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< Back to current issue of Immigration Daily < Back to current issue of Immigrant's Weekly

< Back to current issue of Immigration Daily                        <Back to current issue of Immigrant's Weekly 

[Federal Register: October 19, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 203)]
[Notices]               
[Page 62785-62792]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr19oc00-144]                         

=======================================================================
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF STATE

[Public Notice 3442]

 
Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs Request for Proposals 
(ECA/PE/C/EUR-01-19): Exchanges and Training Programs for the New 
Independent States (NIS): Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, 
Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Belarus, 
Moldova, Ukraine, Russia

SUMMARY: The United States Department of State, Bureau of Educational 
and Cultural Affairs, Office of Citizen Exchanges, Europe/Eurasia 
Division, announces an open competition for assistance awards in the 
areas of Media Training, Women's Leadership, Public Advocacy Training, 
and Prevention of Trafficking in Women and Girls. Public and private 
non-profit organizations meeting the provisions described in IRS 
regulation 26 CFR 1.501C may apply to

[[Page 62786]]

conduct exchanges and training programs. Grants are subject to the 
availability of funds.
    Overall grant making authority for this program is contained in the 
Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, Public Law 87-
256, as amended, also known as the Fulbright-Hays Act. The purpose of 
the Act is ``to enable the Government of the United States to increase 
mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the 
people of other countries * * *; to strengthen the ties which unite us 
with other nations by demonstrating the educational and cultural 
interests, developments, and achievements of the people of the United 
States and other nations * * * and thus to assist in the development of 
friendly, sympathetic and peaceful relations between the United States 
and the other countries of the world.'' The funding authority for the 
program cited above is provided through the Fulbright-Hays Act and the 
FREEDOM Support Act.
    Programs and projects must comply with Bureau requirements and 
guidelines outlined in the Solicitation Package: the Request for 
Proposals (RFP) and the Proposal Submission Guidelines (PSI).

Announcement Title and Number

    All communications with the Bureau concerning this Request for 
Proposals (RFP) should refer to the announcement title ``Exchanges and 
Training Programs for the NIS'' and reference number ECA/PE/C/EUR-01-
19.

Overview

    The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (the Bureau) invites 
applicants to submit proposals that encourage the growth of democratic 
institutions in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, 
Uzbekistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Belarus, Moldova, Ukraine and 
Russia. Exchanges and training programs supported by the institutional 
grants from the Bureau should operate at two levels: they should 
enhance institutional partnerships, and they should offer practical 
information to individuals and groups to assist them with their 
professional and volunteer responsibilities.
    Strong proposals usually have the following characteristics: an 
active, existing partnership between a U.S. organization and a NIS 
institution(s); a proven successful track record for conducting program 
activity; cost-sharing from U.S. and NIS sources, including donations 
of air fares, hotel and/or housing costs, ground transportation, 
interpreters, room rentals, etc.; experienced staff with NIS language 
ability; a clear, convincing plan outlining exactly how the program 
components will be carried out and how permanent results will be 
accomplished as a result of the grant; and a follow-on plan that 
extends beyond the Bureau grant period. Knowledge of the current 
technological capacity (Internet connectivity, email, hardware and 
software) of NIS partners and their countries and/or regions, and a 
description of the role of technology in the proposed program, are 
essential. Cost-sharing in tangible forms of in-kind and monetary 
contributed to the program by the prospective grantee institution, NIS 
partners, as well as funding from third party sources, should be 
included in the budget.
    Unless otherwise specified below: (1) Program activity may include: 
``training of trainers (TOT),'' internships, short-term training, 
consultations, study tours, site visits, and extended, intensive 
workshops; and (2) programming may take place in the United States and/
or in Russia, Belarus, Moldova, Ukraine, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, 
Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. Proposals should 
reflect a practical understanding of the current political, economic 
and social environment that is relevant to the theme addressed in the 
proposal. Proposals should also indicate a strong knowledge of similar 
activities and organizations working in the region. The Bureau strongly 
encourages applicants to design exchange programs for non-English 
speakers.
    Applicants should identify the U.S. and NIS partner organizations 
and individuals with whom they are proposing to collaborate and 
describe in detail previous cooperative projects. Specific information 
about the NIS partners' activities and accomplishments is required and 
should be included in the section on ``Institutional Capacity.'' 
Resumes for individuals mentioned in the proposal should be included, 
including proposed U.S. and NIS staff, trainers, consultants, etc.
    Programs should be designed so that the sharing of information and 
training that occurs during the grant period will continue long after 
the grant period is over. Proven methods of sustainability include, but 
are not limited to: a model TOT program that would include initial 
training, practice presentation sessions for the NIS participants, 
followed by training activities coordinated and implemented by the NIS 
participants in their home countries; a commitment to create or support 
in-country training/resource centers; plans to create online 
communities, professional networks or professional associations; 
regularly published electronic and/or hard-copy newsletters; and 
ongoing mentoring through Internet communication.
    To be considered for a grant award in this competition, the 
proposed training and exchange programs must address one of the 
following themes:
     Media Training (Ukraine or Belarus/Ukraine, Russia, 
Caucasus Regional, Central Asia Regional)
     Women's Leadership Programs (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, 
Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan--Single 
Country & Regional)
     Public Advocacy Training for NGOs and Associations 
(Russia, Belarus/Russia, Belarus--with Cross-Border component)
     Prevention of Trafficking in Women and Girls (Russia, 
Belarus, Moldova--Single- and Multi-country)

