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< Back to current issue of Immigration Daily < Back to current issue of Immigrant's Weekly

Federal Register: May 1, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 84)]
[Notices]               
[Page 25345-25350]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr01my00-72]                         

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Administration for Children and Families

 
Refugee Resettlement Program: Proposed Notice of Allocations to 
States of FY 2000 Funds for Refugee Social Services

AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), ACF, HHS.

ACTION: Proposed notice of allocations to States of FY 2000 funds for 
refugee social services.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This notice establishes the proposed allocations to States of 
FY 2000 funds for social services under the Refugee Resettlement 
Program (RRP). In the final notice, allocation amounts could be 
adjusted slightly based on final adjustments in FY 1999 arrivals in 
some States.
    This notice includes a $15.5 million set-aside to: (1) Provide 
outreach and referral services to ensure that eligible refugees access 
the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP)and other programs 
for low income working populations; and (2) provide specialized 
interpreter training and the hiring of interpreters to enable refugees 
to have equal access to medical and legal services.

DATES: Comments on this notice must be received by May 31, 2000.

ADDRESSES: Address written comments, in duplicate, to: Barbara R. 
Chesnik, Office of Refugee Resettlement, Administration for Children 
and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barbara R. Chesnik, Division of 
Refugee Self-Sufficiency, (202) 401-4558.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Amounts for Allocation

    The Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) has available $143,953,000 
in FY 2000 refugee social service funds as part of the FY 2000 
appropriation for the Department of Health and Human Services (Pub. L. 
No. 106-113).
    The FY 2000 House Appropriations Committee Report (H.R. Rept. No. 
106-370) reads as follows with respect to social services funds:

    The bill provides $140,000,000 for social services, about the 
same as the fiscal year 1999 appropriation and $7,990,000 below the 
budget request. Funds are distributed by formula as well as through 
the discretionary grant making process for special projects. The 
Committee agrees that $19,000,000 is available for assistance to 
serve communities affected by the Cuban and Haitian entrants and 
refugees whose arrivals in recent years have increased. The 
Committee has set aside

[[Page 25346]]

$26,000,000 for increased support to communities with large 
concentrations of refugees whose cultural differences make 
assimilation especially difficult justifying a more intense level 
and longer duration of Federal assistance. Finally, the Committee 
has set aside $14,000,000 to address the needs of refugees and 
communities impacted by recent changes in Federal assistance 
programs relating to welfare reform. The Committee urges ORR to 
assist refugees at risk of losing, or who have lost benefits, 
including SSI, TANF and Medicaid, in obtaining citizenship.

In addition, the House report provides:

    It is estimated that approximately $20,000,000 will be available 
in FY 2000 from carryover funds, and the Committee intends that 
these funds be used under social services to increase educational 
support to schools with a significant proportion of refugee children 
and for the development of alternative cash assistance programs that 
involve case management approaches to improve resettlement outcomes. 
Such support should include intensive English language training and 
cultural assimilation programs.

    The FY 2000 Senate Appropriations Committee Report (S. Rept. No. 
106-166) recommended $147,990,00 for social services in the FY 2000 
budget:

    The Committee provides $19,000,000 to serve communities affected 
by the Cuban and Haitian entrants and refugees, the same as the 
amount contained in last year's appropriation. The Committee also 
includes $14,000,000 to address the needs of refugees and 
communities affected by recent changes in Federal assistance 
programs, and $16,000,000 to assist communities with large 
concentrations of refugees whose cultural differences make 
assimilation difficult. These funds are included in the social 
services line item.

    The FY 2000 Conference Report on Appropriations (H.R. Conf. 106-
479) reads as follows concerning social services:

    The conference agreement includes $20,000,000 from carryover 
funds that are to be used under social services to increase 
educational support to schools with a significant proportion of 
refugee children and for the development of alternative cash 
assistance programs that involve case management approaches to 
improve resettlement outcomes. Such support should include intensive 
English language training and cultural assimilation programs.
    The agreement also includes $26,000,000 for increased support to 
communities with large concentrations of refugees whose cultural 
differences make assimilation especially difficult justifying a more 
intense level and longer duration of Federal assistance.

