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Immigrants Of The Week: Brian George, Oliver Smithies, Andrew Sullivan, Uri Geller, And Catalino Tapia

by Greg Siskind

Editor's note: Here are some entries from Greg Siskind's blog.


"Jerry Seinfeld is a very, very bad man"

Seinfeld television show fans will remember these were words uttered by Babu Bhatt in the famous episode "The Visa". Babu is a former Pakistani restaurant owner (Jerry ruined his business two seasons before). Jerry and Elaine offer to do Babu a favor and watch his mail for his visa renewal paperwork while he is out of town and of course forget to do it. The final scene of the show has a deported Babu cursing Jerry from a café in Pakistan.

Of course as an immigration lawyer I'm prone to overanalyze the accuracy of the storyline, but had to take a step back and laugh. But I guess there have been many cases where a lost piece of mail caused an immigration crisis.

Babu is played by Brian George, a British-Israeli-Indian-Iraqi-Canadian actor who has had a long and very successful career playing a variety of ethnic characters in film and television. He was born in Jerusalem to an Indian mother and an Iraqi father (who was raised in India) and then moved to London as a child and then later with his family to Toronto. He joined Toronto's famous Second City comedy troupe and then, like many of the Second City alumni, went on to work in Hollywood.