Media Training

Overview

    In most countries of the NIS, severe economic crises and attempts 
by government and private sector to control media outlets are 
threatening the survival of the independent media. Although training in 
the area of objective reporting and investigative journalism has been 
conducted in many NIS countries, most journalists would benefit from 
training in this area. The ability and know-how to develop new methods 
of effective, applicable income generation and to implement better 
fiscal management practices, and a commitment to objective reporting 
are critical to the survival of independent media.
    The Bureau is interested in proposals from applicants who possess a 
thorough understanding of the current state and needs of the media in 
the NIS. Training activities should not duplicate the work done under 
recent or existing media training programs, but should complement those 
efforts.
    Proposals may include a combination of in-country and U.S.-based 
training activities. When providing a U.S.-based component, the program 
should include a hands-on internship training component at an 
appropriate media outlet. For these internships, the names of those 
media establishments willing to host participants should be provided 
and the applicant should describe why these media establishments have 
been chosen. The internship format may include both individual 
placements as well as work in small groups (not to exceed three at a 
time). If the small group format is used, the internships

[[Page 62787]]

must have a practical program component, not just be site visits. For 
proposals with a U.S.-based component, the Bureau will give higher 
ranking to proposals that ensure lasting linkages between these 
participants and their American colleagues. When organizations propose 
an internship program at a U.S. media outlet, efforts should be made to 
recruit participants who possess some knowledge of the English 
language.

Media Training for Ukraine or Ukraine/Belarus

     In-country training activities that include both 
Belarusians and Ukrainians should take place in Ukraine.
     Proposals should emphasize training in objective 
reporting, investigative journalism and/or developing and implementing 
effective and applicable income generation schemes and adopting better 
fiscal management practices.
     Participants may be journalists and/or media managers.
     Applicants are strongly encouraged to submit proposals 
that include both Belarusian and Ukrainian participants.

Media Training for Russia

     Proposals should emphasize training in objective reporting 
and/or developing and implementing effective and applicable income 
generation schemes and adopting better fiscal management practices.
     Participants may be journalists and/or media managers.
     Participants should be recruited from areas outside of the 
major cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg.

Regional Media Training for the Caucasus Region

     Proposals should emphasize training in objective reporting 
and/or developing and implementing effective and applicable income 
generation schemes and adopting better fiscal management practices.
     When possible, applicants are encouraged to include 
working visits to media outlets in another country of the region.
     Participants may be journalists and/or media managers.

Regional Media Training for Central Asia

     Proposals should focus efforts on Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan 
and Uzbekistan.
     Participants should be media managers.
     Projects should emphasize training in developing and 
implementing effective and applicable income generation schemes and 
adopting better fiscal management practices in order to reduce 
dependence on government support.

