081           75,900           97,881           98,693
                                                                    ====================================================================================
    Long-term Climate & Air Quality Research.......................          30,000           30,525           29,409           33,025           33,019
    Information Technology/High Performance Computing..............          12,750           12,750           12,000           12,750           12,750
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal...................................................          42,750           43,275           41,409           45,775           45,769
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Total, Climate and Air Quality Research....................         129,650          154,356          117,309          143,656          144,462
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Atmospheric Programs:
    Weather Research...............................................          37,350           37,075           35,850           38,075           37,500
    STORM..........................................................           2,000   ...............  ...............           1,000              350
    Wind Profiler..................................................           4,350            4,350            4,350            4,350            4,350
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal...................................................          43,700           41,425           40,200           43,425           42,200
    Solar/Geomagnetic Research.....................................           7,000            6,182            6,000            6,182            6,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total, Atmospheric Programs....................................          50,700           47,607           46,200           49,607           48,200
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Ocean and Great Lakes Programs:
    Marine Prediction Research.....................................          27,325           22,595           19,725           30,245           32,525
    GLERL..........................................................           6,825   ...............           7,125   ...............           7,000
    Sea Grant Program..............................................          59,250           59,250           61,250           64,750           62,250
    National Undersea Research Program.............................          13,800            5,750   ...............          17,000           15,800
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Ocean and Great Lakes Programs......................         107,200           87,595           88,100          111,995          117,575
    Acquisition of Data............................................          12,952           12,952           12,952           12,952           12,952
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Total, OAR.................................................         300,502          302,510          264,561          318,210          323,189
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                      NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

Operations and Research:
    Local Warnings and Forecasts...................................         444,487          466,471          459,252          463,237          462,180
    Susquehanna River Basin flood system...........................           1,125              619            1,250            1,500            1,313
    Aviation forecasts.............................................          35,596           35,596           35,596           35,596           35,596
    Advanced Hydrological Prediction System........................           1,000            1,000            1,000            1,000            1,000
    WFO Maintenance................................................           3,250            5,250            3,250            5,250            4,250
    Weather Radio Transmitters.....................................  ...............  ...............           3,000   ...............           4,308
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal...................................................         480,758          508,936          503,348          505,403          508,647
    Central Forecast Guidance......................................          37,081           38,001           37,081           38,001           37,500
    Atmospheric and Hydrological Research..........................           3,000            3,068            3,000            3,068            3,034
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Operations and Research.............................         520,839          550,005          543,429          546,472          549,181
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Systems Acquisition:
    Public Warnings and Forecast Systems:
        NEXRAD.....................................................          38,836           38,802           38,802           38,802           38,802
        ASOS.......................................................           7,345            7,423            7,345            7,423            7,423
        AWIPS/NOAA Port............................................          32,150           38,642           32,150           38,642           35,396
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page H12467]]


            Total, Systems Acquisition.............................          78,331           84,867           78,297           84,867           81,621
                                                                    ====================================================================================
            Total, NWS.............................................         599,170          634,872          621,726          631,339          630,802
                                                                    ====================================================================================
    NAT'L ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE

Satellite Observing Systems:
    Ocean Remote Sensing...........................................           4,000            4,000   ...............           4,000            4,000
    Environmental Observing Systems................................          53,300           53,912           50,800           56,412           53,300
    Global Disaster Information Network............................  ...............           5,500   ...............  ...............           3,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Satellite Observing Systems.........................          57,300           63,412           50,800           60,412           60,300
                                                                    ====================================================================================
    Data and Information Services..................................          38,700           32,454           40,700           35,754           49,700
    Environmental Data Management Systems..........................          12,335           12,335           12,335           12,335           12,335
    Regional Climate Centers.......................................           2,750   ...............           2,750            3,600            2,900
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, EDMS................................................          53,785           44,789           55,785           51,689           64,935
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Total, NESDIS..............................................         111,085          108,201          106,585          112,101          125,235
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                          PROGRAM SUPPORTS

Administration and Services:
    Executive Direction and Administration.........................          19,387           19,902           19,902           19,902           19,902
    Systems Acquisition Office.....................................             712              712              700              712              712
    NMFS Study.....................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............             750              750
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal...................................................          20,099           20,614           19,900           21,364           21,364
    Central Administrative Support.................................          31,850           33,132           31,850           33,132           33,132
    Minority Serving Institutions..................................  ...............          17,000   ...............  ...............          15,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Administration and Services.........................          51,949           53,746           51,750           54,496           69,496
    Aircraft Services..............................................          10,760           11,009           11,000           14,309           11,809
    Rent Savings (Transferred to ATB)..............................          (4,656)  ...............          (4,656)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Program Support.....................................          58,053           64,755           58,094           68,805           81,305
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Fleet Planning and Maintenance.....................................          13,243            9,294            7,000           19,004           11,010
Facilities:
    NOAA Facilities Maintenance....................................           1,809            1,941            1,800            1,941            1,870
    Environmental Compliance.......................................           2,000            3,899            2,000            3,899            2,000
    Suitland.......................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............          14,700   ...............
    Columbia River Facilities......................................           3,365   ...............           3,365            3,465            3,365
    NERRS Construction.............................................  ...............  ...............  ...............           3,000   ...............
    Boulder Facilities (GSA) Operations............................           3,850            5,350            3,850            4,000            4,000
    NARA Records Mgmt..............................................  ...............             262   ...............             262   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Facilities..........................................          11,024           11,452           11,015           31,267           11,235
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Direct Obligations.................................................       1,793,411        1,989,890        1,736,012        2,042,875        1,991,420
                                                                    ====================================================================================
    Offset for Fee Collections (Adjustment)........................          (4,000)  ...............           4,000            4,000            4,000
    Reimbursable Obligations.......................................         195,767          204,400          204,400          204,400          204,400
    Offsetting Collections (data sales)............................           3,600            3,600            3,600            3,600            3,600
    Offsetting Collections (fish fees/IFQ CDQ).....................           4,000   ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Reimbursables....................................         199,367          208,000          212,000          212,000          212,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Total, Obligations.........................................       1,992,778        2,197,890        1,948,012        2,254,875        2,203,420
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Financing:
    Deobligations (Prior year recoveries)..........................         (36,000)         (36,000)         (36,000)         (10,000)         (16,650)
    Unobligated Balance transferred, net...........................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Offsetting Collections (data sales)............................          (3,600)          (3,600)          (3,600)          (3,600)          (3,600)
    Offsetting Collections (fish fees/IFQ CDQ).....................          (4,000)  ...............          (4,000)  ...............          (4,000)
    Federal Funds..................................................        (134,927)        (147,700)        (147,700)         147,700)        (147,700)
    Non-federal Funds..............................................         (60,840)         (56,700)         (56,700)         (56,700)         (56,700)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Financing........................................        (239,367)        (244,000)        (248,000)        (218,000)        (228,650)
Budget Authority...................................................       1,753,411        1,953,890        1,700,012        2,036,875        1,974,770
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Financing From:
    Promote and Develop American Fisheries.........................         (68,000)         (68,000)         (68,000)         (66,278)         (68,000)
    Coastal Zone Management Fund...................................          (4,000)          (3,200)          (4,000)          (3,200)          (3,200)
    Anticipated Offsetting Collections (fish fees).................  ...............         (20,000)  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Anticipated Offsetting Collections (navigation fees)...........  ...............         (14,000)  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Disaster Relief--Norton Sound..................................  ...............          (5,000)          (5,000)          (5,000)          (5,000)
    Disaster Relief--NE Fisheries..................................  ...............         (15,000)         (15,000)         (15,000)         (15,000)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Subtotal, ORF..............................................       1,310,677        1,501,890        1,240,012        1,610,875        1,883,570
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Additional Adjustments:
    Domestic Travel................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............          (4,000)
    Foreign Travel.................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............          (2,400)
    General Office Supplies........................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............          (5,000)
    Non-Maritime/Non-capitalized equipment.........................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............          (3,000)
        Subtotal, ORF..............................................       1,681,411        1,828,690        1,608,012        1,947,397        1,869,170
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Total, ORF.................................................       1,681,411        1,828,690        1,608,012        1,947,397        1,869,170
                                                                    ====================================================================================
             PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION
Systems Acquisition:
    CAMS...........................................................  ...............          15,823            4,500           17,823           19,823
    AWIPS..........................................................          16,000           17,300           16,000           17,300           16,300
    ASOS...........................................................           3,855            5,125            3,855            5,125            3,855
    NEXRAD.........................................................           8,280            9,580            8,280            9,580            8,280
    Computer Facilities Upgrades...................................          11,100           15,085           11,100           15,085           15,085
    Polar Spacecraft and Launching.................................         190,979          213,619          206,965          213,639          210,310
    Geostationary Spacecraft and Launching.........................         266,615          290,824          290,824          290,824          290,824
    Radiosonde Replacement.........................................           7,000            7,000            2,000            7,000            5,000
    GFDL Supercomputer.............................................           5,000            7,000            5,000            7,000            4,000
    Evansville Dopple Radar........................................  ...............           5,500            5,500   ...............           5,500
    NOAA Weather Radio Expansion/Enhancement.......................  ...............           6,244   ...............           6,244   ...............
    National Data Archive [NEDAAS].................................  ...............           4,000   ...............           4,000            2,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Systems Acquisition..............................         508,829          597,100          554,024          593,620          580,977
                                                                    ====================================================================================

[[Page H12468]]


Construction:
    WFO Construction...............................................           9,526            9,526            9,136            9,526            9,526
    NERRS Construction.............................................           6,750            8,000            6,000            8,000            7,500
    Botanical Gardens..............................................           1,500   ...............  ...............  ...............           3,500
    Alaska Facilities..............................................           9,750            1,000   ...............          19,000           19,000
    National Marine Life Center....................................  ...............  ...............  ...............           1,000              800
    Great Bay NERRS, NH............................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............           5,000
    Kasitsna Bay Lab/Kachemak Bay..................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............           5,000
    NORC Rehabilitation (Suitland).................................           3,045   ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Marine Sanctuaries.............................................           3,000            3,000            3,000   ...............  ...............
    Suitland Facility..............................................           3,000   ...............  ...............  ...............          15,000
    Norman, OK.....................................................  ...............           3,000   ...............           3,000            3,000
    LaJolla Bluffs, CA.............................................  ...............           4,600   ...............           4,600   ...............
    Western Region Consolidation...................................  ...............             200   ...............             200   ...............
    Coastal Service Center Wing (SC)...............................  ...............  ...............  ...............           4,000   ...............
    Aquatic Resources..............................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............           5,000
    Pribilof Island Cleanup (AK)...................................  ...............  ...............  ...............           7,000            6,000
    Folly Beach Seabrook Tract (SC)................................  ...............  ...............  ...............           2,000            2,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Construction.....................................          36,571           29,326           18,136           57,326           81,326
                                                                    ====================================================================================
    Fleet Replacement..............................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Fishery Research Vessel Placement..............................          51,567            8,300   ...............           8,300            8,300
        Adventurous Refurbishment..................................  ...............           8,000   ...............           8,000            8,000
        Fairweather Refurbishment..................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............           6,800
        Naval Surplus vessels for coastal research (YTT)...........  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............           5,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Fleet Replacement............................          51,567           16,300   ...............          16,300           28,100
        Deobligations (PAC)........................................          (7,400)          (7,504)          (8,704)          (7,504)          (7,504)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
    Offset from House floor action:
            Total, PAC.............................................         589,567          635,222          563,456          659,742          682,899
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Pacific Coast Salmon Recovery......................................          58,000          160,000           58,000           58,000           74,000
    Coastal Impact Assistance Fund.................................  ...............         100,000   ...............  ...............  ...............
    Fisheries Assistance Fund......................................  ...............          10,000   ...............  ...............  ...............
Fisherman's Contingency............................................             953              951              951              953              952
Foreign Fish. Observer Fund........................................             189              191              189              191              191
Fisheries Finance Program..........................................             338            6,628              238              338              288
    (Individual Fisheries Quota)...................................            (100)            (100)  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Total, NOAA................................................       2,330,458        2,741,682        2,230,846        2,666,621        2,627,500
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

       The following narrative provides additional information 
     related to certain items included in the preceding table.


                         national ocean service

       The conferees have provided a total of $290,699,000 under 
     this account for the activities of the National Ocean 
     Service, instead of $260,448,000 as recommended in the House 
     bill and $321,260,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment.
       Mapping and Charting.--The conference agreement provides 
     $37,437,000 for NOAA's mapping and charting programs, 
     reflecting continued commitment to the navigation safety 
     programs of the NOS and concerns about the ability of the NOS 
     of continue to meet its mission requirements over the long 
     term. Within the total funding provided under Mapping and 
     Charting, the conference agreement includes $2,580,000 for 
     the joint hydrographic center established in fiscal year 
     1999, one-time funding of $300,000 for the Seacoast Science 
     Center, and $1,500,000 for shoreline mapping as requested in 
     the budget.
       The conference agreement also includes $20,450,000 within 
     the line item Address Survey Backlog/Contracts exclusively 
     for contracting with the private sector for data acquisition 
     needs. This is $2,450,000 above the request and is intended 
     to increase efforts to address the backlog through contract 
     support.
       Geodesy.--The conference agreement provides $22,384,000 for 
     geodesy programs, including $19,634,000 for the base program; 
     not less than $500,000 for the South Carolina Geodetic Survey 
     as referenced in the Senate report; not less than $1,000,000 
     for the implementation of the National Height Modernization 
     (NHM) system in North Carolina; not less than $1,000,000 for 
     the California Spatial Reference Center; and not less than 
     $250,000 for the National Geodetic Survey to implement the 
     NHM study.
       Tide and Current Data.--The conference agreement includes 
     $15,089,000 for this activity, including $12,293,000 for the 
     base program and $2,796,000 for the continued implementation 
     of the Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (PORTS) 
     program, as referenced in the House report.
       The conference agreement includes $2,000,000 above the 
     request for data acquisition and for building NOAA corps 
     officer strength and for additional days at sea.
       Ocean Assessment Program.--The conference agreement 
     includes $49,956,000 for the activity, including the 
     following: $12,658,000 for the base program; $5,800,000 to 
     continue the Cooperative Institute for Coastal and Estuarine 
     Environmental Technology; $900,000 for the South Florida 
     ecosystem restoration program; $2,000,000 to support coral 
     reef studies in the Pacific and Southeast, of which 
     $1,000,000 is for Hawaiian coral reef monitoring, $500,000 is 
     for reef monitoring in Florida, and $500,000 is for reef 
     monitoring in Puerto Rico through the Department of Natural 
     Resource; $4,425,000 for pfisteria and other harmful algal 
     bloom research and monitoring, of which $500,000 is for a 
     pilot project to preemptively address emerging problems prior 
     to the occurrence of harmful blooms, to be carried out by the 
     South Carolina Department of Marine Resources: $2,500,000 for 
     the JASON project; and $2,923,000 for the NOAA Beaufort/
     Oxford Laboratory. In addition, the conference agreement 
     includes $18,750,000 for the Coastal Services Center, 
     including funds for initiation of a collaborative program in 
     Hawaii for the U.S. Pacific Basin, consistent with activities 
     identified in the fiscal year 2000 conference report, and 
     funding for planning and design for additional space at the 
     Coastal Services Center.
       Office of Response and Restoration.--The conference 
     agreement includes $11,600,000 for the activity, including; 
     $2,674,000 for the Estuarine and Coastal Assessment program, 
     $5,210,000 for the Damage Assessment program, $1,000,000 in 
     accordance with the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, and $2,716,000 
     for a new base program to provide greater flexibility for 
     program managers to address response and restoration 
     functions. No funding is provided for coral restoration.
       Oceanic and Coastal Research.--The conference agreement 
     includes $9,500,000 for this activity, which includes 
     $6,970,000 for base, $1,250,000 for fish forensics and 
     enforcement, and $1,280,000 for the Marine Environmental 
     Health Research Laboratory (MEHRL). The conference agreement 
     includes language as proposed in the Senate report regarding 
     national overhead costs associated with managing the missions 
     and operations of the research facilities funded in the 
     Oceanic and Coastal Research activity and the National Ocean 
     Service is directed to transfer budget and management 
     operations for the MEHRL and the Charleston Lab to the 
     Coastal Services Center.
       The conference agreement does not include the proposed 
     transfer of the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 
     (GLERL) from Oceanic and Atmospheric Research to NOS, as 
     proposed in the Senate report.
       Coastal Ocean Program (COP).--The conference agreement 
     provides $18,287,000 for the Coastal Ocean Program, of which 
     $5,287,000 is provided for research related to hypoxia, 
     pfistereia, and other harmful algal blooms, including the 
     ``dead-zone'' in the Gulf of Mexico, as referenced in the 
     House report. The managers of COP are directed to follow the 
     direction included in the Senate report concerning research 
     on small high-salinity estuaries and the land use-coastal 
     ecosystem study. The conference agreement also assumes 
     continued funding at the current level for restoration of the 
     South Florida ecosystem.
       Coastal Zone Management.--The conference agreement includes 
     $66,250,000 for this activity, of which $52,000,000 is for 
     grants under sections 306, 306A, and 309 of the Coastal Zone 
     Management Act (CZMA), and $4,500,000 is for program 
     administration. NOAA is directed to prepare an assessment of 
     the National impact of this program and submit such 
     assessment to the Committees on Appropriations no later than 
     March 15, 2001. The conference agreement does not include 
     funding for the Non-Point Pollution program authorized under 
     section 6217 of the CZMA. The conference agreement also 
     includes $9,750,000 for the National Estuarine Research 
     Reserve System (NERRS) operations

[[Page H12469]]

     and maintenance program, an increase of $3,750,000 above the 
     current year level.
       Marine Sanctuary Program.--The conference agreement 
     includes $20,500,000 for the National Marine Sanctuary 
     Program. Of this amount, $500,000 is provided to support the 
     activities of the Northwest Straits Citizens Advisory 
     Commission as outlined in the House and Senate reports.


                   national marine fisheries service

       The conference agreement includes a total of $517,945,000 
     for the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), instead of 
     $406,583,000, as recommended in the House bill and 
     $540,889,000, as recommended in the Senate report.
       In addition, the conference agreement includes $4,000,000 
     to be collected under the Magnuson-Stevens Act to support the 
     Community and Individual Fishery Quota Program.
       Resource Information.--The conference agreement provides 
     $119,945,000 for fisheries resource information. Within the 
     funds provided for resource information, $88,145,000 is 
     provided for the base programs. The conference agreement 
     includes $4,250,000 for west coast groundfish. NMFS is 
     directed to distribute this funding to appropriate labs based 
     on the current year distribution, and no labs should receive 
     less than current year funding. Funding above the amounts for 
     the base program is as follows: $1,700,000 is to expand stock 
     assessments; $850,000 is for MARMAP; $2,500,000 is for the 
     Gulf of Mexico consortium; and $200,000 is for the Atlantic 
     Herring and Mackerel initiative. In addition, NMFS is 
     expected to continue to provide onsite technical assistance 
     to the National Warmwater Aquaculture Research Center and 
     provide $250,000 from base resources for the harvest 
     technology unit under this direction included in the Senate 
     report. In addition, $500,000 is provided for the Hawaiian 
     Community Development Program and fishery demonstration 
     projects for native fisheries, as referenced in the Senate 
     report.
       In addition, within the total funds provided for resource 
     information, the conference agreement includes: $6,500,000 
     for the Gulf of Alaska for continued implementation of the 
     Magnuson-Stevens Act, as referenced in the Senate report; 
     $1,000,000 for research on Alaska near shore fisheries, to be 
     distributed as in the current year; $850,000 for the 
     Chesapeake Bay oyster recovery partnership; $300,000 for 
     research on the Charleston bump; $300,000 for research on 
     shrimp pathogens; $150,000 for lobster sampling; $600,000, 
     for bluefin tuna tagging initiative for the New England 
     Aquarium; $300,000 for Chinook Salmon research in the NMFS 
     Auke Bay laboratory; $750,000 for Magnuson-Stevens Act 
     implementation; $200,000 for the Northeast Fisheries Science 
     Center for the Cooperative Marine Education and Research 
     Program, under the direction in the Senate report; $300,000 
     for research on Southeastern sea turtles; $200,000 for the 
     Kotzebue Sound test fishery for king crab and sea snail; 
     $1,000,000 for the State of Alaska for the Bering Sea crab; 
     $350,000 for the South Carolina Department of Natural 
     Resources Biological Identification Program; and $1,000,000 
     for the Tri-Coastal Marine Stock Assessment. In addition, 
     within the amounts provided for Resource Information, 
     $8,000,000 is included to continue the aquatic resources 
     environmental initiative. NOAA is directed to continue 
     working with the Xiphophorus Genetic Stock Center to improve 
     the understanding of fish genetics and evolution.
       NMFS is directed to continue collaborative research with 
     the Center for Shark Research and other qualified 
     institutions to provide the information necessary for 
     effective management of the highly migratory shark fishery 
     and conservation of shark fishery resources.
       Funding for the Chesapeake Bay Multi-Species Management 
     Strategy has been moved to the Chesapeake Bay Office line, 
     for a total of $2,500,000 for the office, of which $500,000 
     is for multi-species management, including blue crabs.
       Under the MARFIN line, $3,250,000 is provided for base 
     activities, including $750,000 for activities relating to red 
     snapper research, and $250,000 is provided for Northeast 
     activities.
       Funding for right whale research and recovery activities is 
     provided under the Endangered Species line. Under the Yukon 
     River Chinook Salmon line, $1,000,000 is provided for base 
     activities, and $500,000 is provided for the Yukon River 
     Drainage Fisheries Association. Under the Pacific Salmon 
     Treaty Program, $5,587,000 is provided for base activities, 
     $1,844,000 is provided for the Chinook Salmon Agreement, and 
     funding is provided for the North Pacific Research Board, as 
     referenced in the Senate report. The conference agreement 
     includes $12,300,000 for Steller sea lion recovery, to be 
     allocated according to the direction in the Senate report. 
     Senate language regarding the Administration's reduction of 
     funding for Steller sea lion recovery is included by 
     reference.
       Senate language regarding computer hardware and software 
     funding is included by reference.
       Funding for bluefish/striped bass has been provided as 
     follows: $450,000 for the NMFS base research program, 
     $800,000 for the Cooperative Marine Education and Research 
     Program in New Jersey, and $250,000 for other existing 
     bluefish/striped bass research.
       Funding of $2,500,000 is provided for a cooperative 
     research program to address the lack of sufficient funding 
     for research for the southeast.
       Fishery Industry Information.--The conference agreement 
     provides $37,630,000 for this activity. Within the $6,750,000 
     provided for Alaska groundfish monitoring, the conference 
     agreement includes $3,125,000 for the base program, of which 
     $1,600,000 is to implement requirements of the American 
     Fisheries Act and the crab and scallop fisheries management 
     plans; $1,000,000 for a winter pollock survey in Alaska; and 
     current year levels for NMFS rockfish research, crab 
     management, and external rockfish research. In addition, the 
     conference agreement provides $175,000 for the Gulf of Alaska 
     Coastal Communities Coalition, $300,000 for the NMFS Alaska 
     region infield monitoring program, and $150,000 for the 
     Bering Sea Fisherman's Association CDQ.
       Within the funds provided for fish statistics, the 
     conference agreement provides $13,180,000 for the base 
     program, $1,000,000 for the National Standard 8 program, 
     $2,000,000 for research and data collection on fishing 
     communities and economics; and $1,500,000 for the Atlantic 
     States Marine Fishery Commission as referenced by the Senate 
     report. Of the $3,700,000 for recreational fishery harvest 
     monitoring, $500,000 is for the annual collection of data on 
     marine recreational fishing, with the balance to be expended 
     in accordance with the direction included in the Senate 
     report. Funds are also appropriated under the Fish Industry 
     Information activity for the Pacific Fisheries Information 
     Network, including Hawaii, and the Alaska Fisheries 
     Information Network as two separate lines, in accordance with 
     the direction included in the Senate report. In addition, of 
     the funding, $3,500,000 is provided for the Gulf of Mexico 
     Fisheries Information Network.
       Under the Acquisition of Data line, within the total of 
     $26,900,000, $957,000 is provided for additional days at sea 
     for data acquisition.
       Fisheries Management Programs.--The conference agreement 
     includes $62,888,000 for this activity. Within this amount, 
     $29,288,000 is provided for base activities, and $4,000,000 
     is for NMFS facilities maintenance. In addition, $21,000,000 
     is included to provide increases for data collection on 
     fishery management programs, including $8,000,000 to respond 
     to lawsuits under the National Environmental Policy Act 
     (NEPA), $3,000,000 for research regarding Hawaiian sea 
     turtles related lawsuits, and $10,000,000 for research 
     regarding the Alaska Steller sea lion and pollock lawsuit. Of 
     the $10,000,000 provided for research regarding litigation 
     concerning Alaska Stellar sea lion and Bearing Sea/Aleutian 
     Islands and Gulf of Alaska groundfish fisheries, $6,000,000 
     is for the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, 
     $2,000,000 is for the National Ocean Service, and $2,000,000 
     is for the North Pacific Fishery Management. The requested 
     levels for the Atlantic Salmon Recovery Plan, the State of 
     Maine Recovery Plan, and Rancho Nuevo sea turtles are 
     included. Funding is included for continuation of the Bronx 
     River recovery and restoration project as referenced in the 
     House report; $300,000 for the Connecticut River Partnership; 
     and $150,000 for Chinook Salmon management; and $6,700,000 is 
     for American Fisheries Act Implementation, including $500,000 
     each for the North Pacific Fishery Management Council and the 
     State of Alaska.
       The conference agreement appropriates a total of 
     $14,055,000 for NMFS support of the Columbia River hatcheries 
     program. NMFS is expected to support base hatchery operations 
     at a level of $11,400,000, $600,000 is for fall chinook 
     rearing, $1,700,000 is provided for monitoring and evaluation 
     efforts, and $300,000 is for conservation marking as 
     referenced in the Senate report.
       Under the Pacific Tuna Management line, $400,000 is for 
     swordfish research as referenced in the Senate report and the 
     balance is for JIMAR.
       For New England Fisheries Management, $5,000,000 is 
     provided as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. The 
     conference agreement also includes a transfer of $15,000,000 
     from USDA (P.L. 106-78) for NE cooperative fisheries.
       Protected Species Management.--Within the funds provided 
     for protected species management, $750,000 is for 
     continuation of a study on the impacts of California sea 
     lions and harbor seals on salmonids and the West Coast 
     ecosystem, $1,500,000 is provided for the State of Maine 
     salmon recovery, and $750,000 is for bottle-nosed dolphins.
       Driftnet Act Implementation.--Within the funds provided for 
     Driftnet Act Implementation, $150,000 is for Pacific Rim 
     Fisheries Program, $200,000 is for Washington and Alaska 
     participation, and $250,000 is for Russian EEZ observers.
       Marine Mammal Protection Act.--Within funds provided, 
     $900,000 is for harbor seal research in Alaska.
       Endangered Species Recovery Plans.--A total of $55,338,000 
     is provided for this activity. Of these amounts, $1,500,000 
     is for technical support to the State of Washington, $850,000 
     is for Alaskan Steller sea lion recovery, $2,700,000 is for 
     other species, $3,338,000 is for sea turtles, $36,450,000 is 
     for the Pacific salmon recovery initiative, $3,500,000 is for 
     marine mammals, $2,000,000 for Atlantic Salmon recovery, and 
     $5,000,000 is for right whales. Within the amount provided 
     for right whales, NMFS is directed to make tagging whales a 
     priority. NMFS is directed to make $2,900,000 available to 
     the Northeast Consortium to administer a competitive grants 
     program, open to all Atlantic coastal States, using an 
     independent review panel of experts and scientists in the 
     field, to fund research

[[Page H12470]]

     on whale-friendly fishing gear and operations, surveys and 
     studies to reduce potential conflicts between right whales 
     and local industries, and other research including tagging, 
     acoustic studies, habitat research and hydrodynamic modeling 
     studies. Of the funding provided, $2,100,000 is to help meet 
     its responsibilities for the implementation of programs, 
     research, and enforcement activities for the recovery of the 
     right whale, including the use of aerial surveys, of which no 
     more than 30 percent can be used for salaries. Due to the 
     Department of Commerce's delay in providing a spending plan 
     and allocating right whale funds in fiscal year 2000, NMFS is 
     directed to provide the Committees on Appropriations no later 
     than January 30, 2001, with a spending plan for fiscal year 
     2001. In addition, the Committee expects NMFS to develop and 
     submit by July 31, 2001, a five-year research and management 
     plan to facilitate right whale recovery.
       Native Marine Mammal Commissions.--The conference agreement 
     recommends that funding be distributed at current year 
     levels.
       Observers and Training.--The conference agreement 
     distributes funding as follows: (1) $425,000 for the North 
     Pacific fishery observer training program; (2) $1,875,000 for 
     North Pacific marine resources observers; (3) $350,000 for 
     east coast observers; (4) $2,275,000 for west coast 
     observers; (5) $1,200,000 for observers for Hawaii; and (6) 
     $350,000 for Atlantic coast observers. NMFS is directed to 
     submit a spending plan prior to allocation of funding. Senate 
     language regarding enforcement and surveillance is adopted by 
     reference.
       Interstate Fish Commissions.--The conference agreement 
     includes $8,000,000 for this activity, of which $750,000 is 
     to be equally divided among the three commissions, and 
     $7,250,000 is for implementation of the Atlantic Coastal 
     Fisheries Cooperative Management Act.
       Other.--In addition, within the funds available for the 
     Saltonstall-Kennedy grants program, NMFS is directed to 
     provide to the Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation 
     funding to be used in accordance with the direction included 
     in the Senate report, and to provide funds pursuant to the 
     direction included in the House report to support ongoing 
     efforts related to Vibrio vulnificus. Senate report language 
     regarding the Hawaiian fisheries development program and the 
     Oceanic Institute is adopted by reference.


                    oceanic and atmospheric research

       The conference agreement includes a total of $323,189,000 
     for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research activities, instead of 
     $264,561,000 as recommended in the House bill and 
     $318,210,000 as recommended in the Senate-reported amendment.
       Interannual and Seasonal Climate Research.--The conference 
     agreement includes $14,943,000 for interannual and seasonal 
     climate research, of which $2,000,000 is for the Institute 
     for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space.
       Climate and Global Change Research.--The conference 
     agreement includes $68,500,000 for the Climate and Global 
     Change research program, of which $750,000 is above base 
     resources for the International Research Institute for 
     Climate Prediction to restore it to the fiscal year 2000 
     appropriated level of funding. Of the amounts provided, 
     $1,000,000 is for the variability beyond ENSO activity, 
     $1,000,000 is the climate forming agents activity, and 
     $2,000,000 is for refinement of climate models.
       Climate Observations & Services.--The conference agreement 
     includes $1,000,000 for climate data and information; 
     $2,000,000 for baseline observations; $5,000,000 for ocean 
     observations; $3,000,000 for the climate reference network; 
     and $1,250,000 for an ice research program at the Thayer 
     School of Engineering.
       Long-Term Climate and Air Quality Research.--The conference 
     agreement provides $33,019,000 for this activity. Funding is 
     distributed as follows: $27,850,000 for base; $500,000 for 
     the California ozone study; and $4,669,000 for the Health of 
     the Atmosphere initiative.
       Atmospheric Programs.--The conference agreement provides 
     $37,500,000 for this activity. Of this amount, $1,000,000 is 
     provided for research related to wind-profile data in 
     accordance with the direction provided in the Senate report. 
     In addition, $1,500,000 is provided for the U.S. Weather 
     Research Program for hurricane-related research.
       STORM.--The conference agreement includes $350,000 for the 
     Science Center for Teaching, Outreach and Research on 
     Meteorology for the collection and analysis of weather data 
     in the Midwest.
       Marine Prediction Research.--The conference agreement 
     includes $32,525,000 for marine prediction research. Within 
     this amount, the following is provided: $9,825,000 for the 
     base program; $1,650,000 for Arctic research; $2,400,000 for 
     the Open Ocean Aquaculture program; $3,300,000 for tsunami 
     mitigation, of which $1,000,000 is for TWEAK; $150,000 for a 
     Lake Champlain Study; $2,100,000 for the VENTS program; 
     $4,300,000 for continuation of the initiative on aquatic 
     ecosystems, including $300,000 for a nitrogen study; 
     $1,650,000 for implementation of the National Invasive 
     Species Act, of which $850,000 is for the Chesapeake Bay and 
     Great Lakes ballast water demonstrations; $100,000 for the 
     Lake Champlain Canal Barrier Demonstration, as referenced in 
     Senate report; $500,000 for additional resources to support 
     Hypoxia research; $2,600,000 for mariculture research; and 
     $450,000 for the Pacific tropical fish program to be 
     administered by HIEDA. The conference agreement includes 
     $2,000,000 for the ocean exploration initiative, as 
     referenced in Senate report; $500,000 for the International 
     Pacific Research Center at the University of Hawaii, and 
     $1,000,000 for the SE Atlantic Marine monitoring and 
     prediction center at the University of North Carolina, as 
     referenced in the Senate report.
       GLERL.--Within the $7,000,000 provided for the Great Lakes 
     Environmental Research Laboratory, the conference agreement 
     assumes continued support for the Great Lakes nearshore and 
     zebra mussel research programs at current levels.
       Sea Grant.--The conference agreement includes $62,250,000 
     for the National Sea Grant program, of which $56,250,000 is 
     for the base program. Sea Grant is directed to fund the 
     oyster disease research program at $2,000,000, an increase of 
     $500,000, and to maintain current levels for the zebra mussel 
     research program and the Gulf of Mexico oyster program. The 
     Sea Grant program is directed to develop a research plan to 
     address the causes of harmful algal blooms and a monitoring 
     and prevention program and submit to the Committees on 
     Appropriations by June 30, 2001.
       National Undersea Research Program (NURP).--The conference 
     agreement includes $15,800,000 for the National Undersea 
     Research Program (NURP). The Senate report included 
     $17,800,000 for this program; the House did not include 
     funding for this program. Of the amount provided, $6,900,000 
     is for research conducted through the east coast NURP centers 
     and $6,900,000 is for the west coast NURP centers, including 
     Hawaiian and Pacific center and the west coast and polar 
     regions center. The conferees expect level funding will be 
     available for Aquarius, ALVIN, and program administration. Of 
     the amount provided, $2,000,000 is for the National Center 
     for Natural Products.


                        national weather service

       The conference agreement includes a total of $630,802,000 
     for the National Weather Service (NWS), instead of 
     $621,726,000 as proposed in the House bill, and $631,339,000 
     as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment.
       Local Warnings and Forecasts.--The conference agreement 
     includes $462,180,000 for this activity, including 
     $452,280,000 for base, $4,790,000 for mitigation activities, 
     and $400,000 for the Cooperative Observers Network. The NWS 
     is directed to submit a spending plan to the Committees on 
     Appropriations for the Cooperative Observers Network. Within 
     the total amount provided for Local Warnings and Forecasts, 
     $270,000 is for the North Dakota Agricultural Weather 
     Network, $590,000 is for the University of Utah for support 
     to the Winter Olympics; and $500,000 is for the Mount 
     Washington Observatory, as directed in Senate report. The NWS 
     is directed to follow direction in the Senate report relating 
     to ``the 1995 Secretary's Report to Congress on the Adequacy 
     of NEXRAD Coverage and Degradation of Weather Services'', and 
     to make appropriate arrangements for Erie, PA and Williston, 
     ND. Of the funds provided for Local Warnings and Forecasts, 
     $3,350,000 is provided for data buoys, of which $1,700,000 is 
     for Alaska.
       Weather Radio Transmitters.--Of the amount provided, 
     $2,323,000 is provided for base; $500,000 is for the sate of 
     Illinois, to complete state-wide implementation; $77,000 is 
     for a transmitter in Mason County, Kentucky; $100,000 is for 
     Melba, Mississippi transmitters; $100,000 is for Barrow, 
     Alaska; $125,000 is for New Hampshire; $855,000 is for 
     Kentucky, including Elizabethtown; $150,000 is for South 
     Dakota; and $78,000 is for a transmitter in Steuben County, 
     Indiana.


     national environmental satellite, data and information service

       The conference agreement includes $125,235,000 for NOAA's 
     satellite and data management programs. In addition, the 
     conference agreement includes $580,977,000 under the NOAA PAC 
     account for satellite systems acquisition and related 
     activities.
       Satellite Observing Systems.--The conferees have included 
     $60,300,000 for this activity, an increase of $3,000,000 for 
     the Global Disaster Information Network (GDIN). Funding for 
     other services is consistent with current year levels. 
     Funding for the wind demonstration project is to be provided 
     in accordance with the direction in the Senate report.
       Environmental Data Management.--The conference agreement 
     includes: $64,935,000 for EDMS activities. For EDMS base 
     activities, the conference agreement includes $25,000,000. No 
     funds are included to continue weather record rescue and 
     preservation activities or the environmental data rescue 
     program. The conference agreement includes $500,000 for the 
     Cooperative Observers Network modernization. In addition, 
     $6,000,000 is included for the Coastal Ocean Data Development 
     Center and $2,500,000 for the Center for Spatial Data 
     Research at Jackson State University. The conference 
     agreement provides $15,700,000 to continue the multi-year 
     program of climate database modernization and utilization, as 
     referenced in the House report. The conference agreement 
     includes $2,900,000 for the Regional Climate Centers.


