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< Back to current issue of Immigration Daily                        <Back to current issue of Immigrant's Weekly 

 
[Congressional Record: October 30, 2000 (House)]
[Page H11538-H11545]
From the Congressional Record Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:cr30oc00-63]                         

 
 PROVIDING FOR CONSIDERATION OF HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTIONS 121, 122, 123, 
AND 124, EACH MAKING FURTHER CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 
                                  2001

  Mr. LINDER. Mr. Speaker, by direction of the Committee on Rules, I 
call up House Resolution 662 and ask for its immediate consideration.
  The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

                              H. Res. 662

       Resolved, That upon the adoption of this resolution it 
     shall be in order without intervention of any point of order 
     to consider in the House the joint resolution (H.J. Res. 121) 
     making further continuing appropriations for the fiscal year 
     2001, and for other purposes. The joint resolution shall be 
     considered as read for amendment. The previous question shall 
     be considered as ordered on the joint resolution to final 
     passage without intervening motion except: (1) one hour of 
     debate equally divided and controlled by the chairman and 
     ranking minority member of the Committee on Appropriations; 
     and (2) one motion to recommit.
       Sec. 2. Upon the adoption of this resolution it shall be in 
     order without intervention of any point of order to consider 
     in the House the joint resolution (H.J. Res. 122) making 
     further continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2001, and 
     for other purposes. The joint resolution shall be considered 
     as read for amendment. The previous question shall be 
     considered as ordered on the joint resolution to final 
     passage without intervening motion except: (1) one hour of 
     debate equally divided and controlled by the chairman and 
     ranking minority member of the Committee on Appropriations; 
     and (2) one motion to recommit.
       Sec. 3. Upon the adoption of this resolution it shall be in 
     order without intervention of any point of order to consider 
     in the House the joint resolution (H.J. Res. 123) making

[[Page H11539]]

     further continuing appropriations for the fiscal year 2001, 
     and for other purposes. The joint resolution shall be 
     considered as read for amendment. The previous question shall 
     be considered as ordered on the joint resolution to final 
     passage without intervening motion except: (1) one hour of 
     debate equally divided and controlled by the chairman and 
     ranking minority member of the Committee on Appropriations; 
     and (2) one motion to recommit.
       Sec. 4. Upon the adoption of this resolution it shall be in 
     order without intervention of any point of order to consider 
     in the House the joint resolution (H.J. Res. 124) making 
     further continuing appropriations for the fiscal year 2001, 
     and for other purposes. The joint resolution shall be 
     considered as read for amendment. The previous question shall 
     be considered as ordered on the joint resolution to final 
     passage without intervening motion except: (1) one hour of 
     debate equally divided and controlled by the chairman and 
     ranking minority member of the Committee on Appropriations; 
     and (2) one motion to recommit.


               
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Linder) is 
recognized for 1 hour.
  Mr. Linder. Mr. Speaker, for the purposes of debate only, I yield the 
customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. Moakley) 
pending which I yield myself such time as I may consume. During 
consideration of this resolution, all time yielded is for the purpose 
of debate only.
  Mr. Speaker, House Resolution 662 is a closed rule providing for 
consideration of House Joint Resolutions 121, 122, 123 and 124. Each of 
these joint resolutions make further continuing appropriations for 
fiscal year 2001 for a period of 1 day. Mr. Speaker, H. Res. 662 
provides for 1 hour of debate on each joint resolution, equally divided 
and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the 
Committee on Appropriations. The rule waives all points of order 
against the consideration of these joint resolutions. Finally, the rule 
provides one motion to recommit on each joint resolution, as is the 
right of the minority. This rule was favorably reported by the 
Committee on Rules yesterday, and I urge my colleagues to support it.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time....
 