Women's Leadership Training for Central Asia and the Caucasus 
Region

Overview

    Over the past decade, women's leadership programs and women-run 
organizations have been supported and strengthened through local, 
national and international initiatives. Much of the work that has been 
done can be replicated and adapted in other communities, creating a 
closer knit community of women's groups and using available resources 
to the utmost potential. For this competition, our priorities focus on 
Central Asia and the Caucasus Region. American organizations and their 
NIS partners should jointly develop proposals that concentrate on 
strengthening and broadening existing networks in order to further the 
progress and provide cohesion for women's groups in these regions and 
across borders. Applicants should accurately describe current advances 
in the sphere of women's leadership, impart a keen understanding of 
each country's unique role, ensure equity if a regional program is 
proposed, and provide a clear explanation of the proposed project's 
potential contribution to the larger domestic and international efforts 
in women's leadership training programs.
    The target audience should be goal-oriented women and women's 
groups who are currently active in their communities. In each country 
or region, participants should be recruited from outlying cities, towns 
and villages, in addition to capital cities. Needs assessments should 
be conducted prior to or during proposal development; priority will be 
given to partnerships whose needs and goals are already defined. 
Proposed training sessions should emphasize development of 
organizational skills; improving organizational efficiency; developing 
and sustaining networks and coalitions with organizations in the public 
and private sector; and implementation of educational, informational 
and/or advocacy programs for communities throughout the country and/or 
region. Proposals may include a plan for building regional associations 
and networks of women's organizations.
    Program activity may take place in the NIS countries and/or in the 
United States. These programs are intended to provide opportunities for 
NIS women and women's groups to increase their visibility and 
effectiveness in the social, economic, political and democratic 
spheres. There are various possibilities for acceptable training 
programs. The following guidelines should aid in the program design 
process. The Bureau welcomes programming ideas that are justified, 
innovative, well defined and include a detailed plan for 
implementation.

Women's Leadership Programs for Central Asia (Kazakhstan, 
Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan)

     Women's leadership in Central Asia can be addressed in 
single-country or regional programs focusing on citizen participation, 
organizational development, growth and sustainability.
     Organizations that have previously conducted women's 
leadership training programs in Russia and Ukraine are encouraged to 
replicate and adapt their programs for the women's leadership programs 
in Central Asia. These programs should include experienced trainers 
from Russia and/or Ukraine for the training components held in Central 
Asia.
     The Bureau encourages programs that support or build on 
country- or region-specific themes or target audiences. Themes may 
include, but are not limited to, combinations of the following: 
community development, cottage industry and small business networks, 
NGOs and awareness campaigns, public-private cooperation, professional 
development, political leadership, and needs of special interest groups 
(i.e. ethnic minorities, women with disabilities, young people).
     Priority will be given to programs that include a strong 
multiplier effect and that will result in the support or creation of a 
network or coalition with activities continuing after the grant period. 
Creation of coalitions and networks should be complementary and not 
duplicative.
     Applicants are strongly encouraged to include women from 
Tajikistan and Turkmenistan in the proposal's target audience. However, 
in-country activities for Central Asians should not take place in 
Tajikistan. Applicants should justify the selection of a regional 
training site(s) in Central Asia and outline the logistics necessary 
for participants from these two countries to participate. For example, 
the applicant should describe in detail the benefit of holding the 
training in the proposed location and potential means of 
transportation, passport and visa requirements between the Central 
Asian countries, and any other travel arrangements issues relevant to 
the region.
     Program plans may include a component for a Small Grants

[[Page 62788]]

Competition. This requires a timeline and detailed plan for outreach, 
advertising, recruitment and selection; a sample application; a 
description of the proposal review and award mechanism; a plan for how 
the grantee would monitor and evaluate small grant activity; and the 
proposed amount for an average grant. Funds for the Small Grants 
Competition should be no more than 25% of the total requested from the 
Bureau.

Women's Leadership Programs for the Caucasus Region (Armenia, 
Azerbaijan, Georgia)

     Women's leadership programs in the Caucasus Region should 
focus on citizen participation, cross-border networking and coalition 
building, organizational development, growth and sustainability.
     The Bureau encourages programs that support or build on 
region-specific themes or target audiences. Themes could include, but 
are not limited to, combinations of the following: community 
development, cottage industry and small business networks, NGOs' role 
in societal issues and awareness campaigns, public-private cooperation, 
professional development, political leadership, cross-cultural and 
cross-border issues, and needs of special interest groups (i.e. ethnic 
minorities, women with disabilities, young people).
     Priority will be given to programs that include a strong 
multiplier effect and that will result in the support or creation of a 
network or coalition with activities continuing after the grant period. 
Creation of coalitions and networks should be complementary and not 
duplicative.
     Applicants should indicate how technology and Internet 
connectivity will help in implementation of regional program 
components.
     Program plans may include a component for a Small Grants 
Competition. This requires a detailed plan for recruitment and 
advertising; a sample application; a description of the proposal review 
and award mechanism; a plan for how the grantee would monitor and 
evaluate small grant activity; and the proposed amount for an average 
grant. Funds for the Small Grants Competition should be no more than 
25% of the total requested from the Bureau.

