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Immigration Daily February 21, 2007
Previous Issues
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Comment

Taxes Without Benefits

A recent New York Times article quotes Ron Hayduk, the author of "Democracy for All: Restoring Immigrant Voting Rights in the United States" saying "until the 1920s, 40 states and territories allowed noncitizens to vote in local, state and even federal elections." When the immigrants were primarily white, and when taxation was light, representation was available to them even before acquiring citizenship. Today, with heavy taxation at all levels - local, state, federal - representation even in school districts is prohibited to most who are not citizens. Our Founding Fathers eloquently argued for no taxation without representation. We urge today's legislators to be guided by our history and to recognize voting rights for all aliens. (For the full article, see here: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/20/nyregion/20vote.html?_r=1&oref=slogin)

We welcome readers to share their opinion and ideas with us by writing to editor@ilw.com.


Focus

New 2007-2008 Editions - Essential Immigration Reference Books

ILW.COM is pleased to offer the new completely revised editions of Patel's Immigration Law Library, the 2007-2008 Edition. This collection includes the essential reference resource "The WHOLE Act, The INA (Annotated), 2007-2008 Edition", used by DHS officials, federal court libraries, and many veteran immigration practitioners. Once you have used this version of the INA, you will wonder why you ever used any other! This collection also features the fully indexed 8 CFR, 2007-2008 Edition, fully indexed 20/22/28 CFR, 2007-2008 Edition , and Patel's Citations, 2007-2008 Edition . Buy the library collection ($100 off). For more info, see here.


Article

Price Tag: Immigration Fee Hikes And How We Should Respond
Gary Endelman writes "What did our mothers tell us when we were young? You get what you pay for? That should be the yardstick against which the USCIS proposed fee increase should be measured."


News

Ombudsman Recommends That USCIS Give Advance Notice
The CIS Ombudsman made a "Recommendation that USCIS adopt a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) under which there would be at least 30 day advance notice to the public and posting on the USCIS website of changes to policy and operations instructions, absent exigent circumstances."

RFEs To Be Re-Issued For Religious Workers
USCIS announced that it would "Reissue Requests for Evidence for Special Immigrant Religious Workers"

Atlanta USCIS Moves
USCIS announced a new location for its Atlanta office.


Classifieds

Help Wanted: Immigration Attorneys
Iselin, NJ - Fragomen, Del Rey, Bernsen & Loewy, LLP, the leading global immigration law firm, seeks associates, with 3+ years of business immigration experience and an interest in Global and International Immigration and Case Management, to work in its International Operations. Candidates must have experience representing multinational corporations (US and foreign), specialized workers and individuals. Must be ambitious and capable of demonstrating excellence in a congenial team environment. Outstanding academic credentials, superlative communication and writing skills are a prerequisite. Multilingual preferred. Fragomen offers a competitive salary and an excellent benefits package. Please send cover letter, resume, law school transcript, + writing sample to recruitment@fragomen.com. EOE.

Help Wanted: Immigration Attorney
Arlington, VA - Small, collegial immigration law firm seeks qualified attorney with 2 years+ of solid immigration experience in all phases of immigration practice emphasizing business needs such as H's, L's and labor certifications. Excellent compensation package and competitive benefits offered. Opportunity for partnership within two years of serving as an associate. Candidate must be enthusiastic and possess excellent communication skills (verbal and written). Individual must be a go-getter with the ability to bring in business. Ideal candidate is an individual imbued with professionalism and tempered with compassion. Interested candidates, send resume to Samuel Levine: levine@visa-usa.com.

Help Wanted: Immigration Professional
Natick, MA - The MathWorks is the leading developer and supplier of software for technical computing and Model-Based Design. Employing more than 1,400 people, The MathWorks was founded in 1984. The company has been profitable every year since its inception and is privately held. We are currently recruiting for an Immigration Specialist. The Immigration Specialisht will oversee our immigration programs and will have the oppportunity to participate in recruiting related programs. Successful candidate will have: proficiency in Microsoft Windows products, 3 yrs. of relevant work experience in immigration or human resources, strong knowledge of immigration law and overall immigration practices, experience managing immigration practices including H-1Bs, F-1s, green cards, etc. For job details (#4736-DC), see here. Interested applicants, send your resume to doug.cohen@mathworks.com.

Help Wanted: Immigration Paralegal
Lead business immigration paralegal wanted for Stamford, CT law firm. Salary commensurate with abilities. Full benefits offered, collegial environment. Must be fully versed in PERM and employment-based visa petitions. Send resume and cover letter to immjobs@yahoo.com.