[[Page H11541]]

  ....
  Mr. ROHRABACHER. Mr. Speaker, in case the American people are having 
difficulty understanding the argument of the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Stenholm), as most of us over here are having difficulty, because it 
does come down to us, we believe, the President asking for more money; 
and we are trying to keep control of the budget.
  But if we cannot understand that, they should be able to understand 
one of the other issues, the major issue of contention between the 
Republicans and the other side of the aisle and the Clinton-Gore 
administration; and that is the Clinton-Gore administration is 
demanding that we stay here, and they are holding us hostage with the 
demand that we give a blanket amnesty to millions of illegal 
immigrants.
  Now, the American people should be able to understand that. All of 
this budget talk, if one cannot understand what is going on there, one 
should be able to understand that this administration, the Clinton-Gore 
administration, the other side of the aisle, want us, and we are 
refusing, to grant a

[[Page H11542]]

blanket amnesty so that millions of more illegal immigrants will, 
number one, be granted amnesty and eventually be eligible for 
government programs, which means millions of illegal immigrants who are 
now not eligible will be eligible for health care benefits, for 
education benefits.
  Here we are trying to give a modest, just a modest bit of tax relief 
to the American people, and that is outrageous; but it is not 
outrageous to bring millions of more illegal immigrants into this 
country and make them eligible for government benefits. Give me a 
break. Give the American people a break.
  No, I am proud to stand here with the Republicans saying, no, we are 
going to watch out for the American people. We care about others. We 
care about our immigrant population. In fact, legal immigrants are some 
of our proudest citizens. We are happy to have them here as legal 
immigrants. But to have millions of illegal immigrants be granted 
amnesty is thumbing their noses at legal immigration and at the 
American people.
  Mr. MOAKLEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 4 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
Texas (Ms. Jackson-Lee).
  (Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas asked and was given permission to revise 
and extend her remarks.)
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Stenholm). I understand what he is saying. He made a very 
important point. He is asking for reason and balance; and that is, to 
respond to the needs of rural and urban hospitals and not give to HMOs 
the $34 billion that our Republican colleagues want to give to 
insurance companies, and not allow some of those dollars to be utilized 
to pay health care providers and hospitals.
  Secondarily, the gentleman from California (Mr. Rohrabacher), my good 
friend who just spoke, has also a misunderstanding what those of us are 
trying to do with respect to legal immigration or access to 
legalization.
  Mr. Speaker, I serve as the ranking member on the Subcommittee on 
Immigration and Claims on the Committee on Judiciary; and I am sorry to 
say it is not a million people coming into this country, it is 
thousands of homeowners and taxpayers who have lived in this country 
for almost 20 years. In fact, the National Restaurant Association is 
begging us to be responsible to hard-working members of their community 
who have worked in their restaurants.
  This is a question with the INS. We all know the status of the INS, 
it made a great error and did not allow these individuals to proceed to 
apply for citizenship. It is not giving them blanket amnesty; it is 
allowing them to apply for citizenship.
  Interestingly enough, when many of us voted in 1996 for what we 
thought was a fair immigration policy in the dark of night, Republicans 
took away the court proceedings that were proceeding in a very orderly 
manner, sponsored by the Catholic Dioses, that would allow individuals 
to go into the courtrooms and proceed in the process of securing their 
citizenship. That was stopped in the dark of night in 1996.
  So what we are standing here for is to ensure that those who are 
trying to seek legalization, access to legalization fairly and 
honestly, citizens in Nevada, citizens in Rhode Island, in New York, in 
Michigan, in California, in Texas, who are already here, whose children 