Public Advocacy Training for NGOs and Associations for Russia, 
Belarus/Russia, Belarus/Cross-Border

Overview

    Public advocacy training on the grassroots level provides a basis 
for organizations to prioritize tasks and focus on issues in a 
practical way, thus allowing them to more effectively impart their 
message to the public and to local & national government.
    The Bureau seeks proposals to provide training to Belarusian and 
Russian NGO leaders, trade union representatives and community leaders 
that will increase the visibility of their groups and strengthen their 
influence on local, regional and national levels. Proposals must 
indicate a practical and sophisticated knowledge of the political and 
NGO environment on the local, regional or national level in Belarus and 
Russia. Applicants should have established relationships with partner 
organizations for joint proposal development and program 
implementation.
    NIS partner NGOs, organizations and institutions should be prepared 
to move beyond basic issues, such as organization and membership, and 
bring their message to a wider audience. Program components may include 
hands-on, intensive training workshops on issue advocacy; civic 
responsibility; good governance; grassroots political organizing; 
campaign management; accountability to constituencies; surveying; 
polling; advocacy; voter outreach, networking, message development, 
working with the media and fundraising.
    Belarusian participants can greatly benefit from partnerships and 
networks developed in cross-border programs with other Central and 
Eastern European (CEE) countries, particularly Poland. Interested 
organizations may consider including experienced trainers from Poland 
or other CEE countries, to assist with training sessions on replicable 
and relevant public relations applications and methods. In these cases, 
existing partnerships and previous experience with the CEE 
organizations or trainers should be outlined in the proposal.

Public Advocacy Training for Joint Belarus/Russia, including CEE 
Cross-Border programs

     Participants in the training program should include both 
Belarusians and Russians.
     Programs may include Polish or CEE trainers for a cross-
border component.
     Program components may take place in the U.S., Russia and/
or Poland (or other CEE country).
     Program plans may include a component for a Small Grants 
Competition. This requires a detailed plan for recruitment and 
advertising; a sample application; a description of the proposal review 
and award mechanism; a plan for how the grantee would monitor and 
evaluate small grant activity; and the proposed amount for an average 
grant. Funds for the Small Grants Competition should be no more than 
25% of the total requested from the Bureau.

Public Advocacy Training for Belarus, including CEE Cross-Border 
programs

     Participants in the training program should include only 
Belarusians.
     Cross-border programs may include Polish or CEE trainers.
     Program components should take place in the U.S. and/or 
Poland (or other CEE country).
     Program plans may include a component for a Small Grants 
Competition. This requires a detailed plan for recruitment and 
advertising; a sample application; a description of the proposal review 
and award mechanism; a plan for how the grantee would monitor and 
evaluate small grant activity; and the proposed amount for an average 
grant. Funds for the Small Grants Competition should be no more than 
25% of the total requested from the Bureau.

Public Advocacy Training for Russia

     Participants in the training program should include only 
Russians.
     Program components may take place in the U.S. and/or 
Russia.
     Program plans may include a component for a Small Grants 
Competition. This requires a detailed plan for recruitment and 
advertising; a sample application; a description of the proposal review 
and award mechanism; a plan for how the grantee would monitor and 
evaluate small grant activity; and the proposed amount for an average 
grant. Funds for the Small Grants Competition should be no more than 
25% of the total requested from the Bureau.

Prevention of Trafficking in Women and Girls for Belarus, Moldova 
and Russia

Overview

    Trafficking in Women and Girls continues to be a serious problem 
globally, and particularly in the NIS. As the problem escalates, the 
need to educate girls, women, families and communities about 
trafficking increases. With the growing number of trafficked women 
repatriated to their home countries, there is also a greater need to 
broaden victim assistance efforts to include reintegration and 
occupational training. Current and past programs to combat trafficking 
in women and girls