                            program support

       The conference agreement provides $81,305,000 for NOAA 
     program support, instead of $58,094,000 as provided in the 
     House report, and $68,805,000, as provided in the Senate-
     reported amendment. Included in this total is $11,809,000 for 
     Aircraft Services, including an increase to base of $800,000 
     for increased fuel costs. Included in the amount

[[Page H12471]]

     provided, $15,000,000 is for the new educational program with 
     Minority Serving Institutions. Under Departmental Management, 
     the Commerce Department is directed to submit reports on the 
     Commerce Administrative Management System (CAMS) 
     implementation, as referenced in the Senate report.
       The conference agreement includes $750,000 to fund a study 
     to review the ability of NMFS to adequately meet its legal 
     missions and requirements. NOAA is expected to have the 
     review headed by an individual from outside the agency who is 
     familiar with oceans and fishery management issues. The 
     individual selected must seek the assistance of the National 
     Academy of Sciences and the American Society of Public 
     Administration in conducting a top to bottom review of NMFS 
     programs, budgetary requirements, management, and constituent 
     relations. This review must be completed within one year. 
     NOAA is expected to give regular progress reports to the 
     Committees on Appropriations prior to submitting the final 
     written report outlining the findings and recommendations for 
     the future.


                     fleet planning and maintenance

       The conference agreement includes $11,010,000 for this 
     activity, instead of $7,000,000 in the House report, and 
     $19,004,000 in the Senate-reported amendment. The amount 
     provided includes $9,294,000 for base and $1,716,000 for 
     additional days at sea and general maintenance.


                               facilities

       The conference agreement includes $11,235,000 for 
     facilities maintenance, lease costs, and environmental 
     compliance, instead of $11,015,000 as proposed in the House 
     report, and $31,267,000 as recommended in the Senate report. 
     The Department of Commerce is directed to continue working 
     with the General Services Administration (GSA) to address the 
     39 percent increase in GSA rental charges for the Boulder 
     facility, as referenced in the Senate report language.


               procurement, acquisition and construction

                     (including transfers of funds)

       The conference agreement includes a total of $682,899,000 
     in direct appropriations for the Procurement, Acquisition and 
     Construction account, and assumes $7,504,000 in deobligations 
     from this account. The following distribution reflects the 
     fiscal year 2001 funding provided for activities within this 
     account:

Systems Acquisition:
  CAMS......................................................$19,823,000
  ASOS........................................................3,855,000
  NEXRAD......................................................8,280,000
  Computer Facilities Upgrade................................15,085,000
  Evansville Doppler..........................................5,500,000
  Polar Spacecraft and Launching............................210,310,000
  Geostationary Spacecraft and Launching....................290,824,000
  Radiosonde Replacement......................................5,000,000
  AWIPS......................................................16,300,000
  National Data Archives......................................2,000,000
  GFDL Supercomputer..........................................4,000,000
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Subtotal, Systems Acquisition...........................580,977,000
                                                       ================

Construction:
  WFO Construction............................................9,526,000
  NERRS Construction..........................................7,500,000
  N.Y. Botanical Garden.......................................3,500,000
  Alaska Facilities..........................................19,000,000
  National Marine Life Center...................................800,000
  Norman, Oklahoma............................................3,000,000
  Aquatic Resources...........................................5,000,000
  Pribilof Cleanup............................................6,000,000
  Folley Beach Tract..........................................2,000,000
  Suitland Facility..........................................15,000,000
  Kasitsna Bay Lab/Kachemak Bay...............................5,000,000
  Great Bay...................................................5,000,000
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Subtotal, Construction...................................81,326,000
                                                       ================

Fleet Replacement:
  Fishery Research Vessel Replacement.........................8,300,000
  ADVENTUROUS Refurbishment...................................8,000,000
  FAIRWEATHER Refurbishment...................................6,800,000
  Navy Surplus Coastal Research Vessel........................5,000,000
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Subtotal, Fleet Replacement..............................28,100,000

       Systems Acquisition.--Of the funding provided for Polar 
     Spacecraft and Launching, $73,325,000 is for Polar 
     Convergence. A total of $290,824,000 for the Geostationary 
     Spacecraft and Launching line is provided as requested in the 
     budget.
       Construction.--The funds appropriated for National 
     Estuarine Research Reserve construction are to be distributed 
     as follows: $7,000,000 is for overall NERRS requirements, and 
     $500,000 is for the Jacques Cousteau NERRS. The funds 
     appropriated for Alaska facilities are to be distributed as 
     follows: $15,000,000 is for the Juneau Lab, and $4,000,000 is 
     for the SeaLife Center. The conference agreement includes 
     $3,000,000 for architecture and engineering of a building for 
     the University of Oklahoma. The conference agreement assumes 
     that funding for NOAA's occupancy of the proposed building 
     will be based on an operating lease arrangement once the 
     building has been constructed by the University of Oklahoma 
     and is ready for NOAA occupancy.
       In addition, the conference agreement includes $15,000,000 
     for NOAA's Suitland, Maryland facility. Funding is provided 
     to cover those costs in addition to the basic building costs 
     provided by the GSA. Bill language is included to prohibit 
     the Department of Commerce from paying the traditional GSA 
     building requirements for the Suitland facility.
       Fleet Replacement.--The conference agreement includes 
     funding for the refurbishment of the Fairweather in Alaska 
     and the Navy Surplus YTT vessel, other than baseline 
     operations, in South Carolina.


                      coastal and ocean activities

       In addition to the funds provided to the National Oceanic 
     and Atmospheric Administration in the above table and 
     narrative, the conference agreement includes an additional 
     $420,000,000 for special purposes. Of this amount, 
     $150,000,000 is for coastal impact assistance as authorized 
     by section 31 of the Outer Continental Shelf Act for fiscal 
     year 2001 only and does not alter the underlying 
     authorization; $135,000,000 is for ocean, coastal and 
     conservation programs, and $135,000,000 is for National 
     Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration programs. Of the funds 
     provided for ocean, coastal and conservation programs, 
     $10,000,000 is provided for implementation of Sate nonpoint 
     pollution control plans pursuant to section 6217 of the 
     Coastal Zone Act, as amended, other than Alaska; $30,000,000 
     is for competitive grants for coastal communities in the 
     Great Lakes region; $14,000,000 is for the University of New 
     Hampshire marine facilities program; $1,000,000 is for the 
     Sea Coast Science Center; $3,000,000 is for the Great Bay 
     Partnership; $1,000,000 is for the New Hampshire Department 
     of Environmental Services Marsh Restoration initiative; 
     $1,000,000 is for the Mississippi Laboratories at Pascagoula, 
     $8,000,000 is for the ACE Basin NERRS Research Center 
     construction, $2,500,000 is for Winyah Bay land acquisition, 
     $2,000,000 is for ACE Basin Land Acquisition, $10,000,000 is 
     for the Sealife Center, $4,000,000 is for Kachameck Bay NERRS 
     research center construction; $1,000,000 is for the Raritan, 
     N.J. NERRS land acquisition; $10,000,000 is for DuPage River 
     restoration; $1,000,000 if for Detroit River restoration, 
     $500,000 is for lower Rouge River restoration; $8,500,000 is 
     for Bronx River restoration and land acquisition; $16,000,000 
     is for a grant for Eastern Kentucky Pride, Inc., of which 
     $11,000,000 is for design and construction of facilities for 
     water protection and related environmental infrastructure, 
     and $5,000,000 is for the aquatic resources environmental 
     initiative; $3,000,000 is for a grant to the Louisiana 
     Department of Natural Resources for brown marsh research, 
     mitigation and nutria control; $2,000,000 is for land 
     acquisition in southern Orange County, California for 
     conservation of coastal sage scrub and riparian habitats; 
     $3,000,000 is for planning, renovation and construction of 
     facilities for a new national estuarine research reserve in 
     San Francisco, California; $2,000,000 is for a grant to the 
     National Fish and Wildlife Foundation for species management 
     and esturaine habitat conservation; and $1,500,000 is for a 
     grant to the Pinellas County Environmental Foundation for the 
     Tampa Bay watershed. Of the funds provided for the National 
     Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration programs, $5,000,000 
     is for National Estuarine Research Reserve operations, 
     $12,000,000 is for Marine Sanctuary operations, $8,500,000 
     for Coastal Zone Management, $1,500,000 for CZMA Program 
     Administration, $4,000,000 is for marine mammal strandings, 
     $14,000,000 is for the National Ocean Service's protection of 
     coral reefs program, $11,000,000 is for the National Marine 
     Fisheries Service's Coral reefs program, $36,000,000 is for 
     additional amounts for the purpose of the Pacific Coastal 
     Salmon Recovery account, $6,000,000 is for fisheries habitat 
     restoration, $15,000,000 is for NOAA's Cooperative 
     Enforcement initiative, $3,000,000 is for Atlantic coast 
     observers, $3,000,000 is for Cooperative Research, $3,000,000 
     is for Red Snapper research, $3,000,000 is for Aquaculture, 
     $5,000,000 is for Harmful Algal Bloom research, $2,000,000 is 
     for the Ocean Exploration initiative, and $3,000,000 is for 
     Marine Sanctuary construction. The amounts provided under 
     this heading for certain activities for ocean, coastal and 
     waterway conservation programs are in addition to amounts 
     provided elsewhere in this bill.
       Of the $135,000,000 provided for NOAA programs, NOAA is 
     directed to develop and submit to the Committees on 
     Appropriations an implementation plan for the additional 
     funding initiatives by February 28, 2001.
       Great Lakes Coastal Restoration Grants.--The conference 
     agreement includes a new appropriation of $30,000,000 for 
     matching grants to be awarded competitively to state and 
     local governments to undertake coastal and water quality 
     restoration projects in the Great Lakes region. Proposals 
     funded under this program should be consistent with a Great 
     Lakes State's approved coastal management program under 
     section 306 of the Coastal Zone Management Act. Restoration 
     projects eligible for funding would include contaminated site 
     cleanup, stormwater controls, wetland restoration, 
     acquisition of greenways and buffers, and other projects 
     designed to control polluted runoff and protect and restore 
     coastal resources. NOAA is directed to develop and submit to 
     the Committees on Appropriations an implementation plan for 
     this initiative no later than January 15, 2001.

[[Page H12472]]

                    pacific salmon coastal recovery

       In fiscal year 2000, funding for the Southern Fund was 
     provided under the NOAA, ORF account heading. The conference 
     agreement includes funding for the Northern Transboundary 
     Fund and Southern Transboundary Fund under this heading, in 
     addition to funding provided within the Department of State. 
     The conference agreement includes the full amount requested 
     for the funds and for a payment to the State of Washington.
       In addition, the conference agreement includes $54,000,000 
     for salmon habitat restoration, stock enhancement, and 
     research. Of this amount, $18,000,000 is provided to the 
     State of Washington, $10,000,000 is provided to the State of 
     Alaska, $9,000,000 is provided to the State of Oregon, and 
     $9,000,000 is provided to the State of California. In 
     addition, $6,000,000 is provided for coastal tribes, and 
     $2,000,000 for river tribes. Of the funds made available to 
     the State of Washington, $4,000,000 shall be allocated 
     through the Salmon Recovery Funding Board directly to the 
     Washington State Department of Natural Resources and other 
     State and Federal agencies for purposes of implementing the 
     State of Washington's Forest and Fish Report. The monies 
     shall be spent in accordance with the terms and conditions of 
     the Forest and Fish Report and consistent with the 
     requirements of the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water 
     Act. Of the funding made available to the State of Alaska, 
     $350,000 shall be used to continue the operation of the 
     Crystal Lake hatchery in Petersburg, and $1,000,000 for the 
     Metlakatla hatchery. None of the $54,000,000 shall be used 
     for the buy back of commercial fishing licenses or vessels.
       The conference agreement includes language proposed in the 
     House bill making funding under this heading subject to 
     express authorization. The Senate-reported amendment did not 
     include this language.


                      COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT FUND

       The conference agreement includes an appropriation of 
     $3,200,000 as provided in the Senate-reported amendment, 
     instead of $4,000,000 as provided in the House bill. This 
     amount is reflected under the National Ocean Service within 
     the Operations, Research, and Facilities account.


                      FISHERMEN'S CONTINGENCY FUND

       The conference agreement includes $952,000 for the 
     Fishermen's Contingency Fund. The House bill included 
     $951,000 and the Senate-reported amendment included $953,000 
     for this program.


                     foreign fishing observer fund

       The conference agreement includes $191,000 for the expenses 
     related to the Foreign Fishing Observer Fund, as provided in 
     the Senate-reported amendment. The House bill included 
     $189,000 for this program.


                   fisheries finance program account

       The conference agreement provides $288,000 in subsidy 
     amounts for the Fisheries Finance Program Account, instead of 
     $238,000 as provided in the House bill and $338,000 as 
     provided in the Senate-reported amendment. Funding is 
     provided in accordance with the Senate-reported amendment.

                        Departmental Management


                         salaries and expenses

       The conference agreement includes $35,920,000 for the 
     departmental management of the Commerce Department, instead 
     of $28,392,000, as proposed in the House bill, and 
     $32,340,000, as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment; of 
     which $4,000,000 is provided for the Department's re-wiring 
     initiative. No funding is provided for the security 
     initiative. Funding of $19,823,000 is provided within NOAA 
     for the Commerce Administrative Management System (CAMS). The 
     Commerce Department is directed to submit quarterly reports 
     for implementation of CAMS, the initial report should include 
     an overview of planned CAMS implementation, including 
     milestones, and cost estimates for each stage of deployment. 
     All subsequent reports should outline progress in meeting the 
     milestones and spending targets.

                      Office of Inspector General

       The conference agreement includes $20,000,000 for the 
     Commerce Department Inspector General, instead of $21,000,000 
     as recommended in the House bill and $19,000,000 as 
     recommended in the Senate-reported amendment. The Inspector 
     General is reminded that office closings, staff reductions, 
     or reorganizations are subject to the reprogramming 
     procedures outlined in section 605 of this Act.

               GENERAL PROVISIONS--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

       The conference agreement includes the following general 
     provisions for the Department of Commerce:
       Sec. 201.--The conference agreement includes section 201, 
     included in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, regarding certifications of advanced payments.
       Sec. 202.--The conference agreement includes section 202, 
     identical in the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, allowing funds to be used for hire of passenger 
     motor vehicles.
       Sec. 203.--The conference agreement includes section 203, 
     identical in the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, prohibiting reimbursement to the Air Force for 
     hurricane reconnaissance planes.
       Sec. 204.--The conference agreement includes section 204, 
     identical in the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, prohibiting funds from being used to reimburse the 
     Unemployment Trust Fund for temporary census workers. The 
     Senate-reported amendment included a provision prohibiting 
     reimbursements in relation to the 1990 decennial census.
       Sec. 205.--The conference agreement includes section 205, 
     as proposed in the House bill, regarding transfer authority 
     among Commerce Department appropriation accounts. The Senate-
     reported amendment proposed to increase the percentage of 
     funding available for transfer.
       The conference agreement does not include section 206 of 
     the House bill providing for the notification of the House 
     and Senate Committees on Appropriations of a plan for 
     transferring funds to appropriate successor organizations 
     within 90 days of enactment of any legislation dismantling or 
     reorganizing the Department of Commerce. The Senate bill did 
     not contain a provision on this matter.
       Sec. 206.--The conference agreement includes section 206, 
     included in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, requiring that any costs related to personnel 
     actions incurred by a department or agency funded in title II 
     of the accompanying Act be absorbed within the total 
     budgetary resources available to such department or agency, 
     with a modification to include loan collateral and grants 
     protection.
       Sec. 207.--The conference agreement includes section 207, 
     as proposed in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, allowing the Secretary to award contracts for 
     certain mapping and charting activities in accordance with 
     the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act.
       Sec. 208.--The conference agreement includes section 208, 
     as proposed in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment with minor technical changes, allowing the 
     Department of Commerce Franchise Fund to retain a portion of 
     its earnings from services provided.
       Sec. 209.--The conference agreement includes section 209, 
     modified from a provision in the Senate-reported amendment, 
     to provide $14,000,000 within the ``National Institute of 
     Standards and Technology, Construction of Research 
     Facilities'' account, for four construction projects. Of this 
     amount, $4,000,000 is appropriated to the Institute at Saint 
     Anselm College, $4,000,000 is for a cooperative agreement 
     with the Medical University of South Carolina, $3,000,000 is 
     for the Thayer School of Engineering for the biocommodity and 
     biomass research initiative, and $3,000,000 is appropriated 
     to establish the Institute for Information Infrastructure 
     Protection at the Institute for Security Technology Studies. 
     In addition, of the amounts provided within the NOAA PAC 
     account, $5,000,000 is provided for a grant to Pride, Inc.
       Sec. 210.--The conference agreement includes a new 
     provision, numbered as section 210, which establishes the Dr. 
     Nancy Foster Memorial Scholarship program for advanced 
     degrees in marine studies, as part of the National Marine 
     Sanctuary Program.

                        TITLE III--THE JUDICIARY

                   Supreme Court of the United States


                         salaries and expenses

       The conference agreement includes $37,591,000 for the 
     salaries and expenses of the Supreme Court, as provided in 
     the Senate-reported amendment, instead of $36,782,000 as 
     provided in the House bill.
       House report language with respect to law clerk selection 
     is adopted by reference.


                    care of the building and grounds

       The conference agreement includes $7,530,000 for the 
     Supreme Court Care of the Building and Grounds account, as 
     provided in the House bill and the Senate-reported amendment. 
     This is the amount the Architect of the Capitol currently 
     estimates is required for fiscal year 2001.

         United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit


                         salaries and expenses

       The conference agreement includes $17,930,000 for the U.S. 
     Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit as provided in the 
     Senate-reported amendment, instead of $17,846,000 as provided 
     in the House bill. This provides funding for base adjustments 
     and two additional assistants. No funding is provided for 
     additional staff in the Clerk's office.

               United States Court of International Trade


                         salaries and expenses

       The conference agreement includes $12,456,000 for the U.S. 
     Court of International Trade as provided in the Senate-
     reported amendment, instead of $12,299,000 as provided in the 
     House bill.

    Courts of Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial Services


                         salaries and expenses

       The conference agreement provides $3,359,725,000 for the 
     salaries and expenses of the Federal Judiciary as provided in 
     the Senate-reported amendment, instead of $3,328,778,000 as 
     provided in the House bill.
       House report language with respect to the Southwest Border 
     is adopted by reference.
       An April 2000 review of Federal judges sharing of 
     courtrooms prepared by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) 
     indicated that courtroom sharing by judges should not cause 
     trial delays for a significant number of

[[Page H12473]]

     trials, and that for the few that might be delayed the 
     waiting time would be less than half a day. The CBO study 
     also found that many courtrooms are in use for a small 
     percentage of the available workdays. A study of the 
     Judiciary's space and facilities program recently completed 
     by Ernst and Young, however, suggested that requiring judges 
     to share courtrooms is not practical. The Ernst and Young 
     report stated that current court records do not adequately 
     track courtroom usage, making it difficult to determine if 
     courtroom sharing by Federal judges is a viable option. The 
     conference agreement directs CBO to review and comment on the 
     Ernst and Young report, and to provide the Committees on 
     Appropriations with its findings no later than February 1, 
     2001. The Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts shall 
     provide such assistance as may be necessary to CBO to 
     complete its review. This issue is of great importance 
     because any reduction in the number of courtrooms and 
     associated court space could significantly reduce rental 
     payments, which continue to consume an inordinate amount of 
     the Judiciary's available resources.


                 vaccine injury compensation trust fund

       The conference agreement provides $2,602,000 from the 
     Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund for expenses 
     associated with the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 
     1986 as provided in the Senate-reported amendment, instead of 
     $2,600,000 as provided in the House bill.


                           defender services

       The conference agreement includes $435,000,000 for the 
     Federal Judiciary's Defender Services account, instead of 
     $420,338,000 as provided in the House bill, and $416,368,000 
     as provided in the Senate-reported amendment. The conference 
     agreement directs that a portion of the funds made available 
     be used for an increase to $75 an hour for in-court time and 
     $55 an hour for out-of-court time for Criminal Justice Act 
     panel attorneys.
       Language relating to capital habeas corpus costs in the 
     House report is adopted by reference.


                    fees of jurors and commissioners

       The conference agreement includes $59,567,000 for Fees of 
     Jurors and Commissioners, as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment, instead of $60,821,000 as provided in the House 
     bill.


                             court security

       The conference agreement includes $199,575,000 for the 
     Federal Judiciary's Court Security account as provided in the 
     Senate-reported amendment, instead of $198,265,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill. Of the amount provided, 
     $10,000,000 for security system funding shall remain 
     available until expended.

           Administrative Office of the United States Courts


                         salaries and expenses

       The conference agreement includes $58,340,000 for the 
     Administrative Office of the United States Courts as provided 
     in the House bill, instead of $50,000,000 as provided in the 
     Senate-reported amendment.
       Language in the introductory section relating to the 
     Federal Judiciary in the House report with respect to the 
     Optimal Utilization of Judicial Resources report is adopted 
     by reference.

                        Federal Judicial Center


                         salaries and expenses

       The conference agreement includes $18,777,000 for fiscal 
     year 2001 salaries and expenses of the Federal Judicial 
     Center as provided in the House bill, instead of $19,215,000 
     as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. Of the amount 
     provided, $1,000 shall be available for official reception 
     and representation expenses, as provided in the House bill, 
     instead of $1,500 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment.

                       Judicial Retirement Funds


                    payment to judiciary trust funds

       The conference agreement includes $35,700,000 for payment 
     to the various judicial retirement funds, as provided in both 
     the House bill and the Senate-reported amendment.

                  United States Sentencing Commission


                         salaries and expenses

       The conference agreement includes $9,931,000 for the U.S. 
     Sentencing Commission, as provided in the Senate-reported 
     amendment, instead of $9,615,000 as provided in the House 
     bill.

                   General Provisions--The Judiciary

       Section 301.--The conference agreement includes a provision 
     included in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment allowing appropriations to be used for services as 
     authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109.
       Sec. 302.--The conference agreement includes a provision as 
     proposed in the House bill related to the transfer of funds, 
     instead of the modification proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment. The House report language with respect to section 
     302 is incorporated by reference.
       Sec. 303.--The conference agreement includes a provision 
     included in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment allowing up to $11,000 of salaries and expenses 
     provided in this title to be used for official reception and 
     representation expenses of the Judicial Conference of the 
     United States.
       Sec. 304.--The conference agreement includes a provision 
     included in the House bill to authorize the Judiciary to 
     appoint statutory certifying officers who will be responsible 
     for verifying the receipt of and payment for goods and 
     services. This authority is currently available to the 
     Executive Branch. The Senate-reported amendment did not 
     contain a similar provision.
       Sec. 305.--The conference agreement includes a new 
     provision authorizing ten district judgeships, one for each 
     of the following states: Arizona, Florida, Kentucky, Nevada, 
     New Mexico, South Carolina, Virginia, and Wisconsin; and two 
     additional district judgeships for Texas. In addition, the 
     section directs the Chief Judge of the Eastern District of 
     Wisconsin to designate one judge who shall hold court for 
     such district in Green Bay, Wisconsin.
       Sec. 306.--The conference agreement includes a new 
     provision that allows the United States Court of Appeals for 
     the Federal Circuit to appoint a circuit executive or a 
     clerk, but not both, or to appoint a combined circuit 
     executive/clerk.
       Sec. 307.--The conference agreement includes a new 
     provision to extend to the Judiciary authority currently 
     available to the Legislative and Executive branches of 
     Government, to use appropriated funds to pay for the 
     employment of personal assistants. The language will allow 
     the judicial branch to hire readers for the blind, 
     interpreters for the deaf, and other personal assistants as 
     may be necessary for judges and other employees with 
     disabilities.
       Sec. 308.--The conference agreement includes a new 
     provision to bring the Supreme Court Police into parity with 
     the retirement benefits provided to the United States Capitol 
     Police and other Federal law enforcement agencies.
       Sec. 309.--The conference agreement includes a provision, 
     modified from a provision proposed as section 304 in the 
     Senate-reported amendment. The modified language authorizes 
     Justices and judges of the United States to receive a salary 
     adjustment only if under each provision of law amended by 
     section 704(a)(2) of the Ethics Reform Act of 1989 (5 U.S.C. 
     5318 note), adjustments under 5 U.S.C. 5305 shall take effect 
     in fiscal year 2001. If such adjustments are made, then 
     $8,801,000 is appropriated for the cost of adjustments under 
     this Title. The House bill did not include a similar 
     provision on this matter.
       The conference agreement does not include the Senate 
     provision related to honoraria or outside earnings limits for 
     Federal judges.

            TITLE IV--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

                   Administration of Foreign Affairs


                    DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS

       The conference agreement includes a total of $3,168,725,000 
     for Diplomatic and Consular Programs, instead of 
     $3,089,325,000 as included in the House bill and 
     $3,148,494,000 as included in the Senate-reported amendment. 
     The conference agreement includes $2,718,725,000 for State 
     Department activities under this account, $40,000,000 related 
     to the implementation of the 1999 Pacific Salmon Treaty, and 
     an additional $410,000,000 to remain available until expended 
     for worldwide security upgrades.
       The conference agreement includes language in this account, 
     and throughout this Title, that modifies citations of 
     authorization legislation carried in previous years. These 
     changes are intended to simplify and streamline bill 
     language, and are not intended to modify the authorities for 
     the use of funds under any account.
       The conference agreement does not include language proposed 
     in the Senate-reported amendment to modify the purposes for 
     which funds transferred from this account to the 
     ``Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service'' 
     account may be used.
       The conference agreement includes language, not included in 
     the House bill or the Senate-reported amendment, transferring 
     $1,400,000 to the Presidential Advisory Commission on 
     Holocaust Assets in the United States.
       The conference agreement includes language, as proposed in 
     the House bill, which makes fees collected in fiscal year 
     2001 related to affidavits of support available until 
     expended. The Senate-reported amendment gave the Department 
     permanent authority to use such fee collections.
       The conference agreement includes language designating 
     $246,644,000 for public diplomacy international information 
     programs as proposed in the House bill. The Senate-reported 
     amendment did not contain a similar provision. This amount 
     represents the full requested funding level for these program 
     activities.
       The conference agreement includes language under this 
     account allowing the Department to collect and use 
     reimbursements for services provided to the press. This 
     language was proposed in the Senate-reported amendment under 
     ``Representation Allowances''. The House bill did not contain 
     a provision on this matter.
       The conference agreement does not include language proposed 
     in the Senate-reported amendment to place limitations on 
     certain details of State Department senior executives to 
     other agencies or organizations. The House bill did not 
     include a similar provision.
       The conference agreement does not include an earmark of 
     $5,000,000 under this account, as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment, for a payment to the City of Seattle

[[Page H12474]]

     for costs incurred as host of the WTO Ministerial Conference. 
     The House bill did not include a provision on this matter. 
     The conference agreement addresses this issue under the 
     ``Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials'' account.
       The conference agreement does not adopt a Senate provision 
     providing $1,000,000 to establish an Ambassador's Fund for 
     Cultural Preservation. Instead, the Department shall identify 
     up to $1,000,000 from funds provided under this account for 
     an Ambassador's Fund for Cultural Preservation as described 
     in the Senate report. United States Ambassadors in less-
     developed countries may submit competitive proposals for one-
     time or recurring projects with awards based on the 
     importance of the site, object, or form of expression, the 
     country's need, the impact of the United States contribution 
     to the preservation of the site, object, or form of 
     expression, and the anticipated benefit to the advancement of 
     United States diplomatic goals. The Department is directed to 
     submit an annual report to the House and Senate Committees on 
     Appropriations on the selection process used, and on the 
     expenditure of funds by project.
       The conference agreement includes language making 
     $5,000,000 available for overseas continuing language 
     education, instead of $10,000,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. The House bill did not include a similar 
     provision. Language in the Senate report requiring a report 
     on the distribution of this funding is adopted by reference.
       The conference agreement does not include language 
     earmarking $12,500,000 for the East-West Center, as proposed 
     in the Senate-reported amendment. The House bill did not 
     contain a similar provision. Funding for the East-West Center 
     is addressed under a separate heading in this Title.
       The conference agreement does not include language 
     earmarking $1,350,000 for the Protection Project as proposed 
     in the Senate-reported amendment. The House bill did not 
     contain a similar provision. The Department is directed to 
     continue support for this activity.
       The conference agreement includes language allowing certain 
     advances for services related to the Panama Canal Commission 
     to be credited to this account and to remain available until 
     expended, as proposed in the House bill. The Senate-reported 
     amendment did not include a similar provision.
       The conference agreement includes a provision, modified 
     from language included in the Senate-reported amendment, 
     designating $40,000,000 under this account to implement the 
     1999 Pacific Salmon Treaty. The Senate-reported amendment 
     provided $60,000,000 for this purpose, and the House bill did 
     not contain a similar provision. Of the amount provided, 
     $10,000,000 is for further capitalizing the Northern Boundary 
     Fund, $10,000,000 is for further capitalizing the Southern 
     Boundary Fund, and $20,000,000 is for the State of Washington 
     Department of Fish and Wildlife as authorized under section 
     628 of this Act.
       The conference agreement does not include a provision 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment regarding funding 
     for the Office of Defense Trade Controls. The Office is 
     expected to review applications, regardless of identified end 
     user, with the utmost scrutiny.
       The conference agreement includes language requiring the 
     Department to notify Congress fifteen days in advance of 
     processing licenses for the export of satellites to the 
     People's Republic of China, as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. The House bill included an identical 
     provision under the Department of Commerce, Bureau of Export 
     Administration.
       The conference agreement includes a provision, not in the 
     House bill or the Senate-reported amendment, to allow the 
     Department to collect and deposit Machine Readable Visa fees 
     as offsetting collections to this account in fiscal years 
     2001 and 2002 to recover costs. The conference agreement does 
     not include provisions to limit the use of Machine Readable 
     Visa fees in fiscal year 2001 and to make excess collections 
     available in the subsequent fiscal year, as carried in both 
     the House bill and the Senate-reported amendment. The House 
     bill included a fiscal year 2001 spending limitation of 
     $342,667,000. The Senate-reported amendment included a 
     limitation of $267,000,000.
       The conference agreement does not include language proposed 
     in the Senate-reported amendment earmarking funds for the 
     Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism and for the 
     preparation of a study on the U.S. Government response to an 
     international WMD terrorist event. The House bill did not 
     include a similar provision.
       The conference agreement includes $410,000,000 for 
     worldwide security upgrades under this account as proposed in 
     the House bill, instead of $272,736,000 as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment. The Department shall submit a 
     detailed spending plan by December 31, 2000, for the entire 
     amount provided for worldwide security upgrades. The House 
     report designated $66,000,000 for a perimeter security 
     initiative, and $16,000,000 to support additional staffing 
     for the Bureau of Diplomatic Security, as requested. Since 
     the time of the budget request, the Department has notified 
     the Committees of increasing requirements to implement 
     perimeter security upgrades. The Department is expected to 
     reflect this development in the spending plan, increasing the 
     amount for perimeter security and decreasing the amount for 
     staffing. Any amount exceeding $8,000,000 for increased 
     staffing will be subject to reprogramming. The conference 
     agreement adopts, by reference, language in the Senate report 
     regarding bomb detection equipment and a report on certain 
     security issues.
       The Committees acknowledge the Department's continuing 
     efforts to increase minority recruitment and diversity in the 
     Foreign Service and commend the Department for its ongoing 
     efforts to partner with Howard University and other 
     institutions. For fiscal year 2001 the Department is directed 
     to supplement its minority recruitment activities by 
     initiating a model program to facilitate the entry of non-
     traditional and minority students into foreign policy 
     careers. This program would provide a continuum of education 
     and support for successful students at two- and four-year 
     colleges to continue their studies at a university that 
     provides undergraduate programs for non-traditional students 
     and graduate studies in international and public affairs. The 
     Department is directed to provide $1,000,000 to the 
     educational partnership between Hostos Community College and 
     Columbia University in New York to establish such a model 
     program. It is expected that this new program would assist 
     members of minority groups in pursuing careers in the Foreign 
     Service and the State Department.
       Within the amount provided under this account, and 
     including any savings the Department identifies, the 
     Department will have the ability to propose that funds be 
     used for purposes not specifically funded by the conference 
     agreement through the normal reprogramming process.
       Extended tours, particularly at language incentive posts, 
     could improve efficiency and reduce costs. The Department is 
     directed to report to the Committees, not later than February 
     15, 2001 on: 1) cost savings by subaccount that would result 
     from four-year tours being adopted; 2) proposed changes to 
     promotion criteria necessary to accommodate four-year tours; 
     and 3) proposed four-year assignments by job description and 
     post with full justification.
       The conference agreement does not adopt language in the 
     Senate report allocating additional funds to certain 
     geographic regions, but commends the Department's operations 
     in Buenos Aires, Argentina; Montevideo, Uruguay; and Sao 
     Paulo, Brazil. These posts are well run, language skills are 
     uniformly excellent, and personnel are genuinely enthusiastic 
     about, and deeply involved in, the local government, 
     community and culture. These posts serve as model embassies 
     to be emulated. The Department is urged to devote the 
     necessary resources to these posts to maintain the high 
     caliber of operations at each.
       Questions have been raised concerning the adequacy of 
     current U.S. representation in Equatorial Guinea. Therefore, 
     the Department is directed to explore the establishment, 
     within resources currently available, of an American Presence 
     Post in Equatorial Guinea and to report to the Committees no 
     later than December 1, 2000, on the costs, staffing, and need 
     for such a post.
       Increasing amounts of funding are requested under this 
     title for costs related to the absence or inadequacy of 
     democratic governance in Kosovo, East Timor, Sierra Leone, 
     and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. United Nations 
     peacekeeping missions in Kosovo and East Timor are, in fact, 
     surrogate governments, for which the United States is 
     assessed over thirty percent of the total costs. In order to 
     ensure that adequate and coordinated efforts are underway to 
     develop effective democratic governance, the Department is 
     directed to submit to the Committees a plan describing all 
     such U.S. Government-sponsored activities in these four 
     locations, and the anticipated results from these activities, 
     not later than May 1, 2001. The Department is directed to 
     coordinate closely with other U.S. Government agencies, the 
     United Nations, the National Endowment for Democracy, and 
     relevant non-governmental organizations in compiling the 
     plan.
       The conference agreement adopts, by reference, language in 
     the House report regarding: reform and restructuring, 
     including the submission of a reorganization plan 
     corresponding with general provisions included in this title; 
     carrying out the recommendations of the Overseas Presence 
     Advisory Panel including the submission of a report; the 
     submission of a minority recruitment and hiring plan; the 
     Overseas Schools Advisory Council; the negotiation of 
     effective extradition treaties; and unfair treatment of U.S. 
     companies in Peru.
       The conference agreement adopts, by reference, language in 
     the Senate report regarding: the Department's budget 
     justification books; amounts to be provided for the Arctic 
     Council and the Bering Straits Commission; the submission of 
     a plan regarding information about biotechnology abroad; and 
     a report on international sea turtle conservation efforts.
       The conference agreement does not include language in the 
     Senate report on Sierra Leone and the Department's Bureau of 
     African Affairs.