are going to school, they want to be able to access legalization.
  In fact, in my good city of Houston, a poor man by the name of Mr. 
Gonzalez, working 13 years, is about to be deported and his family left 
abandoned because he cannot have access to legalization.
  Mr. Speaker, I am happy to yield to the distinguished gentleman from 
Michigan (Mr. Bonior).
  Mr. BONIOR. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the gentlewoman from Texas 
(Ms. Jackson-Lee) for raising this, because this is one of the great 
shames and scandals of our country.
  These people which the gentlewoman speaks of are the people who do 
the work of this country. We could not be building the roads; we could 
not be feeding the people of this country. They have been here for 15 
and 20 years, and they live in fear every day because of their status. 
They make this country work.
  It just is an absolute outrage that we have to deal with this issue 
in a way that is not responsible to them and to the future of this 
country. The gentlewoman from Texas is absolutely right. We ought to do 
something about this. These are the people that take care of our 
children, our grandparents, our roads, our buildings. They collect our 
garbage. They do a lot of things.
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from 
Michigan (Mr. Bonior), the minority whip, for his eloquence on his 
issue, because I hate the undercurrent that I am hearing in this body. 
That is that the reason why we are here and the reason why we are stuck 
in the mud besides the issues on health care and this tax cut is 
because we do not want this millions of illegals to come into this 
country.
  Mr. Speaker, they are here, and they are not millions, they are 
thousands of hard-working individuals who love this country, who love 
their families, and who came here out of persecution, and we opened the 
doors.
  Mr. Speaker, I would simply say that we need to work on this issue.
  Mr. ROHRABACHER. Mr. Speaker, will the gentlewoman yield?
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, this is the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Rohrabacher), my good friend, who I would be delighted 
to yield to when I finish my point, and maybe he can get some time from 
his side, because I know his heart is good.
  Mr. Speaker, I simply say we need to get down to dealing with hard-
working individuals and stop this undercurrent of bias that I am 
hearing. It hurts my heart.
  Mr. LINDER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from Ohio 
(Mr. Traficant).
  (Mr. TRAFICANT asked and was given permission to revise and extend 
his remarks.)
  Mr. TRAFICANT. Mr. Speaker, every time we talk about illegal 
immigration, we talk about racial bias. I have about had it. There are 
immigration laws. If they are in the country illegally, we should throw 
them out.
  We are putting up a neon sign blinking all over the world, come on 
and run in, run in illegally, and we will make one a citizen, and then 
we will let one bring one's family. Beam me up here.
  I disagree with this illegal immigration. If they want to come into 
America, damn it, get in line. There are laws. Follow the law. When 
Congress starts letting people jump the fence and get away with it and 
then use it for political gain, Congress has failed the American 
people, and Congress has shredded the Constitution.
  I want to say one last thing. Several days ago, 10 Mexican narco-
terrorists crossed the border and started shooting at our border 
patrol. They needed a helicopter to come in and provide air coverage.
  We are guarding the borders all over the world. We are flooded with 
heroin and cocaine. And my colleagues are here wanting to make more 
illegal immigrants citizens.
  I am not for making one more illegal immigrant a citizen. There is no 
bias in my heart. I am tired of the charge that is being placed against 
us.
  If they want to come into America, get in line like many Americans 
did legally. If they are not in this country legally, Jim Traficant 
says they should be thrown out, and the Congress of the United States 
should not have a flashing sign saying jump the fence.
  Mr. Speaker, this is an important issue, more than my colleagues 
think. There is a lot of political ramifications that are not very good 
for the country. With that, I would hope the Democrat party would take 
a look at the issue a little more carefully...