Help Wanted: Immigration Paralegal
13-person midtown NYC immigration law firm seeks paralegal with 2+ years of experience with business applications: nonimmigrant and immigrant. Experience with family based, naturalization and other applications a plus. Ideal candidate has BA degree, is detail oriented, organized, conscientious. Candidate must also possess excellent writing, communication & case management skills. Competitive compensation package offered. Email resume + cover letter in MS Word format to Marcia Needleman: mneedleman@levittandneedleman.com.

Immigration Law Certificate
Master the complex and ever changing maze of immigration policies and regulations with the Immigration Law Studies Certificate Program offered by CUNY's School of Professional Studies. This graduate-level certificate program, consisting of (3) three-credit classes, offers students who complete it a comprehensive understanding of the laws, regulations, and processes surrounding the status of immigrants in the US, including family and employment-based immigration and deportation defense. It is designed for individuals working in law firms, companies, government agencies and nonprofit organizations where they interact with immigrants and immigrant legal concerns on a regular basis and would therefore benefit from greater knowledge of the laws and regulations surrounding immigration. Beginning this spring, the program is also being offered online. For more information on class schedules, tuition and fees, course applications and to register, see here.

Case Management Technology
Are you ready for the new changes in immigration? See why we have a 99% customer retention rate. Use our forms with peace of mind - 800+ updated within 24 hours of any new release, no patches or downloads. E-File 20+ forms. Access your firm's online database anywhere you have internet access. Client relationship management tools, practice management tools, group calendaring, emails, notes, reports, invoices, auto email alerts and reminders, document storage and assembly. A library of customizable questionnaires, letters and email templates included. Online access for clients to check case status included. Compliancy modules: I9, LCA, AR 11, PERM. Optional services: credit card processing, Outlook & QuickBooks integration. One-time data entry and auto population into all documents will save you time and reduce errors. INSZoom's case management system is customizable to support solo practitioners, mid-large law firms & corporations. We teach you how to customize the software to fit your processes and communication needs. Founded in 1999, INSZoom is a profitable, financially sound company and now employs 70 engineers and 11 sales and support staff. INSZoom is the "world's largest immigration software company", built with flexible modules that allow you to manage and control technology. To schedule a complimentary online demo, call 925-244-0600 or email mailto:info@inszoom.com.


comingsNgoings

Readers can share their professional announcements (100-words or fewer at no charge), email: editor@ilw.com. Readers interested in learning about featuring your event or conference in Immigration Daily, see here. To feature your newsletter in Immigration Daily, see here.

Immigration Event: Texas
Immigration and National Identity: Lessons from Political Theory (Friday-Saturday, February 23-24, 2007, International Studies, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX). Questions for the conference include: what does it mean to be an American citizen? Is our world a post-national one? Do we have special obligations to foreigners seeking admission to the US, or do we have special obligations to our compatriots? Should immigrants become American citizens, and if so, should they espouse particular values? How should we treat undocumented aliens/illegal immigrants or refugees? How is national identity shaped by the influx of immigrants of different ethnic groups? How is national security affected by immigration? How should African-Americans respond to recent developments? What is the European perspective on these issues? For more info: http://ints.tamu.edu/events.html or contact: Diego von Vacano at davacano@polisci.tamu.edu


Letters

Readers are welcome to share their comments, email: editor@ilw.com (300-words or fewer preferred). Many letters to the Editor refer to past correspondence, available in our archives.

Dear Editor:
Regarding ID's comment (ID 02/16/07), I've been a loyal democrat for almost 40 years but so help me God, if they don't do something to remedy the immigration fiasco, I'll withdraw from the party. Independents, here I come.

Aetna Thompson, Esq.
Rockville, MD

Dear Editor:
There is a compelling need for an amnesty law. When this subject was first opened by President Bush, there seemed to be some hope that there would be some action in this area. However,strong resistance, particularly in the House dimmed any chance of legislative reform. The strongest appeal was to build a wall to safeguard our borders. The Republican House shrewdly focased its attention on border protection only, while suggesting it would deal with the twelve million or more immigrants that have come into our country, at some later time. Then the rhetoric ranged from sending the immigrants back to their native countries to requesting them to leave the country voluntarily and then allowed to re-enter through legal means. Nothing was heard from the proponents of a comprensive reform law. Those of us who proposed this latter alternative were not heard from. Indeed, the President himself seemed gun shy even to propose a guest worker plan. With the advent of a new Democratic majority in the Congress this year, the prospects for immigration reform seemed likely. However, in reviewing Immigration Daily (ID Comment 02/16/07), I could see that immigration reform seemed just as remote with the Democrats. The House had not even staffed the Immigration Committee with members by January when the new committees were formed. I also observed that immigration reform has seldom been mentioned as priority items. Nevertheless, hope does spring eternal. During the amnesty reform law of 1986 many deserving people became legal residents and citizens. Our country adjusted, as we have in the past when we have permitted refugees to settle in our country. This is the humane thing to do. Illegal immigrants are still coming into our country. Will our informal debate continue for the next twenty years? Elected officials have a responsibily to deal with this problem.