                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND

       The conference agreement includes $97,000,000 for the 
     Capital Investment Fund, instead of $79,670,000 as proposed 
     in the House bill and $104,000,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. The conference agreement does not include 
     language as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment 
     allowing the Department to retain control of

[[Page H12475]]

     its overseas telecommunications infrastructure in the event 
     that the current joint management is abolished or dissolved.
       Within the amount provided in this account, $17,000,000 
     shall be for a pilot project to establish a common technology 
     platform at overseas posts pursuant to the recommendations of 
     the Overseas Presence Advisory Panel. The conference 
     agreement includes the direction in the House report 
     requiring the submission of a spending plan for this pilot 
     project.
       The conference agreement also includes, by reference, the 
     report on modernization projects and resulting efficiencies 
     requested in the House report.


                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

       The conference agreement includes $28,490,000 for the 
     Office of Inspector General as proposed in the House bill, 
     instead of $29,395,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment. The conference agreement includes, by reference, 
     the guidance included in both the House and Senate reports.


               EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS

       The conference agreement includes $231,587,000 for 
     Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs of the Department 
     of State, instead of $213,771,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill and $225,000,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment. The conference agreement makes the funds provided 
     under this account available until expended as in previous 
     years, and as proposed in the House bill.
       The following chart displays the conference agreement on 
     the distribution of funds by program or activity under this 
     account:

                       [In thousands of dollars]

                                                                 Amount
  Academic Programs:
  Fulbright Program.............................................114,000
  Regional Scholars Program.......................................2,000
  Foreign Study Grants for U.S. Undergraduates....................1,500
  College and University Affiliations Program.....................1,000
  Educational Advising and Student Services.......................3,200
  English Language Programs.......................................2,600
  Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowships..................................6,100
  Edmund S. Muskie Fellowship Program...............................500
  American Overseas Research Centers..............................2,280
  South Pacific Exchanges...........................................500
  Tibet Exchanges...................................................500
  East Timor Exchanges..............................................500
  Disability Exchange Clearinghouse.................................500
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Subtotal, Academic Programs.................................135,180
                                                       ================

  Professional and Cultural Programs:
  International Visitor Program..................................46,500
  Citizen Exchange Program.......................................15,000
  Congress Bundestag Youth Exchange...............................2,857
  Mike Mansfield Fellowship Program...............................2,200
  Olympic/Paralympic Exchanges....................................1,000
  Special Olympic Exchanges.........................................500
  Youth Science Leadership Institute of the Americas................100
  Irish Institute...................................................500
  Montana International Business Exchange...........................100
  University of Akron Global Business Exchange......................100
  Interparliamentary Exchanges with Asia............................150
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Subtotal, Professional and Cultural Exchanges................69,007
                                                       ================

North/South Center................................................1,400
Exchanges Support................................................26,000
                                                       ================

    Total.......................................................231,587

       Deviations from this distribution of funds will be subject 
     to the normal reprogramming procedures under section 605 of 
     this Act. Significant carryover and recovered balances are 
     often available under this account, and the Department is 
     directed to submit a proposed spending plan for such 
     balances, subject to the regular reprogramming procedures. To 
     the extent such balances are available, the Department is 
     encouraged to give priority to providing additional support 
     for the Muskie Fellowship Program, and supporting the Central 
     European Executive Exchange Program and the Institute for 
     Representative Government.
       The conference agreement includes only $500,000 in new 
     appropriations under this account for Muskie Fellowships for 
     graduate student exchanges with the former Soviet Union. In 
     addition to the amounts provided under this account for 
     nations of the former Soviet Union, the Department expects to 
     receive transfers from appropriations for Freedom Support Act 
     exchange programs. In fiscal year 2000, an additional 
     $93,000,000 was transferred to this account for exchanges 
     with the former Soviet Union, including $18,309,000 for 
     graduate student exchanges. A similar amount is expected to 
     be available for such exchanges in fiscal year 2001. In its 
     graduate exchange programs with the former Soviet Union, the 
     Department shall emphasize Masters in Business Administration 
     programs in such areas as marketing, distribution, and 
     finance.
       Should balances become available, the Department is 
     expected to consider awarding a grant for the Central 
     European Executive Exchange Program. The Committees expect 
     that the proposal submitted for this project will include 
     participation from Central European countries in addition to 
     Hungary and the Czech Republic, and will contain a plan to 
     continue the project in future years without Federal 
     financial support.
       The conference agreement includes, by reference, the 
     program guidance contained in both the House and Senate 
     reports.


                       REPRESENTATION ALLOWANCES

       The conference agreement includes $6,499,000 for 
     Representation Allowances instead of $5,826,000 as proposed 
     in the House bill, and $6,773,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. The conference agreement does not include 
     language under this account allowing the Department to 
     collect and use reimbursement for services provided to the 
     press as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. This 
     language is instead included under the ``Diplomatic and 
     Consular Programs'' account.


              PROTECTION OF FOREIGN MISSIONS AND OFFICIALS

       The conference agreement includes $15,467,000 for 
     Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials, instead of 
     $8,067,000 as provided in the House bill and $10,490,000 as 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. Of the amount 
     provided, $5,000,000 is designated for reimbursement to the 
     City of Seattle. Similar language was included in the Senate-
     reported amendment under ``Diplomatic and Consular 
     Programs''. The House bill did not address this matter. The 
     direction included in the House and Senate reports regarding 
     the review of reimbursement claims is adopted by reference.


            EMBASSY SECURITY, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE

       The conference agreement includes $1,079,976,000 for this 
     account, instead of $1,064,976,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill and $782,004,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment.
       The conference agreement does not include language proposed 
     in the Senate-reported amendment adding ``Centers for 
     Antiterrorism and Security Training'' to the allowable uses 
     of funding under this account. The House bill had no similar 
     language.
       The conference agreement does not include a Senate 
     provision stating that certain proceeds of sales shall be 
     available only for a new embassy facility in the Republic of 
     Korea. Proceeds realized from the sale of the diplomatic 
     facility in Seoul known as ``Compound II'' shall only be 
     available for the site acquisition and preparation, design, 
     or construction of diplomatic facilities, housing, or Marine 
     security guard quarters in the Republic of Korea. These funds 
     shall be available for obligation and expenditure until all 
     proceeds from the sale of ``Compound II'' are exhausted. The 
     Committees expect the Department to provide an update every 
     January 1 on construction projects in the Republic of Korea.
       The conference agreement includes $663,000,000 for the 
     costs of worldwide security upgrades, including $515,000,000 
     for capital security projects. The conferees direct the 
     Department to comply with the direction in the House report 
     regarding the submission of a spending plan within sixty days 
     of the date of enactment of this Act. In proposing such a 
     spending plan, the Department shall include an assessment of 
     need, and such funding as is appropriate, for security 
     upgrades related to existing housing, schools, and Marine 
     quarters, as well as the acquisition of new secure Marine 
     quarters.
       The conference agreement does not include new 
     appropriations for non-security capital projects. The 
     Department has indicated that $30,500,000 is available from 
     previous appropriations and proceeds to pay all anticipated 
     site acquisition and related costs of the new Beijing 
     chancery project in fiscal year 2001. The conference 
     agreement includes, by reference, the direction in the Senate 
     report regarding the Beijing chancery project. The ongoing 
     costs of housing projects in Chengdu and Shenyang are 
     included in amounts provided for facilities rehabilitation 
     under this account.
       The budget request included planned expenditures of 
     $67,000,000 from proceeds of sale of surplus property for 
     opportunity purchases and capital projects. The conference 
     agreement anticipates that the amount of funds available for 
     such purchases will be much greater, and directs the 
     Department to submit a spending plan for these funds that 
     includes: at least $19,000,000 for opportunity purchases to 
     replace uneconomical leases; at least $25,000,000 for capital 
     security projects; and $20,000,000 for continuing costs of 
     the Taiwan project. Any additional use of these funds is 
     subject to reprogramming.
       The conference agreement includes, by reference, language 
     in the House report under ``Worldwide Security Upgrades'' and 
     ``Responding to the Recommendations of the Overseas Presence 
     Advisory Panel'', and language in the Senate report on joint 
     ventures

[[Page H12476]]

     and a General Accounting Office review of a property issue in 
     Paris. Within the amount provided under this account, the 
     Department is expected to support the rehabilitation projects 
     in Moscow and Istanbul described in the Senate report.
       The Department is directed to submit, and receive approval 
     for, a financial plan for the funding provided under this 
     account, whether from direct appropriations or proceeds of 
     sales, prior to the obligation or expenditure of funds for 
     capital and rehabilitation projects. The overall spending 
     plan shall include project-level detail, and shall be 
     provided to the Appropriations Committees not later than 60 
     days after the date of enactment of this Act. Any deviation 
     from the plan after approval shall be treated as a 
     reprogramming in the case of an addition greater than 
     $500,000 or as a notification in the case of a deletion, a 
     project cost overrun exceeding 25 percent, or a project 
     schedule delay exceeding 6 months. Notification requirements 
     also extend to the rebaselining of a given project's cost 
     estimate, schedule, or scope of work.


           EMERGENCIES IN THE DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE

       The conference agreement includes $5,477,000 for the 
     Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service account, 
     as provided in the House bill, instead of $11,000,000, as 
     provided in the Senate-reported amendment.


                   REPATRIATION LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

       The conference agreement includes a total appropriation of 
     $1,195,000 for the Repatriation Loans Program account as 
     provided in the House bill, instead of $1,200,000 as provided 
     in the Senate-reported amendment.


              PAYMENT TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE IN TAIWAN

       The conference agreement includes $16,345,000 for the 
     Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan account, as 
     provided in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment. The conference agreement includes, by reference, 
     language in both the House and Senate reports. Funding for 
     the relocation of the Institute is discussed under the 
     ``Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance'' account.


     PAYMENT TO THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY FUND

       The conference agreement includes $131,224,000 for the 
     Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund 
     account, as provided in both the House bill and the Senate-
     reported amendment.

              International Organizations and Conferences


              CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

       The conference agreement includes $870,833,000 for 
     Contributions to International Organizations to pay the costs 
     assessed to the United States for membership in international 
     organizations, instead of $880,505,000 as proposed in the 
     House bill, and $943,944,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment.
       The conference agreement includes language requiring that 
     $100,000,000 may be made available to the United Nations only 
     pursuant to a certification that the U.N. has taken no action 
     during calendar year 2000 prior to the enactment of this Act 
     to cause the U.N. to exceed the adopted budget for the 
     biennium 2000-2001. Similar language was included in the 
     House bill. The Senate-reported amendment did not include a 
     provision on this matter.
       The conference agreement does not include an additional 
     $64,800,000 for the United States share of the new North 
     Atlantic Treaty Organization headquarters as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment. The House bill did not have a 
     similar provision. Within the amount provided under this 
     heading, $8,000,000 is included for the first incremental 
     payment for the U.S. share of the new headquarters building, 
     as requested.
       The amount provided by the conference agreement is expected 
     to be sufficient to fully pay assessments to international 
     organizations. The conference agreement anticipates that the 
     Department has prepaid $32,600,000 of the fiscal year 2001 
     assessment for the United Nations regular budget, using 
     excess fiscal year 2000 funds. In addition, the Department's 
     recalculation of its fiscal year 2001 request for this 
     account has resulted in a lowering of the request by an 
     additional $37,908,000, resulting primarily from exchange 
     rate fluctuations. In recognition of the prepayment and the 
     recalculation of the request, the conference agreement 
     assumes an adjusted request level of $875,552,000. The 
     conference agreement does not include requested funding for 
     the Interparliamentary Union and the Bureau of International 
     Expositions, and anticipates additional savings related to 
     requested programs that are terminating or have not yet 
     begun.
       Provisions in the House report relating to reports on 
     reforms in international organizations, and Senate report 
     language relating to reporting on War Crimes Tribunals are 
     adopted by reference. The conference agreement does not 
     include an additional $13,000,000, as proposed in the Senate 
     report, for Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) disease 
     prevention and control programs. The Department is encouraged 
     to pursue appropriate funding for such an initiative in the 
     future. The conference agreement adopts, by reference, 
     language in the House report concerning PAHO, and directs the 
     Department to provide PAHO with its full United States 
     assessment level for fiscal year 2001.


        CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES

       The conference agreement provides $846,000,000 for 
     Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities, 
     instead of $500,000,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment and $498,100,000 as proposed in the House bill.
       The conference agreement provides that, of the total 
     funding provided under this heading, not to exceed fifteen 
     percent shall remain available until September 30, 2002. The 
     Senate-reported amendment made all funding available until 
     expended, and the House bill had no provision on the matter. 
     The conferees expect that before any excess funding is 
     carried over into fiscal year 2002 in this account, the 
     Department shall transfer the maximum allowable amount to the 
     Contributions to International Organizations account to 
     prepay the fiscal year 2002 assessment for the United Nations 
     regular budget.
       The conference agreement includes, by reference, language 
     in the House report requiring a Department report to the 
     Committees related to the costs of continuing UN activities 
     in Angola and Haiti from the UN regular budget, requiring a 
     report on peacekeeping assessment rate reform, and directing 
     the Department to support the work of the UN Office of 
     Internal Oversight Services. The conference agreement also 
     includes, by reference, language in the Senate report 
     regarding the investigation of charges against those 
     responsible for the planning and execution of the air war 
     over Serbia and Kosovo.
       The establishment of several large and complex missions 
     over the past year has overtaken the capacity of the UN to 
     successfully plan and manage such activities. The Department 
     is directed to allocate available funds in this account on a 
     priority basis, and to take no action to extend or expand 
     missions or create new missions for which funding is not 
     available. The conference agreement does not include funding 
     for the MINURSO mission in Western Sahara. In addition to the 
     notification requirements under this account, the Department 
     is directed to submit a proposed distribution of the total 
     resources available under this account no later than December 
     31, 2000, through the normal reprogramming process.


                           ARREARAGE PAYMENTS

       The conference agreement does not include funding for 
     arrearage payments in this Act. The Senate-reported amendment 
     provided $102,000,000 for additional arrearage payments above 
     the $926,000,000 authorized and appropriated in previous 
     years, subject to certain conditions. The House bill did not 
     include new funding for arrearage payments.

                       International Commissions


 INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $7,142,000 for Salaries 
     and Expenses of the International Boundary and Water 
     Commission (IBWC) as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment, instead of $19,470,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill. The conference agreement includes, by reference, 
     language in the House report regarding the South Bay 
     International Wastewater Treatment Plant.


                              CONSTRUCTION

       The conference agreement includes $22,950,000 for the 
     Construction account of the IBWC instead of $26,747,000 as 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment and $6,415,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill. The conference agreement provides 
     funding for the following activities: facilities renovation--
     $425,000; heavy equipment replacement--$1,000,000; land 
     mobile radio systems replacement--$500,000; hydrologic data 
     collection system rehabilitation--$500,000; Rio Grande 
     construction--$2,685,000; Colorado River construction--
     $805,000; a feasibility study for the construction of a 
     diversionary structure to control sewage flows in the flood 
     control channel of the Tijuana River--$500,000; and 
     operations and maintenance--$16,535,000. The conference 
     agreement adopts, by reference, language in the House report 
     regarding the reallocation of funds subject to reprogramming. 
     The conferees also expect the Commission to submit to the 
     Committees, not later than November 15, 2001, an end-of-year 
     report on operations and maintenance spending. This report 
     shall include actual obligations, and balances carried 
     forward, by project.


              AMERICAN SECTIONS, INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS

       The conference agreement includes $6,741,000 for the U.S. 
     share of expenses of the International Boundary Commission; 
     the International Joint Commission, United States and Canada; 
     and the Border Environment Cooperation Commission, as 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment, instead of 
     $5,710,000 as proposed in the House bill. The conference 
     level will provide funding at the following levels for the 
     three commissions: International Boundary Commission--
     $970,000; International Joint Commission--$3,771,000; and 
     Border Environment Cooperation Commission--$2,000,000.


                  INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS

       The conference agreement includes $19,392,000 for the U.S. 
     share of the expenses of the International Fisheries 
     Commissions and related activities, as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment, instead of $15,485,000 as proposed 
     in the House bill.

[[Page H12477]]

       The conference agreement includes the funding distribution 
     requested in the President's budget and adopts, by reference, 
     language in the Senate report on treating Lake Champlain with 
     lampricide, and giving priority to States providing matching 
     funds.

                                 Other


                     PAYMENT TO THE ASIA FOUNDATION

       The conference agreement includes $9,250,000 for the 
     Payment to the Asia Foundation account, instead of $8,216,000 
     as provided in the House bill, and instead of no funding as 
     provided in the Senate-reported amendment. The conferees 
     support the work of the Asia Foundation on democracy and the 
     rule of law in the Asia-Pacific region. Since the 
     establishment of multi-party democracy in 1990, Nepal 
     continues to struggle with political instability, weak legal 
     institutions and economic stagnation. Increased funding in 
     this account is expected to allow the Foundation to expand 
     law reform activities in Nepal.


           EISENHOWER EXCHANGE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM TRUST FUND

       The conference agreement includes language as provided in 
     both the House bill and the Senate-reported amendment 
     allowing all interest and earnings accruing to the Trust Fund 
     in fiscal year 2001 to be used for necessary expenses of the 
     Eisenhower Exchange Fellowships.


                    ISRAELI ARAB SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

       The conference agreement includes language as provided in 
     both the House bill and the Senate-reported amendment 
     allowing all interest and earnings accruing to the 
     Scholarship Fund in fiscal year 2001 to be used for necessary 
     expenses of the Israeli Arab Scholarship Program.


                            EAST-WEST CENTER

       The conference agreement includes $13,500,000 for 
     operations of the East-West Center as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment, instead of no funds as proposed in the 
     House bill. The conference agreement does not include an 
     additional earmark of $12,500,000 from the Department of 
     State, Diplomatic and Consular Programs account, as proposed 
     in the Senate-reported amendment.


                    NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR DEMOCRACY

       The conference agreement includes $30,999,000 for the 
     National Endowment for Democracy as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment, instead of $30,872,000 as proposed in the 
     House bill. The Endowment shall submit to the Committees, not 
     later than February 1, 2001, a detailed program plan for NED 
     activities in East Timor, Kosovo, Sierra Leone and the 
     Democratic Republic of the Congo.

                             RELATED AGENCY

                    Broadcasting Board of Governors


                 INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS

       The conference agreement includes $398,971,000 for 
     International Broadcasting Operations, instead of 
     $419,777,000 as proposed in the House bill and $388,421,000 
     as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. Rather than 
     funding broadcasting to Cuba under this account, as proposed 
     by the House, all funding for broadcasting to Cuba is 
     included under a separate account, as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment, and as enacted in previous years.
       The conference agreement includes language in this and 
     other broadcasting accounts that modifies citations of 
     authorization legislation as carried in previous years. These 
     changes are intended to simplify and streamline bill 
     language, and are not intended to modify the authorities for 
     the use of funds under any account.
       The conference agreement includes, by reference, language 
     in the House report on the review of television-related 
     programs, Radio Free Asia, further consolidation and 
     streamlining within international broadcasting, and 
     reprogramming requirements. The conference agreement also 
     includes, by reference, language in the Senate report on the 
     VOA charter requirements, and on the initiation of RFE/RL 
     broadcasting in Avar, Chechen and Circassian.
       The Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) is expected to 
     devote a proportionate and reasonable share of total VOA 
     programming to the charter requirements of explaining 
     American foreign policy and explaining American values, 
     institutions, and thought. Should the BBG determine that 
     organizational changes would facilitate the achievement of 
     this goal, such proposed changes shall be submitted to the 
     Committees through the regular reprogramming process.
       The conference agreement provides inflationary adjustments 
     to base funding levels for all broadcasting entities. Within 
     the amount provided, $1,000,000 shall be for Uighur language 
     broadcasting by Radio Free Asia. The BBG is directed to 
     provide an allocation plan for all available funding under 
     this account to the Committees within sixty days from the 
     enactment of this Act.


                          BROADCASTING TO CUBA

       The conference agreement includes $22,095,000, to remain 
     available until expended, for Broadcasting to Cuba under a 
     separate account as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment, instead of $22,806,000 within the total for 
     International Broadcasting Operations as proposed in the 
     House bill. The conference agreement does not include 
     language proposed in the Senate-reported amendment, providing 
     that funds may be used for aircraft to house television 
     broadcasting equipment. The House bill did not contain a 
     provision on this matter.


                   BROADCASTING CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

       The conference agreement includes $20,358,000 for the 
     Broadcasting Capital Improvements account, instead of 
     $18,358,000 as proposed in the House bill, and $31,075,000 as 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. The conference 
     agreement does not include language proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment making a specific amount under this 
     account available for the costs of overseas security 
     upgrades.
       The conference agreement includes, by reference, language 
     in the House report on digital development and conversion, 
     security upgrades, relocation of the Poro Point medium wave 
     transmitter, and the submission of a spending plan through 
     the reprogramming process. The conference agreement also 
     includes, by reference, language in the Senate report on the 
     notification of the Committees prior to the release of funds 
     for security upgrades.
       The BBG may propose through the reprogramming process to 
     allocate funds under this account for rotatable antennas, or 
     for other infrastructure improvements at the Greenville, NC, 
     transmitting station, as discussed in the Senate report.

       General Provisions--Department of State and Related Agency

       Section 401.--The conference agreement includes section 
     401, as proposed in the House bill, permitting use of funds 
     for allowances, differentials, and transportation. The 
     Senate-reported amendment included a similar provision with 
     minor technical differences related to the citation of 
     authorizing provisions.
       Sec. 402.--The conference agreement includes section 402, 
     as provided in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, dealing with transfer authority.
       Sec. 403.--The conference agreement includes section 403, 
     proposed as section 404 in both the House bill and the 
     Senate-reported amendment, prohibiting the use of funds by 
     the Department of State or the Broadcasting Board of 
     Governors (BBG) to provide certain types of assistance to the 
     Palestinian Broadcasting Corporation (PBC). The conference 
     agreement does not include training that supports accurate 
     and responsible broadcasting among the types of assistance 
     prohibited. The conferees agree that neither the Department 
     of State, nor the BBG, shall provide any assistance to the 
     PBC that could support restrictions of press freedoms or the 
     broadcasting of inaccurate, inflammatory messages. The 
     conferees further expect the Department and the BBG to submit 
     a report to the Committees, before December 15, 2000, 
     detailing any programs or activities involving the PBC in 
     fiscal year 2000, and any plans for such programs in fiscal 
     year 2001.
       Sec. 404.--The conference agreement includes section 404, 
     proposed as section 405 in the House bill, creating the 
     position of Deputy Secretary of State for Management and 
     Resources. The Senate-reported amendment did not include a 
     provision on this matter. The conference agreement adopts, by 
     reference, the guidance on this matter provided in the House 
     report under the ``Diplomatic and Consular Programs'' 
     account.
       Sec. 405.--The conference agreement includes section 405, 
     as proposed in the Senate bill, prohibiting the use of funds 
     made available in this Act by the United Nations for 
     activities authorizing the United Nations or any of its 
     specialized agencies or affiliated organizations to tax any 
     aspect of the Internet.
       Sec. 406.--The conference agreement includes section 407, 
     not included in either the House bill or the Senate-reported 
     amendment, extending authorities to provide protective 
     services to departing and incoming Secretaries of State.
       Sec. 407.--The conference agreement includes section 408, 
     not included in either the House bill or the Senate-reported 
     amendment, waiving provisions of existing legislation that 
     require authorizations to be in place for the State 
     Department and the Broadcasting Board of Governors prior to 
     the expenditure of any appropriated funds.

                       TITLE V--RELATED AGENCIES

                      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                        Maritime Administration


                       MARITIME SECURITY PROGRAM

       The conference agreement includes $98,700,000 for the 
     Maritime Security Program as proposed in both the House bill 
     and the Senate-reported amendment.


                        OPERATIONS AND TRAINING

       The conference agreement includes $86,910,000 for the 
     Maritime Administration Operations and Training account 
     instead of $84,799,000 as proposed in the House bill and 
     $80,240,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. 
     Within this amount, $47,236,000 shall be for the operation 
     and maintenance of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, 
     including $13,000,000 above base funding levels for further 
     deferred maintenance and renovation requirements as described 
     in the House report. The conferees adopt, by reference, 
     language in the House report regarding the submission of a 
     spending plan for this initiative.
       The conference agreement includes $7,473,000 for the State 
     Maritime Academies. Within the amount for State Maritime 
     Academies, $1,200,000 shall be for student incentive 
     payments, the same amount as provided in fiscal year 2000.
       The conference agreement also includes, by reference, 
     language in the House report

[[Page H12478]]

     on submission of a report on maritime education and training.


          MARITIME GUARANTEED LOAN (TITLE XI) PROGRAM ACCOUNT

       The conference agreement provides $30,000,000 in subsidy 
     appropriations for the Maritime Guaranteed Loan Program 
     instead of $10,621,000 as proposed in the House bill and 
     $20,221,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. The 
     conference agreement adopts the Senate approach of dropping a 
     limitation on the loan program level of not to exceed 
     $1,000,000,000. The House bill included this provision, which 
     has also been carried in previous years. MARAD shall not make 
     commitments exceeding $1,000,000,000 in fiscal year 2001, 
     including commitments made with appropriations from previous 
     fiscal years, without prior notification to the Committees in 
     accordance with section 605 reprogramming procedures.
       The conference agreement also includes an additional 
     $3,987,000 for administrative expenses associated with the 
     Maritime Guaranteed Loan Program instead of $3,795,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill, and $4,179,000 as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment. The amount for administrative 
     expenses may be transferred to and merged with amounts under 
     the MARAD Operations and Training account.
       MARAD has indicated to the Committees that it expects to 
     carry over approximately $10,000,000 in this account which 
     may be used as additional subsidy budget authority in fiscal 
     year 2001.


           ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--MARITIME ADMINISTRATION

       The conference agreement includes provisions, as proposed 
     in both the House bill and the Senate-reported amendment, 
     involving Government property controlled by MARAD, the 
     accounting for certain funds received by MARAD, and a 
     prohibition on obligations from the MARAD construction fund.

      Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement provides $490,000 for the 
     Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad, 
     as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment, instead of 
     $390,000 as proposed in the House bill.

                       Commission on Civil Rights


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $8,900,000 for the 
     salaries and expenses of the Commission on Civil Rights as 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment, instead of 
     $8,866,000 as proposed in the House bill.
       The conference agreement includes language allowing the 
     Chairperson to be reimbursed for 125 billable days, as 
     proposed in the House bill, and as carried in previous years. 
     The Senate-reported amendment included language limiting all 
     commissioners to not more than 75 billable days.

                       Commission on Ocean Policy


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $1,000,000 for the 
     Commission on Ocean Policy as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment, instead of no funding as proposed in the House 
     bill.

            Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $1,370,000 for the 
     Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe as proposed 
     in the Senate-reported amendment, instead of $1,182,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill.

  Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of China


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $500,000 for the 
     Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic 
     of China. Neither the House bill nor the Senate-reported 
     amendment included funding for this new Commission.

                Equal Employment Opportunity Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $303,864,000 for the 
     salaries and expenses of the Equal Employment Opportunity 
     Commission, instead of $290,928,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill, and $294,800,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment.
       Within the total amount, the conference agreement includes 
     $30,000,000 for payments to State and local Fair Employment 
     Practices Agencies (FEPAs) for specific services to the 
     Commission, instead of $29,000,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill, and $31,000,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment. The conference agreement includes, by reference, 
     language in the House report regarding submission of a 
     spending plan, reducing the backlog of private sector 
     charges, and utilizing the experience the FEPAs have in 
     mediation as the Commission implements its alternative 
     dispute resolution programs.

                   Federal Communications Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes a total of $230,000,000 
     for the salaries and expenses of the Federal Communications 
     Commission (FCC), instead of $207,909,000 as provided in the 
     House bill, and $237,188,000 as proposed in the Senate-
     reported amendment. Of the amounts provided, $200,146,000 is 
     to be derived from offsetting fee collections, as provided in 
     both the House bill and the Senate-reported amendment, 
     resulting in a net direct appropriation of $29,854,000, 
     instead of $7,763,000 included in the House bill, and 
     $37,042,000 included in the Senate-reported amendment. 
     Receipts in excess of $200,146,000 shall remain available 
     until expended but shall not be available for obligation 
     until October 1, 2001.
       The conference agreement directs the Commission to submit, 
     no later than December 15, 2000, a financial plan proposing a 
     distribution of all the funds in this account, subject to the 
     reprogramming requirements under section 605 of this Act.
       From within the funds provided, the FCC is urged to support 
     public safety, emergency preparedness and telecommunications 
     functions of the 2002 Olympic Winter Games.
       The Senate report included language on public broadcasting 
     stations' access to spectrum. The House included no similar 
     language. The FCC is examining this issue, which is also 
     pending in the Court of Appeals. The conference agreement 
     reflects the belief that this issue can be resolved through 
     the administrative or judicial process, so no legislative 
     action is required at this time. The Chairman of the FCC 
     should report to the House and Senate Committees on 
     Appropriations on any action the Commission takes on this 
     issue by April 1, 2001.
       The FCC shall take all actions necessary to complete the 
     processing of applications for licenses or other 
     authorizations for facilities that would provide services 
     covered by the Satellite Home Viewers Improvement Act (Public 
     Law 106-113, 113 Stat. 1501), specifically to deliver multi-
     channel video services including all local broadcast 
     television station signals and broadband services in unserved 
     and underserved local television markets by November 29, 
     2000, as required by Public Law 106-113, 113 Stat. 1501.
       The Senate report language with respect to a broadcast 
     industry code of conduct for the content of programming is 
     incorporated by reference.

                      Federal Maritime Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $15,500,000 for the 
     salaries and expenses of the Federal Maritime Commission, 
     instead of $14,097,000 as proposed in the House bill and 
     $16,222,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment.

                        Federal Trade Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes a total operating level 
     of $147,154,000 for the Federal Trade Commission, instead of 
     $134,807,000 as proposed in the House bill and $159,500,000 
     as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. The conference 
     agreement assumes that, of the amount provided, $145,254,000 
     will be derived from fees collected in fiscal year 2001 and 
     $1,900,000 will be derived from estimated unobligated fee 
     collections available from fiscal year 2000. These actions 
     result in a final appropriation of $0. Any use of remaining 
     unobligated fee collections from prior years are subject to 
     the reprogramming requirements outlined in section 605 of 
     this Act.
       The conference agreement adopts by reference the Senate 
     report language on slotting allowances, identity theft and 
     Internet fraud.
       Appropriations for both the Antitrust Division of the 
     Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission are 
     financed with Hart-Scott-Rodino Act pre-merger filing fees. 
     Section 630 of this Act modifies the Hart-Scott-Rodino Act to 
     establish a three-tiered fee structure that increases the 
     filing threshold for a merger transaction from $15,000,000 to 
     $50,000,000. Both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment included in the Federal Trade Commission's 
     appropriation language similar language to create a three 
     tiered fee structure and raise the filing threshold to 
     $35,000,000. It is anticipated that the increase in the 
     filing threshold will reduce the number of mergers requiring 
     review by approximately 50 percent. This should allow the 
     Commission to focus more resources on the review of complex 
     mergers and non-merger activities such as consumer 
     protection.

                       Legal Services Corporation


               PAYMENT TO THE LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

       The conference agreement includes $330,000,000 for the 
     payment to the Legal Services Corporation, instead of 
     $300,000,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment, 
     and $275,000,000 as proposed in the House bill. The 
     conference agreement provides $310,000,000 for grants to 
     basic field programs and independent audits, $10,800,000 for 
     management and administration, $2,200,000 for the Office of 
     Inspector General, and $7,000,000 for client self-help and 
     information technology. The conference agreement also 
     includes $31,625,000 for civil legal assistance under the 
     Violence Against Woman Act programs funded under Title I of 
     this Act. In addition, according to LSC-released statistics, 
     grantees received over $605,000,000 of funding during 1999.
       Within the amounts provided for management and 
     administration, the Corporation is expected to hire at least 
     seven investigators for the Compliance and Enforcement 
     Division to investigate field grantees' compliance with the 
     regulations grantees agreed to abide by when accepting 
     Federal funding.
       The conference agreement adopts by reference the House 
     report language on class

[[Page H12479]]

     action suits and the Senate report language on travel.


          ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION--LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

       The conference agreement includes language to continue the 
     terms and conditions included under this section in the 
     fiscal year 2000 Act, as proposed in both the House bill and 
     the Senate-reported amendment.

                        Marine Mammal Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $1,700,000 for the 
     salaries and expenses of the Marine Mammal Commission, as 
     proposed in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment.

                   Securities and Exchange Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement includes $422,800,000 for the 
     Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), instead of 
     $392,624,000 as proposed in the House bill and $489,652,000 
     as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. The conference 
     agreement includes bill language appropriating separate 
     amounts from offsetting fee collections from fiscal years 
     1999 and 2001, as proposed in both the House bill and the 
     Senate-reported amendment. The conference agreement 
     appropriates $295,000,000 from fees collected in fiscal year 
     1999, and $127,800,000 from fees to be collected in fiscal 
     year 2001.
       The conference agreement provides for the Commission's 
     adjustments to base and requested program increases for 
     additional staff, information systems, and a special pay 
     rate. Within the increased funding provided for information 
     systems, the Commission shall identify $2,000,000 for 
     additional information systems support to help investigate 
     and prosecute Internet fraud cases, as described in the 
     Senate report. The conference agreement does not include 
     language in Title VI of this Act, nor additional funding 
     above the request under this heading, as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment, for the exemption of the SEC from 
     Federal pay regulations.
       Any offsetting fee collections in fiscal year 2001 in 
     excess of $127,800,000 will remain available for the 
     Securities and Exchange Commission in future years through 
     the regular appropriations process.
       The conference agreement includes, by reference, language 
     in the Senate report on the Office of Economic Analysis, the 
     implementation of a new fee collection system, 
     recommendations for increased civil penalties, and the need 
     to educate investors regarding Internet securities fraud.