....                         {time}  1145

  Mr. BONIOR. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding me this 
time, and I will not take the 2 minutes, but I wanted to correct 
something.
  The impression has been left here that these people are illegal; that 
they have come here and not followed the rules. The fact of the matter 
is that many of them have come here as a result of persecution in their 
countries. They have been in line. They are waiting for documentation. 
It is not the case of them sneaking across the border and cutting in 
front of other people. These are people who have been here, have been 
accepted here, are waiting in line and not getting their documentation 
processed.
  I might also add for my colleagues that it is very ironic that we 
could come here and do on a voice vote 193,000 people, allow them into 
this country, high-tech people, when no one was around here, and then 
these folks who have been here for as much as 14 years cannot get the 
satisfaction of knowing that the taxes they have been paying for 14 
years and the work they have been providing to this country is being 
ignored.
  It is an outright scandal and it is a shame. But they happen to be 
nonhigh-tech people. They are people who do the work of the country. 
They do our garbage, they do our roads, our schools, they take care of 
our kids, they do our wash, they do the stuff in the restaurants, cook 
our food. They deserve to be here.
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield?
  Mr. BONIOR. I yield to the gentlewoman from Texas.
  Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for 
yielding. The only thing I wanted to offer to this debate is the fact 
that all of us in this Nation, all of us, no matter how we look and 
what language we might have started out with, have come from somewhere 
and have sought opportunity.
  I do not know how I came legally. I was not able to come here 
legally, as I understand it. My colleagues may question my history, but 
I know my history. I came in another manner.
  So I would simply say that anyone who wants to challenge these 
individuals needs to look at their own personal history. This is a 
terrible shame what we are doing in this Congress.
  Mr. MOAKLEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Arkansas (Mr. Berry).
  Mr. BERRY. Mr. Speaker, I would just reiterate what the gentleman 
from Texas has already said, and certainly part of this disagreement is 
about the immigrants; but the major disagreement we have is that the 
Republicans have chosen to raise their own budget caps and spend that 
money by giving it as a wonderful trick or treat present to the HMOs. 
They have chosen to deny the relief that our hospitals and nursing 
homes need. They have chosen to deny prescription drug benefits for our 
seniors. They have chosen to deny estate tax and marriage tax relief to 
our citizens.
  These people cannot wait. This money should not go to the insurance 
companies, it should not be wasted by giving it to the HMOs. It should 
be used to provide a prescription drug benefit for our seniors, to keep 
our hospitals and nursing homes in business, to provide the services we 
need, to provide estate tax and marriage tax relief to our citizens.
  We should not have to wait another 1 year or 2 years or 4 years to 
see this benefit granted to the American people. It is time for this 
Congress to do its work that we should have done a long time ago.
  Mr. LINDER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 4 minutes to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Thomas) to instruct the gentleman from Arkansas what 
was actually in that bill he voted on.
  Mr. THOMAS. Mr. Speaker, some of us are sitting here somewhat 
confused. We have been listening carefully to the debate and hearing, 
for example, that these folks are legal but they are in fear of their 
status; that in fact we have chosen to give $34 billion to the HMOs.
  If anyone bothered to check the entire cost of this bill, which is 
money for the hospitals, Medicare+Choice, home health, preventive care, 
on and on and on, the entire package, according to CBO, scores at $31.5 
billion over 5 years. Now, I know there has been a discussion on the 
Presidential trail about fuzzy math; but to be able to stand up last 
night and today and to continue to repeat that there is $34 billion for 
managed care in this bill is to simply ignore the fact that the entire 
package is $31.5 billion...
  
  Ms. DeGETTE. Mr. Speaker, I too am dismayed at the tone this debate 
has taken with respect to immigration, and I am saddened and ashamed 
about it.
  All of us think we should enforce the immigration laws; but the 
immigration laws have worked to damage a segment of our society, hard-
working Americans with families who work hard and pay taxes every day, 
people who have been here since before 1986, paying taxes and raising 
families, and the law needs to be made equitable for those people.
  Last year, in Denver, we had a lady who, because she was afraid she 
would be ejected from this country permanently under the immigration 
laws,

[[Page H11544]]