[[Page 62789]]

funded by the international community and NIS-based initiatives, have 
resulted in model assistance programs, as well as publications, printed 
materials and multimedia products that can be used for public awareness 
and educational campaigns.
    Prevention of Trafficking in Women and Girls can be addressed in 
single-country or multi-country programs and should reach a wide 
audience by building on the collective experience of previous campaigns 
and victim assistance efforts conducted in any of the NIS countries. 
Competitive proposals will focus on (1) public awareness and 
educational campaigns for girls, women, families and communities about 
trafficking, and/or (2) victim assistance, including reintegration and 
occupational training. Priority will go to programs that propose to 
reach risk groups, regions or countries where awareness campaigns and 
victim assistance initiatives have been limited or nonexistent.
    For proposals focusing on educational campaigns and public 
awareness: The applicant must demonstrate knowledge of current and 
previous campaigns; explain in-detail how existing materials will be 
used to provide a highly effective program; exhibit an understanding of 
U.S. government priorities; describe how the applicant will integrate 
the program plan with initiatives of the U.S. Embassies' Public Affairs 
Sections in the NIS; and demonstrate how the program plan will 
complement other educational and public awareness campaigns. Emphasis 
should be on the actual implementation of an educational or public 
awareness campaign, in cooperation with several partner NGOs and 
organizations in the NIS. Program activities should, where possible, 
reach a regional or national audience. Program components may take 
place in Belarus, Moldova and/or Russia.
    For proposals focusing on victim assistance, reintegration and 
occupational training: Program components may include, but are not 
limited to, crisis intervention; counseling and hotlines; viable job 
skills training courses appropriate to the local market; reintegration 
workshops; establishment of local NGO networks that can serve as 
resources for shelters and crisis centers; support for rehabilitation 
services; and professional training for staff of shelters, crisis 
centers, hotlines, NGO or employment resource centers, and job skills 
courses. Program components may take place in Belarus, Moldova, Russia 
and/or the U.S.
    In addition to the above information, competitive proposals will 
address these guidelines:
     Applicants should check the State Department website for 
current information on the Prevention of Trafficking in Women and Girls 
on the International Information Programs website: 
www.usinfo.state.gov/topical/global/traffic/ and the President's 
Interagency Council on Women website: http://secretary.state.gov/www/
picw/index.html.
     Proposals should include sample educational and/or 
training materials and a description of how the materials will be 
integrated into proposed activities.
     Applicants may consider including experienced trainers 
from NIS or CEE countries to conduct training sessions or assist with 
educational campaigns. In these cases, existing partnerships and 
previous experience with the CEE organizations or trainers must be 
outlined in the proposal.
     The Bureau is particularly interested in proposals that 
will utilize the capacity of local NGOs and other organizations to 
assist with logistics, planning, and implementation of the local or 
regional educational and public awareness campaigns.
     Applicants should expect to work closely with Public 
Affairs Sections of the U.S. Embassies in the NIS on coordination of 
activities.
     Program plans may include small subcontracts with NIS 
organizations to cover costs for local logistics for outreach and 
educational or public awareness campaigns. When subcontracts are 
proposed, signed agreements with each organization or individual should 
be included in the proposal.
     Proposals must include a timeline for the entire proposed 
grant period, a schedule for each program component, subcontract 
agreements, resumes for each individual proposed in the program plan, 
and letters of support from NIS partner NGOs and other organizations.
     The program plan may include a Small Grants Competition 
for NIS NGOs and other organizations to conduct ongoing reintegration 
and occupational training workshops. This requires a detailed plan for 
outreach and advertising; a sample grant application; a description of 
the proposal review and award mechanism; a plan for how the U.S. 
grantee organization would monitor and evaluate small grant activity; 
and the proposed amount for an average grant. Funds for the Small 
Grants Competition should be no more than 25% of the total requested 
from the Bureau.

Selection of Participants

    To be competitive, proposals should include a description of an 
open, merit-based participant selection process, including advertising, 
recruitment and selection. A sample application should be submitted 
with the proposal. Applicants should expect to carry out the entire 
selection process, but the Bureau and the Public Affairs Sections of 
the U.S. Embassies abroad should be consulted. The Bureau and the U.S. 
Embassies retain the right to nominate participants and to approve or 
reject participants recommended by the grantee institution. Priority 
must be given to foreign participants who have not traveled to the 
United States.

Visa Regulations

    Foreign participants on programs sponsored by The Bureau are 
granted J-1 Exchange Visitor visas by the U.S. Embassy in the sending 
country. All programs must comply with J-1 visa regulations. Please 
refer to the Proposal Submission Instructions (PSI) for further 
information.