William Wright, Jr.
Phoenix, Arizona

Dear Editor:
With the exception of his criticism of ID, I agree with the opinions expressed by Deport Illegals (ID, 02/20/2007) regarding illegal immigration. And as did Deport Illegals, at first I too found confusing ID's statement, "Despite the cry from Americans for federal help on healthcare, no Schedule A relief was enacted. In fact, no immigration benefits were found in this gigantic half-trillion dollar legislation." I had to read that sentence several times before I understood exactly what was meant. At first, I too thought it was addressing neglected health care benefits, rather than benefits to the legal immigration system. But I finally figured it out. It is clear that Deport Illegals does not understand what is "Schedule A" which is actually legal immigration, streamlined to fill shortage jobs in the health care industry by making Nurses and Physical Therapists exempt from Labor Certification as a prerequisite to filing an employment based Application for Permanent Residence. This exemption exists because the Department of Labor has already pre-certified those occupations, recognizing that workers are in short supply. However, to facilitate the speedy immigration of these shortage specialties, we must also separate Schedule A occupations from the employment based visa quota system, by providing a separate employment based category for Schedule A workers, in order to alleviate the nursing shortage faced by American hospitals. Regarding ID's comment that "The need for immigration benefits is crystal clear in a country with 10 million undocumented and rising.", the better choice of words may have been "immigration reform", rather than "immigration benefits". Of course, what "reform" means is also open to interpretation. This teaches us that immigration semantics and vocabulary are complex and confusing. Therefore, it is imperative that anyone with an immigration matter, no matter how simple they may believe it to be, seek competent legal counsel.

David D. Murray, Esq.,
Newport Beach, CA

Dear Editor:
Please let us know the availability of tape for the seminar on 02/20/2007.

kayo loveless, Assistant, Law Office of Carmen DiAmore-Siah
Honolulu, HI

Editor's Note: All of our seminars are available on CD, for details please write to webmaster@ilw.com

Dear Editor:
With regards to education evaluations: There seems to have been a serious change in the acceptance of the PGD's from the private Indian Institutions. I have seen an RFE that specifically mentioned a specific evaluating company as not being accepted. It stated that only Institutions with government recognition or affiliation with universities would be accepted. However, in other cases I have seen them approved for H1b when combined with a 3 year degree for bachelor's equivalency. In some cases I have seen a PGD accepted as equivalent to a US Master's degree. Any light that can shed on this would be very helpful as we enter "H1b" season.

Sheila Danzig
Career Consulting International

Dear Editor:
The reign of terror and systematic violations of even the most basic legal and human rights of both legal and illegal immigrants described in the editorial "They Are America" in this Sunday's New York Times (February 18) should be cause for concern, not only for immigration advocates, but for everyone who cares about our democracy. Even though crossing the line from "enforcement" to outright persecution of mainly Latino immigrants may delight bigots who would like to see a "Mexicanerfrei", i.e, ethnically cleansed America, even people like Lou Dobbs and Tom Tancredo should ask themselves exactly how many basic rights we can take away from those whose skin color or language may irritate our white supremacists without endangering our own freedoms. Which brings me to the subject of the 2 million (and counting) Iraqi refugees whose lives have been shattered by the Bush/Cheney grab for oil and empire. So far, we have let in exactly 463 of these refugees, whom 3,000 of our soldiers have died to liberate. I understand that the number of Iraqi refugees admitted may go up to 7,000. Is this the way we show much we really care about the Iraqi people, as opposed to their oil? Maybe the only thing that can be said in favor of anti-immigrant prejudice is that fear of refugee influxes by unpopular ethnic groups may one day be a deterrent to starting any more colonial wars. However, I don't think this notion will faze our Decider-in-Chief and Co (a/k/a/ Vice) Decider-in-Chief very much.

Roger Algase, Esq.
New York, NY


An Important disclaimer! The information provided on this page is not legal advice. Transmission of this information is not intended to create, and receipt by you does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. Readers must not act upon any information without first seeking advice from a qualified attorney. Copyright 1995-2007 American Immigration LLC, ILW.COM. Send correspondence and articles to editor@ilw.com. Letters and articles may be edited and may be published and otherwise used in any medium. The views expressed in letters and articles do not necessarily represent the views of ILW.COM.

Publisher:  Sam Udani    Legal Editor:  Michele Kim                        ISSN:   1930-062X


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