left this country. She left this country and she left her newborn 
child, who is an American citizen, in the arms of her husband, who is 
also an American citizen, because she was afraid that she would never 
be able to come back if she did not leave and reapply.
  That is not only an inequity, it is a terrible human tragedy, and 
that is what we are trying to do. We are not trying to open the borders 
to everybody. We are not trying to let criminals in here. We are trying 
to protect the rights of hard-working Americans who are decent citizens 
and who pay taxes. That is what we are trying to do.
  I think we should stop all of this terrible slurring on the race and 
everything else, and we ought to get down to what this is all about.
  Mr. MOAKLEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. LINDER. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, none of us is happy being here today on this resolution. 
I believe it is fair to say that both sides would rather be home 
talking to our constituents about the future. And as long as I can 
remember, there have been continuing resolutions passed for several 
days at a time so that only the negotiators were kept here finishing 
the job. As I recall, one year during the Reagan administration, 
agreement was never reached, and the entire next fiscal year was 
conducted under a continuing resolution that President Reagan signed.
  Yet we are here today forced to pass a series of continuing 
resolutions because we have a President who has been reluctant to leave 
the stage with grace and dignity. In order to have his way, he is 
willing to threaten to shut down the government unless we agree to this 
nonsense. He is willing to shut down the government unless we agree 
with him on his priorities in the budget. And he is willing to put 
everyone else at risk, both parties included, unless he gets his way.
  Does the world not see what is going on here? My guess is that they 
do not because they view the world through the eyes of an uncritical 
press. In 1995, the President vetoed a continuing resolution because it 
contained a ``legislative rider,'' his words, in an appropriations 
bill. Today, he is holding an entire Congress, Democrats and 
Republicans alike, hostage because we are unwilling to approve his 
``legislative rider'' in an appropriation bill. Is he likely to 
succeed? Perhaps. Because we have an uncritical press that will not 
tell that story.
  The American people might be interested in one rider he insists upon. 
We have heard it talked about today. The President is insisting on a 
rider that will grant total amnesty to as many as a million immigrants 
who came to the Nation illegally. Now, to be sure, we are a Nation of 
immigrants. We welcome those who come to our shores and use the legal 
process to become Americans. But the President wants to put those who 
ignore our laws ahead of those who are law abiding. But we will never 
hear this from the press.
  We have been here daily since the President issued his edict that he 
would not sign any continuing resolution that was longer than 24 hours. 
I want to commend the chairman of the Committee on Appropriations, the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Young), and the ranking member, the 
gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Obey). I have never seen two more 
dedicated workers for the cause of getting the people's work 
accomplished. They have been here day and night to complete the task.
  I confess they differ in their views as to the right solution for the 
final sticking points; but unlike the President, they are here working. 
They were prepared to meet even on that evening last week when the 
President and his Chief of Staff were attending the World Series, and 
the next day, when the President found it more important to get in a 
round of golf. And over the past weekend, when the President was 
campaigning for his side, oh, yes, we have been ready to meet and solve 
this. But the President has not been here, and an uncritical press will 
not point that out.
  In fact, the President plans a trip to California this week to 
campaign. We will pass one of these 1-day continuing resolutions, and a 
military jet will be dispatched to take it to the President for his 
signature. But that cost of thousands of dollars will not be billed to 
his party or the people he was campaigning for. The taxpayer will foot 
the bill. But an uncritical press will not burden the public with that 
fact.
  We are here and will be here until the President returns to town to 
sit down and negotiate. We do not expect every decision to go our way, 
but neither should the President.

                              {time}  1200

  But absent the critical press, we will never know.
  So we are left to stand here on this 30th day of October. We will 
pass this series of 24-hour continuing resolutions. We will wonder when 
the President plans to return from the campaign. We will get the job 
done for the American people. And we will look back to the old days 
when Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Johnson, Ford, Carter, Reagan and 
Bush understood that their day had passed and they left the stage with 
grace and dignity and we will long for that time.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time, and I move the 
previous question on the resolution.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Pease). The question is on ordering the 
previous question.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.
  Mr. MOAKLEY. Mr. Speaker, I object to the vote on the ground that a 
quorum is not present and make the point of order that a quorum is not 
present.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Evidently a quorum is not present.
  The Sergeant at Arms will notify absent Members.
  Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XX, the Chair will reduce to 5 minutes 
the minimum time for electronic voting, if ordered, on the question of 
agreeing to the resolution.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 286, 
nays 73, not voting 73, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 580]