Project Funding

    The funding available for NIS Exchanges and Training will be 
disbursed through grants to several organizations. Although no funding 
limit exists, organizations are strongly encouraged to submit proposals 
that do not exceed $130,000. Proposals that do not exceed $130,000 will 
be given priority. Organizations with less than four years of 
experience in managing international exchange programs are limited to 
$60,000.

Notice

    The terms and conditions published in this RFP are binding and may 
not be modified by any Bureau representative. Explanatory information 
provided by the Bureau or program officers that contradicts published 
language will not be binding. Issuance of the RFP does not constitute 
an award commitment on the part of the U.S. Government. The Bureau 
reserves the right to reduce, revise, or increase proposal budgets in 
accordance with the needs of the program and the availability of funds. 
Awards made will be subject to periodic reporting and evaluation 
requirements. Organizations will be expected to cooperate with the 
Bureau in evaluating their programs under the principles of the 
Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) of 1993, which requires 
federal agencies to measure and

[[Page 62790]]

report on the results of their programs and activities.
    Final awards cannot be made until funds have been appropriated by 
Congress, allocated and committed through internal U.S. Department of 
State procedures.

Budget Guidelines

    Applicants must submit a comprehensive line item budget based on 
the model in the Proposal Submission Instructions, but are encouraged 
to provide the optional separate sub-budgets for each program 
component, location or activity in order to facilitate decisions on 
funding. Applicants should include a budget narrative or budget notes 
for clarification of each line item.
    Cost sharing: Since the Bureau's grant assistance constitutes only 
a portion of total project funding, proposals should list and provide 
evidence of other sources of cost sharing, including financial and in-
kind support. Proposals with substantial private sector support from 
foundations, corporations, and other institutions will be considered 
highly competitive. Please refer to the statement on cost sharing in 
the Proposal Submission Instructions.
    The following program costs are eligible for funding consideration:
    1. Transportation: International and domestic airfares (per the Fly 
America Act), transit costs, ground transportation costs, and visas for 
U.S. participants to travel to the NIS countries (visas for NIS 
participants to travel to the U.S. for travel funded by the Bureau's 
grant assistance are issued at no charge).
    2. Per Diem: For U.S.-based programming, organizations should use 
the published Federal per diem rates for individual U.S. cities. For 
activities in the NIS and Central Europe, the Bureau strongly 
encourages applicants to budget realistic costs that reflect the local 
economy.
    Domestic per diem rates may be accessed at: http://
www.policyworks.gov/ and foreign per diem rates can be accessed at: 
http://www.state.gov/www/perdiems/index.html.
    3. Interpreters: Local interpreters with adequate skills and 
experience may be used for program activities. Typically, one 
interpreter is provided for every four visitors who require 
interpreting, with a minimum of two interpreters. The Bureau grants do 
not pay for foreign interpreters to accompany delegations from their 
home country. Salary costs for local interpreters must be included in 
the budget. Costs associated with using their services may not exceed 
rates for U.S. Department of State interpreters. The Bureau strongly 
encourages applicants to use local interpreters. U.S. Department of 
State Interpreters may be used for highly technical programs with the 
approval of the Office of Citizen Exchanges. Proposal budgets should 
contain a flat $170/day per diem for each U.S. Department of State 
interpreter, as well as home-program-home air transportation of $400 
per interpreter, reimbursements for taxi fares, plus any other 
transportation expenses during the program. Salary expenses are covered 
centrally and should not be part of an applicant's proposed budget.
    4. Book and cultural allowance: Foreign participants are entitled 
to a one-time cultural allowance of $150 per person, plus a book 
allowance of $50. Interpreters should be reimbursed up to $150 for 
expenses when they escort participants to cultural events. U.S. program 
staff, trainers or participants are not eligible to receive these 
benefits.
    5. Consultants: Consultants may be used to provide specialized 
expertise or to make presentations. Daily honoraria cannot exceed $250 
per day. Subcontracting organizations may also be used, in which case 
the written agreement between the prospective grantee and subcontractor 
should be included in the proposal. Subcontracts should be itemized in 
the budget.
    6. Room rental: Room rental may not exceed $250 per day.
    7. Materials development: Proposals may contain costs to purchase, 
develop and translate materials for participants. The Bureau strongly 
discourages the use of automatic translation software for the 
preparation of training materials or any information distributed to the 
group of participants or network of organizations. Costs for good-
quality translation of materials should be anticipated and included in 
the budget. Grantee organizations should expect to submit a copy of all 
program materials to the Bureau.
    8. Equipment: Proposals may contain costs to purchase equipment for 
NIS-based programming such as computers, fax machines and copy 
machines. Costs for furniture are not allowed. Equipment costs must be 
kept to a minimum.
    9. Working meal: Only one working meal may be provided during the 
program. Per capita costs may not exceed $5-8 for a lunch and $14-20 
for a dinner, excluding room rental.
    The number of invited guests may not exceed participants by more 
than a factor of two-to-one. Interpreters must be included as 
participants.
    10. Return travel allowance: A return travel allowance of $70 for 
each foreign participant may be included in the budget. The allowance 
may be used for incidental expenses incurred during international 
travel.
    11. Health Insurance: Foreign participants will be covered under 
the terms of a Bureau-sponsored health insurance policy. The premium is 
paid by the Bureau directly to the insurance company. Applicants are 
permitted to include costs for travel insurance for U.S. participants 
in the budget.
    12. Administrative Costs: Costs necessary for the effective 
administration of the program may include salaries for grantee 
organization employees, benefits, and other direct and indirect costs 
per detailed instructions in the Application Package. While there is no 
rigid ratio of administrative to program costs, priority will be given 
to proposals whose administrative costs are less than twenty-five (25) 
per cent of the total requested from the Bureau. Proposals should show 
strong administrative cost-sharing contributions from the applicant, 
the NIS partner and other sources.
    Please refer to the Proposal Submission Instructions (PSI) for 
complete budget guidelines.