                     Small Business Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement provides an appropriation of 
     $331,635,000 for the Small Business Administration (SBA) 
     Salaries and Expenses account, instead of $304,094,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill and $143,475,000 as proposed in 
     the Senate-reported amendment. The conference agreement does 
     not split funding for non-credit business assistance programs 
     into a separate account, as proposed in the budget request 
     and the Senate-reported amendment, but rather includes 
     funding for such programs under this account.
       In addition, the conference agreement includes $37,000,000 
     for programs related to the New Markets Venture Capital 
     Program subject to the authorization of that program, 
     including $7,000,000 for BusinessLINC and $30,000,000 for 
     technical assistance.
       The conference agreement includes language, as proposed in 
     the Senate-reported amendment, allowing SBA to use five 
     percent, or not to exceed $3,000,000, of increased 
     collections of delinquent non-tax debt to reimburse for 
     qualified expenses of such collections. The House bill did 
     not contain language on this matter.
       In addition to amounts made available under this heading, 
     the conference agreement includes $129,000,000 for 
     administrative expenses under the Business Loans Program 
     account. This amount is transferred to and merged with 
     amounts available under Salaries and Expenses. The conference 
     agreement also includes an additional $108,354,000 for 
     administrative expenses under the Disaster Loans Program 
     account, which may under certain conditions be transferred to 
     and merged with amounts available under Salaries and 
     Expenses. These conditions are described under the Disaster 
     Loans Program account.
       The conference agreement provides a total of $166,541,000 
     for SBA's regular operating expenses under this account. This 
     amount includes $2,000,000 for expenses of the HUBZone 
     program, and $8,000,000 for systems modernization initiatives 
     to continue the improvement of SBA's management and oversight 
     of its loan portfolio. This amount also includes $2,000,000 
     to assist the SBA in transforming its workforce to meet 
     changes in the way its programs are carried out. The SBA 
     shall submit a plan, prior to the expenditure of resources 
     provided for systems modernization and workforce 
     transformation, in accordance with section 605 of this Act.
       The conference agreement includes the following amounts for 
     non-credit programs:

Small Business Development Centers..........................$88,000,000
7(j) Technical Assistance.....................................3,600,000
Microloan Technical Assistance...............................20,000,000
SCORE.........................................................3,750,000
Business Information Centers....................................500,000
Women's Business Centers.....................................12,000,000
Survey of Women-Owned Businesses................................694,000
National Women's Business Council...............................750,000
One Stop Capital Shops........................................3,100,000
US Export Assistance Centers..................................3,100,000
Advocacy Research.............................................1,100,000
National Veterans Business Development Corp...................4,000,000
SBIR Rural Outreach Program...................................5,000,000
ProNet..........................................................500,000
Drug-free Workplace Grants....................................3,500,000
PRIME........................................................15,000,000
New Markets Technical Assistance.............................30,000,000
BusinessLINC..................................................7,000,000
Regulatory Fairness Boards......................................500,000
                                                       ________________
                                                       
    Total...................................................202,094,000

       Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs).--Of the amounts 
     provided for SBDCs, the conference agreement includes 
     $2,000,000 to continue the SBDC Defense transition program, 
     and $1,000,000 to continue the Environmental Compliance 
     Project, as directed in the House report. In addition, the 
     conference agreement includes language, similar to that 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment under ``Non-Credit 
     Business Assistance Programs'' making funds for the SBDC 
     program available for two years.
       National Veterans Business Development Corporation.--The 
     conference agreement includes language, as proposed in the 
     House bill, designating $4,000,000 for the National Veterans 
     Business Development Corporation. The Senate-reported 
     amendment did not include a provision on this matter, but 
     Senate report language designated $4,000,000 for the same 
     purpose.
       Microloan Technical Assistance.--The conference agreement 
     includes $20,000,000 for the Microloan Technical Assistance 
     program. Should savings occur during fiscal year 2001 in this 
     account, the SBA may propose to allocate an additional amount 
     for the Microloan Technical Assistance program through the 
     regular reprogramming process. The SBA was unable to obligate 
     approximately $3,500,000 allocated to this program in fiscal 
     year 2000, which was transferred to the Business Loans 
     Program account.
       The conference agreement adopts language included in the 
     House report directing the SBA to fully fund LowDoc 
     Processing Centers, and to continue activities assisting 
     small businesses to adapt to a paperless procurement 
     environment.


                NON-CREDIT BUSINESS ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

       The conference agreement adopts the approach in the House 
     bill of not including funding under a separate heading for 
     the non-credit business assistance programs of the SBA. 
     Instead, funding for these programs is included under 
     ``Salaries and Expenses'', as in previous years. The Senate-
     reported amendment included $153,690,000 for such programs 
     under this separate account.


                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

       The conference agreement provides $11,953,000 for the SBA 
     Office of Inspector General, instead of $10,905,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill and $13,000,000 as proposed in the 
     Senate-reported amendment.
       An additional $500,000 has been provided under the 
     administrative expenses of the Disaster Loans Program account 
     to be made available to the Office of Inspector General for 
     work associated with oversight of the Disaster Loans Program. 
     The conference agreement does not include direction provided 
     in the Senate report.


                     BUSINESS LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

       The conference agreement includes $294,410,000 under the 
     SBA Business Loans Program Account, instead of $269,300,000 
     as proposed in the House bill, and $296,200,000 as proposed 
     in the Senate-reported amendment. The conference agreement 
     includes language, as proposed in the House bill, making 
     $45,000,000 of the amount included for guaranteed loans 
     available for two fiscal years. The Senate-reported amendment 
     did not contain a similar provision. Within the amount 
     provided, $22,000,000 shall be available only for the New 
     Markets Venture Capital Program, subject to the enactment of 
     authorizing legislation in fiscal year 2001.
       The conference agreement includes $2,250,000 for the costs 
     of direct loans, instead of $2,500,000 as proposed in the 
     House bill and $2,600,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment. The conferees understand that $300,000 in 
     carryover is available for the Microloan Direct Loan Program, 
     and, together with the appropriated amount, will support an 
     estimated fiscal year 2001 program level of over $28,400,000.
       Not including the funding provided for the New Markets 
     Venture Capital Program, the conference agreement includes 
     $141,160,000 for the costs of guaranteed loans, including the 
     following programs:
       7(a) General Business Loans.--The conference agreement 
     provides $114,960,000 in subsidy appropriations for the 7(a) 
     general business guaranteed loan program, instead of 
     $114,500,000 as proposed in the House bill and $134,000,000 
     as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment. When combined 
     with an estimated $14,000,000 in available carryover balances 
     and recoveries, this amount will subsidize an estimated 
     fiscal year 2001 program level of up to $10,400,000,000, 
     assuming a

[[Page H12480]]

     subsidy rate of 1.24%. In addition, the conference agreement 
     includes a provision, as proposed in both the House bill and 
     the Senate-reported amendment, requiring the SBA to notify 
     the Committees in accordance with section 605 of this Act 
     prior to providing a total program level greater than 
     $10,000,000,000.
       Small Business Investment Companies (SBIC).--The conference 
     agreement provides $26,200,000 for the SBIC participating 
     securities program as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment, instead of $23,300,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill. This amount will result in an estimated total program 
     level of $2,000,000,000 in fiscal year 2001. No appropriation 
     is required for the SBIC debentures program, as the program 
     will operate with a zero subsidy rate in fiscal year 2001.
       The conference agreement includes required language, as 
     proposed in the House bill, limiting the 504 CDC and the SBIC 
     debentures program levels, instead of similar language in the 
     Senate-reported amendment.
       In addition, the conference agreement includes $129,000,000 
     for administrative expenses to carry out the direct and 
     guaranteed loan programs as proposed in the House bill, 
     instead of $130,800,000 as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment, and makes such funds available to be transferred 
     to and merged with appropriations for Salaries and Expenses.


                     DISASTER LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

       The conference agreement includes a total of $184,494,000 
     for this account, of which $76,140,000 is for the subsidy 
     costs for disaster loans and $108,354,000 is for 
     administrative expenses associated with the disaster loans 
     program. The House bill proposed $140,400,000 for loans and 
     $136,000,000 for administrative expenses. The Senate-reported 
     amendment provided $142,100,000 for loans and $139,000,000 
     for administrative expenses.
       For disaster loans, the conference agreement assumes that 
     the $76,140,000 subsidy appropriation, when combined with 
     $71,000,000 in carryover balances and $10,000,000 in 
     recoveries, will provide a total disaster loan program level 
     of $900,000,000.
       The conference agreement includes language, as proposed in 
     the House bill, designating amounts for direct and indirect 
     administrative expenses, and allowing appropriations for 
     indirect administrative costs to be transferred to and merged 
     with appropriations for Salaries and Expenses under certain 
     conditions. The conference agreement includes $98,000,000 for 
     direct administrative expenses instead of $125,646,000 as 
     proposed in the House bill, and $9,854,000 for indirect 
     administrative expenses as proposed in the House bill. The 
     amount provided for direct administrative expenses, when 
     combined with an estimated $26,000,000 in carryover balances, 
     will provide the requested level for this activity. The 
     conference agreement includes a provision that any amount in 
     excess of $9,854,000 to be transferred to Salaries and 
     Expenses from the Disaster Loans Program account for indirect 
     administrative expenses shall be treated as a reprogramming 
     of funds under section 605 of this Act, as proposed in the 
     House bill. In addition, any such reprogramming shall be 
     accompanied by a report from the Administrator on the 
     anticipated effect of the proposed transfer on the ability of 
     the SBA to cover the full annual requirements for direct 
     administrative costs of disaster loan-making and -servicing.
       Of the amounts provided for administrative expenses under 
     this heading, $500,000 is to be transferred to and merged 
     with the Office of Inspector General account for oversight 
     and audit activities related to the Disaster Loans program.


        ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION--SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

       The conference agreement includes a provision providing SBA 
     with the authority to transfer funds between appropriations 
     accounts as proposed in the House bill, instead of a similar 
     provision in the Senate-reported amendment.

                        State Justice Institute


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

       The conference agreement provides $6,850,000 for the State 
     Justice Institute as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment, instead of $4,500,000 as proposed in the House 
     bill. The conference agreement does not include the transfer 
     of an additional $8,000,000 to this account from the Courts 
     of Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial Services 
     account in Title III as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment.

                      TITLE VI--GENERAL PROVISIONS

       The conference agreement includes the following general 
     provisions:
       Sec. 601.--The conference agreement includes section 601, 
     identical in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, regarding the use of appropriations for publicity 
     or propaganda purposes.
       Sec. 602.--The conference agreement includes section 602, 
     identical in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, regarding the availability of appropriations for 
     obligation beyond the current fiscal year.
       Sec. 603.--The conference agreement includes section 603, 
     identical in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, regarding the use of funds for consulting 
     services.
       Sec. 604.--The conference agreement includes section 604, 
     as proposed in the House bill, providing that should any 
     provision of the Act be held to be invalid, the remainder of 
     the Act would not be affected. The Senate-reported amendment 
     did not include this provision, which has been carried in 
     previous years.
       Sec. 605.--The conference agreement includes section 605, 
     as included in the Senate-reported amendment, establishing 
     the policy by which funding available to the agencies funded 
     under this Act may be reprogrammed for other purposes, 
     instead of the version in the House bill which contained 
     minor differences.
       Sec. 606.--The conference agreement includes section 606, 
     identical in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, regarding the construction, repair or modification 
     of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration vessels in 
     overseas shipyards.
       Sec. 607.--The conference agreement includes section 607, 
     as proposed in the House bill, regarding the purchase of 
     American-made products. The Senate-reported amendment did not 
     include this provision, which has been carried in previous 
     years.
       Sec. 608.--The conference agreement includes section 608, 
     identical in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, which prohibits funds in the bill from being used 
     to implement, administer, or enforce any guidelines of the 
     Equal Employment Opportunity Commission similar to proposed 
     guidelines covering harassment based on religion published by 
     the EEOC in October, 1993.
       Sec. 609.--The conference agreement includes section 609, 
     as proposed in the House bill, prohibiting the use of funds 
     for any United Nations peacekeeping mission that involves 
     U.S. Armed Forces under the command or operational control of 
     a foreign national, unless the President certifies that the 
     involvement is in the national security interest. The Senate-
     reported amendment did not contain a provision on this 
     matter.
       Sec. 610.--The conference agreement includes section 610, 
     identical to the House bill and section 609 in the Senate-
     reported amendment, that prohibits use of funds to expand the 
     U.S. diplomatic presence in Vietnam beyond the level in 
     effect on July 11, 1995, unless the President makes a 
     certification that several conditions have been met regarding 
     Vietnam's cooperation with the United States on POW/MIA 
     issues.
       Sec. 611.--The conference agreement includes section 611, 
     as proposed in the House bill, which prohibits the use of 
     funds to provide certain amenities for Federal prisoners. The 
     Senate-reported amendment included a similar provision as 
     section 612, but proposed to make the prohibition permanent.
       Sec. 612.--The conference agreement includes section 612, 
     as proposed in the House bill, restricting the use of funds 
     provided under the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
     Administration for fleet modernization activities. The 
     Senate-reported amendment did not contain a provision on this 
     matter.
       Sec. 613.--The conference agreement includes section 613, 
     identical in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, which requires agencies and departments funded in 
     this Act to absorb any necessary costs related to downsizing 
     or consolidations within the amounts provided to the agency 
     or department.
       Sec. 614.--The conference agreement includes section 614, 
     as proposed in the Senate-reported amendment, which 
     permanently prohibits funds made available to the Federal 
     Bureau of Prisons from being used to make available any 
     commercially published information or material that is 
     sexually explicit or features nudity to a prisoner. The House 
     bill included a similar provision as section 614, but did not 
     propose to make the prohibition permanent.
       Sec. 615.--The conference agreement includes section 615, 
     as proposed in the House bill, which limits funding under the 
     Local Law Enforcement Block Grant to 90 percent to an entity 
     that does not provide public safety officers injured in the 
     line of duty, and as a result separated or retired from their 
     jobs, with health insurance benefits equal to the insurance 
     they received while on duty. The Senate-reported amendment 
     did not include a similar provision.
       Sec. 616.--The conference agreement includes section 616, 
     as proposed in the House bill, which prohibits funds provided 
     in this Act from being used to promote the sale or export of 
     tobacco or tobacco products, or to seek the reduction or 
     removal of foreign restrictions on the marketing of tobacco 
     products, provided such restrictions are applied equally to 
     all tobacco or tobacco products of the same type. This 
     provision is not intended to impact routine international 
     trade services provided to all U.S. citizens, including the 
     processing of applications to establish foreign trade zones. 
     The Senate-reported amendment did not contain a provision on 
     this matter.
       Sec. 617.--The conference agreement includes section 617, 
     modified from language proposed as section 615 in the Senate-
     reported amendment, which extends the prohibition in last 
     year's bill on use of funds to issue a visa to any alien 
     involved in extrajudicial and political killings in Haiti. 
     The provision also adds eight individuals to the list of 
     victims, and extends the exemption and reporting requirements 
     from last year's provision. The House bill did not contain a 
     provision on this matter.
       Sec. 618.--The conference agreement includes section 618, 
     identical, but proposed as section 617 in the House bill and 
     section 616 in the Senate-reported amendment, which

[[Page H12481]]

     prohibits a user fee from being charged for background checks 
     conducted pursuant to the Brady Handgun Control Act of 1993, 
     and prohibits implementation of a background check system 
     which does not require or result in destruction of certain 
     information.
       Sec. 619.--The conference agreement includes section 619, 
     modified from language proposed as section 618 in the House 
     bill and section 619 in the Senate-reported amendment, which 
     delays obligation of any receipts deposited or available in 
     the Crime Victims Fund in excess of $537,500,000 until the 
     following fiscal year. The conferees have taken this action 
     to protect against wide fluctuations in receipts into the 
     Fund, and to ensure that a stable level of funding will 
     remain available for these programs in future years.
       Sec. 620.--The conference agreement includes section 620, 
     proposed as section 619 in the House bill, which prohibits 
     the use of Department of Justice funds for programs which 
     discriminate against, denigrate, or otherwise undermine the 
     religious beliefs of students participating in such programs. 
     The Senate-reported amendment did not contain a provision on 
     this matter.
       Sec. 621.--The conference agreement includes section 621, 
     identical in both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment, but proposed as section 620 in the House bill, 
     which prohibits the use of funds to process visas for 
     citizens of countries that the Attorney General has 
     determined deny or delay accepting the return of deported 
     citizens.
       Sec. 622.--The conference agreement includes section 622, 
     proposed as section 621 in the House bill, which prohibits 
     the use of Department of Justice funds to transport a maximum 
     or high security prisoner to any facility other than to a 
     facility certified by the Bureau of Prisons as appropriately 
     secure to house such a prisoner. The Senate-reported 
     amendment did not contain a similar provision.
       Sec. 623.--The conference agreement includes section 623, 
     modified from language proposed as section 622 in the House 
     bill, regarding the Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change. The 
     Senate-reported amendment did not include a provision on this 
     matter. The conference agreement does not adopt the report 
     language contained in the House report.
       Sec. 624.--The conference agreement includes section 624, 
     modified from language proposed as section 623 in the House 
     bill, which prohibits funds from being used for the 
     participation of United States delegates to the Standing 
     Consultative Commission unless the President submits a 
     certification that the U.S. Government is not implementing a 
     1997 memorandum of understanding regarding the 1972 Anti-
     Ballistic Missile Treaty between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R., 
     or the Senate ratifies the memorandum of understanding. The 
     Senate-reported amendment did not include a provision on this 
     matter.
       Sec. 625.--The conference agreement includes section 625, 
     proposed as section 624 in the House bill, which prohibits 
     the use of funds for the State Department to approve the 
     purchase of property in Arlington, Virginia, by the Xinhua 
     News Agency. The Senate-reported amendment did not include a 
     provision on this matter.
       Sec. 626.--The conference agreement includes section 626, 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment as section 623, 
     amending existing law related to certain medical costs to 
     apply to suspects in the custody of the Federal Bureau of 
     Investigation. The House bill did not include a provision on 
     this matter.
       Sec. 627.--The conference agreement includes section 627, 
     proposed in the Senate-reported amendment as section 624, 
     amending a fiscal year 1999 supplemental appropriations 
     provision to permanently extend the time period in which 
     certain takings of Cook Inlet Beluga Whales would be 
     considered violations of the Marine Mammal Protection Act. 
     The House bill did not include a provision on this matter.
       Sec. 628.--The conference agreement includes section 628, 
     modified from language proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment as section 625, amending Public Law 106-113 to 
     extend the authorization for Pacific Salmon Treaty and 
     Recovery efforts. The House bill did not include a provision 
     on these matters.
       Sec. 629.--The conference agreement includes a new section 
     629, to clarify the Interstate Horseracing Act regarding 
     certain pari-mutuel wagers.
       Sec. 630.--The conference agreement includes a new section 
     630, which modifies existing law to include a three-tiered 
     Hart-Scott-Rodino fee structure that increases the filing 
     threshold for a merger transaction from $15,000,000 to 
     $50,000,000. Similar language was included under the 
     ``Federal Trade Commission, Salaries and Expenses'' heading 
     in Title V of both the House bill and the Senate-reported 
     amendment.
       Sec. 631.--The conference agreement includes a new section 
     631, authorizing the stabilization and renovation of a 
     certain lock and dam.
       Sec. 632.--The conference agreement includes a new section 
     632, requiring the Federal Communications Commission to take 
     certain actions regarding Low-Power FM regulations.
       Sec. 633.--The conference agreement includes a new section 
     633, providing additional amounts for the Small Business 
     Administration, Salaries and Expenses account for a number of 
     small business initiatives.
       Sec. 634.--The conference agreement includes a new section 
     634, prohibiting the use of funds in this, or any previous 
     Act, or hereinafter made available to the Department of 
     Commerce, to allow fishing vessels to use aircraft to assist 
     in the fishing of Atlantic bluefin tuna.

                         TITLE VII--RESCISSIONS

                         DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

                    Drug Enforcement Administration


                   DRUG DIVERSION CONTROL FEE ACCOUNT

                              (RESCISSION)

       The conference agreement includes a rescission of 
     $8,000,000 from the amounts otherwise available for 
     obligation in fiscal year 2001 for the ``Drug Diversion 
     Control Fee Account'', as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment. The House bill did not include a rescission from 
     this account.

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                        Maritime Administration


          MARITIME GUARANTEED LOAN (TITLE XI) PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                              (RESCISSION)

       The conference agreement includes a rescission of 
     $7,644,000 from unobligated balances under this heading, as 
     proposed in the House bill. The Senate-reported amendment did 
     not include a rescission from this account.
       The conference agreement does not include a title providing 
     contingent emergency funds for a ``Southwest Border 
     Initiative'' for certain Department of Justice and Federal 
     Judiciary accounts, as proposed in the Senate-reported 
     amendment.
       These needs are instead addressed in the regular accounts 
     for such programs in Title I and Title III of this Act.

                       TITLE VIII--DEBT REDUCTION

                         DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY

                       Bureau of the Public Debt

      Gifts to the United States for Reduction of the Public Debt

       The conference agreement includes a new title depositing an 
     additional amount in fiscal year 2001 into the account 
     established under 31 U.S.C. section 3113(d), to reduce the 
     public debt.

           TITLE IX--WILDLIFE, OCEAN AND COASTAL CONSERVATION

       Secs. 901-902.--The conference agreement includes 
     $50,000,000 for formula grants to the States for wildlife 
     conservation and restoration programs. Funding is provided 
     through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the Department 
     of Interior. This amount is in addition to funds provided for 
     new, competitively awarded and cost-shared wildlife programs 
     in the FY 2001 Interior Appropriations Act. This action 
     recognizes wildlife conservation as a critical component of a 
     nationwide strategy and supports state efforts in wildlife 
     conservation and restoration. The conference agreement 
     includes authorization language for this program.
       Funding has been provided for the development, revision, 
     and implementation of wildlife conservation and restoration 
     programs and plans to address the unmet needs for a diverse 
     array of wildlife and associated habitats. Funds provided to 
     states or territories may be used for planning and 
     implementation of wildlife conservation programs and 
     conservation strategies, including wildlife conservation, 
     wildlife conservation education, and wildlife-associated 
     recreation projects, for new programs and projects as well as 
     to enhance existing programs and projects.
       Each state's apportionment is determined by formula which 
     considers the total area of the state (1/3 of the formula) 
     and the population (2/3 of the formula). No state will 
     receive an amount that is less than one percent of the amount 
     available or more than five percent for any fiscal year. 
     Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia each receive a sum 
     equal to not more than one-half of one percent and Guam, the 
     Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the Northern Mariana 
     Islands each receive a sum equal to not more than one-fourth 
     of one percent. The conference agreement requires States and 
     other jurisdiction to have or agree to develop a wildlife 
     conservation strategy and plan as a condition for receiving a 
     federal grant under this program.
       Sec. 903.--The conference agreement includes language 
     authorizing a coastal impact assistance program for fiscal 
     year 2001.

                                TITLE X

       The conference agreement includes a new title X to 
     authorize loan guarantees in order to facilitate access to 
     local television broadcast signals in unserved and 
     underserved areas, and for other purposes.

                                TITLE XI

       The conference agreement includes a new title XI, the Legal 
     Immigration Family Equity Act.

                   CONFERENCE TOTAL--WITH COMPARISONS

       The total new budget (obligational) authority for the 
     fiscal year 2001 recommended by the Committee of Conference, 
     with comparisons to the fiscal year 2000 amount, the 2001 
     budget estimates, and the House and Senate bills for 2001 
     follow:

                       [In thousands of dollars]

New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 2000.......$39,600,967

[[Page H12482]]

Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority, fiscal year50,932,968
House bill, fiscal year 2001.................................37,394,617
Senate bill, fiscal year 2001................................36,689,955
Conference agreement, fiscal year 2001.......................39,868,390
Conference agreement compared with:
  New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 2000........+267,423
  Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority, fiscal y-11,064,578
  House bill, fiscal year 2001...............................+2,473,773
  Senate bill, fiscal year 2001..............................+3,178,435

  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, I know that Members are anxious to leave, but 
we have one Member of this institution who is leaving for good. I feel 
that we are all going to miss him. I think he has a right to say to the 
House whatever is in his heart in this his last day of service in this 
institution.
  I yield 10 minutes to the distinguished gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. 
Minge), who has served his district and his country very well in the 
years that he has been in this institution.
  Mr. MINGE. Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague from Wisconsin for 
yielding me this time.
  Almost 8 years ago, I first addressed this body. Today I speak on the 
floor for what may be the last time. As has everyone in this House, I 
have been elected by folks at home to represent them in this, the 
people's Chamber. It is an honor. It is a privilege. I participated in 
the 103rd Congress when the Democrats controlled both Chambers and the 
White House. I served in the 104th, the 105th, and the 106th Congresses 
with Republican majorities and a Democrat in the White House. I have 
seen bitter party differences and shared the frustration of stalemate 
and even shutdown. However, I have also felt the occasional sense of 
cooperation and accomplishment. I do not wish to review the score card 
of this game of power over the last 8 years. Rather, I wish to speak to 
the challenges that Congress and America face in the years to come.

                              {time}  1730

  First, for the health and perhaps for the survival of our system of 
government, we must rehabilitate the way we finance political 
campaigns. I recognize we will never achieve perfection in campaign 
finance reform. Money always will undoubtedly be the most seamy side of 
politics. However, right now we face a veritable political hell. The 
insidious effect of raising money on policy and even process is tearing 
at the integrity of our system. By most accounts, over $3 billion has 
been spent on the year 2000 elections. And what has all this money 
brought us? It has spawned national cynicism, public despair and 
increasing apathy among voters. We must have a fix for this process.
  Unless good government groups like the League of Women Voters, Common 
Cause, Public Citizen and others have confidence that we are sincerely 
doing the best we can to enact reforms, our institutions will suffer.
  In 1993, as a new Member of Congress, I was asked by an interviewer 
from a religious radio station what I thought was the most important 
problem facing our country. Despite our preoccupation with health care, 
the deficit, family values, and other matters, I said campaign finance 
reform. It goes to the heart of the democratic process.
  Second, our national and global economies are becoming increasingly 
concentrated. Fewer and fewer businesses dominate more and more sectors 
of the economy. This threatens our ability to maintain a free market 
system, the cornerstone of our economy. Antitrust laws and their 
enforcement are controversial. However, if we do not maintain a 
commitment to the principle of competition, the dynamics of a vibrant 
marketplace will be eroded.
  All of us have heard promises of savings but also read about the loss 
of jobs and endless disappointments with mergers. Congress holds one of 
the keys to enforcement of the principles of competition. Antitrust, 
fair trade, regulated industries, deregulation, route awarding 
guidelines, intellectual property, government trade and government 
contracts and numerous other areas are contributing components to a 
competition policy. Consumers, suppliers, and small businesses, 
including farmers, are at risk in the long-term if we are not more 
vigilant.
  Third, just as private sector concentration creates problems, 
unchecked power in government is a threat to the well-being of our 
society. The perceived problems of a national health care system 
resulted in health insurance companies and others raising the specter 
of runaway government power.
  Fairness, lack of effective competition and stifling of new ideas are 
problems. The unjust regional disparities in Federal health care 
financing are an example of a continuing and unjust feature of the 
massive Medicare program. A free society, like a free economy, is 
threatened by too great a concentration of power in any entity. 
Countervailing forces are needed.
  Our challenge in Congress is to structure public programs so such 
countervailing forces exist without destroying the effectiveness of the 
programs. Built-in checks are necessary for the long-term effectiveness 
and fairness of government programs.
  This problem of power in government extends to elected officials and 
legislative bodies. Early on, we developed a tradition, now a 
constitutional rule, that Presidents cannot serve more than two 
consecutive terms. Like the executive, the legislative branch can have 
problems of concentration of power that must be addressed. The term 
limit movement grew out of the unhappiness of many opponents to 40 
years of Democrat majorities in Congress and the seniority system. The 
3-year term limit on committee chairs currently in effect in the House 
is an effort to break up the legislative power. This effort should not 
be abandoned.
  Fourth, we must better address the fundamental problem of the 
difficulty of reforming public programs under current legislative 
procedures. It takes enormous efforts to pass legislation with a 
bicameral legislative branch, a complex committee system, Senate holds, 
the filibuster, a Presidential veto, and often politically divided 
leadership. Once created, programs are even more difficult to reform. 
Virtual consensus is needed. The low visibility of most reforms makes 
them less than exciting and makes it very difficult to attract the 
national attention and the public support needed for their adoption.
  Efforts to give agencies discretion to reform themselves through 
rulemaking is not adequate. Nor are judicial review or 5-year 
reauthorizing bills effective.
  The result is that, once created, Federal programs tend to be on 
automatic pilot. For programs to work effectively, Congress needs to 
craft a better framework for encouraging needed structural changes. The 
Federal Government's far flung activities and programs have become too 
significant a part of our Nation's economy to be hobbled with this 
handicap. The process for consideration of reform legislation should be 
simplified or quasi-independent status like the Postal Service should 
be considered for more operations.

  Fifth and finally, we need to constantly recommit ourselves to 
maintaining respect for one another. The bitter divides in Northern 
Ireland, in the Balkans, in the Middle East, in Africa, and in the 
Indian subcontinent are examples of how supposedly self-governing 
societies are consumed and can be destroyed by internal animosities.
  The 1990s have been a turbulent and all too often bitter time here in 
Congress. We cannot allow our all too genetic predisposition for pride, 
animosity, jealousy and bickering to destroy us and our institutions. 
We must allow the healing process to work. Respect and trust must be 
constantly nourished. Competition, self-righteousness, negative zeal, 
political campaigns and partisanship constantly drags us back into 
bitter disagreements, often unnecessarily.
  Testosterone routinely trumps conciliation. Healthy disagreement and 
a loyal opposition cannot be allowed to degenerate and destroy working 
relationships. Hopefully it will not take an external enemy to unite 
us. We must rise above our differences.
  Every day I have walked over to this Capitol, seen the dome, and 
realized that this is where our Nation's elective representatives meet, 
deliberate and make decisions, I am awed. I have

[[Page H12483]]

pinched myself that I am here. I urge that we in Congress never allow 
ourselves to forget that we have a stewardship responsibility for the 
survival of our political institutions.
  Self-governance and personal freedom are the core principles that we 
as Americans often take for granted. Our 220-year-old system of broad-
based self-governance and individual rights is the longest running 
democracy in the history of our civilization and perhaps the history of 
mankind.
  It is fragile. It is dependent on the trust of our people and our 
institutions, and we as political leaders must renew the process. We 
must make it work. We have a stewardship obligation to our children, 
grandchildren and future generations to enrich and strengthen this 
grand experiment and pass it on strong and intact.
  This will be our generation's greatest success. We cannot afford to 
fail.
  I appreciate the opportunity to serve with my colleagues. I am 
honored and humbled to have been elected by a free people. I wish 
success for the work of the 107th Congress. I hope and pray this body 
and our system of self-governance and our freedoms continue for 
countless generations to come.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I inquire of the Chair how much time remains 
on both sides.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Pease). The gentleman from Illinois (Mr. 
Porter) has 30 minutes remaining. The gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. 
Obey) has 21 minutes remaining.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2\1/2\ minutes to the distinguished 
gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. Frank).
  Mr. FRANK of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the 
consideration of my friend, the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Obey), 
and the consideration from the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Porter).
  Mr. Speaker, I want to express my appreciation to the Members of the 
Committee on Appropriations who worked so hard given the unfortunate 
context which was created through no fault of theirs, and there is a 
great deal in this bill that I admire. Indeed it is to some extent a 
pleasant surprise in some respects. But there is one aspect which 
disappointments me greatly, and I feel the need to comment on it.
  In 1996, again as part of an overall appropriations bill, this House 
passed an immigration bill which included one of the cruelest, most 
unfair provisions this Congress has legislated in my memory. It was one 
which retroactively subjected people who had committed minor crimes 
mandatorily to deportation. In the ensuing years, its implementation 
has ruined families; it has destroyed lives; it has inflicted on 
innocent children more pain than almost any other single act I can 
think of in a concentrated way. People who were the age of 18 or 19 or 
20 who committed a minor offense and who had turned their lives around 
and had become responsible members of their community, responsible 
parents, have found themselves ripped from the communities where they 
have been living, ripped from their families and sent back.
  We worked, those of us on the Committee on the Judiciary, in a 
bipartisan way to try to deal with that.
  The gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Hyde), the chairman of the Committee 
on the Judiciary; the gentleman from Florida (Mr. McCollum); and I and 
others worked and put together a bipartisan bill to relieve some, 
albeit not all, of the damage that bill does to people and it went 
through this House unanimously. It went to the other body, and we had 
hoped, given the difficulty that sometimes occurs there of getting 
separate legislation passed, that it would be included in this final 
bill, just as the bill that was seeking to amend had been included in 
this final bill.
  We had agreement from the White House. We had, as I said, Republican 
and Democratic support here. At the last minute, the negotiations to 
include that vital humanitarian measure, supported by many Members of 
both sides of the aisle, was killed by the objection of the senior 
Senator from Texas. I do not think we have seen more cruelty inflicted 
on well-intentioned and well-behaved people than by that act.
  So while I congratulate the Committee on Appropriations for the work 
they have done on the appropriations, I do have to note that a stunning 
piece of cruelty is left uncorrected by this bill.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 4 minutes to the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Goodling), the chairman of the Committee on Education 
and the Workforce.
  (Mr. GOODLING asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. GOODLING. Mr. Speaker, how sad I would have been if on my last 
day, after 26 years in this Congress, I would not have had an 
opportunity to vote on this legislation. I certainly want to thank the 
gentleman from Florida (Chairman Young) and the gentleman from Illinois 
(Chairman Porter) and the ranking member, the gentleman from Wisconsin 
(Mr. Obey), for giving me that opportunity.
  As I have said many times, priorities are very important when we talk 
about funding, and for many years I asked us to please think about 
children with special needs and I am happy to say that in the last 5 
years, after the President signs this legislation, they will have 
increased spending 175 percent in the areas of IDEA. What that means to 
local school districts is the fact that they can do the modernization 
and the renovation; they can reduce class size; they can do all sorts 
of things, if they have that kind of money.
  I want to thank them also for including funding increases for Even 
Start and including the Literacy That Involves Families Together Act in 
the conference report.