The Conference report provided $143,995,000 in social services funds.
    The Departments of Labor, Health, and Human Services, and 
Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act (Pub L. No. 106-113, 
appendix E, section 301) rescinded discretionary budget authority 
government-wide by .38 percent. Agencies, however, were provided 
flexibility regarding how the recission would be applied. Accordingly, 
ORR's total social services appropriation was reduced from $143,995,000 
to $143,953,000. In accordance with Congressional report language, the 
Director of the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) proposes to use 
the $143,953,000 appropriated for FY 2000 social services as follows:
     $72,203,750 will be allocated under the 3-year population 
formula, as set forth in this notice for the purpose of providing 
employment services and other needed services to refugees.
     $12,749,250 will be awarded as social service 
discretionary grants through competitive grant announcements that will 
be issued separately from this notice.
     $19,000,000 will be awarded to serve communities most 
heavily affected by recent Cuban and Haitian entrant and refugee 
arrivals. These funds would be awarded through a discretionary grant 
announcement that will be issued separately from this notice.
     $26,000,000 will be awarded through discretionary grants 
for communities with large concentrations of refugees whose cultural 
differences make assimilation especially difficult justifying a more 
intense level and longer duration of Federal assistance. Awards will be 
made through announcements issued separately from this notice.
     $14,000,000 will be awarded to address the needs of 
refugees and communities impacted by recent changes in Federal 
assistance programs relating to welfare reform. Awards will be made 
through announcements issued separately from this notice.
     $20,000,000 will be awarded in prior year funds to 
increase educational support to schools with a significant proportion 
of refugee children and for the development of alternative cash 
assistance programs that involve case management approaches to improve 
resettlement outcomes. This support will include intensive English 
language training and cultural assimilation programs. Awards will be 
made through an announcement issued separately from this notice.
    In addition, we are proposing to add $15,500,000 in prior year 
funds to the FY 2000 formula social services allocation as a set-aside 
for referral and interpreter services, increasing the total amount 
available for the formula social services program in FY 2000 to 
$87,703,750.
    Congress provided ORR with broad carry-over authority in the FY 
2000 HHS appropriations law to use unexpended FY 1998 and FY 1999 CMA 
funds for assistance and other activities in the refugee program 
provided through September 30, 2001. The appropriations law states:

    That funds appropriated pursuant to section 414(a) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act under Public Law 105-78 for fiscal 
year 1998 and under Public Law 105-227 for fiscal year 1999 shall be 
available for the costs of assistance provided and other activities 
through September 30, 2001.

Refugee Social Service Funds

    The population figures for the social services allocation include 
refugees, Cuban/Haitian entrants, Amerasians from Vietnam, and Kurdish 
asylees since these populations may be served through funds addressed 
in this notice. (A State must, however, have an approved State plan for 
the Cuban/Haitian Entrant Program or indicate in its refugee program 
State plan that Cuban/Haitian entrants will be served in order to use 
funds on behalf of entrants as well as refugees.)
    The Director is proposing to allocate $72,203,750 to States on the 
basis of each State's proportion of the national population of refugees 
who had been in the U.S. 3 years or less as of October 1, 1999 
(including a floor amount for States which have small refugee 
populations).
    The use of the 3-year population base in the allocation formula is 
required by section 412(c)(1)(B) of the Immigration and Nationality Act 
(INA) which states that the ``funds available for a fiscal year for 
grants and contracts [for social services] * * * shall be allocated 
among the States based on the total number of refugees (including 
children and adults) who arrived in the United States not more than 36 
months before the beginning of such fiscal year and who are actually 
residing in each State (taking into account secondary migration) as of 
the beginning of the fiscal year.''
    As established in the FY 1991 social services notice published in 
the Federal Register of August 29, 1991, section I, ``Allocation 
Amounts'' (56 FR 42745), a variable floor amount for States which have 
small refugee populations is calculated as follows: If the application 
of the regular allocation formula yields less than $100,000, then--
    (1) A base amount of $75,000 is provided for a State with a 
population of 50 or fewer refugees who have been in the U.S. 3 years or 
less; and
    (2) For a State with more than 50 refugees who have been in the 
U.S. 3 years or less: (a) A floor has been calculated consisting of 
$50,000 plus the regular per capita allocation for refugees above 50 up 
to a total of $100,000 (in other words, the maximum under the floor 
formula is $100,000); (b) if this calculation has yielded less than 
$75,000, a base amount of $75,000 is provided for the State.