                               YEAS--286

     Aderholt
     Archer
     Armey
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baker
     Baldacci
     Baldwin
     Ballenger
     Barcia
     Barrett (NE)
     Barrett (WI)
     Bartlett
     Barton
     Bass
     Bentsen
     Bereuter
     Berkley
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop
     Blagojevich
     Bliley
     Blunt
     Boehlert
     Boehner
     Bonilla
     Bono
     Borski
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (OH)
     Bryant
     Burr
     Burton
     Buyer
     Callahan
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canady
     Cannon
     Capps
     Capuano
     Carson
     Castle
     Chabot
     Chambliss
     Chenoweth-Hage
     Clement
     Coble
     Coburn
     Collins
     Combest
     Cook
     Cox
     Coyne
     Cramer
     Cubin
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davis (FL)
     Davis (VA)
     Deal
     DeLauro
     DeLay
     DeMint
     Deutsch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dixon
     Dooley
     Doolittle
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Ehlers
     Ehrlich
     Emerson
     Engel
     English
     Eshoo
     Evans
     Ewing
     Fattah
     Fletcher
     Foley
     Fossella
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Ganske
     Gejdenson
     Gekas
     Gibbons
     Gilchrest
     Gillmor
     Gilman
     Goode
     Goodling
     Gordon
     Goss
     Graham
     Granger
     Green (WI)
     Greenwood
     Gutknecht
     Hall (OH)
     Hall (TX)
     Hansen
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayes
     Hayworth
     Herger
     Hill (IN)
     Hill (MT)
     Hilleary
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hobson
     Hoeffel
     Hoekstra
     Holden
     Horn
     Hostettler
     Houghton
     Hunter
     Hutchinson
     Hyde
     Isakson
     Istook
     Jefferson
     Jenkins
     John
     Johnson (CT)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones (NC)
     Kelly
     Kennedy
     Kilpatrick
     Kind (WI)
     Kingston
     Kleczka
     Knollenberg
     Kucinich
     Kuykendall
     LaHood
     Largent
     Larson
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Leach
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (KY)
     Linder
     LoBiondo
     Lofgren
     Lowey
     Lucas (KY)
     Lucas (OK)
     Luther
     Maloney (CT)
     Manzullo
     Markey
     Matsui
     McCarthy (MO)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCrery
     McGovern
     McHugh
     McKeon
     McNulty
     Meehan
     Meek (FL)
     Mica
     Millender-McDonald
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, Gary
     Minge
     Mink
     Moakley
     Mollohan
     Moore
     Moran (KS)
     Morella
     Murtha
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Nethercutt
     Ney
     Northup
     Norwood
     Nussle
     Ose
     Packard
     Pallone
     Paul
     Pease
     Peterson (MN)
     Peterson (PA)
     Petri
     Pickering
     Pitts
     Pombo
     Pomeroy
     Porter
     Portman
     Pryce (OH)
     Quinn
     Rahall
     Ramstad
     Regula
     Reynolds
     Rivers
     Roemer
     Rogan
     Rogers
     Rohrabacher
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Rothman
     Roukema
     Royce
     Ryan (WI)
     Ryun (KS)
     Sabo
     Salmon
     Sanchez
     Sanders
     Sanford
     Sawyer
     Saxton
     Scarborough
     Schaffer

[[Page H11545]]


     Schakowsky
     Sensenbrenner
     Sessions
     Shadegg
     Sherman
     Sherwood
     Shimkus
     Shows
     Simpson
     Skeen
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (MI)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Souder
     Spence
     Stabenow
     Stump
     Sununu
     Sweeney
     Tancredo
     Tauzin
     Taylor (NC)
     Terry
     Thomas
     Thornberry
     Thune
     Tiahrt
     Tierney
     Toomey
     Traficant
     Udall (CO)
     Udall (NM)
     Upton
     Vitter
     Walsh
     Wamp
     Watts (OK)
     Weiner
     Weldon (FL)
     Weldon (PA)
     Weller
     Wexler
     Whitfield
     Wicker
     Wilson
     Wolf
     Wu
     Wynn
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                                NAYS--73

     Andrews
     Baird
     Becerra
     Berman
     Berry
     Bonior
     Boswell
     Clay
     Clayton
     Clyburn
     Condit
     Costello
     DeGette
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Edwards
     Etheridge
     Farr
     Filner
     Ford
     Frost
     Gephardt
     Gonzalez
     Green (TX)
     Gutierrez
     Holt
     Inslee
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Kildee
     Lampson
     Lee
     Lewis (GA)
     McDermott
     McKinney
     Meeks (NY)
     Menendez
     Miller, George
     Moran (VA)
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olver
     Ortiz
     Owens
     Pastor
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Phelps
     Price (NC)
     Rangel
     Reyes
     Rodriguez
     Roybal-Allard
     Rush
     Sandlin
     Scott
     Serrano
     Sisisky
     Stenholm
     Strickland
     Stupak
     Tanner
     Tauscher
     Taylor (MS)
     Thompson (CA)
     Thurman
     Towns
     Velazquez
     Waters
     Watt (NC)
     Waxman
     Woolsey