                              {time}  1745

  All of the reports that we have at this point show that teaching 
parents literacy and parents skills so they can be their child's first 
and most important teacher has improved their opportunity greatly to 
succeed.
  I am also happy to report that under this proposal, we have worked 
out an agreement on renovation. I still believe that renovation, 
building and so on, is the responsibility of the State and local 
government, except when they talk about mandates that have come from 
the Federal level. That is what we have done in this legislation, tried 
to deal with those particular mandates.
  There is also $25 million for a charter school demonstration project. 
I hope the gentlewoman from New Mexico (Mrs. Wilson) is listening. That 
will be very important when we talk about effective ways of leveraging 
private capital for charter schools.
  On class size reduction, we have worked out and added to what we were 
able to do last year, which indicates that if we have 10 percent or 
more of unqualified teachers in the school district, they can use 100 
percent of all this money in order to better prepare the existing 
teaching force they have. As I have tried to point out so many times, 
it does not matter what the class size is if we cannot put a quality 
teacher in that classroom.
  I am also happy to point out that the conference hopes to open the 
doors even more in post-secondary education for our Nation's poor 
students with, again, the highest Pell grant award ever. I commend the 
Committee on Appropriations for maintaining our effort to increase this 
opportunity for people with low income.
  Again, I want to merely thank the gentleman from Illinois (Chairman 
Porter), who also is spending his last day here. I do not know if he 
got up at 3 o'clock this morning and started playing solitaire on the 
computer, as I did, because all of a sudden I realized at that hour, 
this was my last trip around that Baltimore beltway. I am very happy 
that that is true, and unhappy that I am leaving such a wonderful group 
of people, but it was my choice.
  Again, I thank all Members for this piece of legislation. I think it 
is an outstanding accomplishment.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from 
Florida (Mr. Foley).
  Mr. FOLEY. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding time to 
me.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong support of this legislation, and 
I want to thank my colleagues for their hard work on reaching this 
agreement.
  I want to talk today about the Medicare provisions of this package, 
the portion of the bill that will help many health care providers and 
beneficiaries

[[Page H12484]]

whose needs were not met by the current Medicare program.
  This Congress passed the Balanced Budget Act in 1997 to save Medicare 
from insolvency. Now it is time to add some funds and benefits to the 
program to ensure it keeps up with the needs of those we serve. This 
bill effectively does that.
  We have updated hospital payments so our hospitals nationwide can 
continue to provide the quality care we expect from them. We have also 
added and expanded preventive benefits for beneficiaries, including 
screening for glaucoma.
  I introduced with my colleague, the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. 
Lewis), medical nutrition therapy, and expanded coverage of pap smears 
and pelvic exams.
  The bill also eliminates the time limit for immunosuppressant drugs 
cosponsored by the gentlewoman from Florida (Ms. Thurman) for Medicare 
beneficiaries who have had an organ transplant, and waives the 24-month 
waiting period for those who suffer from ALS. These are provisions that 
have had our strong support this year.
  The bill addresses our Nation's rural hospital crisis, and 
incorporates many of the provisions of H-CARE, which I introduced this 
year with bipartisan and bicameral support. So often, these small and 
isolated hospitals serve a disproportionate share of Medicare 
beneficiaries with special needs. Our rural communities need this 
coverage, and have been supported by people like the gentleman from 
Arkansas (Mr. Dickey) and others of this Congress, and the gentleman 
from Oklahoma (Mr. Watkins).
  Finally, the bill updates payments to the Medicare+Choice program so 
beneficiaries can continue to have a low-cost alternative to 
traditional Medicare. Much has been said about the funding in this bill 
for the HMOs that provide this coverage, but this is something of 
utmost importance to my constituents and to many seniors across the 
country.
  We have all heard about the planned withdrawals from the Medicare 
plus Choice program. This bill takes a first step towards bringing 
stability to this program and to the beneficiaries who depend on it.
  I also want to thank our colleagues in the Committee on Commerce and 
those on the Committee on Ways and Means who have worked valiantly to 
get this bill produced. I think the seniors of our Nation will greatly 
benefit from this, and I again urge my colleagues to support us in this 
effort as we prepare to finish the 106th Congress on what I believe 
will be a very positive note, which is additional health care for our 
seniors. Hopefully, we can continue to work for health care for all 
Americans.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Texas 
(Mr. Combest), chairman of the Committee on Agriculture.
  Mr. COMBEST. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding time to 
me.
  Mr. Speaker, one of the things that this bill does have in it that is 
from the authorizing side is the Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 
2000. This is not some insignificant piece of legislation, this is 
something that has been worked on for the last 2 years, very difficult 
to get through a number of committees in both the House and Senate.
  I can speak at length on the bill. I will not. What I do want to say 
is this would not have happened had it not been for the leadership of 
our colleague, the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Ewing), who will be 
leaving the Congress of his own choice at the end of this year. This is 
something that I think he will be able to take with him as one of the 
major accomplishments that he made.
  I cannot thank him enough, number one, for his work and effort in 
seeing this come to fruition, as well as thanking him for his 
friendship.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 4 minutes to the 
gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Talent), the chairman of the Committee on 
Small Business.
  (Mr. TALENT asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. TALENT. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding time to 
me.
  Mr. Speaker, the conference before us enacts by reference H.R. 5667, 
the Small Business Reauthorization Act of 2000. That bill will 
reauthorize the SBA for 3 years, and continue and improve a number of 
important small business programs.
  It contains the provisions of H.R. 2392, which reauthorizes and 
improves the Small Business Innovation and Research Program, or the 
SBIR program. I know many Members in the House will be pleased that we 
are getting that done on the last day.
  The bill also contains provisions of a number of pieces of 
legislation which overwhelmingly passed this House and which 
reauthorize and improve the 7(a) program, the 504 program, and the SBIC 
program. We made a lot of progress in strengthening those programs in 
the 4 years of my chairmanship, and I believe strongly in all of them. 
I urge my colleagues to support them in the conference report.
  Mr. Speaker, the bill also contains another measure which many 
people, including the President, have called the most significant anti-
poverty legislation in the last 30 years, the American Community 
Renewal Act. Provisions in the bill will offer hope and opportunity to 
thousands of Americans who are living in economically underserved and 
blighted communities in our Nation. It will provide them and their 
communities tools, proven tools that are working in neighborhoods 
around the country already to fight the neglect, remove the scourge of 
drug abuse, and lift the pall of poverty that darkens the lives of so 
many of our fellow Americans.
  The American Community Renewal Act will provide tax incentives to 
build businesses in these communities. In these communities, there will 
be a zero percent capital gains tax. It will require HUD to cooperate 
with neighborhood development groups so people can build homes and we 
can improve home ownership, provide assistance to fight the problems of 
drug abuse, allowing faith-based groups to participate in Federal drug 
and alcohol programs, and it will assist people in savings, allowing 
them to put up money from their earned income tax credit, with the 
government matching it.
  It will give these communities things many of the rest of us take for 
granted: safe streets, a vital economy, and good schools, and things 
like hope and dignity.
  Mr. Speaker, for several years my colleagues, the gentleman from 
Oklahoma (Mr. Watts), the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Davis), and our 
former colleague, Mr. Flake, and I have struggled to build this 
legislation in a bipartisan fashion. I am greatly pleased that on the 
final day and in the final hour of this Congress, we are succeeding. I 
am glad not just for us, but for those in the communities we visited 
around the country who will be helped by that legislation.
  Mr. Speaker, this is my last speech and my last vote as a Member of 
this body. I am privileged to be able to cast it on behalf of this 
compromise measure, and in particular, on behalf of the American 
Community Renewal Act and its provisions.
  I urge all my friends and colleagues in the House to support the 
bill.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 2 minutes to the 
gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. Kelly).
  Mrs. KELLY. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of the conference report 
and urge its passage. The report before us will enact by reference H.R. 
5667, which contains the provisions of the Small Business 
Reauthorization Act of 2000. This is the 3-year authorization for Small 
Business Administration, and it will continue to improve an array of 
important small business programs that have the overwhelming support of 
this body.
  H.R. 5667 contains the provisions of H.R. 2392, which reauthorizes 
and improves the Small Business Innovation and Research Program. This 
program authorizes millions of dollars of research funds for small 
businesses on the cutting edge of technology.
  It also contains the provisions of H.R. 2614, H.R. 2615, H.R. 3845, 
and H.R. 3843, which reauthorize and improve the 7(a), 504, and SBIC 
programs. These programs represent over $11 billion in guarantees to 
ensure that small business has access to the financing necessary to 
create jobs and build our economy.
  Mr. Speaker, all these provisions passed the House earlier this year 
by overwhelming margins, and I am certain they will retain the support 
of this

[[Page H12485]]

body. I believe strongly in all these SBA provisions, and I urge my 
colleagues to support them and this conference report.
  I also want to simply take a moment to thank the gentleman from 
Missouri (Chairman Talent) for his very hard work as chairman of the 
Committee on Small Business. All of us in small business owe him a 
great debt of gratitude for his tremendously good work.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to yield 3 minutes to my 
colleague, the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Archer), the distinguished 
chairman of the Committee on Ways and Means.
  Mr. ARCHER. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding time to 
me.
  Mr. Speaker, for the 6th year in a row this Congress is cutting taxes 
for the American people. Six consecutive years of tax relief, not tax 
increases; 6 years of a growing economy, a balanced budget, and a 
Federal budget surplus for the first time in a generation; 6 years of 
letting Americans keep just a little more of their money.
  That is an amazing record of bipartisan achievement for which we can 
all be proud. Without question, I would like to have done more for the 
American taxpayers. However, I am pleased with the progress we have 
made. We have advanced the cause of tax relief for American families 
and small businesses in a bipartisan fashion, and I am hopeful that we 
can see more enacted into law next year.
  While this tax relief package consists mostly of a community renewal 
bill that the gentleman from Illinois (Speaker Hastert), the conference 
chairman, the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr. Watts), and the chairman of 
the Committee on Small Business (Mr. Talent), put together, it also 
contains a very important extension of medical savings accounts, our 
MSAs, a new idea in health care that I launched in the eighties and 
that can be expanded in future years.
  MSAs have been available now for only a limited period of time, but 
they are the best patients' rights and checks on HMOs, and will greatly 
strengthen the doctor-patient relationship.
  Second, MSAs are the right medicine at the right time for millions of 
Americans who have no insurance coverage. Almost one-third of MSA 
purchasers up to now have been people who previously had no insurance.
  Third, MSAs are a natural antidote to the problems of affordable 
prescription drug coverage and long-term health care for the elderly.
  Finally, President-elect Bush is a strong supporter of MSAs, so in 
passing this bill today, we are laying a foundation for the expansion 
in the future.
  Mr. Speaker, this is the last time I will address my colleagues from 
the floor of this House as chairman of the Committee on Ways and Means. 
I am proud of my record, and proud of the things that we have 
accomplished together for the American people.
  Our record on tax relief is historic: as I mentioned, 6 consecutive 
years of tax relief, including the largest tax cut since 1981. But we 
did so much more. We balanced the budget. We liberated millions of 
families from welfare dependency. We ended the social security earnings 
penalty once and for all, and we did so many more important things that 
time prevents me from listing all of them tonight.
  These are the priorities for which I fought for 30 years. As I took 
the gavel of the Committee in 1995, the experts said they could not be 
done, but we did them. I am proud of these and so many other historic 
legislative accomplishments.
  Today some of those same experts say Congress will never be able to 
save social security or eliminate the income tax.

                              {time}  1800

  They use the same Shermanesque statements that it will never be done 
that saturated the media in 1995 when we set our sights on changing the 
way Washington worked.
  So I, for one, do not put much stock in their predictions, because 
they usually have been wrong. I have been in the arena, and I have 
great optimism and faith in our public servants who have served 
alongside me. My colleagues, we have changed the way Washington works. 
We did it together. It was extremely difficult, but we did it.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 1 minute.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to mention an important piece of legislation that 
the Speaker of the House was responsible for bringing into this bill. 
The Community Renewal Tax Relief Act, I think is going to make a great 
difference for communities like North Chicago in my district.
  Mr. Speaker, people may think that my district is a wealthy district, 
and on average, it is; but we have very, very poor communities. North 
Chicago is a prime example. It has the lowest per capita sales tax 
revenue in the county. It is one of the poorest communities in 
Illinois.
  It has an unemployment and poverty rate that is three times the 
national average. It has commercial and industrial property with a 
vacancy rate of over 50 percent. This is exactly the kind of community 
that will benefit from this legislation.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to commend the Speaker of the House for insisting 
that we pass this legislation, enact it into law and benefit 
communities like North Chicago.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman from Maryland 
(Mrs. Morella).
  Mrs. MORELLA. Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of this 
conference report.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to commend the gentleman from Florida (Mr. 
Young), the chairman of the Committee on Appropriations, and the 
gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Obey), the ranking member.
  It certainly has been very interesting that we have had a number of 
people who have spoken on this bill in a glowing fashion who will not 
be with us in the next Congress, the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. 
Talent), the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Goodling), the gentleman 
from Texas (Mr. Archer); and I know there are a number of others who 
will be very much missed, but I particularly want to single out the 
gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Porter) because he has done so much for 
medical research, as well as for education.
  Since I have the National Institutes of Health in my district, I have 
seen firsthand the kind of exemplary work he has done. He will be, 
indeed, missed; and this bill is going to reflect his work.
  I particularly wanted to point out in my 1 minute that I am pleased 
that the legislation includes a waiver of Medicare's 24-month waiting 
period for ALS patients. ALS is Lou Gehrig's disease. It is a crippling 
disease.
  It affects 25,000 to 30,000 families across America. They are struck 
with a crippling and creeping paralysis that eventually leaves them not 
even able to eat or breathe.
  I wanted to also point out that I rise in tribute of a constituent, a 
former councilwoman, Betty Ann Krahnke, who found out she had ALS, a 
debilitating disease, and continued to serve until she could no longer. 
She and her husband and the ALS foundation have worked indefatigably on 
behalf of this legislation knowing that people do not live very often 
more than 19 months. So the 24-month waiver is important.
  I salute those who have put it together. I am so pleased that the 
provision is in this, and I hope that we will all vote for this bill.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Ewing).
  Mr. EWING. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. 
Porter) for yielding the time to me.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of this conference report and 
also in support of H.R. 5660, which will be included in this package by 
reference.
  This is a bill that culminates 4 years of work by the Committee on 
Commerce, the Committee on Agriculture, the Committee on Banking and 
Financial Services, and by our colleagues in the Senate. And it is, in 
fact, a legal modernization bill of enormous proportions which will 
affect all of the financial industry in this country.
  First and foremost, it is intended to keep America on the competitive 
edge with our trading partners in this world economy; and it also 
modernizes the system here, so that not only can we be competitive in 
our financial industry, but we can be profitable.
  I want to thank all that have taken part in it, the staff on the 
Committee on Agriculture, Senator Gramm in the other body. Everyone has 
worked tirelessly on this, and I appreciate their support. I ask my 
colleagues for their consideration on this bill.

[[Page H12486]]

                Announcement by the Speaker Pro Tempore

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Pease). Members are reminded that 
pursuant to clause 5 of rule XVII, the use of personal electronic 
equipment on the floor of the House is not allowed. Members will please 
disable their cellular phones.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Weldon).
  (Mr. WELDON of Pennsylvania asked and was given permission to revise 
and extend his remarks.)
  Mr. WELDON of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of 
this legislation.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise to thank our colleagues on the Committee on 
Appropriations, because we have a historic event that will take place 
when we pass this bill.
  We have supported the law enforcement community in America. We have 
supported teachers in America; but in this bill, for the first time, 
the Congress will provide $100 million of appropriated monies for the 
1.2 million men and women who serve every one of our districts as paid 
and volunteer firefighters.
  The $80 million in grants will be matched by local funding, $10 
million will go for burn research, and $10 million will go to rural 
fire departments and those communities across the country that are 
desperately in need of new equipment. This is historic. To help these 
volunteers to continue to protect their towns is one of the most 
important things that we can do as a body.
  Mr. Speaker, I am so happy to stand here, to thank my colleagues. The 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young) made a commitment to us a long time 
ago. I want to thank him.
  I want to thank the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Porter). I want to 
thank our distinguished staff director, Mr. Dyer, the gentleman from 
Maryland (Mr. Hoyer) on the other side, all the Members who were 
involved in this because of the historic nature of this funding.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Gilman), the chairman of the Committee on International 
Relations.
  Mr. GILMAN. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. 
Porter) for yielding the time to me.
  Mr. Speaker, I just want to commend the gentleman from Pennsylvania 
(Mr. Weldon) for his outstanding work on behalf of our fire paramedic 
volunteers, something that was long overdue and something that will 
help protect lives and property throughout our Nation.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he may consume to the 
gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. Dickey).
  (Mr. DICKEY asked and was given permission to revise and extend his 
remarks.)
  Mr. DICKEY. Mr. Speaker, I am in support of this bill, with 
reservations.
  Today, I will vote for the final appropriation bill of this 106th 
session of Congress, but with some sadness. The regret because in the 
Labor HHS and Education portion of these bills $4 million of projects 
in the 4th District have at the last minute been removed from the bill. 
These dollars had been placed in the bill to benefit educational 
institutions in the 4th District as well as hospitals, agencies for the 
aging, volunteer fire departments, bridges, boys and girls clubs, and 
other well deserved projects. I did everything I could to stop this 
from happening, but matters after the election were out of my control.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the distinguished 
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Jackson-Lee).
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from 
Wisconsin (Mr. Obey) for yielding this time to me.
  Mr. Speaker, being cognizant of the approaching storm, let me very 
quickly thank the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young) and the gentleman 
from Wisconsin (Mr. Obey) for their leadership and the gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Porter) for his leadership. I spent many hours in front 
of his committee, and I thank him.
  There has been much talk about the whole idea of bipartisanship, 
maybe even the word ``compromise,'' but I believe that bipartisanship 
encourages one to put your feet in the shoes of the other fellow, put 
your feet in the shoes of central Americans or Haitians and Liberians 
who have worked so hard in this Nation, contributing taxpayers and 
homeowners who by this bill have been denied a simple access to 
legalization, individuals who came to this country, fleeing persecution 
seeking the freedom that we would offer; what a shame.
  So we know what kind of bipartisanship we can expect in the next 
Congress. I would hope as well that we would have looked more favorably 
at allowing those who might have committed offenses as juveniles not to 
be deported and separated from their families, but that means that you 
have to step in the other fellow's shoes.
  I do, however, want to note the good works that have been done for 
the hospitals and Medicaid payments and the $12 billion to help our 
hospitals, and I would hope that this bill will pass on that basis.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the distinguished 
gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Davis).
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of this 
conference report and would simply like to reference two parts. 
Especially, I strongly support the fix that has been provided for the 
teaching disproportionate share in public hospitals, and I also want to 
reference the American Community Renewal Act and New Markets 
Initiative. I want to commend the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Talent), 
the chairman of the Committee on Small Business, for the hard work that 
he did on making sure that we get to this point with that legislation, 
he and the gentleman from Oklahoma (Mr.  Watts).
  Mr. Speaker, I also want to thank the gentleman from Illinois 
(Speaker Hastert) and President Clinton for making sure that this 
legislation became a part, and remained a part, of the package. It is a 
good bill. It is good legislation.
  I commend the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young), the gentleman from 
Wisconsin (Mr. Obey), and all of those who framed it and the gentleman 
from Illinois (Mr. Porter) and say thank you to a great Congress.
  Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 2 minutes.
  Mr. Speaker, first of all, Mr. Speaker, I want to take note of the 
fact that the gentleman in the chair, the gentleman from Indiana (Mr. 
Pease), is also leaving this institution. He has not served with us 
very long, but he has served with us very well.
  I was just remarking with one Member on the majority side of the 
aisle about the grace with which he handles his duties in the chair, 
which he does often. He handles the gavel lightly but firmly. I think 
everyone who has gotten to know him appreciates his character, his 
goodwill, and the quality of service to this institution.
  Secondly, I want to add one word about one additional staffer: Scott 
Lilly has served as my right arm for many years. He is the staff 
director on the Committee on Appropriations on the minority side. I do 
not know anyone who I have ever worked with who has had better judgment 
or is more dedicated both to this institution and to what this country 
is supposed to stand for.
  He has worked tirelessly on behalf of each and every Member on this 
side of the aisle, and I would also say on many occasions people on 
both sides of the aisle. I am profoundly grateful to the service he has 
provided this body.
  Lastly, I simply want to say that there are a number of items in this 
bill that Members will not agree with. There are many items that I do 
not agree with. There are a number of authorizations that have been 
added that I think are ill advised. There are some changes in the 
appropriation items themselves to which I do not agree.
  An example, in October, we had an agreement on snowmobiles; that has 
now, I understand today, been changed because the administration 
negotiated a new arrangement with the Senate leadership. I do not like 
it, but also at this late date there is not much that I can do about 
it. We certainly cannot hold up the entire bill because of it.
  Mr. Speaker, I simply want to urge every Member to recognize that the 
education funding, the health funding and the worker protection funding 
in this bill makes this a worthy enterprise; and even though the 
process by which we arrived here was one that I would recommend to 
absolutely no one in the future, I think that the contents are 
something which we can go home

[[Page H12487]]

with justifiable pride, because they will, in fact, help meet the needs 
of a changing and growing Nation.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1815

  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume, 
and I will be very brief. I realize Members have planes to catch.
  But I want to take a moment to thank the gentleman from Florida (Mr. 
Young), my chairman, who has worked tirelessly to bring this 
legislation to fruition. He is wonderful to work with, a man of good 
humor and goodwill, great patience, a true leader in the House of 
Representatives.
  I want to thank the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Obey.) It has been 
one of my real pleasures to work with him. I have great respect for 
him. We have worked well together. It has been a tremendous pleasure to 
have been able to work with him all these years and to share in many 
respects, although we have certainly had our differences, many of the 
same agenda items.
  Let me say that I have been pleased to have a subcommittee staff that 
has been absolutely outstanding, the best on the Hill, led by Tony 
McCann, our clerk; and Francine Salvador; Carol Murphy; Susan Firth; 
Jeff Kenyon; and Tom Kelly, our detailees. They have done an absolutely 
outstanding job throughout this year and previous years in bringing 
this bill to fruition.
  I want to thank my administrative assistant, Katherine Fisher. I want 
to thank our front office staff, led by Jim Dyer, including John Mikel 
and Chuck and Dale and Brian and Elizabeth and John. They all do a 
magnificent job for the people of this country and for this Congress.
  I want to thank Scott Lilly, as the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. 
Obey) has said, Cheryl Smith, Mark Mioduski, and Christina Hamilton. 
All of them do a tremendous job and work well with us to get the work 
of the Congress done.
  Mr. Speaker, as Bill Natcher would have said, this is a good bill, 
and I commend it to all of the Members.
  I have said my farewells to this body long ago, but let me just say 
in closing it has been a tremendous honor and privilege to serve with 
all of the Members of this body. I have served, I have counted them up, 
I have served with 1,346 different Members over my 21 years.
  I wish all the Members of this Congress a very Merry Christmas and a 
Happy New Year. I wish them a wonderful new 107th Congress. I hope our 
paths will cross many times in the years ahead.
  Mr. SALMON. Mr. Speaker, I rise to urge my colleagues to vote in 
favor of the Computer Crime Enforcement Act of 2000. The bill provides 
$25 million in grants (from the Department of Justice) to local law 
enforcement officials to combat computer crime. Specifically, the 
grants will be used to: teach state and city law enforcement agents how 
to investigate hi-tech crimes; purchase the necessary equipment to 
assist in the investigation of computer crimes; and train prosecutors 
to conduct investigations and forensic analysis of evidence in 
prosecutions of computer crime.
  As you know, many businesses, educational institutions, banks, 
hospitals, and other information-intensive entities have fallen prey to 
hi-tech criminals who illegally break into computer systems and steal 
sensitive information.
  A recent poll conducted by the Information Technology Association of 
America (who endorse my bill) found that 61 percent of consumers 
questioned are less likely to shop over the Internet as a result of the 
rise in cybercrimes. Clearly, e-commerce and e-crime cannot co-exist.
  The FBI refers many of these cases to local law enforcement agencies. 
Unfortunately, local law enforcement agents have not had the necessary 
equipment or training to protect the public from hi-tech thieves. At a 
cybercrime summit I hosted in Phoenix this summer, many local law 
enforcement officials told me that they do not have the necessary 
equipment nor have they received adequate training to protect the 
public from hi-tech thieves.
  As a follow-up to my cybercrime summit, I asked several law 
enforcement agencies from Arizona to respond to a questionnaire 
regarding computer crime. Forty-three percent of the agencies do not 
have funds specifically set aside for computer crime investigations 
even though 50 percent of the agencies investigate more than 10 cases a 
month. More frightening is the fact that 43 percent of the agencies 
have personnel who are only moderately trained in computer crime 
investigation.
  Computer crime has been on the rise for some time. And companies are 
requiring more federal assistance. According to a recent report 
released by the FBI and the Computer Security Institute, 32 percent of 
companies surveyed required help from law enforcement agencies--up 17 
percent from the prior year. And, according to a recent report by San 
Francisco's Computer Security Institute, nearly a third of U.S. 
companies, financial institutions, government agencies and universities 
say their computer systems were penetrated by outsiders last year. More 
than half of the organizations said their computer systems were subject 
to unauthorized access by insiders, and 57 percent said the Internet 
was a ``frequent point of attack'' by hackers, up 37.5 percent from 
three years ago.
  We can no longer afford to be mystified by those who commit these hi-
tech crimes. The small network that once was the electronic home to a 
few scientists has become an electronic labyrinth where hundreds of 
millions of people regularly pay taxes, trade stock, bank, buy goods, 
and send intensely personal information. When criminals gain access to 
this sensitive information, the consequences can be devastating.
  Computer criminals know no boundaries. And they are becoming 
sophisticated to the point that most companies aren't even aware that 
they are under attack. Therefore, it is imperative that Congress 
address the needs of local police officers who are fighting this new 
wave of crime on the front lines. To have a successful, national 
cybercrime strategy, the FBI's expertise in fighting hi-tech crimes 
will need to filter down to the states. I urge my colleagues to vote 
for this bill.
  Ms. PELOSI. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this omnibus measure, 
which includes funding for many programs of vital importance to the 
American people. The programs funded within the Labor-HHS-Education 
Appropriations bill are so important because they affect families at 
work, in school, at home, and in their communities. I commend Chairman 
Porter and Ranking Member Obey for negotiating a strong bill that 
reflects our national values. In particular, I would like to thank 
Chairman Porter for his many years of dedicated service on our 
subcommittee and in Congress. His knowledge, dedication, and ability to 
reach across party lines will be sorely missed. David Obey's hard work, 
commitment, and advocacy for Democratic priorities must also be 
recognized. In addition, I commend the Clinton Administration for 
holding firm on its initiatives and funding priorities, which helped us 
provide the largest single year increase for health and education 
programs in our nation's history.
  Funding for health programs is increased significantly over the 
measure passed by the House in June. The increase of $6.6 billion, 16 
percent over fiscal year 2000, includes significant increases for HIV/
AIDS programs, community health centers, biomedical research, substance 
abuse treatment, breast and cervical cancer screening, and programs 
that reduce the harmful impacts of environmental pollutants on human 
health. The bill also increases education programs $6.5 billion or 18 
percent above last year, significantly increasing funding for Class 
Size Reduction, Title I grants for disadvantaged students, teacher 
quality improvement programs, and student financial aide assistance, 
including Pell Grants, and providing $1.2 billion for a new School 
Renovation Program. It also helps children's programs, including Head 
Start, the Community Child Care Block Grant, After School Centers, and 
campus based child care [CAMPUS]. To further address the nation's 
shortage of high quality child care facilities, I also pushed to create 
a new $2.5 million demonstration program to provide technical 
assistance to child care providers in low-income communities, which is 
included in the final bill. The $664 million increase for the Labor 
Department is 6 percent more than last year's funding level and 
increases Youth Job Training Programs and worker protection programs, 
including OSHA and the International Labor Affairs Bureau. These are 
great accomplishments, and we should all be very proud.
  I am especially pleased that we were able to substantially increase 
funds for HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and research. My community in San 
Francisco has been devastated by this terrible epidemic, but we have 
seen tremendous progress over the past decade as the resources 
available to fight HIV/AIDS have been increased. The Ryan White CARE 
Act, which was reauthorized for 5 additional years earlier this 
session, will receive $1.808 billion this year, an increase of $213 
million over last year. Approximately two-thirds of the people living 
with HIV/AIDS in this country receive CARE Act services, and the recent 
declines in AIDS deaths are a direct result of the therapies and 
services made more widely available through this vital program. In 
addition, we have provided a combined increase of $159 million for our 
global and domestic HIV prevention programs. This investment, which now 
totals $923 million, will allow greater access to voluntary counseling 
and testing, stronger linkages between prevention and treatment, and a

[[Page H12488]]

reduction in the number of the new HIV infections worldwide. Finally, 
we have succeeded in securing a substantial increase of $100 million 
for the Minority HIV/AIDS Initiative. The impact of HIV/AIDS on 
communities of color has steadily increased in recent years, and now 
the majority of people living with AIDS are people of color. This 
initiative will provide $350 million to enhance existing systems of 
HIV/AIDS care in minority communities.

  For the third year in a row, we have provided dramatic increases in 
biomedical research at the National Institutes of Health. In addition 
to progress in the search for better treatments and, eventually, a 
vaccine for AIDS, these investments are yielding phenomenal progress in 
our understanding of the human body and how we are affected by our 
environment. One of the great achievements in the history of science, 
the mapping of the human genome, was completed by NIH researchers 
earlier this year. The potential impact on human health cannot be over-
exaggerated. This map will soon enable scientists to identify genetic 
causes and develop precise medical interventions for Alzheimer's, 
cancer, heart disease, and many other health conditions that adversely 
affect millions of Americans each year.
  We have also dramatically strengthened our commitment to 
understanding and preventing illnesses that result from environmental 
pollutants. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention will receive 
nearly $47 million to assess human exposures to toxic substances, 
screen newborns for treatable conditions linked to such exposures, and 
respond to emerging environmental health threats as they develop.
  Access to quality health care for the uninsured has been improved in 
a number of important ways. Funding for the National Breast and 
Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program at the CDC has been increased 
$18 million to $174 million. This program provides lifesaving screening 
to uninsured and underinsured women, and prevents thousands of cases of 
cancer each year. Currently, these programs reach only 12-15 percent of 
the women eligible for services in each state. This year's increases 
will allow more at-risk women to be reached, but clearly we must 
further expand this program in fiscal year 2002. An increase of $150 
million was also included for the nation's community health centers. 
The number of uninsured individuals in need of health care continues to 
increase and community health centers provide high quality primary and 
preventive care that would otherwise be obtained through costly 
emergency room visits, or not at all. An additional $125 million has 
been included for the Community Access Program which provides funds 
that community health centers across the country use to streamline 
administrative procedures and expand crucial primary care services.
  This omnibus measure also includes important provisions that correct 
changes to reimbursement rates in the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 which 
drastically reduced payments for Medicare and other federally funded 
health care programs. These refinements will help hospitals, nursing 
homes, and academic health centers continue to provide the high quality 
care that beneficiaries deserve.

  Although funding for the Substance Abuse Block Grant increased by $65 
million above last year's level, it is disappointing that the 
leadership did not support a larger increase. An estimated 3.6 million 
Americans do not receive the substance abuse treatment they need. 
Earlier this year, to address the treatment gap, I offered a $1.3 
billion amendment to increase treatment and prevention, the most 
effective means to address abuse. In that debate, we cited a Rand 
Corporation study sponsored by the Office of Drug Control Policy and 
the United States Army which demonstrated that to reduce cocaine 
consumption funds invested in drug treatment were 23 times more 
effective than source country control, 11 times more effective than 
interdiction, and 7 times more effective than law enforcement. It is 
unfortunate that on party lines, the Republicans nonetheless voted in 
Committee to oppose increased treatment and prevention funds, and voted 
in the Rules Committee to prevent my amendment from being offered on 
the House floor. I urge the 107th Congress to address this treatment 
and increase funding.
  This bill takes important needed steps to address America's troubling 
child care crisis by significantly increasing funding for child care 
programs. The bill substantially increases the Community Child Care 
Block Grant by 70 percent or $817 million above last year and increases 
Head Start $933 million or 18 percent. Funding for After School Centers 
will nearly double, increasing $393 million, and the Child Care Access 
Means Parents in School program will increase 400 percent from $5 
million to $25 million. This small, but important program supports and 
enhances campus based child care opportunities for low-income parents. 
We must grow this program and work to ensure all parents attending 
school have access to child care on campus so they are able to pursue 
their educational goals. While I commend these significant and much 
needed increases, we must recognize the gravity of America's child care 
problems.
  To address the nation's shortage of child care facilities, I pushed 
to create a new $2.5 million demonstration program that will provide 
technical assistance to child care providers to improve the quality and 
supply of child care facilities in low-income communities. America's 
child care facilities are inadequate and many low-income communities 
face a severe shortage of quality child care space and equipment. This 
crisis is expected to worsen as increasing numbers of welfare 
recipients enter the workforce, and it threatens the ability of parents 
to find and maintain stable employment. This demonstration will provide 
grant funds to non-profit intermediaries to deliver technical 
assistance to home and center-based child care providers to strengthen 
the physical infrastructure of child care facilities and enhance 
business management and entrepreneurial skills to ensure the long-term 
viability of their centers. This federal investment would leverage 
funds from the private sector, stimulate valuable public/private 
partnerships, and provide small, seed-money investments to leverage 
existing community resources. While this demonstration starts small, I 
know it will succeed and expect that we will increase this funding in 
subsequent years.
  I commend the bill for its large funding increase for education and 
know that local school districts will put their Class Size Reduction 
and new School Renovation Program funds to excellent use. There is no 
more important priority than educating our children and passing our 
knowledge and values to the next generation. These funds will help 
local schools recruit, hire, and retain more quality teachers and 
enhance the school learning environment for both teachers and students. 
Teacher quality improvement funds also ensure that new teachers, as 
well as seasoned veterans, may enhance their professional development. 
The increases for Title I grants, Special Education, and student 
financial assistance increase access at all educational levels for 
students with low-incomes, learning disabilities, or social 
disadvantages. Together, this bill ensures that teachers can teach, 
students can learn, and parents can participate in the learning 
process.
  I am pleased that this agreement deletes a GOP rider to stop the 
Department of Labor from moving forward with and enforcing its recently 
published final Ergonomics Standard. This Standard is vitally important 
to protect America's working men and women and will annually prevent 
460,000 workplace injuries. The final standard requires employers to 
identify and fix workplace hazards that cause ergonomic injuries and 
follows the existing business practices of competitive firms such as 
the Ford Motor Company and Xerox. It provides Work Restriction 
Protection to workers suffering on the job injuries and enables them to 
maintain their earnings and full benefits for a limited period while it 
is unsafe to return to work. After years of Republican-led delays, it 
is significant that Congress will now permit the Labor Department to 
enforce ergonomics protections. This success demonstrates the value we 
place on safeguarding America's workers. It is my hope that Congress 
will not revisit this issue in our next session, and that the Labor 
Department will fully enforce these important workplace protections.
  Programs dedicated to the education, health, and working conditions 
of America's families are among our most important responsibilities in 
the Congress. This bill responds to these responsibilities, and I urge 
my colleagues to support it.
  Mr. EWING. Mr. Speaker, today, I am introducing the Commodity Futures 
Modernization Act of 2000 which provides us with an historic 
opportunity to modernize the U.S. futures and over-the-counter market 
laws. The time is now to ensure that the United States continues to be 
the world's financial leader. We have two of the three largest futures 
exchanges in the world, however, our antiquated laws and regulations 
prevent them from being as efficient and effective as possible to 
compete in global markets. The legal uncertainty surrounding the U.S. 
over-the-counter markets must be removed to prevent domestic business 
from migrating overseas and causing our share of these $90 trillion 
markets to shrink.
  The Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000 contains the major 
provisions of the House passed H.R. 4541. These provisions are in 
titles I and II of the legislation and provide regulatory relief for 
the domestic futures exchanges, legal certainty for over-the-counter 
products, and allow for the trading of single stock futures. The bill 
promotes innovation and competition by giving exchanges, banks, 
brokerage firms and others involved in derivatives markets the 
flexibility to decide how best to structure their businesses with legal 
certainty as to the regulatory implications of those decisions. It 
provides unbiased guidelines on what kinds of activities are subject to 
and excluded from the Commodity Exchange Act. Further,

[[Page H12489]]

the legislation makes those exclusions available to transactions in 
financial interests or securities that do not occur on trading 
facilities or occur on excluded electronic trading facilities, no 
matter who operates those facilities.
  By breaking down the Shad-Johnson barrier, the bill will foster a 
healthy competitive environment for futures on single stock and narrow-
based futures indices, risk-management instruments that heretofore have 
been prohibited by an outdated U.S. law. Because foreign competitors 
have already focused considerable resources to attract these markets to 
their shores, I would urge all agencies involved in administering the 
new framework for single stock futures to act as expeditiously as 
possible to ensure that our markets in single stock futures and narrow-
based futures indices are able to meet this competition promptly and 
not suffer from regulatory arbitrage with overseas markets.
  By refraining from altering certain sections of the Act, this 
legislation reaffirms the importance of specific authorities granted 
the CFTC, including its anti-fraud and anti-manipulation powers. 
Section 4b is the principal anti-fraud provision of the Act and the 
Commission has consistently used Section 4b to combat fraudulent 
conduct by bucket shops and boiler rooms that entered into transactions 
directly with their customers and thus did not involve a traditional 
broker-client type of relationship. See, e.g., CFTC v. P.I.E., Inc., 
853 F.2d 721 (9th Cir. 1988) (fraudulent sale of illegal precious 
metals futures contracts marketed as cash-forward transactions); CFTC 
v. Wellington Precious Metals, Inc., 950 F.2d 1525 (11th Cir.), cert. 
denied, 113 S. Ct. 66 (1992) (boiler room operation fraudulently 
selling illegal precious metals contracts to members of the general 
public). This is consistent with both Congress' understanding of and 
past Congressional amendments to Section 4b that confirmed the 
applicability of Section 4b to fraudulent boiler rooms and bucket shops 
that enter into transactions directly with their customers.
  It is the intent of Congress in retaining Section 4b of the Act that 
the provision not be limited to fiduciary, broker/customer or other 
agency-like relationships. Section 4b provides the Commission with 
broad authority to police fraudulent conduct within its jurisdiction, 
whether occurring in boiler rooms and bucket shops, or in the e-
commerce markets that will develop under this new statutory framework. 
This latest version of the legislation adds two new titles not included 
in the original House passed bill. Title III, Legal Certainty for Swap 
Agreements, provides guidelines for the SEC's role in regulating swaps.
  Title IV, the ``Legal Certainty for Bank Products Act of 2000'', 
excludes identified banking products from the Commodity Exchange Act. 
It provides guidelines to determine the proper regulator for hybrid 
products. If the regulators do not agree on who should regulate a 
product, the court will decide.
  Senator Lugar and Senator Gramm have worked tirelessly in the Senate, 
with the House, and with the Administration to make this bill possible. 
Secretary Summers in coordination with Chairman Rainer and Chairman 
Levitt and countless numbers of their staff put in many hours working 
through this language to reach agreement. Finally, I would like to 
thank Chairman Combest, Chairman Leach, Chairman Bliley and all the 
Ranking Members who have worked so hard on this legislation, 
particularly to pass the H.R. 4541 version of this bill through the 
House, and to produce the final package we have presented today. 
Everyone involved and their staff should be commended for their 
extraordinary efforts.
  It is my hope that this legislation will enable America to continue 
being the world leader in financial markets for decades to come.
  Mr. TOWNS. Mr. Speaker, while this legislation contains many positive 
restorations in terms of Medicare beneficiaries and providers, I deeply 
regret that we did not permit the states to offer health coverage for 
lawful immigrant pregnant women and children through Medicaid and the 
State Child Health Insurance program (SCHIP).
  Because of our inaction, many hard working, tax paying, lawfully 
present immigrants will remain ineligible for basic health care. We had 
an opportunity to restore the human rights to lawfully present children 
and pregnant women; yet, we failed to take this first step to make 
health care available to a group of taxpayers who have no other 
affordable access to health services. It is a shortfall that I hope we 
can remedy in the next Congress.
  Ms. DeGETTE. Mr. Speaker, this Congress is considering legislation 
which would authorize the construction of a dam and reservoir that will 
implement the Colorado Ute Indian Water Rights Settlement Act of 1988. 
The Settlement Act, through the construction of the Animas La-Plata 
project, (ALP) is intended to provide the Colorado Southern Ute and Ute 
Mountain Ute Indian Tribes an assured long-term water supply in order 
to satisfy the Tribes' senior water rights.
  That said, what we really are addressing is justice. The Ute Tribes 
once held the majority of the Western Slope of Colorado, but that land 
was slowly and systematically taken from them by the United States 
Government. For over one hundred and thirty years, the Ute Tribes have 
been denied their rights as stewards of the land. Some object to the 
ALP project in any form because of its environmental impacts or cost to 
the taxpayer. I understand and share those concerns. However, it is 
time to right the past wrongs that the federal government inflicted 
upon the Ute people. It is unjust to delay this settlement any longer, 
for doing so would continue a cycle of broken promises to the Ute 
Tribes that is far too familiar.
  The Utes have been extraordinarily patient. Thirty-two years of 
debate and delay have brought us numerous versions of this project--
ALP, ALP-Lite, ALP Ultra-lite--it has become difficult to keep track. 
The project has been evaluated by numerous federal and state agencies, 
and subject to multiple lawsuits and negotiation sessions. All of which 
have brought us here today to vote on this proposal, which is vastly 
different from the original Animas La-Plata project put forth in 1968. 
It is narrowly tailored and significantly downsized. In fact, it cannot 
even be called Animas La-Plata anymore because the La-Plata River has 
been taken out of the equation. Yet, this project still satisfies the 
senior water rights of the Southern Ute and Ute Mountain Ute Tribes and 
finally fulfills our promises to them.
  I also am pleased that this bill instructs the Department of the 
Interior to complete a thorough environmental analysis of the current 
proposal. Previous versions of ALP were appropriately delayed in order 
to fully assess the impact on endangered species and the environment. 
The resulting discussions and additional research contributed to the 
redesigned project proposed today. Since the final proposal of ALP is 
vastly different from previous designs, it is critical that the 
environmental impacts of this new version continue to be carefully 
evaluated in order to ensure adequate protection of the environment.
  I support the Animas La Plata project as outlined in this legislation 
as the most viable manner in which to satisfy the Ute Tribes' water 
rights that were established under their 1868 treaty with the United 
States, and subsequently upheld by the Supreme Court decision in 
Winters v. United States (1908). Colorado's Ute Tribes have waited long 
enough for the fulfillment of that treaty. I urge passage of this bill 
so that the tribes may regain some of what we have taken from them.
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of the 
Omnibus package before us. Let me highlight a few matters:


                         commerce-Justice-State

  Provides $1 billion for the COPS program, which is $437 million above 
the Y 2000 level. This total includes $535 million for core COPS 
program, $100 million for community prosecutors, and $140 million for a 
new COPS technology initiative.
  State and local law enforcement assistance program--Provides $2.8 
million for state and local law enforcement block grants, $687 for 
state prison grants, $228 million for violence against women grants, 
$250 million for juvenile crime block grants, and 569 million for Byrne 
grants.
  FBI--Provides $3.3 billion for the FBI, which is $161 million above 
the FY 2000 level.
  Drug Enforcement Administration--Provides $1.4 billion for the DEA, 
which is $82 million more than last year.
  Commerce Department--Provides for a total of $5.2 for the Commerce 
Department and related agencies.
  State Department--Provides a total of 6.6 billion for State 
Department programs, which is $729 million more than in the FY 2000 
budget. This includes $3.2 billion for diplomatic and consular programs 
and some $871 million for international peacekeeping operations.
  Mr. Speaker, I would like to take opportunity to express my 
appreciation to the Clinton Administration, House and Senate Leadership 
for working to finally complete the business of the 106th Congress. 
This bill before the House will provide appropriations for several 
separate appropriations bills, which have been combined to speed their 
adoption into law.
  In my testimony to the Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor/HHS, I 
urged the committee to increase the funding for children's mental 
health services, which they have done through the appropriation of a 
Mental Health Block Grant program in the amount of $240 million, $63 
million more than last year's funding.
  As for my request for additional funding for HIV/AIDS this 
appropriation measure will place an additional $97 million over the 
amount initially requested by the Administration bring their 
appropriation to $767 million for Fiscal year 2001. It is my hope that 
this additional funding will go those who are in greatest need minority 
HIV/AIDS programs. Minority AIDS

[[Page H12490]]

programs have been woefully under funded over the last few Congresses, 
despite the fact that minorities are the fastest growing population 
infected with AIDS/HIV.