[[Page 25347]]

    The Director is also proposing to allocate an additional $15.5 
million from prior year carry-over funds as a set-aside to: (1) Provide 
referral services, including outreach, to ensure that refugees are able 
to access the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) and 
other programs for low income populations; and (2) provide for the 
hiring of interpreters and special interpreter training to enable 
refugees to have equal access to medical and certain legal services. 
Depending upon the existing capacity and need in the community, we 
encourage States to use the funds equally for both activities. Both 
types of services are not subject to the 5-year limitation and may be 
provided to refugees regardless of their length of time in the U.S. See 
45 CFR 400.152(b).
    Eligible refugee families often are not aware of, or do not know 
how to access, other Federal support programs available to low income 
working families in the community. We believe that these programs, 
including SCHIP, Food Stamps, Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program 
(LIHEAP), Medicaid, Head Start, low-income housing, the Special 
Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), 
child care assistance, adult day care for aged dependents, and other 
support programs for low-income families, are important for the well-
being of working refugees, particularly refugee families, and are 
necessary to help these refugees maintain employment and move toward 
full self-sufficiency.
    The organizations funded by the set-aside amount are expected to 
conduct outreach into the community to identify low-income refugees and 
to help these refugees enroll in and to be familiar with the services 
available and the participation requirements of these programs. We 
expect States to fund community-based organizations, to the maximum 
extent possible, to provide hands-on assistance, which means having the 
application forms available and helping refugees to fill out the 
application, accompanying the refugee to the eligibility office, 
assisting in the communication between the family and the eligibility 
worker, closely following the application process until the family has 
been found eligible, and then helping the family effectively use the 
service or support program in which they have been enrolled. For 
example, there may be different levels of medical coverage available to 
a family, depending on the ages of the children and the income level of 
the family, each with different requirements. It is important for the 
caseworkers/advocates funded through this initiative to understand the 
program requirements (such as a co-payment structure) in order to help 
the family make decisions and fully participate.
    The organizations funded under this set-aside should develop 
effective ways to provide an on-going link between these services, the 
population they serve, and the targeted low income programs. Methods 
might include: partnering with schools to identify refugee children who 
may be eligible for SCHIP by virtue of their eligibility for the school 
lunch program; connecting with local Head Start programs to help 
identify refugee children who are eligible for SCHIP and other health 
care programs; arranging to have Medicaid eligibility workers visit the 
Mutual Assistance Association (MAA) or other participating organization 
on a scheduled basis; and working with other groups serving low income 
families, such as hospitals, WIC programs, low-income housing programs, 
and food assistance programs to make these services widely known to the 
refugee community being served.
    It is also important that States provide as high a standard as 
possible in interpretation to non-English speaking and to Limited-
English-Proficient (LEP) refugees, particularly in regard to medical 
and legal issues. As mentioned earlier, we are therefore including 
funding in the set-aside for States to improve the availability and 
quality of interpreter services for refugees in their communities. The 
set-aside funds are to be used by States: (1) To fund specialized 
interpreter training for medical and legal services; and (2) to pay for 
the hiring and employment of these trained interpreters by MAAs, 
voluntary agencies, and other community-based organizations serving 
refugees, to the maximum extent possible, in order to increase the 
number of skilled interpreters in the community.
    Interpretation requires a great deal of skill--interpreters need to 
be fluent in English and the language spoken by the refugee. They must 
have the ability to quickly understand the message and terminology, if 
technical, in one language and to express it as quickly and correctly 
in another language. In addition to fluency in two languages, 
interpreters must have the skills to handle confidential client 
information and to deal with a variety of professionals in the medical, 
legal, law enforcement, social services, and other fields.
    States should use qualified training programs or trainers to 
provide the interpreter training. Several strategies may be employed, 
e.g., the direct training of interpreters in a group setting, paying 
the course tuition and associated expenses for individuals at a 
community college or university, and the training of trainers in order 
to establish and maintain an efficient training capacity in the 
community. To the extent possible, we would expect States to use an 
established curriculum rather than incurring costs to develop a new 
one. Funding of interpreter services should be directed to areas of 
greatest need and to the most linguistically isolated communities.
    States must determine a community's capacity to ensure refugee 
access to medical and other services, and then examine how best to fund 
and maintain interpreter services for refugees based upon the need and 
size of refugee population. For example, an interpreter bank with 
dedicated interpreters may be a preferred option if the needs of the 
community can justify full-time interpreters. However, because the 
provision of interpreter services may not fully occupy funded staff in 
some locations or in certain languages, States may choose to train 
bilingual caseworkers at voluntary resettlement agencies, MAAs and 
refugee service providers. States may also consider cross-training of 
interpreters so that they may also assist, for example, in enrolling 
clients in SCHIP, Medicaid, or other services for low-income clients, 
and/or serve as case managers or in other staff positions. Staff with 
both bilingual interpreter skills and knowledge of the family services 
network, such as child protective services and the domestic violence 
system, are also highly desirable.
    We also encourage States to set up creative ways to maintain and 
expand the availability of interpreter services in the community, such 
as seeking reimbursement for services from the courts, hospitals, and 
agencies which may be able to pay for interpreter services but have 
been otherwise hindered in providing these services by the lack of 
available and appropriately trained individuals. Fees from low-income 
refugee clients, however, may not be sought.
    In light of the unique position that refugee MAAs have in the 
communities where refugees reside, we are asking that States give 
special consideration to MAAs in using the set-aside amount, where 
possible, to provide these services to refugee families. However, 
qualified community based organizations with refugee experience, 
voluntary resettlement agencies, or refugee service providers may be 
funded as well.