                             NOT VOTING--73

     Abercrombie
     Ackerman
     Allen
     Barr
     Blumenauer
     Boucher
     Boyd
     Brady (TX)
     Brown (FL)
     Campbell
     Cardin
     Conyers
     Cooksey
     Crane
     Crowley
     Danner
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     Delahunt
     Dickey
     Everett
     Forbes
     Fowler
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (NJ)
     Goodlatte
     Hastings (FL)
     Hefley
     Hilliard
     Hooley
     Hoyer
     Hulshof
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones (OH)
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kasich
     King (NY)
     Klink
     Kolbe
     LaFalce
     Lantos
     Lazio
     Lipinski
     Maloney (NY)
     Martinez
     Mascara
     McCollum
     McInnis
     McIntosh
     McIntyre
     Metcalf
     Neal
     Oxley
     Pascrell
     Pickett
     Radanovich
     Riley
     Shaw
     Shays
     Shuster
     Snyder
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stearns
     Talent
     Thompson (MS)
     Turner
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Watkins
     Weygand
     Wise

                              {time}  1221

  Mr. WAXMAN changed his vote from ``yea'' to ``nay.''
  Ms. LOFGREN, Mr. GORDON and Mr. KUCINICH changed their vote from 
``nay'' to ``yea.''
  So the previous question was ordered.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. STEARNS. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 580, I was unable to vote. 
Had I been present, I would have voted ``yea.''
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. LaHood). The question is on the 
resolution.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. MOAKLEY. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 296, 
noes 64, not voting 72, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 581]

                               AYES--296

     Aderholt
     Andrews
     Archer
     Armey
     Baca
     Bachus
     Baker
     Baldacci
     Baldwin
     Ballenger
     Barcia
     Barrett (NE)
     Barrett (WI)
     Bartlett
     Barton
     Bass
     Bereuter
     Berkley
     Berman
     Biggert
     Bilbray
     Bilirakis
     Bishop
     Blagojevich
     Bliley
     Blumenauer
     Blunt
     Boehlert
     Boehner
     Bonilla
     Bono
     Borski
     Boswell
     Brady (PA)
     Brown (OH)
     Bryant
     Burr
     Burton
     Buyer
     Callahan
     Calvert
     Camp
     Canady
     Cannon
     Capps
     Castle
     Chabot
     Chambliss
     Chenoweth-Hage
     Clement
     Coble
     Coburn
     Collins
     Combest
     Cook
     Cox
     Coyne
     Cramer
     Cubin
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davis (VA)
     Deal
     DeLay
     DeMint
     Deutsch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dixon
     Dooley
     Doolittle
     Doyle
     Dreier
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Edwards
     Ehlers
     Ehrlich
     Emerson
     Engel
     English
     Eshoo
     Etheridge
     Evans
     Ewing
     Farr
     Fattah
     Fletcher
     Foley
     Fossella
     Frelinghuysen
     Gallegly
     Ganske
     Gejdenson
     Gekas
     Gibbons
     Gilchrest
     Gillmor
     Gilman
     Goode
     Goodling
     Gordon
     Goss
     Graham
     Granger
     Green (WI)
     Greenwood
     Gutierrez
     Gutknecht
     Hall (OH)
     Hall (TX)
     Hansen
     Hastings (WA)
     Hayes
     Hayworth
     Herger
     Hill (IN)
     Hill (MT)
     Hilleary
     Hinchey
     Hinojosa
     Hobson
     Hoeffel
     Hoekstra
     Holden
     Hostettler
     Houghton
     Hunter
     Hutchinson
     Hyde
     Isakson
     Istook
     Jefferson
     Jenkins
     John
     Johnson (CT)
     Johnson, Sam
     Jones (NC)
     Kelly
     Kennedy
     Kilpatrick
     Kind (WI)
     Kingston
     Kleczka
     Knollenberg
     Kuykendall
     LaHood
     Largent
     Larson
     Latham
     LaTourette
     Leach
     Levin
     Lewis (CA)
     Lewis (KY)
     Linder
     LoBiondo
     Lowey
     Lucas (KY)
     Lucas (OK)
     Luther
     Maloney (CT)
     Manzullo
     Matsui
     McCarthy (MO)
     McCarthy (NY)
     McCrery
     McGovern
     McHugh
     McKeon
     McKinney
     McNulty
     Meehan
     Meeks (NY)
     Menendez
     Mica
     Millender-McDonald
     Miller (FL)
     Miller, Gary
     Minge
     Mollohan
     Moore
     Moran (KS)
     Moran (VA)
     Morella
     Murtha
     Myrick
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Nethercutt
     Ney
     Northup
     Norwood
     Nussle
     Ortiz
     Ose
     Packard
     Paul
     Payne
     Pease
     Peterson (MN)
     Peterson (PA)
     Petri
     Pickering
     Pitts
     Pombo
     Pomeroy
     Porter
     Portman
     Price (NC)
     Pryce (OH)
     Quinn
     Rahall
     Ramstad
     Regula
     Reyes
     Reynolds
     Rivers
     Roemer
     Rogan
     Rogers
     Rohrabacher
     Ros-Lehtinen
     Rothman
     Roukema
     Roybal-Allard
     Royce
     Rush
     Ryan (WI)
     Ryun (KS)
     Sabo
     Salmon
     Sanchez
     Sanders
     Sandlin
     Sanford
     Sawyer
     Saxton
     Scarborough
     Schaffer
     Schakowsky
     Scott
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sessions
     Shadegg
     Sherman
     Sherwood
     Shimkus
     Shows
     Simpson
     Skeen
     Skelton
     Slaughter
     Smith (MI)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (TX)
     Smith (WA)
     Souder
     Spence
     Stabenow
     Stump
     Sununu
     Sweeney
     Tancredo
     Tanner
     Tauscher
     Tauzin
     Terry
     Thomas
     Thornberry
     Thune
     Thurman
     Tiahrt
     Toomey
     Towns
     Traficant
     Udall (NM)
     Upton
     Vitter
     Walden
     Walsh
     Wamp
     Watts (OK)
     Waxman
     Weiner
     Weldon (FL)
     Weldon (PA)
     Weller
     Wexler
     Whitfield
     Wicker
     Wilson
     Wolf
     Wynn
     Young (AK)
     Young (FL)