  I thank the Clinton Administration for taking the bold step of 
formally recognizing that the spread of HIV/AIDS in the world today is 
an international crisis, through his declaration of HIV/AIDS to be a 
National Security threat. I am pleased to see that funding for the Ryan 
White AIDS program has been increased by 13% to $2.5 billion for the 
next fiscal year. Further, funding for the National Institutes of 
Medicine has been increased to $2.4 billion, which is 14% over last 
year's appropriations. 13.7 million children suffer from mental health 
problems. The National Mental Health Association reports that most 
people who commit suicide have a mental or emotional disorder. The most 
common is depression and although one in five children and adolescents 
had a diagnosable mental, emotional, or behavioral problem that can 
lead to school failure, substance abuse, violence or suicide, 75 to 80 
percent of these children do not receive any services in the form of 
specialty treatment or some form of mental health intervention.
  This bill will also fund education for our nation's children at $6.5 
billion, which is 18% more than was appropriated last year, and is in 
fact the largest annual increase in the history of the Department of 
Education. This legislation will allow school districts throughout the 
United States to work on reducing class sizes in the early grades, 
create small, successful, safer schools, renovate over 3,500 schools, 
and increase the number of children who have access to Head Start by an 
additional 600,000.
  This bill also incorporates the Fiscal Year 2001 appropriations for 
the Department of Labor at $664 million or 64 percent over last year's 
funding. I am very pleased to see that the funding for the Health and 
Human Services Department is at $48.8 billion, which is $6.6 billion 
over last year's appropriations. After the years of cuts to this vital 
program today we are finally recognizing that the health safety and 
welfare of America's disadvantaged should be addressed with adequate 
resources by the agency charged with providing care to them.
  Many Houstonians' lives were saved by the additional funding from 
LIHEAP and this appropriations will provide $1.4 billion for the coming 
year. I thank my colleagues and urge them to support this appropriation 
measure.
  Mr. BENTSEN. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong support of the 
omnibus appropriations legislation that includes funding for the 
Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services (HHS), and Education, 
Treasury, and Legislative appropriations bill as well as $35 billion 
for the Medicare and Medicaid programs. This comprehensive legislation 
is critically important and will ensure that all Federal agencies 
receive sufficient federal funds for Fiscal Year 2001. I am also 
pleased that legislation includes tax provisions as well as provisions 
to modernize the Commodity Futures Trade Commission, and reauthorize 
the Small Business Administration.
  I am especially pleased that this legislation includes provisions 
similar to legislation which I sponsored (H.R. 1298) which would allow 
schools, homeless shelters, and housing program agencies to 
presumptively enroll those children who are eligible for either 
Medicaid or the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). It 
is estimated that up to 800,000 of the 1.4 million uninsured children 
in Texas are eligible for, but not enrolled, in the Medicaid program. 
This provision will speed up the application process and ensure that 
these children are immediately enrolled in Medicaid to get the services 
that they need. I believe that this provision is the right thing for 
these children and will actually save taxpayer funds by ensuring that 
these children get the preventive care they need. It is cheaper to 
provide health care for these children rather than to pay for their 
care in emergency rooms. I also pleased that these provisions ensure 
that states will not be penalized if they expand their presumptive 
eligibility program. Under current law, states are required to deduct 
any costs related to this presumptive program from their SCHIP 
allotment. These provisions would correct this inequity by permitting 
states to simply expand this program without a penalty.
  A second priority item in this omnibus appropriations bill is the 
$20.3 billion NIH budget included in this bill. As a Co-Chair for the 
Congressional Biomedical Research Caucus, maximizing the NIH budget is 
one of my highest priorities. This $20.3 billion is 14 percent higher 
than last year's budget and is our third installment in doubling the 
NIH's budget over five years. This additional funding will help to 
ensure that more than one third of the peer-reviewed, meritorious 
grants will be funded to help find a cure for such diseases as AIDS, 
cancer, Alzheimer's, and diabetes.
  Another important provision would provide $235 million for pediatric 
graduate medical education for independent childrens' hospitals such as 
Texas Children's Hospital in my district for next year. This provision 
is similar to legislation I have cosponsored to provide guaranteed 
Federal funding to train pediatricians. Under current law, independent 
children's hospitals are not eligible for much graduate medical 
education funding. This provision would correct this inequity.
  This bill also provides $18.4 billion over ten years in Medicare 
reimbursements for Medicare managed care plans. Just this week, 
Congressman Bentsen sponsored a Town Hall in Houston to inform seniors 
of their health care options in the wake of the massive Medicare HMO 
withdrawal from Texas on January 1, 2001. This critical funding will 
establish two minimum floor payments of $475 per person for rural areas 
and $525 for urban areas to help ensure that Medicare beneficiaries 
will continue to have health care options. It also provides a ten-year 
risk adjuster for Medicare managed care plans to ensure higher 
payments. With higher reimbursements, more managed care plans will 
remain part of the Medicare program.
  I am also pleased that this bill includes provisions to improve and 
strengthen the Medicare and Medicaid programs. The Medicare provisions 
will save hospitals $10.7 billion over ten years. The first provisions 
will increase Medicare reimbursements for Indirect Medical Education 
(IME) payments to teaching hospitals such as those at the Texas Medical 
Center which I represent. This provision will restore $600 million for 
teaching hospitals by providing an average 6.5 percent IME payment in 
Fiscal Year 2001, a 6.375 IME payment for Fiscal Year 2002 and 5.5 IME 
payment for Fiscal Year 2003. This bill also includes provisions to add 
$100 million to the Medicare disproportionate share hospitals (DSH) 
program for those hospitals which serve a disproportionate share of the 
uninsured and underserved communities. This bill would also provide a 
full annual inflation update for hospitals prospective payment system 
(PPS) payments in Fiscal Year 2001. In Fiscal Year 2002 and Fiscal Year 
2003, the update will be Market Basket Index minus .55 percent. These 
two provisions will save hospitals $9.5 billion over ten years and are 
similar to legislation which I have cosponsored to protect our nations' 
hospitals.
  This legislation also includes Medicaid provisions to save hospitals 
$7.2 billion over ten years. The first provision will increase Medicaid 
DSH payments, similar to legislation which I have cosponsored. These 
provisions will also give the state of Texas two extra years to spend 
their $446 million SCHIP allotment for Fiscal Year 1998 and 1999. Since 
Texas has only recently begun to enroll children in their SCHIP 
program, the state of Texas did not spend all of their FY 1998 and FY 
1999 allotments in a timely manner. These provisions are critically 
important to enrolling all of the children who will benefit from this 
health insurance program.
  I am also pleased that this bill includes a provision similar to 
legislation which I have cosponsored to help patients with Amyotrophic 
Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig's disease. This provision 
requires the Institute of Medicine to conduct a study on the 24-month 
waiver in the Medicare disability program. Since many ALS patients do 
not live for more than 24 months, the current system prevents many 
patients from enrolling in Medicare. With more information, it is my 
hope that we will have the research available to convince our 
colleagues that this waiver should be granted.
  I am also pleased that this bill includes several benefits for 
beneficiaries. I am especially pleased that this bill eliminates the 
time limits for immunosuppressive drugs. For Medicare patients who have 
had transplants, these lifesaving drugs are critically important. Under 
current law, we provide limited coverage for these immunosuppressive 
drugs. Yet many of these patients must take these immunosuppressive 
drugs for the rest of their lives to ensure that their transplanted 
organs are not rejected. This bill also would modernize the mammography 
benefits for Medicare beneficiaries by ensuring access to cutting-edge 
digital mammograms. This bill provides higher reimbursements for these 
digital mammograms and ensures that Medicare reimbursements will be 
based upon the physician fee schedule rather the current fixed rate 
system. It also provides coverage for colon cancer tests for all 
Medicare beneficiaries, instead of only high-risk individuals. With 
proper screenings, these preventive benefits can save lives and reduce 
health care costs. I also support provisions that will provide coverage 
for medical nutritional therapy for beneficiaries with diabetes. For 
many diabetics, maintaining their diet is part of their treatment and 
nutritional therapy has been shown to reduce complications from this 
disease. This provision is based upon legislation which I have 
cosponsored and will help many diabetics to get proper nutritional 
training.
  I also want to highlight several local projects included in this 
bill. I am especially pleased that this conference report includes 
$850,000 for the Center for Excellence in Minority

[[Page H12491]]

Health Research (CERMH) at MD Anderson Cancer Center. This is the 
second installment in my efforts to ensure that we have provided 
sufficient federal funding for research on the high rate of cancer 
among minorities and underserved patients. With more information on 
cancer, we will learn more about how to reduce these high rates and how 
to provide cutting-edge treatments for these patients.
  I am gratified that the 106th Congress' final piece of legislation 
includes $1.75 million in very important funding for the revitalization 
of Houston's urban center. These funds will enable the Mainstreet 
Coalition, a unique city-county-private sector partnership, to continue 
effectively addressing Houston's urgent urban public transportation, 
development planning, and aesthetic design needs.
  I am very pleased that the final appropriations agreement provides $2 
million for the construction of a police training driving track for the 
Pasadena Police department. Many are aware of the public dangers posed 
by high-speed police chases. Since 30 percent of peace officer deaths 
occur in motor vehicle accidents, it is critical for the Pasadena 
Police Academy to have access to a quality training facility, and the 
Houston Police Department facility is mostly unavailable. Thousands of 
current and future officers and tens of thousands of residents in 
southeast Harris County will benefit from increased public safety.
  I am also pleased that this measure provides $1.3 million for the 
construction of an Emergency Operations Center (EOC) by local emergency 
management authorities in Baytown, Texas. Under this provision, the EOC 
would be a secure location from which public safety officials can 
direct a safe and orderly evacuation during disaster situations such as 
industrial accidents and hurricanes.
  For all of these reasons, I strongly support this conference report 
and urge my colleagues to also vote for it.
  Mr. STENHOLM. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of provisions contained 
in the Conference Report on H.R. 4577 that will enact legislation to 
reform the Commodity Exchange Act.
  It is a great accomplishment that an agreement has been reached on 
this matter. It would not have occurred without the dedication and 
determination of the gentleman from Illinois, Mr. Ewing.
  Mr. Speaker, the agreement tackles and accomplishes the three main 
tasks the Agriculture Committee set for itself at the beginning of our 
CEA reform process:
  Modernizing our Commodity Exchange Act regulatory system;
  Providing legal certainty for our over-the-counter derivatives 
market; and
  Repealing the outdated prohibition on the trading of single stock 
futures in the U.S.
  Mr. Speaker, the agreement is broadly supported by the 
Administration, by the President's Working Group on Financial Markets, 
and by the financial services industry.
  Mr. Speaker, the portions of this bill that reform our regulation of 
trading on futures exchanges will hopefully bring about opportunities 
for great improvement in the efficiency of our markets. The Commodity 
Futures Trading Commission deserves the credit for the design of these 
provisions. As included in this bill, the reform provisions serve as 
our acknowledgment that as technology and research transform our 
trading systems, Congress must ensure that regulatory statutes are 
well-suited to helpful innovations.
  Mr. Speaker, the CFTC's role in preventing and detecting fraudulent 
activity will continue under its new system of regulation. The 
legislation before us deliberately retains the authority of the 
Commission to punish those who commit fraud in violation of section 4b 
of the Commodity Exchange Act. While section 4b makes it a crime for a 
futures commission merchant or other fiduciary to defraud a customer in 
connection with a futures trade, it also is intended to make criminal 
the type of fraud that may occur when a bucket shop or boiler room 
defrauds a customer and no agent-principal relationship is present.
  Mr. Speaker, again I want to clarify that with this bill, section 4b 
is retained in its entirety. It will continue to be a crime for anyone 
to commit fraud in connection with a futures contract--whether or not 
an agency relationship is established. Section 4b provides the 
Commission with broad authority to police fraudulent conduct within its 
jurisdiction, whether occurring in boiler rooms and bucket shops, or in 
the e-commerce markets that will develop under this new statutory 
framework.
  Mr. Speaker, again I support the inclusion of CEA reform in this 
bill, and I congratulate Chairman Ewing for his achievement.
  Mr. UDALL of Colorado. Mr. Speaker, while I have some serious 
reservations about this conference report, I will vote for it.
  One of my concerns relates to the way this bill has been brought to 
the floor of the House.
  We all expect that this will be the last real appropriations bill--as 
opposed to a continuing resolution--of the year, and that when it is 
enacted funding will be available to keep all federal agencies running.
  This is the good news about the parliamentary situation in which we 
find ourselves.
  The bad news is that we must vote yes or no, up or down, on an 
omnibus bill that few if any of us have had much time to review and 
that includes many substantive provisions that have little or nothing 
to do with appropriations and that may well be contrary to good public 
policy in several areas, including protection of the environment.
  This is not the way the Congress should do its business.
  It is not the fault of the House--we completed action on all the 
appropriations bills in a relatively timely way. But regardless of how 
we got here, this is not where we should be.
  From my perspective, there is also both good news and bad news about 
the bill's specific provisions.
  The good news is that the bill includes many provisions that will 
greatly benefit the nation as a whole and Colorado in particular. The 
bad news is that it includes some things that should not be included 
and omits some things that should be part of the conference report.
  Let me first mention some of the good news about the conference 
report.


                               education

  While not all I would have liked, the conference report will allow 
for $6.5 billion increase over last year in education spending, with 
increased funding for Special Education Grants, the TRIO Program for 
minority and disadvantaged students and Head Start. The bill allows for 
an increase in Pell Grants, bringing the maximum award to $3,750. The 
conference report also provides $1.2 billion for school modernization.
  I think we should be doing more in several areas, including assisting 
school districts to repair schools and build new ones, but overall this 
is part of the good news.


                         Health care provisions

  The conference report will increase the National Institutes of Health 
budget $2.5 billion. It also restores funding to health care service 
providers and managed care plans that provide health care services to 
Medicare beneficiaries that have been hard hit by the Balanced Budget 
Act of 1997.
  This is also good news, although more remains to be done.
  In 1997, Congress passed and the President signed into law the 
Balanced Budget Act, which made cuts in Medicare and Medicaid in order 
to balance the budget and secure the solvency of these two critical 
health care programs. However, these cuts have left America's hospitals 
in a state of crisis. Cuts in funding for disproportionate share 
hospitals (DSH), coupled with the skyrocketing costs for prescription 
drugs, have left some of the Nation's premier hospitals operating in 
the red and at the brink of bankruptcy.
  In late January 2000, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released 
its revised baselines for fiscal year 2001 spending programs and 
projections for fiscal year 2001 through 2005. Budget officials project 
that Federal health program spending will be cut by more than $226 
billion--approximately $123 billion more than Congress or the 
Administration ever intended. In addition, the BBA 97 backloaded the 
cuts in Medicaid, so the real hemorrhaging hospitals will experience 
will be in 2001 and 2002.
  During 1999 total Medicare spending fell by almost one percent--the 
first absolute spending reduction in Medicare history. And the Medicare 
Hospital Insurance Trust Fund (which provides payment for inpatient 
hospital and nursing home services) fell by 4.4 percent. 
Simultaneously, our Nation's uninsured rate continues to climb, to the 
tune of 100,000 people every month. Cutting DSH payments while the 
uninsured rate increases does not make sense. At a time of budget 
surpluses, Congress should provide relief to our Nation's safety net 
hospitals that provide critical health care access to the uninsured, 
and I'm pleased we've addressed this is the bill.
  Also, the bill provides more funding for Medicare managed care 
organizations. Since the inception of the Medicare HMO Program three 
years ago, managed care companies have discontinued participation in 
the program, leaving many seniors scrambling to find another managed 
care plan or enrolling in traditional Medicare. Many HMOs argue that 
the reimbursement rates are not adequate enough for them to continue to 
provide coverage to Medicare beneficiaries. In fact, in the last two 
years in my district, the number of Medicare HMOs has dropped from five 
to one. Many seniors rely on managed care plans for affordable and 
quality health care.
  While I believe the funding in this bill for Medicare HMOs is only a 
band-aid solution to a growing problem, I think it's an acceptable move 
at this point. But I think we need to think seriously about how we will 
continue to provide quality health care coverage for our current and 
future retirees.


                              noaa funding

  Another part of the good news is that the conference report is a 
definite improvement over the House bill in terms of the funding it 
provides for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
(NOAA).

[[Page H12492]]

  NOAA operates six of its twelve environmental research laboratories 
in Colorado, and Boulder has the largest concentration of NOAA research 
staff in the nation--300--as well as the largest concentration of 
university staff funded by NOAA research. We in Colorado are proud to 
be the home of so many top-quality scientists engaged in unraveling the 
secrets of the Earth.
  Earlier this year, the work of NOAA's scientists and researchers was 
threatened by much reduced FY 2001 funding levels in the House. 
Particularly devastating would have been cuts to NOAA's Office of 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Research. So, it is definitely good news that 
in the course of the conference process, funding was increased--almost 
to the higher Senate-passed levels. Although we can and should do 
better next year, I am glad that conferees were able to realize the 
value of NOAA's programs.


                              nist funding

  It is also good news that the conference report includes increased 
the funding levels for the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology (NIST).
  The earlier House-passed bill not only would have cut NIST's science 
programs, but also would have provided inadequate funding for 
critically needed repairs and maintenance for NIST's laboratories in my 
hometown of Boulder, Colorado.
  About 530 scientists, engineers, technicians, and visiting 
researchers are based at NIST-Boulder, where they conduct research in a 
wide range of chemical, physical, materials, and information sciences 
and engineering. But NIST's deteriorating labs--most of them 45 years 
old--mean that scientists can't do their work. So I am pleased that 
maintenance funds for NIST--Boulder have been increased in the final 
bill. I am hopeful that this is only the beginning of what must be a 
long-term commitment to maintenance and construction funding for NIST-
Boulder. I will continue to fight to ensure NIST's needs are addressed.


                          sbir reauthorization

  I am also pleased that the conferees saw fit to include the 
reauthorization of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) 
Program in this omnibus legislation. This has been a long time in 
coming--the Senate and the House have spent most of the 106th Congress 
finetuning the SBIR reauthorization language. But we finally have a 
reauthorization bill that all parties can support and that will extend 
this important program through 2008.
  I come from an area of the country that is home to many innovative 
small businesses at the cutting edge in a number of fields. As creative 
as these companies are, they often struggle to come up with the funds 
necessary to refine their ideas, turn them into products, and to take 
those products to the commercial marketplace.
  This SBIR Program has filled a real need for these companies over the 
years, giving them easier access to capital and functioning as a seal 
of approval. It is an important source of funding for the ideas that 
will lead to our future prosperity, and I welcome the inclusion of its 
reauthorization in this omnibus bill.


                         broomfield interchange

  I also want to express my appreciation to the Appropriations 
Committee for allocating $1 million to the City of Broomfield, Colorado 
to complete an environmental impact study on the U.S. 36--Wadsworth 
Blvd. Interchange. This will be an important step towards relieving 
traffic gridlock along this seriously overcrowded route that serves an 
area where growth and development have been occurring at a fast pace, 
and in particular a complex intersection that serves the Interlocken 
business park, the Jefferson County Airport, the Flatirons Crossing 
Mall, and the city--soon to be the county--of Broomfield. I greatly 
appreciated being able to work with the committee and with Broomfield 
to help provide this federal assistance to begin to unclog this 
transportation ``bottleneck.''


                          navajo code talkers

  I also am very pleased that the conference report includes 
legislative language similar to H.R. 4527, authorizing the President to 
present a gold medal on behalf of the Congress to the Navajo Code 
Talkers in recognition of their contributions to the Nation. Last year, 
a high school history teacher in my district, Jim Hamilton of Centarus 
High School in Lafayette, Colorado brought a group of students to 
Washington. Through meeting with Mr. Hamilton and his students, I 
learned that for several years he has been teaching his classes at 
Centarus High School the history of the Navajo Code Talkers service in 
World War II. Like many other Westerners, I am very familiar with the 
inspiring story of these Navajo Code Talkers, whose unique and highly 
successful communications operation greatly assisted in saving 
countless lives and in hastening the end of World War II in the 
Pacific. So, I am happy to have played a role in drawing our colleagues 
attention to the appropriateness of their receiving this long overdue 
honor.
  Now I have to mention some of the bad news about this conference 
report.
  Part of the bad news is that there are areas where the amounts 
included are short of what is needed.


                            reca shortfalls

  One important example of a shortcoming is the funding for awards 
under the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA).
  RECA provides for payments to individuals who contracted certain 
cancers and other serious diseases as a result of their exposure to 
radiation released during above-ground nuclear weapons tests or as a 
result of their exposure to radiation during employment in underground 
uranium mines. Some of my constituents are covered by RECA, as are many 
other Coloradans as well as residents of New Mexico and other states. 
On July 10th of this year, RECA was amended to cover more people and 
additional compensable diseases, to lower radiation exposure 
thresholds, to modify the medical documentation requirements, and to 
remove certain disease restrictions. These are improvements that I 
supported.
  Unfortunately, Congress has not appropriated sufficient money to pay 
all the awards that have been made under RECA. As a result, the Justice 
Department has had to send successful claimants letters--IOUs, in 
effect--indicating that payments must await further appropriations. And 
while this conference report does provide some $10 million for RECA 
payments, that still is far from adequate. In fact, the Justice 
Department tells me that an additional $70 million to $80 million would 
be required just to pay what the government already owes RECA 
claimants.
  We need to do better. We need to provide all the needed funds--but 
that is not all. We should act so that RECA payments will no longer be 
subject to appropriations, but instead will be paid automatically in 
the way that we now have provided for payments under the new 
compensation program for certain nuclear-weapons workers made sick by 
exposure to radiation, beryllium, and other hazards.


                      other legislation provisions

  Finally, another part of the bad news about this conference report is 
that it also includes a number of legislative items that more properly 
should be considered on their own rather than as part of this 
appropriations bill.
  I want to highlight one of those provisions that is of particular 
importance to Colorado.


                        animas-la plata project

  The conference report includes legislation to authorize a revised 
version of the Animas-La Plata project, in southwestern Colorado. In 
our state, few things have been so controversial for so long. The 
original authorization for an Animas-La Plata Project dates back more 
than thirty years, but for many years it seemed that nothing would ever 
come of that authorization.
  The idea was given new life in 1988 by enactment of the Colorado Ute 
Indian Water Rights Settlement Act. By that Act, Congress ratified an 
agreement under which the two Ute tribes agreed that water from the 
project would resolve their water-rights claims and they and the other 
parties could dispense with litigation.
  However, since then more than a dozen more years have gone by without 
a resolution--and unless the current law is changed the tribes will 
have to decide either to go back into court or to continue to wait.
  So, I fully understand why the tribes and many others said it is time 
to resolve this matter. Like them, I am troubled about the time that 
has already elapsed without achieving a final resolution of these 
tribal claims and I am very uncomfortable with the prospect of 
reopening litigation that could be very long and costly for all 
concerned.
  In addition, the project that would be authorized by this legislation 
is not the same as the original proposal and in its revised form it has 
the support of the Clinton Administration.
  Still, while I think notable progress has been made, it is clearer 
that there is not--and may never be--complete consensus on either the 
environmental issues or the fiscal questions that over the years have 
been part of the debate about this contentious matter.
  Personally, I have serious concerns about the very idea of 
constructing a large water storage project as a way to resolve the 
kinds of water-rights claims that are involved here.
  I think that over the past century we have learned--or should have 
learned--that water projects like the one proposed here represent an 
old approach that is not very well-tuned to today's realities. They are 
costly, environmentally disruptive, and inefficient for many reasons, 
including the amount of water they simply lose through evaporation.
  In fact, it is because we have learned about these shortcomings that 
across the country we are seeing a greater emphasis on removing dams 
than on building new ones.
  In addition, as I said earlier I find it very unsatisfactory that the 
House must today vote on this strictly on a take-it-or-leave-it basis, 
with no opportunity to consider amendments or even a separate up-or-
down vote on this or any other part of the overall conference report.

[[Page H12493]]

  It would have been much better if the House had had a chance to 
consider this matter separately under an open rule, to permit full 
debate on the legislation and consideration of amendments.
  We could have done that if the similar bill reported by the Resources 
Committee had ever been brought to the floor.
  When the Resources Committee debated that bill, I voted ``present'' 
even though, as I said, I found--and still find--it very hard to 
support even the scaled-down water project now being proposed.
  My vote in the committee was based on three things.
  First, because while I had--and still have--serious doubts about this 
project, I was persuaded that the time has come for the Congress to 
resolve this matter.
  Second, I recognized the West-wide significance of this project and 
believed the Congress in its entirety--and not just one Committee--
should have an opportunity to debate and vote on this matter.
  And there was a third reason--perhaps the most important one. It has 
to do with the involvement of the Ute tribes.
  If it were up to me alone, the Resources Committee would have 
considered a different bill and neither the bill the committee approved 
nor the Animas-La Plata provisions of this conference report would be 
before us.
  As I told the Resources Committee, I am hard pressed to see how the 
project that would be authorized by this bill can adequately provide 
the tribes with ``wet'' water, barring some future distribution system 
that will have significant environmental consequences--consequences 
that it may not be possible to fully and adequately mitigate.
  But it was my view--it is still my view--that I must take very 
seriously the fact that the tribes have asked for this project. I 
thought then--and I still think--it would not be right for me to 
substitute my judgment for theirs when it comes to the option they 
prefer. Whatever I may think about the merits of the project, I feel 
that I must respect their decision about what is best for them and 
their future.
  So, I did not oppose the action of the Resources Committee in 
ordering the bill reported to the House. I expected that the reported 
bill would by now have been brought up for debate. But, for whatever 
reasons, that did not happen.
  The Senate did give separate consideration to a similar measure, 
which it passed in October. Prior to passage, the Senate revised the 
bill, and I think the result was to improve it--particularly by making 
it even less likely that the bill could be construed as somehow waiving 
any of the requirements of applicable environmental laws or as limiting 
any judicial review in connection with this project.
  Had that Senate bill been considered separately here in the House, it 
would have been possible to amend it further to make this absolutely 
clear--something that I think would have been desirable even though 
perhaps not absolutely necessary.
  But, on balance, I support resolving this contentious matter in a way 
that is finally acceptable to the Tribes rather than allowing this 
issue to continue to languish. While I would have preferred that this 
Animas-La Plata legislation not be included in this conference report, 
I think it is sufficiently acceptable--particularly considering the 
desirable provisions of the conference report I have already 
mentioned--that I will support the conference report even though it is 
included.
  Mr. JACKSON of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, although I have very serious 
concerns, I rise today in support of this conference report. It is not 
a perfect product, but I believe it is a compromise we can all live 
with. By passing this conference report, Congress demonstrates its 
commitment to the employment, education and health needs of all 
Americans. So much is at stake. I urge you to support it.
  I want to commend Chairman John Porter, Ranking Member Obey, my other 
colleagues on the Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations Subcommittee and 
the subcommittee staff for their tireless work to get us here today. I 
want to especially thank the Chairman and the Ranking Member for 
working with me to address the needs of my constituents and all 
Americans.
  For some in America, the economy is booming and unemployment is at 
its lowest rate in 30 years. But there are others.
  In the congressional districts on the north side of the Chicago metro 
area, there are more jobs than people. In my district, the south side 
of Chicago and south suburbs, there are more people than jobs. And what 
about health care? While the economy was booming, the number of 
Americans uninsured or under-insured has increased by several million. 
We should not, and cannot settle for this! This conference report 
provides the opportunity for us to leverage our resources and the 
benefits of this booming economy, to ensure that no American is left 
behind.
  There may be some members of this House who disagree with the 
programs that Labor-H provides, but it is in our national interest to 
help those we represent receive skills training to move into an economy 
that is becoming less industrial and more service oriented. It is in 
our national interest to provide educational opportunities so every 
American has a strong foundation that will serve them as they pursue 
their dreams. But education in the head and money in the bank mean 
nothing if there is no health in the body. So it is most definitely in 
our national interest to ensure that every American has the health care 
they need by increasing investment in research, prevention and 
treatment.
  However, as I stated when I began, despite some of the positive 
aspects of this bill, there are four areas which I find problematic.
  (1) The FY 2002 advance for LIHEAP was eliminated. Advance 
appropriations for LIHEAP are vitally necessary so states like Illinois 
can properly plan before the summer and winter for any severe weather 
that puts some of our most vulnerable citizens at risk. No one ever 
wants to be put in the position of deciding between food for their 
children and heat for their homes.
  (2) The FY 2002 advance for the Child Care and Development Block 
Grant was eliminated. This is a missed opportunity to show ``family 
values,'' especially to parents who are making the transition from 
welfare to work.
  (3) The immigration amnesty provisions in the Commerce-Justice-State 
portion of the conference report are inadequate. In whole, the Latino 
Immigration and Fairness Act simply tries to bring fairness and justice 
to our nation's immigration laws by keeping families together, 
especially the families of Central American and Carribean refugees who 
fled civil unrest in their homelands.
  (4) Although I support the New Markets initiative attached to this 
omnibus conference report, I object to the charitable choice language 
because it allows for federally funded employment discrimination. 
Despite the fact that charitable choice provisions were included in 
legislation signed in October, I still believe civil rights and 
constitutional problems exist, and we should not overlook them.
  Even with these objections, I can think of 108.9 billion reasons to 
support this conference report.
  The budget authority for the Labor-HHS-Education bill is $108.910 
billion. Education funding is $42.1 billion, a $6.5 billion or 18 
percent increase over FY2000. Funding to train America's workforce is 
$11.9 billion, a $664 million of 6 percent increase over FY2000. 
Funding for the Department of Health and Human Services is $48.8 
billion, a $6.6 billion or 16 percent increase over 2000. Specifically, 
this omnibus conference report contains:
  $2.9 billion to expand Youth Job Training Programs, $175 million or 7 
percent over last year--which will train 812,000 disadvantaged youth, 
an increase of 78,000 over last year.
  $3.2 billion for Adult Job Training Programs, $63 million or 2 
percent over last year--which will train 1.6 million adults who need 
skills training--223,000 more than were trained last year.
  $20.5 billion for NIH, a $2.5 billion or 14 percent increase over 
last year to expand the federal investment in biomedical research.
  $1.8 billion for Ryan White AIDS Programs, a $213 million or 13 
percent increase; and $767 million for CDC AIDS prevention, an increase 
of $147 million or 24 percent.
  $350 million for the Minority HIV/AIDS Initiative, an increase of 
$99.1 million.
  $1.7 billion for Community Health Centers, an increase of $150 
million or 15 percent; plus an additional $125 million for the 
Community Access Program.
  $185 million for Historically Black Colleges and Universities, an 
increase of $37 million over FY 2000.
  $45 million for Historically Black Graduate Institutions, an increase 
of $14 million over FY 2000.
  Again, I want to reiterate my support for this omnibus conference 
report.
  I want to thank Chairman Porter and Ranking Member Obey and their 
staffs for working with me. Mr. Chairman, I am disappointed to see you 
retiring from Congress, but I want to congratulate you on the work you 
have done as a legislator, on your distinguished career and your 
dedication to public service. I wish you and your family well in your 
future endeavors.
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this 
conference report that incorporates the four outstanding FY 2001 
appropriations bills--Labor-HHS-Education, Commerce-Justice-State, 
Legislative Branch, and Treasury-Postal Service--as well as $550 
million in across-the-board cuts from all non-defense discretionary 
accounts except Labor-HHS, and $450 million in defense cuts.
  In addition, this conference report incorporates: (1) various 
immigration provisions; (2) the Medicare, Medicaid, and S-CHIP Benefits 
Improvement and Protection Act; (3) the New Markets Initiative; and (4) 
the Commodity Futures Modernization Act.
  The version of the FY 2001 Treasury-Postal Service/Legislative Branch 
Appropriations conference agreement included in this legislative

[[Page H12494]]

package is identical to the one vetoed by the President on October 30, 
except that it does not include repeal of the telephone tax.
  Following are highlights of the various key components of this 
omnibus legislative package being brought to the House Floor.


                   labor-hhs-education appropriations

  The Clinton Administration and Congressional Democrats were 
disappointed that the Republican leadership scuttled a bipartisan 
agreement on the Labor-HHS-Education bill that was reached by 
negotiators on the night of October 30. However, it is important to 
note that, through their efforts, the Administration and Congressional 
Democrats were able to secure in this final conference report an 
historic increase in education funding--providing an increase of $6.5 
billion (or 18 percent) in education funding over FY 2000. Indeed, the 
final education funding bill has received the support of the National 
Education Association and other education groups. Following are 
highlights of the final conference report on the Labor-HHS-Education 
bill.
  Class Size Reduction--Provides $1.623 billion for the Class Size 
Reduction Initiative, which is $323 million above the FY 2000 level and 
$127 million less than the President's request.
  Urgent School Renovation--Provides $1.2 billion for President 
Clinton's new Urgent School Renovation Program, providing support for 
short-term emergency repairs at schools, which is $100 million less 
than the President's request.
  Title I Accountability--Provides $225 million for the Title I 
Accountability Fund, which strengthens accountability by accelerating 
state and local efforts to turn around the lowest-performing Title I 
schools, which is $91 million above the FY 2000 level.
  After-School Programs--Provides $846 million for After-School 
Programs, which is $393 million above the FY 2000 level.
  Teacher Quality--Provides $692 million to improve teacher quality, an 
increase of $244 million or 54 percent over FY 2000, to provide 
training in core academic subjects to up to 1 million teachers, reduce 
the number of uncertified teachers, and provide technology training to 
110,000 future teachers.
  Pell Grants--Provides $8.756 billion for the Pell Grant Program, 
which is $1.116 billion above the FY 2000 level. Also provides for a 
maximum Pell Grant of $3,750, an increase of $450 over the maximum 
grant in FY 2000.
  GEAR-UP--Provides $295 million for the GEAR-UP Program, providing 
college preparation for low-income middle school and high school 
students, which is $95 million above the FY 2000 level.
  Head Start--Provides $6.2 billion for Head Start, which is $933 
million above the FY 2000 level.
  LIHEAP--Provides $1.4 billion for the Low-Income Home Energy 
Assistance Program, which is $300 million above the FY 2000 level. (The 
agreement does not include the FY 2002 advance appropriation for LIHEAP 
that had been included in the October 30th tentative conference 
agreement.)
  NIH--Provides $20.3 billion for the National Institutes of Health, 
which is $2.5 billion or 14 percent above the FY 2000 level.
  Ryan White AIDS Programs--Provides $1.8 billion for Ryan White AIDS 
programs, which is $213 million above the FY 2000 level.
  No Ergonomics Rider--Contains no policy riders regarding ergonomics, 
unlike the original House-passed bill.


                 commerce-justice-state appropriations

  Following are highlights of the final conference report on Commerce-
Justice-State Appropriations (the funding levels in the conference 
report are identical to those in the conference report adopted by the 
House back on October 26).
  COPS--Provides $1 billion for the COPS program, which is $437 million 
above the FY 2000 level. This total includes $535 million for the core 
COPS program, $100 million for community prosecutors, and $140 million 
for a new COPS technology initiative.
  State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance Programs--Provides $2.8 
billion for state and local law enforcement assistance programs, 
slightly more than the FY 2000 level--including $523 million for local 
law enforcement block grants, $687 million for state prison grants, 
$288 million for violence against women grants, $250 million for 
juvenile crime block grants, and $569 million for Byrne grants.
  INS--Provides $4.8 billion for the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service (INS), which is $548 million above the FY 2000 level.
  FBI--Provides $3.3 billion for the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
(FBI), which is $161 million above the FY 2000 level.
  Drug Enforcement Administration--Provides $1.4 billion for the Drug 
Enforcement Administration, which is $82 million above the FY 2000 
level.
  Commerce Department--Provides a total of $5.2 billion for the 
Commerce Department and related agencies. This includes $3.1 billion 
for programs of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration; $1 
billion for the Patent and Trademark Office; $563 million for the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology; $146 million for the 
Advanced Technology Program; $440 million for the Economic Development 
Administration; and $337 million for the International Trade 
Administration.
  State Department--Provides a total of $6.6 billion for State 
Department programs, which is $729 million above the FY 2000 level. 
This includes $3.2 billion for diplomatic and consular programs; $1.1 
billion for embassy security, construction and maintenance; $871 
million for membership in international organizations; and $846 million 
for international peacekeeping.