[[Page 25348]]

    A State that can demonstrate that the total amount of set-aside 
funds awarded is not needed to provide the services described above may 
submit a written request to the Director to use a portion of the funds 
for another non-employment service. This request must fully describe 
how the need for the specified set-aside services is already being met 
in the State, as well as a description of the additional service 
proposed, why it is needed, and how it will be provided.

Population To Be Served and Allowable Services

    Eligibility for refugee social services includes persons who meet 
all requirements of 45 CFR 400.43 (as amended by 65 FR 15409 (March 
22,2000)) and 45 CFR 401.2 (Cuban and Haitian entrants).
    Services to refugees must be provided in accordance with the rules 
of 45 CFR Part 400 Subpart I--Refugee Social Services. Although the 
allocation formula is based on the 3-year refugee population, States 
are not required to limit social service programs to refugees who have 
been in the U.S. only 3 years. However, under 45 CFR 400.152, States 
may not provide services funded by this notice, except for referral and 
interpreter services and citizenship and naturalization preparation 
services, to refugees who have been in the United States for more than 
60 months (5 years).
    Allowable social services are those indicated in 45 CFR 400.154 and 
400.155. Additional services not included in these sections which the 
State may wish to provide must be submitted to and approved by the 
Director of ORR (Sec. 400.155(h)).