Review Criteria

    Technically eligible applications will be competitively reviewed 
according to the criteria stated below. Proposals should adequately 
address each area of review. These criteria are not rank ordered.
    1. Program Planning and Ability to Achieve Objectives: Program 
objectives should be stated clearly and precisely and should reflect 
the applicant's expertise in the subject area and the region. 
Objectives should respond to the priority topics in this announcement 
and should relate to the current conditions in the included countries. 
Objectives should be reasonable and attainable. A detailed work plan 
should explain step-by-step how objectives will be achieved and should 
include a timetable for completion of major tasks. The substance of 
workshops, internships, seminars, presentations and/or consulting 
should be described in detail. Sample training schedules should be 
outlined. Responsibilities of in-country partners should be clearly 
described.
    2. Institutional Capacity: The proposal should include (1) the U.S. 
institution's mission and date of establishment (2) detailed 
information about the NIS partner institution's capacity and the 
history of the U.S. and NIS partnership (3) an outline of prior 
awards--U.S. government and private support received for the target 
theme/

[[Page 62791]]

region (4) descriptions of experienced staff members who will implement 
the program. Proposed personnel and institutional resources should be 
adequate and appropriate to achieve the program's goals. The narrative 
should demonstrate proven ability to handle logistics. The proposal 
should reflect the institution's expertise in the subject area and 
knowledge of the conditions in the target country/region(s).
    3. Cost Effectiveness and Cost Sharing: Overhead and administrative 
costs for the proposal, including salaries, honoraria and subcontracts 
for services, should be kept to a minimum. Administrative costs should 
be less than twenty-five (25) per cent of the total funds requested 
from the Bureau. Applicants are encouraged to cost share a portion of 
overhead and administrative expenses. Cost-sharing, including 
contributions from the applicant, the NIS partner, and other sources 
should be included in the budget.
    4. Program Evaluation: Proposals must include a plan and 
methodology to evaluate the program's successes, both as the activities 
unfold and at the program's conclusion. The Bureau recommends that the 
proposal include a draft survey questionnaire or other technique (such 
as a series of questions for a focus group). The evaluation plan should 
show a clear link between program objectives and expected outcomes in 
the short-and medium-term, and provide a well-thought-out description 
of performance indicators and measurement tools.
    5. Multiplier Effect/Impact: Proposals should show how the program 
will strengthen long-term mutual understanding and institutionalization 
of program goals. Applicants should describe how responsibility and 
ownership of the program will be transferred to the NIS participants to 
ensure continued activity and impact. Programs that include convincing 
plans for sustainability will be given top priority.
    6. Follow-on Activities: Proposals should provide a plan for 
continued follow-on activity (beyond the Bureau grant period) ensuring 
that the Bureau-supported programs are not isolated events. Follow-on 
activities should be clearly outlined.
    7. Support of Diversity: Proposals should demonstrate substantive 
support of the Bureau's policy on diversity. Program content 
(orientation, evaluation, program sessions, resource materials, follow-
on activities) and program administration (selection process, 
orientation, evaluation) should address diversity in a comprehensive 
and innovative manner. Applicants should refer to The Bureau's 
Diversity, Freedom and Democracy Guidelines on page four of the 
Proposal Submission Instructions (PSI).