                         immigration provisions

  Democrats advocated the inclusion in this final appropriations 
conference report of immigration provisions found in the Latino and 
Immigrant Fairness Act (LIFA) that would have provided fair treatment 
for individuals fleeing political violence and instability in their 
home countries, relief for individuals who have been left in legal 
limbo because of the Immigration and Naturalization Service's 
misinterpretation of immigration law, and relief for individuals who 
are eligible for permanent residency. Instead, the Republicans have 
included a package of immigration provisions that provide limited 
relief and fail to address due process concerns or fairness for Central 
Americans, Haitians and Liberians who have fled persecution. The 
immigration package includes:
  Restoring the 245(i) adjustment of status mechanism (under which a 
person eligible for an immigrant visa and for whom a visa is currently 
available can get permanent resident status in the U.S. rather than 
having to return abroad to get a visa) available to anyone who is the 
beneficiary of a petition for an immigrant visa or application for 
labor certification filed before April 30, 2001, provided that the 
beneficiary is physically present in the U.S. on the date of enactment 
of the Act.
  Providing relief to immigrants who have been here since 1982 and who 
were prevented from adjusting their status under a one-time amnesty 
program passed in 1986. Specifically, this provision would provide 
permanent residency to individuals who were members of the classes in 
the lawsuits Catholic Social Services, Inc. v. Meese, League of United 
Latin American Citizens v. INS and Zebrano v. INS. The spouses and 
minor children of these individuals will be allowed to stay in the 
country and work while their immigrant visas are being processed.
  Amending the Nicaraguan Adjustment and Central American Relief Act 
(NACARA) and the Haitian Refugee Immigration Fairness Act (HRIFA)--two 
laws which passed in the mid-1990s to provide relief for refugees--to 
ensure that qualifying applicants for relief are not turned away 
because of previous deportation orders.


  medicare, medicaid and schip benefits improvement and protection act

  The final package includes the Medicare, Medicaid and SCHIP Benefits 
Improvement Act--a revised version of provisions that were included in 
the tax cut bill passed by the House on October 26. This legislation 
invests about $35 billion over five years to restore Medicare and 
Medicaid health care provider payments; add preventive benefits and 
reduce beneficiary cost sharing under Medicare; and improve health 
insurance options for low-income children, families and seniors. The 
total of $35 billion includes restored Medicare and Medicaid health 
care provider payments of approximately $12 billion for hospitals, $11 
billion for managed care plans, $2 billion for nursing homes, $2 
billion for home health agencies, and $3 billion for other providers. 
The total also includes approximately $5 billion for Medicare and 
Medicaid beneficiary improvements.
  The Clinton Administration and Congressional Democrats are 
particularly pleased that over the last few weeks they have been 
successful in adding to the bill passed in October increased payment 
restorations for rural and teaching hospitals, hospices, and home 
health agencies. They are also pleased about being successful in adding 
a number of other provisions including: (1) extending for a year 
provisions allowing welfare families who leave the rolls for jobs to 
retain Medicaid coverage temporarily; (2) allowing states the option of 
enrolling eligible uninsured children in Medicaid and the State 
Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) through schools, child 
support enforcement agencies, and other sites; (3) suspending the 
normal 24-month waiting period for Medicare for individuals disabled by 
Lou Gehrig's disease; and 4) simplifying enrollment of low-income 
Medicare beneficiaries for Medicaid assistance with premiums and cost-
sharing.


            community renewal and new markets tax provisions

  The legislative package contains community renewal and New Markets 
tax provisions, similar to those passed by the House twice earlier this 
year. These provisions expand the community renewal efforts undertaken 
in the Empowerment Zone legislation first enacted in 1993 and expanded 
in 1997. The provisions include those that:

[[Page H12495]]

  Create nine additional empowerment zones and forty ``renewal 
communities'' which are eligible for a number of tax incentives for 
investment and job creation;
  Provide the President's ``New Markets'' tax credit;
  Increase the per-capita annual volume cap on the low-income housing 
tax credit and the per capita state volume cap on tax-exempt private 
activity bonds and extends the tax benefits for existing zones through 
2009; and

  Extend the Brownfields tax incentive.
  In addition, the bill extends the availability of Medical Savings 
Accounts (MSAs) for two years through 2002, corrects the effect of an 
error in the Consumer Price Index on a number of Federal benefit 
programs and indexing of tax brackets and exemptions, and provides an 
extension and enhancement of the charitable deduction for corporate 
contributions of computers and other high-tech equipment to schools and 
public libraries. The tax provisions needed to implement the newly 
authorized single-stock futures contracts in the Commodity Futures 
Modernization Act of 2000 (also incorporated in this conference report) 
are contained in the bill. There are also numerous technical 
corrections and administrative provisions.


              commodity futures modernization act of 2000

  Finally, the legislative package includes the language of the 
Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000, legislation that makes 
major changes in the regulatory structure of the commodity futures and 
financial derivatives markets. The bill is similar to H.R. 4541 that 
was passed by the House on October 19, but it contains revisions based 
on negotiations between Senate Banking Committee Chairman Gramm, House 
Republicans and the Treasury, SEC and CFTC. It reauthorizes the funding 
for the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, incorporates many of the 
recommendations of the President's Working Group on Financial Markets 
regarding the regulation of financial derivatives, lifts the ban on 
trading of single-stock and narrowly-based index futures, and updates 
the regulatory structure for financial and commodity futures and 
options markets. The tax provisions needed to implement creation of 
single-stock futures are contained in the Community Renewal and New 
Markets tax bill that is also included in the conference report.
  This version of the bill is acceptable to the Treasury Department, 
Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading 
Commission. Basic investor protections in current law and regulations 
are preserved. However, some consumer advocates have expressed concern 
that the deregulation of derivatives markets in this bill weakens the 
protections against fraud and manipulation and could lead to future 
instability of the financial markets.
  Mr. DAVIS of Florida. Mr. Speaker, as we all know, we are approaching 
an education crisis in our country. Over the next decade, school 
districts throughout the country will need to hire over 2 million new 
teachers. Four months after the school year started, my school 
district, Hillsborough County, Florida, still needs to hire over 150 
new teachers. Over the next decade, our school district will need more 
than 7,000 new teachers. To meet this need and address this critical 
shortage of teachers that our school districts are facing, talented 
Americans of all ages should be recruited to become successful, 
qualified teachers. That's why I, along with Representative Tim Roemer, 
introduced the Transition to Teaching Act.
  I am pleased to stand here today in support of the provisions in this 
Omnibus Appropriations Bill, which will provide $34 million over the 
next fiscal year to help us recruit quality teachers through the 
Transition to Teaching program. This money will allow us to begin to 
develop this program to train mid-career professionals who want to 
become teachers.
  Our bill is intended to help people get the training they need to 
become teachers. The funding in this bill will help us move people from 
the boardroom to the classroom, from the firehouse to the schoolhouse 
or from the police station on Main Street to the classroom on Main 
Street.
  Under this program, we will encourage professional associations, 
business and trade groups, unions and other organizations to follow the 
military's example and encourage their retiring employees to become 
teachers. Under the bill before us tonight, these groups, along with 
institutions of higher learning, would be awarded grants to design a 
program, modeled after Troops to Teachers, to train these targeted 
individuals to teach our children. The institutions of higher learning 
would tailor the program to meet the particular needs of the 
professionals who are leaving their previous career to become teachers.
  In addition, to help the individuals with the educational cost of 
becoming a qualified teacher, the bill provides a stipend of up to 
$5,000 per participant. In exchange for the stipend, the individuals 
must agree to teach in a high-need school district for at least three 
years.
  In closing, I would like to thank Mr. Obey, the Ranking Democrat on 
the Appropriations Committee, Chairman Young, and Chairman Porter for 
their help in funding this important program.
  The time is now for us to do more to encourage additional talented 
people to consider the call of the classroom. I encourage my colleagues 
to support the bill before us.
  Mr. EVANS. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of this omnibus bill. 
I am pleased that after months of hard work, we are prepared to pass a 
Balanced Budget Act (BBA) package that will bring long awaited relief 
to our nation's hospitals.
  It has long been apparent that the savings that have resulted from 
the 1997 BBA package have far exceeded expectations. These savings have 
been realized at the expense of the health care industry, particularly 
hospitals. I have seen the effects of these cuts first hand in the 
hospitals of western Illinois, where hospitals are in danger of closing 
their doors to those in need. Today, we are taking action to lift this 
financial burden from the backs of hospitals. I am particularly pleased 
to see that this bill includes provisions to address the unique needs 
of rural hospitals.
  Of particular importance to patients in Illinois is the increase in 
DSH payments to public hospitals who serve a disproportionate share of 
Medicaid patients. Without these provisions, the state of Illinois was 
poised to lose $500 million per year in federal Medicaid funding. The 
inclusion of this provision will allow Illinois' hospitals to continue 
their mission of expanding health care services to low income and 
underserved populations.
  While this bill makes great strides in restoring the cuts made by the 
1997 BBA bill, we still have work to do. This year, I have heard from 
hundreds of Medicare patients and their health care providers who have 
suffered from severe lung and heart disorders and are unable to get the 
treatment that they need to restore their health because Medicare does 
not cover cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation.
  Evidence is ample that cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation services 
result in increased longevity and quality of life. But even more 
telling are the stories that I have heard from cardiac and pulmonary 
rehabilitation patients, who are discarding their wheelchairs and canes 
to resume the lives they enjoyed before being afflicted with their 
conditions. It is for those patients that have not been able to benefit 
from these services that I will continue my work in the 107th Congress 
to bring this sensible coverage to the Medicare program.
  On the whole, this bill will bring meaningful relief to our nation's 
health care institutions and move us closer to a day when every 
American will have access to affordable, quality care. I am proud to 
support this bill.
  Mr. KLECZKA. Mr. Speaker, the Medicare, Medicaid, and SCHIP Benefits 
Improvement and Protection Act of 2000 (H.R. 5561), which passed as 
part of the final Omnibus Appropriations package, contains important 
provisions (Title III, Section 301) needed by institutions that provide 
blood and blood products to the nation's hospitals.
  The legislation directs the Health Care Financing Agency (HCFA) to 
consider the prices of blood and blood products purchased by hospitals 
in the next rebasing and revision of the hospital market basket to 
determine if prices are adequately reflected. In addition, the bill 
requires that Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) to analyze 
the increased hospital costs attributable to new blood technologies and 
to recommend necessary changes to provide fair reimbursement.
  These provisions are greatly needed because two recent technologies 
have been introduced to increase the safety of our nation's blood 
supply, Nucleic Acid Testing and Leukoreduction. Nucleic Acid Testing 
allows for the early detection of infectious diseases, such as HIV and 
Hepatitis C, by detecting the genetic material of the viruses, while 
Leukoreduction removes white cells and has the potential to shorten the 
severity of the illness and duration of hospital stays for patients who 
receive blood.
  In its first 15 months of implementation, the nucleic acid test 
detected and intercepted four HIV-positive donations and more than 57 
Hepatitis C-positive donations. This means that roughly 150 potential 
HIV and Hepatitis C infections were prevented, and lives were saved. 
While these new technologies are remarkable, these innovations have 
significantly increased costs. Nationally, these new blood safety 
procedures add approximately 40 percent to the cost of blood.
  The purpose of the blood-related provisions in this legislation is to 
determine how much of an update increase may be needed to defray these 
costs that markedly improve the quality of our blood supply. By 
restoring the full inflationary update to the market basket index, 
Congress is providing the nation's hospitals with the means to afford 
new blood therapies and to ensure that patients are treated with the 
safest possible products.

[[Page H12496]]

  All Americans deserve the peace of mind of safe blood and blood 
products, and I am pleased these provisions were included in the final 
Medicare relief package.
  Mr. GREEN of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to voice my opinions on 
the Labor-HHS-Education portion of the Omnibus package.
  Now that we have reached an agreement on this bill, I suggest that we 
take a look at what has changed from the bill that was practically a 
``done deal'' in October to the piece of legislation that is before us.
  While the overall funding for education has risen approximately $6.5 
to $6.6 billion over FY 2000, which would be the largest increase in 
education funding ever, funding was cut by over $1.3 billion from the 
figures agreed to in the October version of the budget.
  The whole Labor-HHS bill was cut approximately $2.5 billion from that 
agreement, so over half of the cuts to this bill come from education 
funding. Here is a sampling of the final funding levels for education 
programs in this bill: $1.2 billion for the School Renovation 
Initiative; funding for Head Start is at $6.2 billion, an increase of 
$933 million over FY 2000; $851 billion for 21st Century Community 
Learning Centers, an increase of $372 million; $1.62 billion for the 
Class Size Reduction and Teacher Assistance program; $8.8 billion for 
Pell Grants, which would set the maximum award at $3,750, an increase 
of $450 from FY 2000; and $295 million for GEAR UP, an increase of $100 
million over FY 2000.
  While I applaud the increases in education funding that this bill 
represents, I am saddened that we have chosen to cut education funding 
from the agreement we reached in October 2000. By leaving this 
important bill until the final days of the 106th Congress, we have 
subjected these programs to more scrutiny than other appropriations, 
and have chosen to cut the hopes and dreams of future generations.
  Mr. Speaker, while I plan to vote in favor of this bill, I do so with 
a heavy heart. I only hope that this Congress is not remembered as the 
Grinch that stole the Christmas gift of education that our children 
have been waiting for all year long.
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. I rise mainly to state that I have some 
concerns about what is not in the Immigration proposal that we will 
vote to add in this final appropriations bill.
  The proposed ``V'' nonimmigrant visitor's visa would allow the 
spouses and children of lawful permanent residents to live and work in 
the United States while they are waiting for a immigrant visa that 
would enable them to become permanent residents. This would make a 
compassionate change in the law that would unite families that have 
been separated by the long waiting lines for immigrant visas.
  I am disappointed though that the visa would only be available to 
spouses and children who have waited three years or longer for an 
immigrant visa. The United States government does not benefit from 
keeping these families apart for three years, and it would work a great 
hardship on the people in these families.
  The bill also provides relief for some other applicants for visas. 
For the next three years, it would establish a waiver of certain 
grounds of inadmissibility for individuals who are otherwise qualified 
for a ``V'' or ``K'' visa and who are already physically present in the 
United States. The waiver would apply to inadmissibility on account of 
prior unlawful entry or for overstaying as a visitor for more than six 
months.
  Once again, I welcome a compassionate change in the law, and once 
again, I am concerned that the change would not go far enough. The 
waiver only applies to people who are already physically present in the 
United States. Those bars to admissibility would continue to separate 
the families whose foreign members are identically situated in every 
respect except that they are outside of the United States.
  This bill also has a ``late amnesty fix'' which would provide 
assistance for people who were wrongly prevented from applying for 
amnesty under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. This is 
good start, but it still misses the mark Mr. Chairman.
  Many of the late amnesty applicants already have a court ordered 
right to apply for amnesty. We need to do more. We need to change the 
registry date.
  The ``registry'' provision gives long-time foreign residents who have 
been here without proper documents an opportunity to adjust to 
permanent status if they have nothing in their background that would 
disqualify them from immigrant status. The registry date is currently 
set at 1972.
  The majority of immigrants who would benefit from updating the 
registry date are the late amnesty applicants, but a change in the 
registry date also would help other deserving groups such as the 15,000 
Liberian nationals in this country who came to the United States ten 
years ago because of the civil unrest in Liberia. The situation of the 
Liberians is typical of the long time residents of this country who 
would benefit from a change in the registry date. They have had 
children who are citizens of the United States, purchased homes, and 
become upstanding members of American communities. They have fully 
assimilated into our society.
  If the registry date is not changed, thousands of people will be 
forced to abandon their homes, will have to separate from their 
families, move out of their communities, be removed from their jobs, 
and return to countries where they no longer have ties.
  Mr. WELDON of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased that the bill before 
us would add an additional $35 billion to Medicare's budget over the 
next five years. As you may recall, the principle reason I voted 
against the 1997 Balanced Budget Agreement (BBA) was my concern that 
the budget restraints on the Medicare budget included in that bill were 
unsustainable. That has proven to be the case and that is why we are 
moving forward with legislation to add money to the Medicare budget.
  I have cosponsored legislation that would add billions of dollars to 
Medicare, and I was pleased to vote for this legislation when it was 
before the House a few months ago. I am glad that this bill will also 
increase spending on Medicare+Choice HMOs. I have heard from many of my 
constituents who are enrolled in these plans and who have become 
increasingly concerned about the availability of these plans in their 
communities. This funding will help ensure that these plans remain 
available to seniors. Given the opportunity to vote separately on this 
additional Medicare funding, I would again vote in favor of it.
  While I am very supportive of this additional funding for Medicare 
and have recently voted in favor of this added funding, I am 
disappointed that Congressional leaders and President Clinton have 
chosen to lump this provision into a single catchall omnibus bill with 
hundreds of billions of dollars in spending and a various unrelated 
legislative provisions. This omnibus bill was just finalized earlier 
this morning and no one member of Congress is quite sure what is in the 
bill.
  We do know of several things that are in the bill. Some of these are 
troubling. I understand that the omnibus bill would provide a 26 
percent increase in funding for programs funded under the Labor, Health 
and Human Services (Labor/HHS) Appropriations bill, increasing funding 
from $85 billion in fiscal year 2000 to over $111 billion in 2001. This 
will result in additional spending of at least $180 billion over the 
next ten years for these programs. I also understand that this bill may 
have several hundred million dollars in last minute pork barrel 
spending. I am concerned that spending this money here will make it 
more difficult to find the money needed to pay for Medicare 
prescription drugs plans, a tax deduction for health insurance and 
long-term care insurance, and other important initiatives.
  Also, dropped from the bill is a provision that was adopted by the 
Senate and supported by the House on a 250-170 vote. This provision 
would have prohibited taxpayer funding from being used to provide the 
morning after abortion pill to school age children at school based 
health clinics. Without this provision, federally funded school clinics 
will be able to distribute morning after abortion pills to 12 and 15 
year old children without their parents permission. This undermines the 
rights of parents and should not be allowed to continue. It will also 
foster promiscuity among teenagers and contribute to the rapid 
progression of sexually transmitted diseases among teenagers. It was 
wrong to drop this provision due to President Clinton's objections.
  This bill also creates a new federal school construction program but 
does so in a way that will force school construction in Florida to 
increase between 15 and 30 percent. President Clinton insisted that 
Florida school construction projects funded under this program be 
subject to the more expensive Davis-Bacon, prevailing union wage 
requirements. This means that the taxpayers will get 15 to 30 percent 
fewer classrooms for the same amount of money. I believe that if the 
federal government is going to return tax dollars to Florida, the 
people of Florida should determine what rules will apply to school 
construction. I could not in good conscience agree to the creation of a 
new federal government program under these conditions.
  I am also very troubled that the bill before us would cut national 
defense spending by $500 million from what was recently enacted into 
law. Defense spending is being cut to fund Labor/HHS programs at a time 
when our military leaders tell us they do not have enough money to meet 
their demands and provide adequate training to our men and women in 
uniform.
  I am sure that over the next few weeks we will discover additional 
objectionable provisions in this bill. It is for the reasons listed 
above that I rise in opposition to this bill.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of the bill, and I want 
to thank Chairman Young, Mr. Obey, and Chairman Porter for their 
tireless work in getting us, finally, to this

[[Page H12497]]

day. They are not to blame for why it took so long, but they deserve 
our thanks for delivering a bill that, while it is not everything I had 
hoped, makes a number of critical investments in America's children and 
health research.
  Because we worked together, this bill will make the largest single 
investment in education in a generation, helping reduce class size with 
funds to renovate and repair 3,500 schools and to hire 8,000 new 
teachers. And it will help prepare those teachers with a more than 50 
percent increase in funding for teacher training. These are important 
steps toward strengthening America's public schools and make every 
classroom a place of learning and discipline.
  Child care also receives a tremendous boost with a 70 percent 
increase in the Child Care Development Block grant program. By lifting 
funding to $2 billion, more families will have access to high quality, 
affordable child care. How much more information do we need about the 
critical zero to five years of a child's life before we ensure that 
EVERY child in America will learn and grow in an enriching child care 
environment. By supporting child care in America--and by providing a 
nearly $1 billion increase for Head Start--we help ensure that every 
child in America gets the right start in life.
  The bill before us will also support a number of organizations in my 
district that help to make our community stronger and more caring. I am 
particularly grateful that the Committee chose to support the efforts 
of Connecticut Children's Hospice, which provides much needed help and 
care to families and their children in very difficult and tragic times.
  And because of a bipartisan commitment to health research, this bill 
keeps us on track to doubling research at the National Institutes of 
Health with a 14 percent increase this year. That is a tribute to the 
members of the subcommittee, and particularly, to our chairman, John 
Porter. He leaves behind a great legacy, and I thank him.
  We should be proud of the achievements in this bill, but a great deal 
of work remains. Even with this record investment, too many children 
and families will not have access to high quality child care. Medical 
research into chronic disease remains underfunded. Bipartisan 
legislation to support school modernization efforts with construction 
bonds should be on this floor. Yet I am pleased with the progress we 
have made, and I will support the bill. It represents progress, but we 
can, and should, do more.
  Mr. COMBEST. Mr. Speaker, I concur with the remarks of the gentleman 
from Virginia, Mr. Bliley, concerning title II of H.R. 5660, the 
Commodity Futures Modernization Act.
  It is my understanding as well that nothing in title II of the bill 
would: Authorize any bank or similar institution to engage in any 
activity or transaction, or hold any asset, that the institution is not 
authorized to engage in or hold under its chartering or authorizing 
statute; authorize depository institutions either to take delivery of 
equity securities under a security futures product or under any other 
circumstance, or otherwise to invest in any equity security, otherwise 
prohibited for depository institutions; and allow a depository 
institution to use single stock futures to circumvent restrictions in 
the law on ownership of equity securities under its chartering or 
authorizing statute.
  Mr. DINGELL. Mr. Speaker, I support H.R. 5660, the Commodity Futures 
Modernization Act, despite the curious process that produced this final 
version of the bill. The critical investor protection and market 
integrity provisions approved overwhelmingly by the House in October 
remain intact, making it possible for many Democrats to support this 
important legislation.
  The fundamental purposes of this bill are to modernize the regulation 
of our futures markets, to provide legal certainty for the over-the-
counter derivatives market, and to authorize the trading of security 
futures products, consistent with maintaining the innovation, 
efficiency, transparency, honesty, and integrity of these vital 
markets.
  Title I on commodity futures modernization places greater 
responsibility on contract markets and execution facilities to regulate 
themselves and their members. However, the CFTC is charged with 
supervising the exercise of this self-regulatory power in order to 
assure that it is used effectively to fulfill the responsibilities 
assigned to these organizations and that it is not used in a manner 
inimical to the public interest. The Congress intends that the CFTC use 
its oversight and enforcement powers to correct self-regulatory lapses 
where they occur. Although self-regulation has not always performed up 
to expectations, on the whole it has worked well, and we believe it 
should be preserved and strengthened under strong CFTC oversight.
  Title II creates a coordinated regulatory structure for SEC and CFTC 
regulation of securities-based futures. I have significant reservations 
about the efficacy and wisdom of single stock futures. These products 
will most likely be used by day traders and other speculators and raise 
concerns about excessive speculation and excessive volatility in the 
underlying securities markets. However, this legislation provides a 
strong framework for the prudential regulation of these products. We 
intend a high degree of cooperation and coordination between the SEC 
and CFTC. With respect to volatility, this bill provides that single 
stock futures are subject to the same rules that cover other 
securities, including circuit breakers and market emergency rules. With 
respect to excessive speculation and leverage, the bill requires that 
margin treatment of stock futures must be consistent with the margin 
treatment for comparable exchange-traded options. This ensures that 
margin levels will not be set dangerously low and that stock futures 
will not have an unfair competitive advantage vis-a-vis stock options. 
Most importantly, single stock futures are subjected by this bill to 
protections to curb the potential for market manipulation, insider 
trading, and other fraudulent schemes. We expect these requirements to 
be vigorously enforced for the protection of investors and to maintain 
the integrity and efficiency of these markets.
  One of the most important provisions of the bill, Title III, gives 
the SEC antifraud authority over securities-based swap agreements. By 
authorizing the SEC to apply Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange 
Act of 1934 to these swap agreements, the bill provides important 
additional protections to the vital and dynamic markets for these 
instruments. In extending these protections, the bill explicitly makes 
rules adopted under Section 10(b) to address fraud, manipulation, or 
insider trading applicable to securities-based swap agreements. Thus, 
the antifraud rules currently in existence--and those needed in the 
future--apply to such swap agreements to the same extent that they 
apply to securities. This permits the SEC to use its tested methods to 
enhance the protection in theses markets and to respond as necessary to 
developments in the future. The bill also explicitly makes judicial 
precedent relating to Section 10(b), as well as Section 17(a) of the 
Securities Act, applicable to securities-based swaps, to the same 
extent as it applies to securities. Thus, for example, cases 
establishing theories of liability and private rights of actions will 
apply directly to securities-based swaps.
  Section 4b is the principal antifraud provision of the Commodity 
Exchange Act. It is the intent of Congress in retaining Section 4b in 
this bill that the provision be given its broadest reading for the 
protection of investors and these markets. Thus, Section 4b provides 
the CFTC with broad authority to police fraudulent conduct within its 
jurisdiction, whether the transactions are directly with customers or 
involve a traditional broker-client relationship, whether occurring in 
boiler rooms and bucket shops, or in the e-commerce markets that will 
develop under this new statutory framework.
  The purpose of Title IV of this bill is clear: to clarify what is 
already the current state of the law that the CFTC does not regulate 
the traditional array of products that banks have been offering for 
years, or in the words of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley statute, identified--
banking products. These products are deposit accounts, savings 
accounts, CDs, banker's acceptances, letters of credit, loans, credit 
card accounts, and loan participation.
  The language of Title IV is very tightly worded. Title IV requires 
that, to obtain this bill's exclusion, a bank must first obtain a 
certification from its regulator that the identified banking product 
was commonly offered by that bank prior to December 5, 2000. This means 
that the product was actively bought, sold, purchased or offered--not 
just a customized deal that the bank may have done for a handful of 
clients. Also, the product cannot be a product that was either 
prohibited by the Commodity Exchange Act or regulated by the CFTC.
  In other words--a bank can't try to sneak futures contracts out of 
regulation by using this provision.
  With respect to new products, Title IV is also abundantly clear: the 
Commodity Exchange Act doesn't apply to new bank products that are not 
indexed to the value of a commodity. Again, the plain language is 
clear: Congress' intent is that no bank use this exclusion for products 
that are properly regulated under the Commodity Exchange Act.
  Lastly, Title IV allows hybrid products to be excluded from the 
Commodity Exchange Act if, and only if, they pass a ``predominance 
test'' that indicates that they are primarily an identified banking 
product and not a contract, agreement or transaction appropriately 
regulated by the CFTC. While the statute provides a mechanism for 
resolving disputes about the application of this test, there is no 
intent that a product which flunks this test not be regulated by the 
CFTC.
  Finally, I received a letter dated December 14, 2000, from the 
Chairman of the New York Mercantile Exchange stating that: ``The New 
York Mercantile Exchange has serious concerns regarding provisions . . 
. that would

[[Page H12498]]

have the effect of removing energy trades conducted on electronic 
trading systems from nearly all public scrutiny and accountability.'' 
On December 12, 2000, a coalition that includes the Consumer Federation 
of America, the Derivatives Study Center, and the Economic Policy 
Institute wrote to Members of the Senate and the House, complaining 
that this bill ``goes too far in deregulating derivatives markets'' and 
``recklessly reduces market protections.'' I want to assure these 
groups that I have heard their concerns. The changes made by this 
legislation do not need to yield the dire results that they predict. A 
great deal will depend on how the law is implemented and enforced by 
the federal financial regulators and the self-regulatory organizations.
  The importance of these markets cannot be underestimated. It is our 
intent, with the passage of this legislation, that these markets be 
regulated and supervised in the public interest. It is not the job of 
government to protect fools from themselves, but it is the job of 
government to protect the rest of us from the dangerous machinations of 
fools, knaves and scoundrels. I pledge my vigorous efforts to seeing 
that this legislation accomplishes that result.
  Mr. BEREUTER. Mr. Speaker, this Member rises today in support of H.R. 
4577, the FY 2001 Appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health 
and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies. This Member 
strongly supports the funding level for the Medicare, Medicaid, and 
State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) givebacks, the 
increase in spending for education, and the tax assistance for 
affordable housing.
  First, under the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, cuts were made that put 
a great deal of stress on many Medicare and Medicaid providers, 
particularly in rural areas. In a predominately rural state, such as 
Nebraska, a growing elderly population greatly relies upon the services 
Medicare and Medicaid reimburse. Hospitals and other health service 
providers throughout my district have been in constant communication 
with my office describing the financial stress that they have been put 
under as a result of these cuts. This Member strongly supports the 
``givebacks'' provided in the bill that will not only shore up the 
financial stability of our health service providers but also extend the 
benefits that Medicare will be able to provide our senior population as 
a result of its enactment.
  Second, this Member supports the $44.5 billion that the bill provides 
for education spending. This is a $6.5 billion increase over last 
year's education funding level and is $2 billion more than the 
President's request. Specifically, this Member supports the $1.34 
billion increase in special education grants, the $994 million 
allocated for Impact Aid, and the increase in the funding level for 
Pell grants.
  However, the Member believes we are setting a bad precedent by 
beginning grant programs for school modernization. Obviously, this 
money can be well used by a number of school districts; however, 
funding public school buildings and renovation is a responsibility of 
states and local school districts and not the Federal Government. Once 
we start funding school renovation, this effort could possibly extend 
to construction of new schools with no end expected. The Federal 
Government thus would provide a reward for those states who have not 
kept up with their responsibilities for their school buildings; 
sometimes because they lack the will to raise the revenue locally. The 
school districts in my state and many others have generally met their 
responsibilities and should not be expected to have resources from 
their Federal income taxes subsidize states and school districts that 
are not meeting their responsibilities.
  Mr. Speaker, the funding of public elementary and secondary schools, 
under the U.S. Constitution, is primarily the responsibilities of the 
states. We should not start this Federal grant program.
  Lastly, this Member supports the essential tax assistance for 
affordable housing in this legislation. In particular, the measure 
increases the highly successful Federal Low Income Housing Tax Credit 
from $1.25 per capita to $1.75 per capita in 2002. This tax credit 
provides an essential incentive to developers to construct affordable 
housing. In addition, this legislation increases the Private Activity 
Bond Cap from the current $50 per capita to $75 per capita and it 
increases the small state bond cap limit from $150 million to $225 
million in 2002. The private activity bond cap in Nebraska provides tax 
exempt financing for, among other things, single and multifamily 
housing.
  Mr. Speaker, for these reasons and others, this Member encourages his 
colleagues to support H.R. 4577. The measure provides a necessary 
increase in the essential services upon which so many Nebraskans and 
others throughout the country rely.
  Mr. LEACH. Mr. Speaker, last year, after nearly two decades of work, 
the U.S. Congress passed the Financial Modernization Act to bring our 
nation's banking and securities laws in line with the realities of the 
marketplace. Today, an analogous opportunity presents itself to 
modernize the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA) that governs the trading of 
futures and options.
  The important role of the over-the-counter derivatives industry in 
the historic economic expansion of the last decade is largely 
unchronicled. These contracts, which allow manufacturers, multi-
national corporations, energy producers, governments and others to 
hedge themselves against the risk of financial calamity, ensure that 
unforeseen market movements do not bankrupt business and thus constrain 
economic productivity.
  Because of anachronistic constraints established under the CEA, 
however, legal uncertainty exists for trillions of dollars of existing 
contractual obligations.
  The issue facing the Congress has been whether an appropriate 
regulatory framework can be established to deal not only with certain 
problems that confront today's risk management markets, but new 
dilemmas that appear to be on the horizon. The compromise language 
before us today as a part of this appropriations bill largely 
accomplishes our goals.
  The fact is that the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA) is an awkward 
legislative vehicle designed in an era in which financial products of a 
nature now in place were neither in existence, nor much contemplated. 
Indeed, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) was 
fundamentally designed to supervise agriculture and commodities 
markets, not financial institutions.
  Legislation of this nature involves different committees with 
different concerns and sometimes-competitive jurisdictional interests. 
From the Banking Committee's perspective, I would like to make clear my 
respect for the work of the Agriculture Committee, led by Chairmen 
Combest and Ewing, which produced a bill that reflected a credible way 
of dealing with the concerns that had developed during much of the last 
decade as derivatives-related products have grown.
  Nonetheless, the Banking Committee in July adopted on a bipartisan 
manner a number of clarifying amendments, and this fall the House 
approved H.R. 4541 with only a handful of dissenting votes. After 
continued negotiation, involving the other body and the Administration, 
further modifications have been made to the legislation to provide an 
even greater level of assurance that over-the-counter derivatives will 
continue to be a vital part of America's financial innovation and 
continued success.
  The legislation will ensure that most over-the-counter derivatives 
offered by banks and other financially sophisticated parties are legal 
and enforceable. It provides that these contracts will be allowed to be 
negotiated via new means of electronic commerce. While retaining the 
role of the Federal financial regulators, it will allow these new 
contracts to be offered, sold and cleared without having to jump 
through new, unwarranted bureaucratic processes.
  While this legislation represents a great leap forward there remain 
issues that will require the further scrutiny and due diligence of this 
body and it will be necessary to closely monitor the application of 
this bill, with a mindful eye on further innovation, to ensure that the 
genius of our financial services industry is not again restricted by 
outdated and overly burdensome laws.
  In this regard, H.R. 5660 contains several provisions which require 
further clarification. Title II of the legislation empowers the 
Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to regulate certain 
securities-based futures contracts. It is important to note that 
excluded from the definition of ``security future,'' contained in 
section 201 of the legislation, and thus from the jurisdiction of the 
SEC, are contracts excluded from the Commodity Exchange Act under 
section 2(c), (d), (f) and (g) of that Act, and those products excluded 
under Title IV of the Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000.
  These exclusions are intended to clarify that over-the-counter 
derivatives transactions among eligible contract participants related 
to the prices of securities are outside the jurisdiction of the SEC, 
and the SEC is not to use the new authority granted the agency by this 
act to attempt to regulate over-the-counter derivatives activities. The 
jurisdiction granted the SEC by this Act, like that granted to the 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) under the Commodity 
Exchange Act, is limited to transactions conducted on organized 
exchanges otherwise regulated by the respective agency. Over-the-
counter derivatives transactions offered by banks and other highly 
sophisticated end users remain outside the jurisdiction of the SEC.
  Additionally, Title III of the act contains further limitations on 
the authority of the SEC with respect to the jurisdiction of that 
agency related to swap agreements. As Title III makes clear, ``security 
based swap agreements'' are not securities, and the SEC is prohibited 
from regulating them as such.