Service Priorities

    In the past, a number of States have focused primarily on serving 
refugee cash assistance (RCA) recipients because of the need to help 
these refugees become employed and self-sufficient within the 8-month 
RCA eligibility period. Now, with the passage of welfare reform, 
refugee recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) 
also face a time limit for cash assistance and need appropriate 
services as quickly as possible to become employed and self-sufficient. 
In order for refugees to move quickly off TANF, we believe it is 
crucial for these refugees to receive refugee-specific services that 
are designed to address the employment barriers that refugees typically 
face.
    Some States are doing remarkably well in helping refugees achieve 
self-sufficiency. For this reason, this may be a good time for these 
States to re-examine the range of services they currently offer to 
refugees and expand the range of services beyond employment services to 
address the broader needs that refugees have in order to successfully 
integrate into the community.
    States should also expect that these funds will be made available 
to pay for social services which are provided to refugees who 
participate in Wilson/Fish projects. Section 412(e)(7)(A) of the INA 
provides that:

    The Secretary [of HHS] shall develop and implement alternative 
projects for refugees who have been in the United States less than 
thirty-six months, under which refugees are provided interim 
support, medical services, support [social] services, and case 
management, as needed, in a manner that encourages self-sufficiency, 
reduces welfare dependency, and fosters greater coordination among 
the resettlement agencies and service providers.

    This provision is generally known as the Wilson/Fish Amendment. The 
Department has already issued a separate notice in the Federal Register 
with respect to applications for such projects (64 FR 19793, April 22, 
1999).

II. (Reserved for Discussion of Comments in Final Notice)

III. Allocation Formulas

    Of the funds available for FY 2000 for social services, $72,203,750 
is allocated to States in accordance with the formula specified below. 
In addition, $15.5 million in set-aside funds are allocated in 
accordance with the formula specified below. A State's allowable 
allocation is calculated as follows:
    1. The total amount of funds determined by the Director to be 
available for this purpose; divided by--
    2. The total number of refugees, Cuban/Haitian entrants, Amerasians 
from Vietnam, and Kurdish asylees who arrived in the United States not 
more than 3 years prior to the beginning of the fiscal year for which 
the funds are appropriated, as shown by the ORR Refugee Data System. 
The resulting per capita amount is multiplied by--
    3. The number of persons in item 2, above, in the State as of 
October 1, 1999, adjusted for estimated secondary migration.
    The calculation above yields the formula allocation for each State. 
Minimum allocations for small States are taken into account.

IV. Basis of Population Estimates

    The population estimates for the allocation of funds in FY 2000 are 
based on data on refugee arrivals from the ORR Refugee Data System, 
adjusted as of October 1, 1999, for estimated secondary migration. The 
data base includes refugees of all nationalities, Amerasians from 
Vietnam, Cuban and Haitian entrants, and Kurdish asylees.
    For fiscal year 2000, ORR's proposed formula allocations for the 
States for social services are based on the numbers of refugees, 
Amerasians, Kurdish asylees, and entrants who arrived during the 
preceding three fiscal years: 1997, 1998, and 1999, based on arrival 
data by State. Therefore, estimates have been developed of the numbers 
of refugees and entrants with arrival or resettlement dates between 
October 1, 1996, and September 30, 1999, who are thought to be living 
in each State as of October 1, 1999.
    The estimates of secondary migration were based on data submitted 
by all participating States on Form ORR-11 on secondary migrants who 
have resided in the U.S. for 36 months or less, as of September 30, 
1999. The total migration reported by each State was summed, yielding 
in-and out-migration figures and a net migration figure for each State. 
The net migration figure was applied to the State's total arrival 
figure, resulting in a revised population estimate.
    Estimates were developed separately for refugees and entrants and 
then combined into a total estimated 3-year refugee/entrant population 
for each State. Eligible Amerasians and Kurdish asylees are included in 
the refugee figures.
    Havana parolees (HP's) are enumerated in a separate column in Table 
1, below because they are tabulated separately from other entrants. For 
FY 1999, Havana parolee arrivals for all States are based on actual 
data. For FY 1998, Florida's HP's (10,183) are based on actual data, 
while HP's in other States (3,258) are prorated according to the States 
proportion of the three-year ((FY 1996-FY 1998) entrant populations. 
For FY 1997, Florida's HP's (3,957) are based on actual data, while 
HP's in other States (2,035) were prorated according to their 
proportions of the three-year entrant population.
    If a State does not agree with ORR's population estimate and wishes 
ORR to reconsider its population estimate, it should submit written 
evidence to ORR, including a list of refugees identified by name, alien 
number, date of birth, and date of arrival. Listings of refugees who 
are not identified by their alien number will not be considered. Such 
evidence should be submitted separately from comments on the proposed 
allocation formula no later than 30 days from the date of publication 
of this notice and should be addressed to: Loren Bussert, Division of 
Refugee Self-Sufficiency,