                                NOES--64

     Baird
     Becerra
     Bentsen
     Berry
     Bonior
     Capuano
     Carson
     Clay
     Clayton
     Clyburn
     Condit
     Costello
     Davis (FL)
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     Dicks
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Filner
     Ford
     Frost
     Gephardt
     Gonzalez
     Green (TX)
     Holt
     Inslee
     Jackson (IL)
     Jackson-Lee (TX)
     Kildee
     Kucinich
     Lampson
     Lee
     Lewis (GA)
     Lofgren
     Markey
     McDermott
     Meek (FL)
     Miller, George
     Mink
     Moakley
     Oberstar
     Obey
     Olver
     Owens
     Pallone
     Pastor
     Pelosi
     Phelps
     Rangel
     Rodriguez
     Sisisky
     Stenholm
     Strickland
     Stupak
     Taylor (MS)
     Thompson (CA)
     Tierney
     Udall (CO)
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Waters
     Watt (NC)
     Woolsey
     Wu

                             NOT VOTING--72

     Abercrombie
     Ackerman
     Allen
     Barr
     Boucher
     Boyd
     Brady (TX)
     Brown (FL)
     Campbell
     Cardin
     Conyers
     Cooksey
     Crane
     Crowley
     Danner
     Davis (IL)
     DeFazio
     Delahunt
     Dickey
     Everett
     Forbes
     Fowler
     Frank (MA)
     Franks (NJ)
     Goodlatte
     Hastings (FL)
     Hefley
     Hilliard
     Hooley
     Horn
     Hoyer
     Hulshof
     Johnson, E. B.
     Jones (OH)
     Kanjorski
     Kaptur
     Kasich
     King (NY)
     Klink
     Kolbe
     LaFalce
     Lantos
     Lazio
     Lipinski
     Maloney (NY)
     Martinez
     Mascara
     McCollum
     McInnis
     McIntosh
     McIntyre
     Metcalf
     Neal
     Oxley
     Pascrell
     Pickett
     Radanovich
     Riley
     Shaw
     Shays
     Shuster
     Snyder
     Spratt
     Stark
     Stearns
     Talent
     Taylor (NC)
     Thompson (MS)
     Turner
     Watkins
     Weygand
     Wise

                              {time}  1231

  Mr. OLVER changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the resolution was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
  Stated for:
  Mr. STEARNS. Mr. Speaker, on rollcall No. 581, I was unable to vote. 
Had I been present, I would have voted ``aye.''

                          ____________________


			


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