[[Page H12499]]

  In general, it should be clear that nothing in this legislation is 
intended to permit the SEC to regulate equity securities derivative 
transactions entered into by banks. The exclusions from the definition 
of ``security future,'' as well as Title III, are designed to ensure 
that the regulatory reach of the SEC is limited to entities over which 
the securities laws explicitly require registration. Banks have been 
engaging in equity related derivatives for well over a decade, under 
the supervision of the appropriate banking regulators. Nothing in this 
legislation is intended to alter that regulatory structure, nor to 
place new regulatory burdens on banks.
  A separate matter which requires attention is the treatment to be 
afforded ``principal-to-principal'' transactions. Section 101 of the 
legislation contains a definition of ``organized exchange'' which 
incorporates this ``principal-to-principal'' concept. Under this 
legislation, whether an entity is an organized exchange or not has 
ramifications as to whether the entity might be regulated by the CFTC 
and, in some cases, the SEC. Additionally, sections 103, 106, 202, and 
402 of the legislation utilize this ``principal-to-principal'' concept 
in providing exemptions and exclusions from the jurisdiction of the 
CFTC and SEC.
  A ``principal-to-principal'' transaction includes any transaction 
whereby a party to the transaction books the transaction for the 
party's own account. It includes ``riskless principal'' transactions, 
whereby one party enters into a transaction and thereafter or 
contemporaneously enters into an offsetting transaction so that the 
risk or payments under the transactions net out. The fact that the 
party has entered into off-setting transactions in no way alters the 
``principal-to-principal'' nature of the transaction, and any party 
that has entered into a ``riskless principal'' transaction may be 
assured that its contracts remain legally enforceable and excluded or 
exempted from the jurisdiction of the CFTC and/or SEC, as applicable.
  A final matter which deserves attention is the definition of 
``trading facility'' contained in section 103 of the legislation. 
Whether an entity is a ``trading facility'' has ramifications as to 
whether or not the entity might be regulated by the CFTC and/or the 
SEC. It should be made clear that the definition of ``trading 
facility'' is not to be construed so broadly as to include existing and 
developing electronic systems which permit parties to negotiate and 
enter into over-the-counter derivatives transactions.
  For instance, Derivatives Net Inc., which maintains the ``Blackbird'' 
electronic trading system, operates a facility whereby parties may meet 
in a centralized electronic forum to conduct over-the-counter 
derivatives transactions. The swap agreements entered into by 
participants entered into on this system are themselves excluded from 
the jurisdiction of the CFTC, and will remain excluded from the 
jurisdiction of the SEC under the new powers granted that agency under 
this bill. Nothing in the definition of ``trading facility,'' nor 
anything else in this legislation, is intended to provide authority to 
either the CFTC or the SEC to exercise jurisdiction over entities such 
as Blackbird.
  Mr. Speaker, I congratulate all who worked from so many different 
perspectives to develop this landmark legislation and urge its passage.
  Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I rise in opposition to this piece of 
legislation because, among other things, it fails to correct some of 
the most basic inequities in our immigration code. For months, we have 
worked to obtain passage of the Latino and Immigrant Fairness Act. 
Unfortunately, the Republican Leadership has been held hostage by a 
small group of anti-immigrant members within their caucus.
  The result of the Presidential election has hardened this groups' 
determination to keep immigrants, particularly people of color, out of 
this country. If this is the spirit of compassionate conservatism and 
bipartisanship we have to look forward to under a Republican 
Administration, then I am not at all impressed.
  First, we sought to establish legal parity among Central American, 
Liberian and Carribean refugees--so that all refugees that fled 
political turmoil in the 1980s and early 1990s are treated the same. In 
1997, the Republicans gave the ``right'' type of immigrants--Cubans and 
Nicaraguans--immigration relief, leaving behind immigrants from other 
countries who did not have the same political influence.
  The Republicans have completely refused to even meet in good faith to 
discuss the issue.
  Second, we sought to update what's known as the ``registry'' date, so 
that all immigrants who have lived in this country since 1986 qualify 
to remain here. This provision would have helped people who were 
eligible under the Reagan era legalization program but were improperly 
denied permanent residency by the INS in the late 1980s. It also would 
have reinforced our long held belief that long time immigrants in 
America should be given the opportunity to solidify their families and 
economic stability by becoming permanent residents.
  The Republicans begrudgingly have agreed to help only a small class 
of people who have lived in the United States since 1982 and are 
covered by a class action suit.
  Third, we sought to restore section 245(i) of the Immigration Act. 
This would let all immigrants who have a legal right to seek permanent 
resident status to stay in this country with their families while they 
await a decision. Because Congress failed to extend section 245(i) in 
1997, families who have a right to be together here in the United 
States are being torn apart for up to 10 years.
  Instead of restoring section 245(i), the Republicans have merely 
agreed to re-authorize section 245(i) for four months from the date 
this bill is enacted.
  Fourth, we sought inclusion of H.R. 5062, legislation which had 
bipartisan support and passed the House under suspension of the rules. 
The bill was a modest step towards addressing the most widely 
recognized injustices of the overly harsh 1996 law, and in particular, 
eliminating the retroactivity of the 1996 law's deportation 
legislation.
  After reaching an agreement on these provisions, the Republicans 
caved to anti-immigrant members of their caucus, and refused to include 
any part of H.R. 5062 in this legislation.
  Finally, and most offensive to me, there appeared to be bipartisan 
agreement to include certain technical fixes to the 1997 Nicaraguan 
Adjustment and Central American Relief Act and the 1998 Haitian Refugee 
Immigration Fairness Act. These provisions would not have allowed into 
the country a single person that Congress intended to cover in the 
original bills.
  The Republicans have agreed to provide relief to affected Central 
Americans but have refused similar assistance to Haitian refugees. 
There is no principled, intellectual or rational reason for not 
assisting Haitians and other persons of color who were originally 
covered by the 1998 legislation.
  One of the greatest measures of our Nation's strength is the 
diversity of our people. If we look above us we see inscribed our 
national motto--e pluribus unum--``Out of many, one.'' It reminds us 
that we are a Nation of immigrants. Because this bill fails to uphold 
the principles that are most dear to us as a Nation, I must oppose this 
legislation and will continue to seek a fairer and more decent piece of 
legislation--it is long overdue.
  Mr. CLAY. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this historic $6.5 
billion increase in education spending and several important 
initiatives included in this conference report. While I am disappointed 
that the Republican leadership insisted on reducing the amount of 
education funding in an earlier bipartisan deal reached in late 
October, this conference report still provides significant increases 
for programs that serve some of our most vulnerable populations.
  I want to start by highlighting the inclusion of the $1.2 billion 
school modernization initiative. Modeled after the proposal announced 
by President Clinton in his last State of the Union address and a bill 
I introduced earlier this year, this initiative will provide much 
needed assistance to renovate and repair our crumbling and overcrowded 
public schools. This proposal will provide $900 million for school 
renovation and $300 million for technology and special education costs. 
I have long known that the Federal Government has a very important role 
to play in ensuring that our children do not learn in crumbling and 
overcrowded schools with health and safety violations. The enactment 
and funding of this proposal shows that Congress as a whole finally 
recognizes the importance of a Federal role in this area.
  The need for this program is well documented. From GAO's 1995 report 
which found $112 billion in school construction needs to a recent 
analysis by the National Education Association, which found over $300 
billion in renovation needs, our schools, and in turn our children, are 
suffering in outdated buildings which are in a state of horrible 
disrepair.
  I also want to express by support for continued funding of the 
Clinton/Clay Class Size Reduction Program. This initiative, first 
enacted in the 1999 Omnibus Appropriation package, has helped 
communities hire close to 38,000 teachers to reduce class size in the 
early grades. This year's increase of $323 million over last year will 
approximately 8,000 additional fully qualified teachers to be hired--
reducing class size for thousands of young children. Nothing in our 
educational system can substitute for the individual attention a child 
receives in a small class from a fully qualified teacher.
  This Appropriations Conference Report also provides much needed 
increases for other vital education programs. The cornerstone of our 
Federal education effort, Title I, will receive a $661 million increase 
over last year. After-school programs, through the 21st Century 
Community Learning Centers Program, will receive a $393 million boost 
over last year. Also, the Eisenhower Professional Development Program 
and other teacher quality

[[Page H12500]]

initiative will receive nearly $200 million in additional funding.
   I am pleased that this bill recognize that the Federal Government 
has an active and vital role in helping improve education--a reality 
that I have been advocating throughout my time in Congress. This 
legislation represents what I hope will be a continued effort to expand 
and enhance the role of the Federal Government in a way that ensures 
educational excellence for all our school children.
  Mr. WELLER. Mr. Speaker, than you for this opportunity to offer my 
support and thanks for a provision included in H.R. 5662 which extends 
the existing brownfields cleanup tax incentive through January 1, 2004, 
and removes the targeting requirement. My colleagues Nancy Johnson, 
Bill Coyne and I have worked hard to ensure that the current law tax 
provision be extended and made eligible for brownfield cleanups in all 
communities across the nation. I am pleased that we have accomplished 
this in this bill and I urge my colleagues to support this legislation.
  Brownfield sites exist throughout our districts--abandoned eyesores 
that blight our communities and drag down local economies. Many 
brownfield properties are located in prime business locations near 
critical infrastructure, including transportation, and close to a 
productive workforce. These sites need to be put back into productive 
use, contributing to the economy and producing good paying jobs where 
they are needed most.
  The first step towards doing this is to remediate these sites 
environmentally. This U.S. Conference of Mayors estimates that there 
are over 400,000 brownfields sites across the country. We clearly 
should not limit the treatment of Section 198 to merely targeted areas. 
Development of these sites will help restore many blighted areas, 
create jobs where unemployment is high and ease pressure to develop 
beyond the fringes of communities. Small, urban centered businesses 
often benefit most directly by this redevelopment. Currently, many of 
these brownfield sites do not meet the existing targeting requirements 
and are not cleaned up because they cannot take advantage of the 
Section 198 brownfields expensing provision. U.S. EPA estimates that 
the existing provision will ultimately clean-up only 14,000 brownfields 
nationwide, but GAO estimates that more than 420,000 brownfields exist. 
Clearly, the current provision needs to reach further into our 
communities. I am pleased that H.R. 5662 will solve this problem.
  By expanding the existing provision, more disadvantaged communities 
in urban, suburban and rural areas can take advantage of the expensing 
provision and revitalize their brownfield sites. This would offer 
important economic and environmental improvements for these 
communities. The U.S. Conference of Mayors recently completed a survey 
of 187 large and small cities throughout the Nation, including Chicago, 
Houston, New York and Miami. According to the responses to this survey, 
the 187 cities estimated that if their 21,000 existing brownfield sites 
were redeveloped, this would bring additional tax revenues of up to 
$2.4 billion annually and could create up to 550,000 jobs. In Chicago 
alone, developing 2,000 brownfield sites would mean $78 million in 
additional tax revenue to the city and 34,000 new jobs.
  Mr. Speaker, I applaud the inclusion of this provision in H.R. 5662 
which will extend the existing brownfields expensing provision through 
January 1, 2004, and remove the targeting requirement. This provision 
is pro-environmental and pro-community legislation and I urge my 
colleagues to support this legislation.
  Mr. BARCIA. Mr. Speaker, I am extremely pleased that H.R. 828, the 
Wet Weather Water Quality Act of 2000, has been included in this 
measure. I would like to thank Chairman Shuster, Ranking Member 
Oberstar and my Subcommittee Chairman Mr. Boehlert, and Ranking member 
Mr. Borski for their support and dedication in moving this important 
legislation forward. H.R. 828 enjoys strong, national bipartisan 
support, with almost 70 cosponsors.
  As the primary sponsor of H.R. 828, I am pleased to have played a 
role in halting and reversing the Federal Government's decade-long 
disinvestment in municipal water quality infrastructure needs 
nationwide. While the funding this important legislation calls for will 
be helpful, it is only a start given the immense water quality 
infrastructure needs that we face as a nation. My hope is that the 
107th Congress will continue to address this critical issue which 
affects all Americans--in as strong a bipartisan manner as we witness 
today in passing H.R. 828 as part of the last Act of the 106th.
  In addition to authorizing infrastructure funding for CSO and 
Sanitary Sewer Overflow control programs nationwide, H.R. 828 also will 
codify EPA's 1994 National Combined Sewer Overflow Policy. This is a 
step that has been proposed by both sides of the aisle since 1995. I am 
pleased it will become a reality today. The National CSO Policy 
provides a proven roadmap for America's communities with combined 
sewers to follow as they strive to implement CSO controls. It offers 
important flexibility for CSO communities to develop individually 
tailored control programs. In addition to the reasonable amount of time 
to implement CSO controls that is implicit in the Act, it will also 
require EPA to complete an important guidance document on the required 
step of developing, as appropriate, wet weather designated uses and 
water quality standards to be achieved by CSO control programs.
  This important Act marks the first time that the Clean Water Act will 
speak to the issue of CSO control--a major environmental problem and 
challenge in my district, the Great State of Michigan, and in 34 states 
nationwide. In taking this bold step, Congress has set out nation on a 
course to finally resolve sewer overflow problems which have persisted 
in our nation for more than one hundred years.
  Mr. BONIOR. Mr. Speaker, today's education funding bill will repair 
crumbling schools, hire 8,000 new teachers, open 3,100 new after school 
centers, and help send 100,000 more needy students to college.
  For students in Macomb and St. Clair Counties, we are providing 
$850,000 for our school districts to develop after-school programs. The 
network of ``Kids Klubs,'' as they are known, in our community provides 
a safe-haven for our children and a great service for our families. For 
schools which need repair, this bill provides $1.2 billion to renovate 
1,200 schools nationwide. We also continue our commitment to reducing 
class size in the early grades and making schools safer by providing 
$1.6 billion to hire new teachers. Further, our bill will increase 
federal funding for financial aid by 15%--including raising the maximum 
Pell Grant award to $3,750.
  The enactment of this historic bill, renews our commitment to our 
students, teachers and families--the pillars of our community, and the 
pillars of our future.
  Mr. MOAKLEY. Mr. Speaker, at long last, the end is in sight. Today's 
Omnibus Appropriations bill contains all the major unfinished business 
remaining this session. It contains the Labor-Health and Human Services 
Appropriations bill the Commerce-Justice-State Appropriations changes 
the Legislative Branch Appropriations bill. The Treasury-Postal 
Appropriations bill, the reform of the Commodities Exchange markets, 
the balanced budget amendment fix for Medicare, the new market 
initiative and a whole lot else.
  In fact the bill is right here next to me on the desk. I hear the 
three people who carried it up here are in traction. But, despite its 
size all in all. I am pleased with the bill and I congratulate my 
colleagues for their hard work. However, Mr. Speaker, I want to point 
out one major problem in this bill the Low Income Home Energy 
Assistance Program, or LIHEAP.
  Although the bill includes $1.4 billion for LIHEAP funding in this 
fiscal year, it cuts the advanced appropriations for next fiscal year.
  Mr. Speaker, hundreds of thousands of Massachusetts residents, not to 
mention millions of other Americans, rely on LIHEAP to help heat their 
homes during the freezing winter months. If the advanced funding is 
cut, states will be unable to get their programs in place before the 
cold hits and millions of Americans could be faced with the horrible 
choice between heating their homes and putting food on the table.
  Mr. Speaker, no one should have to make that choice and if we wait 
too long to pass this funding, they might have to. I certainly hope 
appropriations will include full funding for LIHEAP during next year's 
appropriations debate. Americans everywhere are facing record high fuel 
prices and they are looking to Congress to do the right thing.
  Mr. LARGENT. Mr. Speaker, I want to offer my strong support for those 
provisions of H.R. 4577 that send much needed relief to the Medicare 
program. By passing this legislation, Congress will improve health care 
for millions of Americans by strengthening Medicare, Medicaid, and the 
Children's Health Insurance Program (S-CHIP).
  Over three years ago, Congress made important changes to the Medicare 
and Medicaid programs when the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 was passed 
and signed into law. At the time, the Medicare program was facing 
bankruptcy and changes were needed to keep this vital program for our 
Nation's seniors.
  As those changes were implemented, many hospitals, home health 
facilities, and outpatient health service professionals expressed 
concerns to me about low reimbursements from HCFA for their services.
  In response to those concerns, Congress passed legislation last fall, 
the Balanced Budget Refinement Act (BBRA), to fix some of the 
unintended consequences of the BBA by returning some $16 billion to 
hospitals and other providers.
  Throughout this year, I have received considerable feedback from 
hospitals, home health care companies, and nursing home providers 
concerned that BBRA did not go far enough in adjusting current 
reimbursement

[[Page H12501]]

rates. I have been closely watching these developments and have urged 
my fellow members of Congress to support this important legislation.
  In particular, I am pleased with several of the legislation's 
important provisions, including those addressing the Medicare+Choice 
program. The Medicare+Choice program was created as part of the 1997 
Balanced Budget Act to increase health care options for Medicare 
beneficiaries by allowing them to enroll in private plans, such as HMOs 
or PPOs. While the majority of beneficiaries remain in the traditional 
fee-for-service Medicare, enrollment in managed care plans has grown in 
recent years. Many seniors enrolled in Medicare+Choice have come to 
enjoy greater benefits than traditional Medicare such as prescription 
drug coverage, eyeglasses, and dental care.
  Unfortunately, the Medicare+Choice program has been grossly 
mismanaged and underfunded by the Health Care Financing Administration 
(HCFA). In the last year alone, 41 plans terminated service to Medicare 
beneficiaries in 58 service areas, forcing 327,000 seniors to choose a 
new plan or to move back into traditional Medicare.
  Fortunately, the legislation before us today will send billions of 
dollars to the Medicare+Choice program. Much of this new funding will 
be directed toward raising the minimum ``floor payment,'' which will 
greatly aid Oklahoma's rural areas that have been most affected by low 
reimbursement rates.
  Additionally, I am pleased to see increased funding for our community 
health centers and hospitals. This will also particularly benefit 
Oklahoma's rural areas and areas with large uninsured populations.
  I also support increasing drug coverage for patients with life 
threatening diseases. Congress worked hard last year to ensure that we 
committed funds in the Balanced Budget Refinement Act to extend 
coverage of immunosuppressive drugs for Medicare patients beyond the 
previous 36 month time limit. We all know how important these drugs are 
to persons with organ transplants. I do not believe it is a wise policy 
to cut them off from the coverage. I'm delighted that this legislation 
removes the time limitation on immunosuppressive drug coverage.
  Furthermore, many of Oklahoma's seniors lack adequate access to first 
rate medical facilities because they live in areas that are medically 
underserved. Innovative health delivery and education programs using 
telemedicine can go a long way to addressing those unmet needs. I am 
pleased that we are able to incorporate provisions in this legislation 
that allow for Medicare reimbursement of telehealth services in certain 
settings. I believe these provision will have a positive impact on the 
delivery of health care to Oklahoma seniors.
  The American people can be proud of the hard work that has gone into 
the product we have today. It's a good bill, that not only makes health 
coverage for all seniors more affordable, but improves health care for 
millions of Americans. Today, I am proud to see Congress and the 
Administration put politics aside and come together to support these 
important programs.
  Mr. BLILEY. Mr. Speaker, as you know, H.R. 5660, the Commodity 
Futures Modernization Act of 2000, is incorporated by reference into 
the conference report to accompany H.R. 4577, the Departments of Labor, 
Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act for 2001. In order to clarify the legislative 
history of this legislation, I want to clarify some of the language of 
this legislation.
  It is my understanding that nothing in title II of the House bill 
would authorize any bank or similar institution to engage in any 
activity or transaction, or hold any asset, that the institution is not 
authorized to engage in or hold under its chartering or authorizing 
statute; authorize depository institutions either to take delivery of 
equity securities under a security futures product or under any other 
circumstance, or otherwise to invest in any equity security, otherwise 
prohibited for depository institutions; or allow a depository 
institution to use single stock futures to circumvent restrictions in 
the law on ownership of equity securities under its chartering or 
authorizing statute.
  Mr. MURTHA. Mr. Speaker, there is no more important part of this 
year's final budget negotiations than the provisions we debate today on 
Medicare reimbursement levels.
  This debate is not about dollars or statistics. It's about the toll 
that past cutbacks have taken on our health care system.
  I've visited with hospital CEO's and workers throughout Western 
Pennsylvania and seen their frustration at not being able to provide 
the full care their patients need. I've gone on home health care visits 
where citizens simply can't understand the cutbacks that make it harder 
for them to stay in their homes. I've exchanged emails with families of 
organ transplant recipients who can't understand why immunosuppressive 
drugs are only covered for a limited time period. And in our largely 
rural area, I've spoken with citizens who are concerned about the loss 
of their neighborhood hospital, who fear a longer trip to an emergency 
center that can literally mean the difference between life and death, 
and who can't understand why the health care professionals at area 
hospitals are so stretched and lacking Medicare support.
  People understand that we have the finest health care system in the 
world and the finest-trained professionals. But we must not hinder that 
system--we must provide the support that allows those professionals to 
do their jobs fully. The Medicare relief legislation helps to move us 
toward that goal.
  In no area more than health care does our debate need to be 
nonpartisan and goal-oriented. Today's bill is not the end of the 
fiscal battle for Medicare; we will need further steps. Let us not 
assign blame, but rather let us aim at streamlining the increasingly 
complex health care system, at providing the support needed by our 
medical professionals. Let's build on this step in the coming months to 
expand health care coverage, preventive care coverage in Medicare and 
make sure Senior Citizens can afford their prescription drugs, 
streamline the paperwork bureaucracy, and get health care decision-
making back into the hands of the patients and medical professionals.
  We have more to do--on reimbursements and on health care overall--but 
this Medicare reimbursement improvement provides a key step in the 
right direction, a step we can build on, and a step toward the 
partnership we need to assure that all Americans, of all ages, have 
access to the full health care they need. Moreover, it's a step toward 
creating the partnership we need with our hospitals, home health care 
personnel and other medical care providers to help our citizens receive 
quality health care and have a better quality of life.
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this 
opportunity to express my appreciation to the Clinton Administration, 
House and Senate Leadership for working to finally complete the 
business of the 106th Congress. This bill before the House will provide 
appropriations for several separate appropriations bills, which have 
been combined to speed their adoption into law.
  In my testimony to the Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor/HHS, I 
urged the committee to increase the funding for children's mental 
health services, which they have done through the appropriation of a 
Mental Health Block Grant program in the amount of $420 million, $63 
million more than last year's funding.
  As for my request for additional funding for HIV/AIDS this 
appropriation measure will place an additional $97 million over the 
amount initially requested by the Administration bringing their 
appropriation to $767 million for Fiscal Year 2001. It is my hope that 
this additional funding will go to those who are in greatest need 
minority HIV/AIDS programs. Minority AIDS programs have been woefully 
under funded over the last few Congresses, despite the fact that 
minorities are the fastest growing population infected with AIDS/HIV.
  I thank the Clinton Administration for taking the bold step of 
formally recognizing that the spread of HIV/AIDS in the world today is 
an international crisis, through his declaration of HIV/AIDS to be a 
National Security threat.
  I am pleased to see that funding for the Ryan White AIDS program has 
been increased by 13 percent to $2.5 billion for the next fiscal year. 
Further, funding for the National Institutes of Medicine has been 
increased to $2.4 billion, which is 14 percent over last year's 
appropriations.
  Over 13 million children suffer form mental health problems. The 
National Mental Health Association reports that most people who commit 
suicide have a mental or emotional disorder. The most common is 
depression and although one in five children and adolescents has a 
diagnosable mental, emotional, or behavioral problem that can lead to 
school failure, substance abuse, violence or suicide, 75 to 80 percent 
of these children do not receive any services in the form of specialty 
treatment or some form of mental health intervention.

  This bill will also fund education for our nation's children at $6.5 
billion, which is 18% more than was appropriated last year, and is in 
fact the largest annual increase in the history of the Department of 
Education.
  This legislation will allow school districts throughout the United 
States to work on reducing class sizes in the early grades, create 
small, successful, safer schools, renovate over 3,500 schools, and 
increase the number of children who have access to Head Start by an 
additional 600,000.
  This bill also incorporates the Fiscal Year 2001 appropriations for 
the Department of Labor at $664 million or 64 percent over last year's 
funding.
  I am very pleased to see that the funding for the Health and Human 
Services Department is at $48.8 billion, which is $6.6 billion over

[[Page H12502]]

year's appropriations. After the years of cuts to this vital program 
today we are finally recognizing that the health safety and welfare of 
America's disadvantaged should be addressed with adequate resources by 
the agency charged with providing care to them.
  Many Houstonians' lives were saved by the additional funding from 
LIHEAP and this appropriations will provide $1.4 billion for the coming 
year.
  I thank my colleagues and urge them to support this appropriation 
measure.
  Mr. PORTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Pease). Without objection, the previous 
question is ordered on the conference report.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the conference report.
  Pursuant to clause 10 of rule XX, the yeas and nays are ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 292, 
nays 60, not voting 80, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 603]

                               YEAS--292

     Abercrombie
     Allen
     Andrews
     Archer
     Armey
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baird
     Baldacci
     Baldwin
     Barcia
     Barrett (NE)
     Barrett (WI)
     Bass
     Becerra
     Bentsen
     Bereuter
     Berkley
     Berry
     Biggert
     Bilirakis
     Bishop
     Blagojevich
     Bliley
     Boehner
     Borski
     Boucher
     Boyd
     Brady (PA)
     Brady (TX)
     Brown (OH)
     Bryant
     Burr
     Buyer
     Camp
     Canady
     Capps
     Capuano
     Cardin
     Carson
     Castle
     Chambliss
     Clayton
     Clement
     Clyburn
     Coble
     Collins
     Combest
     Condit
     Cooksey
     Costello
     Coyne
     Cramer
     Crowley
     Cubin
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davis (FL)
     Davis (IL)
     Davis (VA)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Deutsch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dickey
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doolittle
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Dunn
     Edwards
     Ehlers
     Ehrlich
     Emerson
     Engel
     English
     Etheridge
     Evans
     Ewing
     Fletcher
     Foley
     Ford
     Fossella
     Fowler
     Franks (NJ)
     Frelinghuysen
     Frost
     Gallegly
     Ganske
     Gekas
     Gephardt
     Gibbons
     Gilchrest
     Gilman
     Gonzalez
     Goode
     Goodling
     Gordon
     Goss
     Green (TX)
     Greenwood
     Gutknecht
     Hall (OH)
     Hall (TX)
     Hastert
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayes
     Hill (IN)
     Hilleary
     Hilliard
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hoeffel
     Holden
     Hooley
     Horn
     Hoyer
     Hulshof
     Hunter
     Hutchinson
     Hyde
     Isakson
     Istook
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Jefferson
     Jenkins
     John
     Johnson (CT)
     Johnson, E.B.
     Jones (OH)
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kasich
     Kelly
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilpatrick
     King (NY)
     Kleczka
     Knollenberg
     Kuykendall
     LaHood
     Lampson
     Larson
     LaTourette
     Lazio
     Leach
     Lee
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (GA)
     Lewis (KY)
     Linder
     Lipinski
     LoBiondo
     Lowey
     Lucas (KY)
     Lucas (OK)
     Luther
     Maloney (CT)
     Maloney (NY)
     Markey
     Martinez
     Mascara
     Matsui
     McCarthy (MO)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCollum
     McCrery
     McGovern
     McHugh
     McIntyre
     McNulty
     Meehan
     Meeks (NY)
     Menendez
     Miller (FL)
     Minge
     Mink
     Moore
     Moran (KS)
     Morella
     Murtha
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Neal
     Nethercutt
     Ney
     Northup
     Nussle
     Obey
     Olver
     Ose
     Owens
     Oxley
     Packard
     Pallone
     Pascrell
     Pastor
     Payne
     Pease
     Peterson (MN)
     Petri
     Phelps
     Pickering
     Pomeroy
     Porter
     Pryce (OH)
     Quinn
     Rahall
     Ramstad
     Rangel
     Regula
     Reyes
     Reynolds
     Rivers
     Rodriguez
     Roemer
     Rogan
     Rothman
     Roukema
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Sabo
     Sanders
     Sawyer
     Saxton
     Schakowsky
     Scott
     Serrano
     Shaw
     Shays
     Sherman
     Sherwood
     Shimkus
     Shows
     Simpson
     Sisisky
     Skeen
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (TX)
     Spence
     Spratt
     Stabenow
     Stenholm
     Strickland
     Stump
     Stupak
     Sununu
     Sweeney
     Talent
     Tanner
     Tauscher
     Tauzin
     Taylor (MS)
     Taylor (NC)
     Thomas
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Thune
     Tiahrt
     Tierney
     Towns
     Traficant
     Turner
     Udall (CO)
     Udall (NM)
     Upton
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wamp
     Watkins
     Watt (NC)
     Watts (OK)
     Weiner
     Weldon (PA)
     Weller
     Wexler
     Weygand
     Whitfield
     Wilson
     Wise
     Wolf
     Woolsey
     Wu
     Wynn
     Young (AK)

                                NAYS--60

     Aderholt
     Barr
     Bartlett
     Barton
     Blunt
     Boswell
     Burton
     Cannon
     Chabot
     Chenoweth-Hage
     Cook
     Cox
     Crane
     Deal
     DeFazio
     DeLay
     DeMint
     Duncan
     Frank (MA)
     Goodlatte
     Graham
     Granger
     Green (WI)
     Hayworth
     Herger
     Hoekstra
     Hostettler
     Inslee
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones (NC)
     Kind (WI)
     Kingston
     Kucinich
     Manzullo
     Metcalf
     Paul
     Pitts
     Pombo
     Radanovich
     Riley
     Rohrabacher
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Ryun (KS)
     Salmon
     Sanford
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Smith (MI)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Stark
     Stearns
     Tancredo
     Terry
     Thurman
     Toomey
     Vitter
     Weldon (FL)
     Wicker

                             NOT VOTING--80

     Ackerman
     Baker
     Ballenger
     Berman
     Bilbray
     Blumenauer
     Boehlert
     Bonilla
     Bonior
     Bono
     Brown (FL)
     Callahan
     Calvert
     Campbell
     Clay
     Coburn
     Conyers
     Danner
     Delahunt
     Dooley
     Eshoo
     Everett
     Farr
     Fattah
     Filner
     Forbes
     Gejdenson
     Gillmor
     Gutierrez
     Hansen
     Hastings (FL)
     Hefley
     Hill (MT)
     Hobson
     Holt
     Houghton
     Klink
     Kolbe
     LaFalce
     Lantos
     Largent
     Latham
     Lofgren
     McDermott
     McInnis
     McIntosh
     McKeon
     McKinney
     Meek (FL)
     Mica
     Millender-McDonald
     Miller, Gary
     Miller, George
     Moakley
     Mollohan
     Moran (VA)
     Napolitano
     Norwood
     Oberstar
     Ortiz
     Pelosi
     Peterson (PA)
     Pickett
     Portman
     Price (NC)
     Rogers
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Sanchez
     Sandlin
     Scarborough
     Schaffer
     Shadegg
     Shuster
     Snyder
     Souder
     Walden
     Walsh
     Waters
     Waxman
     Young (FL)

                              {time}  1839

  Mr. TERRY and Mr. BURTON of Indiana changed their vote from ``yea'' 
to ``nay.''
  So the conference report was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
  Stated for:
  Mr. BONIOR. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 603, I was not able to vote 
on this important legislation because of my son's college graduation. 
Had I been here, I would have voted ``yea'' because of the dramatic 
increases for public education.
  Ms. BROWN of Florida. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 603, had I been 
present, I would have voted ``yea.''
  Mr. DOOLEY of California. Mr. Speaker, I was unavoidably detained 
during the vote on the conference report on H.R. 4577 on December 15, 
2000. Had I been present, I would have voted ``yea'' on the measure.
  Mr. PORTMAN. Mr. Speaker, because I was unavoidably detained, I was 
absent for rollcall vote No. 603. Had I been present, I would have 
voted ``yea.''
  Mr. WALDEN of Oregon. Mr. Speaker, I regret that I was not able to be 
present for the rollcall vote on H.R. 4577, the FY 2001 Labor, Health 
and Human Services, and Education Appropriations bill on December 15, 
2000. Unfortunately inclement weather prevented me from returning to 
Washington, DC. Had I been present for this vote, I would have voted 
``yea.''
  Stated against:
  Mr. FILNER. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 603, I am on ``leave of 
absence'' for the week of December 11. Had I been present, I would have 
voted ``nay.''
  Mr. McDERMOTT. Mr. Speaker, I was absent and unable to vote the 
evening of December 15, 2000. I would have voted against H.R. 4577 
(rollcall No. 603).

                          ____________________


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