[[Page 25349]]

Office of Refugee Resettlement, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW., 
Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-4732.
    Table 1, below, shows the estimated 3-year populations, as of 
October 1, 1999, of refugees (col. 1), entrants (col. 2), Havana 
parolees (col. 3); total refugee/entrant population, (col. 4); the 
proposed formula amounts which the population estimates yield (col. 5); 
the proposed allocation amounts after allowing for the minimum amounts 
(col. 6); the proposed set-aside amount (col. 7); and the proposed 
total allocation (col. 8).

V. Proposed Allocation Amounts

    Funding subsequent to the publication of this notice will be 
contingent upon the submittal and approval of a State annual services 
plan that is developed on the basis of a local consultative process, as 
required by 45 CFR 400.11(b)(2) in the ORR regulations.
    The following amounts are for allocation for refugee social 
services in FY 2000:

Table 1.--Estimated Three-Year Refugee/Entrant Populations of States Participating in the Refugee Program and Proposed Social Service Formula Amount and
                                                           Proposed Allocations for FY 2000--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                   Havana       Total        Proposed        Proposed
                State                   Refugees     Entrants     parolees    population  formula amount    allocation       Set-aside    Total proposed
                                        \1\  (1)       (2)        \2\  (3)       (4)            (5)             (6)                         allocation
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alabama.............................          570            4           69          643        $162,891        $162,891         $35,145        $198,036
Alaska \3\..........................            0            0            0            0               0               0               0               0
Arizona.............................        7,141          367          292        7,800       1,975,977       1,975,977         426,326       2,402,303
Arkansas............................           64            0           10           74          18,746          75,000           4,045          79,045
California..........................       30,770           41          476       31,287       7,925,949       7,925,949       1,710,058       9,636,007
Colorado............................        3,402            3            6        3,411         864,110         864,110         186,435       1,050,545
Connecticut.........................        3,084           19          150        3,253         824,084         824,084         177,800       1,001,884
Delaware............................           74            7            2           83          21,026          75,000           4,537          79,537
Dist. of Columbia...................        1,666            1           10        1,677         424,835         424,835          91,660         516,495
Florida.............................       12,854        7,288       27,085       47,227      11,964,036      11,964,036       2,581,293      14,545,329
Georgia.............................       10,578           18          129       10,725       2,716,969       2,716,969         586,198       3,303,167
Hawaii..............................          100            0            0          100          25,333          75,000           5,466          80,466
Idaho \4\...........................        2,045            0            0        2,045         518,061         518,061         111,774         629,835
Illinois............................       12,003            7          239       12,249       3,103,044       3,103,044         669,495       3,772,539
Indiana.............................        1,750            0           11        1,761         446,115         446,115          96,251         542,366
Iowa................................        6,075            0            4        6,079       1,539,996       1,539,996         332,261       1,872,257
Kansas..............................          868            0            8          876         221,917         221,917          47,880         269,797
Kentucky \5\........................        3,675          918          503        5,096       1,290,972       1,290,972         278,533       1,569,505
Louisiana...........................        1,495           57           93        1,645         416,729         416,729          89,911         506,640
Maine...............................          638            0            0          638         161,625         161,625          34,871         196,496
Maryland............................        2,755            6           61        2,822         714,898         714,898         154,242         869,140
Massachusetts.......................        6,711           67           99        6,877       1,742,153       1,742,153         375,877       2,118,030
Michigan............................        8,433          432          263        9,128       2,312,400       2,312,400         498,910       2,811,310
Minnesota...........................        8,362            0           10        8,372       2,120,882       2,120,882         457,590       2,578,472
Mississippi.........................          116            2           11          129          32,680          75,000           7,051          82,051