Diversity, Freedom and Democracy Guidelines

    Pursuant to the Bureau's authorizing legislation, programs must 
maintain a non-political character and should be balanced and 
representative of the diversity of American political, social, and 
cultural life. ``Diversity'' should be interpreted in the broadest 
sense and encompass differences including, but not limited to 
ethnicity, race, gender, religion, geographic location, socio-economic 
status, and physical challenges. Applicants are strongly encouraged to 
adhere to the advancement of this principle both in program 
administration and in program content. Please refer to the review 
criteria under the 'Support for Diversity' section for specific 
suggestions on incorporating diversity into the total proposal. Public 
Law 104-319 provides that ``in carrying out programs of educational and 
cultural exchange in countries whose people do not fully enjoy freedom 
and democracy,'' the Bureau ``shall take appropriate steps to provide 
opportunities for participation in such programs to human rights and 
democracy leaders of such countries.'' Public Law 106--113 requires 
that the governments of the countries described above do not have 
inappropriate influence in the selection process. Proposals should 
reflect advancement of these goals in their program contents, to the 
full extent deemed feasible.

Review Process

    The Bureau will acknowledge receipt of all proposals and will 
review them for technical eligibility. Proposals will be deemed 
ineligible if they do not fully adhere to the guidelines stated herein 
and in the Solicitation Package. All eligible proposals will be 
reviewed by the program office, as well as the Public Diplomacy section 
overseas, where appropriate. Eligible proposals will be forwarded to 
panels of Bureau officers for advisory review. Proposals may also be 
reviewed by the Office of the Legal Adviser or by other Department 
elements. Final funding decisions are at the discretion of the 
Department of State's Assistant Secretary for Educational and Cultural 
Affairs. Final technical authority for assistance awards (grants or 
cooperative agreements) resides with the Bureau's Grants Officer.

Deadline for Proposals

    All copies must be received by the U.S. Department of State, Bureau 
of Educational and Cultural Affairs, by 5 p.m. Washington, D.C. time on 
Tuesday, December 19, 2000.
    Faxed documents will not be accepted at any time. The mailroom 
closes at 5:00 p.m.; no late submissions will be accepted. Documents 
postmarked by December 19, 2000, but received at a later date, will not 
be accepted. Each applicant must ensure that the proposals are received 
by the above deadline.

To Download an Application Package Via the Internet

    The entire Application Package may be downloaded from the Bureau's 
website at http://exchanges.state.gov/education/rfps/.

Submissions

    Applicants must follow all instructions given in the Application 
Package. The applicant's original proposal and ten (10) copies 
(unbound) should be sent to: U.S. Department of State, Ref.: ECA/PE/C/
EUR-01-19, Program Management, ECA/EX/PM, Room 336, 301 4th Street, 
S.W., Washington, D.C. 20547.
    Once the RFP deadline has passed, Bureau staff may not discuss this 
competition in any way with applicants until the proposal review 
process has been completed.

For Further Information, Contact

    By mail: United States Department of State, SA-44, Bureau of 
Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Citizen Exchanges (ECA/PE/
C), Room 220, Washington, DC 20547 attn: NIS Exchanges & Training.
    By phone: Tel: (202) 260-6230; fax: 202-619-4350, By e-mail: 
nistraining@pd.state.gov.
    Interested applicants may request the Application Package, which 
includes the Request for Proposals (RFP) and the Proposal Submission 
Instructions (PSI). Please specify ``Europe/Eurasia Program 
Coordinator'' on all inquiries and correspondence. All potential 
applicants should read the complete announcement before sending 
inquiries or submitting proposals.

Notification

    Final awards cannot be made until funds have been appropriated by 
Congress, allocated and committed through internal U.S. Department of 
State procedures.


[[Page 62792]]


    Dated: October 8, 2000.
William B. Bader,
Assistant Secretary for Educational and Cultural Affairs, U.S. 
Department of State.
[FR Doc. 00-26364 Filed 10-18-00; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4710-05-P



			


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