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[Congressional Record: May 11, 2000 (Extensions)]
[Page E718]
From the Congressional Record Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:cr11my00-52]                         

[[Page E718]]


 
 REGARDING SECTION 110 OF THE ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION REFORM AND IMMIGRANT 
                       RESPONSIBILITY ACT OF 1996

                                 ______
                                 

                           HON. DOC HASTINGS

                             of Washington

                    in the house of representatives

                         Thursday, May 11, 2000

  Mr. HASTINGS of Washington. Mr. Speaker, today I am in support of 
repealing Section 110 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant 
Responsibility Act of 1996. While I certainly support the goal of 
enhanced immigration enforcement through better record-keeping at our 
nation's borders, implementing Section 110 prior to the establishment 
of a speedy automated entry-exit system will cause serious problems on 
the borders. Specifically, mandatory documentation will create massive 
traffic delays that would clog both the Northern and Southern borders, 
and obstruct trade and tourism nationwide.
  The Immigration and Naturalization Service does not have the 
technology in place to carry out the entry-exit system required by 
Section 110 without unacceptable delays at all border crossings. As a 
representative from the State of Washington, my constituents will be 
adversely affected by the implementation of Section 110. In 1999, 
Washington State alone exported close to $3 billion worth of goods to 
Canada. Applying Section 110 without adequate technology in place will 
create lines of waiting vehicles stretching several miles that would 
severely cripple trade, travel, and tourism between Washington State 
and Canada.
  Likewise, in 1999, Washington State had close to 5.5 million border 
crossings at its 5 border stations. Of this, over 300,000 crossings 
were at the border station in Oroville, Washington, which is in my 
district. Oroville is a relatively small community in Central 
Washington that is not equipped to handle the extensive traffic jams 
that would be caused by Section 110. The City of Oroville recently 
adopted Resolution 391, and I submit the resolution to be included in 
the Congressional Record. In the Resolution, the City of Oroville 
requests that Congress delay the implementation of Section 110 until 
the United States Attorney General has addressed and resolved the 
issues and concerns relating to implementation.
  Until technologies are developed to allow for extensive record-
keeping at our border stations while ensuring timely border crossings, 
it is simply unreasonable to try and implement Section 110.

                           Resolution No. 391

       A resolution to urge the United States Congress 
     (``Congress'') to repeal or delay the implementation of 
     Section 110 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigration 
     Responsibility Act of 1996 (``Act'').
       Whereas, Section 110 of the Act requires the establishment 
     of an automated entry-exit control system at all airports, 
     seaports and land border crossings to ``collect a record of 
     departure for every alien departing the United States and 
     match the records of departure with the record of the Alien's 
     arrival in the United States'';
       Whereas, implementation of Section 110 will add to the 
     congestion at international crossings and increase the size 
     and amount of delays and holdups at border crossings;
       Whereas, delays and holdups at the border crossings will 
     limit the potential for industry expansion and will have 
     negative national and international economic impacts on 
     efficiency, service and jobs;
       Whereas, trade and tourism between the United States and 
     its North American neighbors has grown considerably since the 
     enactment of NAFTA;
       Whereas, trade and tourism are becoming an increasingly 
     important sector of both the local border economies and the 
     national economy;
       Whereas, the World Travel and Tourism Council predicts that 
     travel and tourism will ultimately account for 100 million 
     jobs in this decade;
       Whereas, through steady, incremental efforts, current alien 
     arrival and departure data collection and sharing systems at 
     ports of entry may be improved in ways that will advance 
     important national objectives including expanded trade, 
     travel and tourism, enhanced national security and law 
     enforcement;
       Whereas, future advances in data collection technology will 
     enable federal, state and local governments and the private 
     sector to increase the flow of goods and persons across our 
     national borders.
       Whereas, the appropriate agencies within the 
     Administration, through advances in technology over time, may 
     be able to recommend to Congress how to improve alien arrival 
     and departure data collection and sharing systems at land and 
     sea ports of entry in ways that advance important national 
     objectives, including expanded trade, travel and tourism, 
     enhanced national security and law enforcement;
       Whereas, any such recommendations from the appropriate 
     agencies should involve cooperative efforts between the 
     public and private sectors including federal, state and local 
     governments to ensure appropriate realization of these 
     objectives;
       Whereas, the technology to collect the data required by 
     Section 110 of the Act is not yet commercially feasible;
       Whereas, it is of critical importance that the data 
     collection system created pursuant to Section 110 of the Act 
     not interfere with the ebb and flow of goods and persons 
     across our national borders.
       Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved by The City Council of the 
     City of Oroville, That that City of Oroville urges the United 
     States Congress to delay implementation of Section 110 of the 
     illegal immigration Reform and Immigration Responsibility Act 
     of 1996 until the United States Attorney General has 
     addressed and resolved the issues and concerns of this 
     resolution in coordination with the private sector and state 
     and local governments.
       Passed this 2nd day of May, 2000.
                                         David K. Reynolds, Mayor.
                                  Kathy M. Jones, Clerk-Treasurer.



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