Missouri............................        7,553            2           16        7,571       1,917,965       1,917,965         413,809       2,331,774
Montana.............................           59            0            0           59          14,946          75,000           3,225          78,225
Nebraska............................        2,338            4           30        2,372         600,900         600,900         129,647         730,547
Nevada \5\..........................        1,077          520          479        2,076         525,914         525,914         113,468         639,382
New Hampshire.......................        1,496            0            0        1,496         378,982         378,982          81,767         460,749
New Jersey..........................        3,327          167          801        4,295       1,088,054       1,088,054         234,752       1,322,806
New Mexico..........................          460          256          375        1,091         276,383         276,383          59,631         336,014
New York............................       26,881          818          692       28,391       7,192,304       7,192,304       1,551,771       8,744,075
North Carolina......................        3,860            3           39        3,902         988,495         988,495         213,272       1,201,767
North Dakota........................        1,509            0            1        1,510         382,529         382,529          82,532         465,061
Ohio................................        4,285            5           36        4,326       1,095,907       1,095,907         236,447       1,332,354
Oklahoma............................          501            0            9          510         129,199         129,199          27,875         157,074
Oregon..............................        4,881          285          266        5,432       1,376,091       1,376,091         296,898       1,672,989
Pennsylvania........................        7,532           62          201        7,795       1,974,711       1,974,711         426,052       2,400,763
Rhode Island........................          397            1            6          404         102,345         102,345          22,081         124,426
South Carolina......................          268            1            9          278          70,426         100,000          15,195         115,195
South Dakota \5\....................        1,037            0            0        1,037         262,704         262,704          56,679         319,383
Tennessee...........................        3,767            4          140        3,911         990,775         990,775         213,764       1,204,539
Texas...............................       12,944          637          622       14,203       3,598,052       3,598,052         776,295       4,374,347
Utah................................        3,526            0            2        3,528         893,750         893,750         192,830       1,086,580
Vermont.............................        1,048            0            0        1,048         265,490         265,490          57,281         322,771
Virginia............................        4,538          101          111        4,750       1,203,320       1,203,320         259,621       1,462,941
Washington..........................       17,779            4           41       17,824       4,515,362       4,515,362         974,209       5,489,571
West Virginia.......................           16            0            0           16           4,053          75,000             875          75,875
Wisconsin...........................        1,755            2            7        1,764         446,875         446,875          96,415         543,290
Wyoming \3\.........................            0            0            0            0  ..............  ..............  ..............  ..............
                                     -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total...........................      238,063       12,109       33,414      283,586      71,840,960      72,203,750      15,500,000     87,703,750
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Includes: refugees, Kurdish asylees, and Amerasian immigrants from Vietnam adjusted for secondary migration.

[[Page 25350]]


\2\ For FY 1999, Havana Parolee arrivals for all States are based on actual data. For FY 1998, Florida's HP's (10,183) are based on actual data, while
  HP's in other States (3,258) are prorated according to the State's proportion of the three-year (FY 1996-FY 1998) entrant population. For FY 1997,
  Florida's HP's (3,957) are based on actual data, while HP's in other States (2,035) were prorated according to their proportions of the three-year
  entrant population.
\3\ Alaska and Wyoming no longer participate in the Refugee Program.
\4\ The allocation for Idaho is expected to be awarded to the State replacement designee.
\5\ The allocations for South Dakota, Kentucky, and Nevada are expected to be awarded to Wilson/Fish projects.

VI. Paperwork Reduction Act

    This notice does not create any reporting or recordkeeping 
requirements requiring OMB clearance.

[Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No. 93.566 Refugee 
Assistance--State Administered Programs]
    Dated: April 25, 2000.
Lavinia Limon,
Director, Office of Refugee Resettlement.
[FR Doc. 00-10783 Filed 4-28-00; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4184-01-P



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